Hepatology News and Research RSS Feed - Hepatology News and Research

Hepatology is the branch of medicine that incorporates study of liver, gallbladder, biliary tree and pancreas as well as management of their disorders.
SARAH study completes patient enrolment to evaluate treatment for primary liver cancer

SARAH study completes patient enrolment to evaluate treatment for primary liver cancer

SARAH, a large French study of patients with advanced, inoperable primary liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma, or HCC) has completed patient enrolment, exceeding its 400-patient target, according to its principal investigator, Professor Valérie Vilgrain MD, PhD, Department of Radiology, Beaujon Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP) and Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, France. [More]
AGA receives gift to support young investigators advance into neuroenteric disease research

AGA receives gift to support young investigators advance into neuroenteric disease research

The American Gastroenterological Association Research Foundation has received a generous gift from prominent San Francisco philanthropist Athena Blackburn, which will create new research opportunities for young investigators who are interested in neuroenteric disease. [More]
Long-term TDF ‘promising’ in Chinese HBV patients after multiple antiviral failures

Long-term TDF ‘promising’ in Chinese HBV patients after multiple antiviral failures

Long-term tenofovir disoproxil fumarate therapy is effective in Chinese patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection who have relapsed after treatment with multiple nucleos(t)ide analogues, research suggests. [More]
SLU researchers halt fatty liver disease in animal model

SLU researchers halt fatty liver disease in animal model

Doctors believe that up to 30 percent of the U.S. population may have fat accumulation in the liver, known as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), that can lead to a range of damaging health consequences. [More]
Rutgers patient gets second chance at life following liver transplant

Rutgers patient gets second chance at life following liver transplant

Mati Muñoz is 65 years old - filled with the enthusiastic energy that comes with a second chance at life. A decade ago, says Muñoz, who lives in Woodbridge Township, N.J., her liver was being destroyed by hepatitis C, a viral disease she believes she contracted as a girl in her native Cuba from a poorly sterilized needle used in a medical procedure. [More]
New study shows that chronic narcotic use more prevalent in children with IBD

New study shows that chronic narcotic use more prevalent in children with IBD

Chronic narcotic use is more than twice as prevalent in children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), compared with children without this disease, according to a new study1 published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Regulus Therapeutics reports top-line results from RG-101 clinical study for HCV treatment

Regulus Therapeutics reports top-line results from RG-101 clinical study for HCV treatment

Regulus Therapeutics Inc., a biopharmaceutical company leading the discovery and development of innovative medicines targeting microRNAs, today announced top-line results from the 4 mg/kg cohort and additional results from the 2 mg/kg cohort in a completed clinical study evaluating RG-101, a wholly-owned, GalNac-conjugated anti-miR targeting microRNA-122 ("miR-122"), for the treatment of hepatitis C virus infection ("HCV"). [More]
New AGA guideline provides guidance to prevent HBV reactivation

New AGA guideline provides guidance to prevent HBV reactivation

Long-term immunosuppressive therapy can cause the hepatitis B virus (HBV) to become active, even in patients who are not aware that they are infected with the virus. A new guideline from the American Gastroenterological Association provides guidance to physicians and patients who use immunosuppressive agents for the treatment of a variety of disorders, including gastrointestinal, dermatologic, neurologic and rheumatologic, among others. [More]
Update: Bariatric surgery can improve obesity-related health problems in children, adolescents

Update: Bariatric surgery can improve obesity-related health problems in children, adolescents

Bariatric surgery--as a last resort when conservative interventions have failed--can improve liver disease and other obesity-related health problems in severely obese children and adolescents, according to a position paper in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, official journal of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. [More]
Researchers develop new MRI-based technique to better detect NAFLD in children

Researchers develop new MRI-based technique to better detect NAFLD in children

Between 5 and 8 million children in the United States have nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), yet most cases go undiagnosed. To help address this issue, researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine have developed a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based technique to help clinicians and researchers better detect and evaluate NAFLD in children. [More]
Chemotherapy or immunosuppressive treatment may reactivate HBV

Chemotherapy or immunosuppressive treatment may reactivate HBV

Individuals previously infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) who receive chemotherapy or immunosuppressive treatment may be at risk of reactivating the disease according to a summary of report from the Emerging Trends Conference, "Reactivation of Hepatitis B," and published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. [More]
Steroid use associated with five-fold increase of blood clots in IBD patients

Steroid use associated with five-fold increase of blood clots in IBD patients

Compared with biologic therapy, corticosteroid (steroid) use is associated with a nearly five-fold increase of venous thromboembolism in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients, according to a new study1 in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Age and HBsAg level predict NA-induced HBeAg seroconversion durability

Age and HBsAg level predict NA-induced HBeAg seroconversion durability

The combination of age and baseline hepatitis B s-antigen level can help predict hepatitis B virus relapse in patients who achieve hepatitis B e-antigen loss or seroconversion following nucleos(t)ide analogue (NA) treatment, researchers report. [More]
Alcohol drinking pattern influences risk of cirrhosis

Alcohol drinking pattern influences risk of cirrhosis

Approximately 170,000 people die from alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver in Europe every year. Although alcohol is the most important risk factor, less is known about the significance of different patterns of drinking. Currently scientists believe that cirrhosis is a function of the volume of alcohol consumed irrespective of patterns of drinking. Investigators have now established that alcohol drinking pattern has a significant influence on the risk of cirrhosis and that daily drinking increases that risk compared with drinking less frequently. [More]
Bariatric surgery can improve obesity-related health problems in children, adolescents

Bariatric surgery can improve obesity-related health problems in children, adolescents

Bariatric surgery--as a last resort when conservative interventions have failed--can improve liver disease and other obesity-related health problems in severely obese children and adolescents, according to a position paper in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, official journal of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. [More]
Findings may lead to novel therapeutic approaches to prevent fibrosis in Crohn's disease patients

Findings may lead to novel therapeutic approaches to prevent fibrosis in Crohn's disease patients

A natural protein made by immune cells may limit fibrosis and scarring in colitis, according to research published in the inaugural issue of Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the new basic science journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
New research sheds light on the role of Sox10 protein in Hirschsprung's disease patients

New research sheds light on the role of Sox10 protein in Hirschsprung's disease patients

Defects in the protein Sox10, a transcription factor that regulates gene expression, may play a role in the development of post-operative GI dysfunction in Hirschsprung's disease patients, according to new research published in Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the new basic science journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]

Study underscores the importance of appropriate testing, support and care for HCV patients

A new study shows that many patients infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) are lost during different stages of health care to manage the disease. [More]
Oral budesonide suspension offers hope for pediatric patients with EoE

Oral budesonide suspension offers hope for pediatric patients with EoE

A new formulation of oral budesonide suspension, a steroid-based treatment, is safe and effective in treating pediatric patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), according to a new study in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Mayo Clinic researchers correctly evaluate polyps using high-definition optical lenses

Mayo Clinic researchers correctly evaluate polyps using high-definition optical lenses

It may not be necessary for experienced gastroenterologists to send polyps they remove from a patient's colon to a pathologist for examination, according to a large study conducted by physician researchers at the Jacksonville campus of Mayo Clinic. [More]