Hepatology News and Research RSS Feed - Hepatology News and Research

Hepatology is the branch of medicine that incorporates study of liver, gallbladder, biliary tree and pancreas as well as management of their disorders.
UC San Diego School of Medicine launches new NAFLD Research Center

UC San Diego School of Medicine launches new NAFLD Research Center

Roughly one-quarter of all Americans - an estimated 100 million adults and children - have nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a chronic condition that can lead to cirrhosis, liver cancer and liver failure. [More]
Loyola offers multidisciplinary digestive health program

Loyola offers multidisciplinary digestive health program

Loyola University Health System now offers a multidisciplinary digestive health program to treat digestive tract and related medical conditions. Bipan Chand, MD, FACS, FASGE, FASMBS, and Neil Gupta, MD, MPH, are co-directors of the new program. [More]
STAT4 variant predicts HBV IFNα response

STAT4 variant predicts HBV IFNα response

Variation in the STAT4 gene is associated with response to interferon (IFN)α therapy in patients with hepatitis B e antigen-positive chronic hepatitis B virus infection, suggests research published in Hepatology. [More]
Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty treatment may offer new solution for obese patients

Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty treatment may offer new solution for obese patients

In the fight against obesity, bariatric surgery is currently the most effective treatment; however, only 1 to 2 percent of qualified patients receive this surgery due to limited access, patient choice, associated risks and the high costs. A novel treatment method -- endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty -- might offer a new solution for obese patients. [More]
Age of gluten introduction does not reduce risk of celiac disease in at-risk infants

Age of gluten introduction does not reduce risk of celiac disease in at-risk infants

Based on new evidence, the age of introduction of gluten into the infant diet -- or the practice of introducing gluten during breast-feeding -- does not reduce the risk of celiac disease in infants at risk, according to a Position Paper of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. [More]
Minority and ethnic groups diagnosed with colorectal cancer at younger ages

Minority and ethnic groups diagnosed with colorectal cancer at younger ages

Colorectal cancer is the third most common form of cancer and the second most common cause of cancer deaths in the United States. The chance of developing colorectal cancer increases with age. Now, a study by University of Missouri School of Medicine researchers shows that minority and ethnic groups are being diagnosed with colorectal cancer at younger ages and more advanced stages than non-Hispanic whites. [More]
Chromoendoscopy superior to other surveillance methods in detecting dysplasia in IBD patients

Chromoendoscopy superior to other surveillance methods in detecting dysplasia in IBD patients

Chromoendoscopy is superior to random biopsy or white-light colonoscopy in detecting dysplasia in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), according to a long-term surveillance study led by James F. Marion, MD, Professor of Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Director of Education and Outreach at The Susan and Leonard Feinstein Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinical Center at The Mount Sinai Hospital, published online in the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. [More]
Disease burden, health care costs higher in children with recurrent acute and chronic pancreatitis

Disease burden, health care costs higher in children with recurrent acute and chronic pancreatitis

The burden of recurrent acute and chronic pancreatitis in children may be higher than previously thought, with high costs related to repeated hospitalizations, report a pair of studies in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition. [More]
Study looks at long-term effects of psychological therapies in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

Study looks at long-term effects of psychological therapies in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

For some time doctors have known that psychological therapies can reduce the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome in the short term. [More]
IBD Plexus brings patients, researchers and doctors together to create IBD research initiative

IBD Plexus brings patients, researchers and doctors together to create IBD research initiative

For the first time, more than 40,000 IBD patients, researchers, and healthcare providers will be brought together by IBD Plexus to create the world's largest registry of IBD patients of all ages which will transform how IBD research is being conducted. [More]
Combination of antiviral medications can eradicate HCV infection in patients with advanced liver disease

Combination of antiviral medications can eradicate HCV infection in patients with advanced liver disease

A large multi-center clinical trial has found that a combination of antiviral medications can eradicate hepatitis C infection in more than 90 percent of patients with advanced liver disease. Known as the ASTRAL-4 trial, the study was co-led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Intermountain Medical Center and published online Nov. 17 in The New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Certain platelet-derived growth factors can encourage regeneration of liver tissue following surgery

Certain platelet-derived growth factors can encourage regeneration of liver tissue following surgery

A team of researchers at the MedUni Vienna has discovered that certain platelet-derived growth factors are of major significance for the liver's regeneration processes. It has been shown that platelets can encourage the regrowth of liver tissue in patients who have had parts of their liver removed surgically. [More]
New drug combination may reduce need for complex regimens to treat hepatitis C

New drug combination may reduce need for complex regimens to treat hepatitis C

The prognosis for people with hepatitis C has improved dramatically in the last few years, thanks to the introduction of direct-acting anti-viral medications, including Harvoni (the brand name for a combination of ledipasvir and sofosbuvir) and Viekira Pack (a mix of ombitasvir, paritaprevir, ritonavir and dasabuvir). [More]
Potential treatment strategy for glycogen storage disease

Potential treatment strategy for glycogen storage disease

Researchers from the Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore and Duke Medicine have identified a potential treatment strategy for an often-fatal inherited glycogen storage disease. [More]
Vitamin E shows same efficacy in diabetic and nondiabetic patients

Vitamin E shows same efficacy in diabetic and nondiabetic patients

There have been numerous studies on the safety and efficacy of using vitamin E to treat nondiabetic patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), but researchers at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases presented results of vitamin E in diabetic and nondiabetic patients. [More]
UC Irvine Health researchers develop one-step test to detect HCV infections

UC Irvine Health researchers develop one-step test to detect HCV infections

UC Irvine Health researchers have developed a cost-effective one-step test that screens, detects and confirms hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections. Dr. Ke-Qin Hu, director of hepatology services, will present findings at the Annual Meeting of American Association for the Study of Liver Disease in San Francisco, Nov. 14-16. Current blood-based HCV testing requires two steps and can be expensive, inconvenient and is not widely available or affordable globally. [More]
Intake of gluten increases risk of celiac disease in children

Intake of gluten increases risk of celiac disease in children

Intake of gluten up until two years of age increases risk of celiac disease at least two-fold in children with genetic risk factors for this disease, according a study published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Loyola presents Scientist of the Year awards

Loyola presents Scientist of the Year awards

Susan Baker, PhD, a leading researcher of a class of viruses that includes Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), has been named Senior Scientist of the Year at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. Wei Qiu, PhD, who is researching the molecular mechanisms of liver cancer, has been named Junior Scientist of the Year. [More]
Researchers team up to evaluate biological and genetic differences of GI cancers in race, ethnicity

Researchers team up to evaluate biological and genetic differences of GI cancers in race, ethnicity

Americans of African descent are at a significantly higher risk for developing and dying from Gastrointestinal (GI) cancers, which include colorectal and pancreatic cancers, compared to individuals who are of Caucasian descent. [More]
Cancer DNA in patient's bloodstream could help deliver personalized treatment for liver cancer

Cancer DNA in patient's bloodstream could help deliver personalized treatment for liver cancer

Fragments of cancer DNA circulating in a patient's bloodstream could help doctors deliver more personalized treatment for liver cancer, Japanese researchers report. [More]
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