Hepatology News and Research RSS Feed - Hepatology News and Research

Hepatology is the branch of medicine that incorporates study of liver, gallbladder, biliary tree and pancreas as well as management of their disorders.
Two new oral medications post-transplant is safe, beneficial for patients with hepatitis C

Two new oral medications post-transplant is safe, beneficial for patients with hepatitis C

All patients with hepatitis C who receive a liver transplant will eventually infect their new livers. These transplanted organs then require anti-viral treatment before they become severely damaged. But traditional post-transplant hepatitis C therapy can take up to a year, is potentially toxic and can lead to organ rejection. [More]
Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology joins AGA's other peer-reviewed journals

Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology joins AGA's other peer-reviewed journals

The American Gastroenterological Association is pleased to welcome a new member to its family of journals: Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology (CMGH). CMGH will showcase cutting-edge digestive biology research in a digital open-access format. [More]
U-M researcher wins AGA-Covidien Research & Development Pilot Award in Technology

U-M researcher wins AGA-Covidien Research & Development Pilot Award in Technology

The American Gastroenterological Association Research Foundation is pleased to announce that Richard S. Kwon, MD, MS, from the University of Michigan, is the recipient of the inaugural AGA-Covidien Research & Development Pilot Award in Technology. This award is supported by a generous grant from Covidien, a leading global provider of health-care products. [More]
MGH, MIT partner to accelerate development of diagnostic tools and therapies

MGH, MIT partner to accelerate development of diagnostic tools and therapies

A novel partnership between Massachusetts General Hospital and Massachusetts Institute of Technology is addressing three major challenges in clinical medicine – improving the diagnosis of disease, developing new approaches to prevent and treat infectious and autoimmune diseases, and developing more accurate methods of diagnosing and treating major neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases. While individual collaborations between MGH and MIT investigators are nothing new, this formalized strategic partnership is designed to accelerate the development of diagnostic tools and therapies. [More]
Inflammation in tissue creates a niche for cancer cells

Inflammation in tissue creates a niche for cancer cells

In order to invade healthy tissue, tumor cells must leave the actual tumor and enter the bloodstream or lymphatic system. For this purpose, they use certain enzymes, proteases that break down the tissue surrounding the tumor, thus opening the way for tumor cells to reach blood or lymphatic vessels. To keep the proteases in check, the body produces inhibitors such as the protein TIMP-1, which thwart the proteases in their work. [More]
Decaffeinated coffee may benefit liver health

Decaffeinated coffee may benefit liver health

Researchers from the National Cancer Institute report that decaffeinated coffee drinking may benefit liver health. Results of the study published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, show that higher coffee consumption, regardless of caffeine content, was linked to lower levels of abnormal liver enzymes. This suggests that chemical compounds in coffee other than caffeine may help protect the liver. [More]
Discovery could lead to treatments for alcohol-related liver diseases

Discovery could lead to treatments for alcohol-related liver diseases

Researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine have identified epigenetic protein changes caused by binge drinking, a discovery that could lead to treatments for alcohol-related liver diseases. [More]
First three recipients of inaugural Harry Winston Fellowships named

First three recipients of inaugural Harry Winston Fellowships named

Harry Winston, Inc. and the UCLA Children's Discovery and Innovation Institute have named the first three recipients of the inaugural Harry Winston Fellowships. [More]
Children who require long-term parenteral nutrition are at risk of IAFLD

Children who require long-term parenteral nutrition are at risk of IAFLD

Children who require long-term parenteral nutrition are at risk of a potentially devastating complication called intestinal failure-associated liver disease (IAFLD). The diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of IAFLD are discussed in a new position paper in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, official journal of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. [More]
Taller individuals are less likely to develop esophageal cancer

Taller individuals are less likely to develop esophageal cancer

Taller individuals are less likely to develop esophageal cancer and it's precursor, Barrett's esophagus, according to a new study1 in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Restarting infliximab therapy after drug holiday is safe for patients with IBD

Restarting infliximab therapy after drug holiday is safe for patients with IBD

Restarting infliximab therapy after a drug holiday is safe and effective for patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), according to a new study1 in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Liver injury caused by herbals and dietary supplements increases 20% in U.S. study group

Liver injury caused by herbals and dietary supplements increases 20% in U.S. study group

New research shows that liver injury caused by herbals and dietary supplements increased from 7% to 20% in a U.S. study group over a ten-year period. [More]
Mount Sinai researchers receive federal funding to treat HCV in primary care settings

Mount Sinai researchers receive federal funding to treat HCV in primary care settings

With the number of people with chronic hepatitis C reaching record levels in New York City and the recent availability of more effective treatments, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai recently announced the receipt of $1.9 million in federal funding to increase its capacity to treat HCV in primary care settings. [More]
High school recipients receive $2,500 to support digestive disease research projects

High school recipients receive $2,500 to support digestive disease research projects

The American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) Research Foundation has announced the 2014 AGA-Eli and Edythe Broad Student Research Fellowship Award recipients. This award stimulates interest in digestive disease research among high school students by supporting budding scientists' research projects. [More]
Access Pharmaceuticals enters into exclusive license agreement with Norgine

Access Pharmaceuticals enters into exclusive license agreement with Norgine

ACCESS PHARMACEUTICALS, INC., an emerging biopharmaceutical company, today announced that it had entered into an exclusive license agreement with Norgine B.V., a leading independent European specialty pharmaceutical company, for the commercialization of MuGard in Europe. [More]
Immunosuppressive drugs increase risk of myeloid disorders among IBD patients

Immunosuppressive drugs increase risk of myeloid disorders among IBD patients

Immunosuppressive drugs called thiopurines have been found to increase the risk of myeloid disorders, such as acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome, a rare bone marrow disorder, seven-fold among inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. [More]
Researchers provide global genotype prevalence estimates for HCV

Researchers provide global genotype prevalence estimates for HCV

In one of the largest prevalence studies to date, researchers from the U.K. provide national, regional, and global genotype prevalence estimates for the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Findings published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, indicate that genotype 1 is the most prevalent worldwide, with over 83 million patients infected of which one-third reside in East Asia. [More]
Galmed reports net loss of $3.9 million for six months ended June 30, 2014

Galmed reports net loss of $3.9 million for six months ended June 30, 2014

Galmed Pharmaceuticals Ltd., a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of a once-daily, oral therapy for the treatment of liver diseases and cholesterol gallstones, today announced financial results for the period ended June 30, 2014. [More]
Study: Dietary elimination is successful method of treatment for adults with EoE

Study: Dietary elimination is successful method of treatment for adults with EoE

Dietary elimination is a successful method of treatment for adults with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), according to a new study1 in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
ESPGHAN statement provides essential technique for kids with feeding and nutrition problems

ESPGHAN statement provides essential technique for kids with feeding and nutrition problems

Placement of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube has become an "essential" technique for children and young people with a wide range of problems with feeding and nutrition, according to a position statement in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, official journal of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. [More]