Herpes News and Research RSS Feed - Herpes News and Research

Herpes is an infection caused by two different but closely related viruses — herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) or cold sores and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) or genital herpes. Both are easy to catch. They have similar symptoms (blisters or sores) and both can occur on different parts of the body. When the infection is on the mouth, it is called oral herpes. When it is on or near the sex organs, it is called genital herpes. There is no cure for herpes. Treatments are available to speed up the healing of the genital sores.
Novel quantitative method may reduce or eliminate need for invasive biopsies

Novel quantitative method may reduce or eliminate need for invasive biopsies

Scientists have identified a quantitative method to measure changes in biomarkers, which may reduce or eliminate the need for invasive biopsies. The method, described in the February 2016 issue of The FASEB Journal uses a novel chimera design of DNA and small DNA with a companion contrast agent to allow antibodies to cross cellular membranes. [More]
Rockefeller University study shows how herpes virus causes traffic jam in immune system pathway

Rockefeller University study shows how herpes virus causes traffic jam in immune system pathway

With over half the U.S. population infected, most people are familiar with the pesky cold sore outbreaks caused by the herpes virus. The virus outsmarts the immune system by interfering with the process that normally allows immune cells to recognize and destroy foreign invaders. How exactly the herpes simplex 1 virus pulls off its nifty scheme has long been elusive to scientists. [More]
High school wrestlers have highest number of skin infections

High school wrestlers have highest number of skin infections

The first national survey of skin infections among high school athletes has found that wrestlers have the highest number of infections, with football players coming in a distant second, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. [More]
Study shows several Envigo rat models susceptible to genital HSV-2 infection

Study shows several Envigo rat models susceptible to genital HSV-2 infection

A scientific collaboration between Envigo and the Department of Infectious Disease at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden has unveiled study findings into rat models and their susceptibility to intra-vaginal herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infection. [More]
Profectus begins Phase 1 clinical study of VesiculoVax-vectored Ebola virus vaccine

Profectus begins Phase 1 clinical study of VesiculoVax-vectored Ebola virus vaccine

Profectus BioSciences, Inc., a clinical-stage vaccine company developing novel vaccines for the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases and the treatment of cancer, announced today the initiation of a Phase 1 clinical study of Profectus' VesiculoVax-vectored Ebola virus vaccine. [More]
Study reveals promising mechanism for attacking Ebola virus

Study reveals promising mechanism for attacking Ebola virus

In late December, nearly two years after the epidemic began, the World Health Organization has declared the African country of Guinea to be free of Ebola virus infections. But, the race to find a cure and therapies to combat the disease are forging ahead as officials warn that inattention could lead to another epidemic. [More]
Asthma in childhood may increase risk of shingles

Asthma in childhood may increase risk of shingles

Nearly 1 million incidences of herpes zoster, which is also known as shingles, occur every year in the U.S., with an estimated one-third of all adults affected by age 80. Despite its prevalence, particularly between ages 50 and 59, it is still unclear why some individuals will develop shingles, and others will not. [More]
Novel strategies on the way for difficult-to-treat head and neck cancer

Novel strategies on the way for difficult-to-treat head and neck cancer

Novel strategies are on the way for difficult-to-treat and advanced head and neck cancer, the most heterogeneous group of malignancies which are generally associated with poor survival, and encouraging results have been presented at the first ESMO Asia 2015 Congress in Singapore. [More]
Shingles vaccine can help protect elderly patients with end-stage renal disease

Shingles vaccine can help protect elderly patients with end-stage renal disease

Elderly patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who received the shingles vaccine were half as likely to develop shingles compared to those who were not vaccinated. The new study from Kaiser Permanente, published in Clinical Infectious Diseases, also found the best protection against shingles was achieved when patients received the vaccination shortly after beginning dialysis. [More]
Combination treatment provides effective one-two punch against prostate cancer

Combination treatment provides effective one-two punch against prostate cancer

Results from a long-term clinical trial conducted by cancer researchers at Houston Methodist Hospital show that combining radiation treatment with "suicide gene therapy," a technique in which prostate cancer cells are genetically modified so they signal a patient's immune system to attack them, provides a safe and effective one-two punch against the disease. [More]
Dompé’s investigational biotech molecule receives orphan drug designation for treatment of neurotrophic keratitis

Dompé’s investigational biotech molecule receives orphan drug designation for treatment of neurotrophic keratitis

The Dompé biopharmaceutical company announced today that the Committee for Orphan Medicinal Products of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) has officially designated recombinant human Nerve Growth Factor (rhNGF) - the investigational biotech molecule developed by Dompé based on research by Nobel Laureate Rita Levi Montalcini - as an orphan drug for the treatment of neurotrophic keratitis. [More]
Nucala (mepolizumab) approved for treatment of asthma patients

Nucala (mepolizumab) approved for treatment of asthma patients

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Nucala (mepolizumab) for use with other asthma medicines for the maintenance treatment of asthma in patients age 12 years and older. Nucala is approved for patients who have a history of severe asthma attacks (exacerbations) despite receiving their current asthma medicines. [More]
Misleading symptoms confuse management of older patients with post-HSE relapse

Misleading symptoms confuse management of older patients with post-HSE relapse

Research shows that teenagers and adults with immune-mediated relapse after herpes simplex encephalitis rarely display the symptoms typically seen in children, delaying the initiation of vital immunotherapy. [More]
Rutgers Cancer Institute scientist leads phase III trial of FDA-approved viral melanoma therapy

Rutgers Cancer Institute scientist leads phase III trial of FDA-approved viral melanoma therapy

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a viral melanoma therapy that was the focus of a phase III clinical trial led by Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey Associate Director for Clinical Science and Chief Surgical Officer Howard L. Kaufman, MD, FACS. [More]
Over 3.7 billion people under 50 have genital HSV-1 infection, shows WHO report

Over 3.7 billion people under 50 have genital HSV-1 infection, shows WHO report

More than 3.7 billion people under the age of 50 – or 67% of the population – are infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), according to the World Health Organization’s first global estimates of HSV-1 infection published today in the journal PLOS ONE. [More]
Oncolytic (cancer-killing) viral therapy approved in the U.S. for use against late-stage melanoma

Oncolytic (cancer-killing) viral therapy approved in the U.S. for use against late-stage melanoma

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced on Oct. 27 that it has approved, for the first time, an oncolytic (cancer-killing) viral therapy in the United States. The drug was approved for use against late-stage melanoma, a deadly skin cancer that can be difficult to treat. [More]
Imlygic approved for treatment of melanoma lesions in the skin and lymph nodes

Imlygic approved for treatment of melanoma lesions in the skin and lymph nodes

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Imlygic (talimogene laherparepvec), the first FDA-approved oncolytic virus therapy, for the treatment of melanoma lesions in the skin and lymph nodes. [More]
Amgen's IMLYGIC receives positive opinion from CHMP for treatment of melanoma

Amgen's IMLYGIC receives positive opinion from CHMP for treatment of melanoma

Amgen today announced that the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use, the scientific committee of the European Medicines Agency, has adopted a positive opinion recommending that IMLYGIC (talimogene laherparepvec) be granted approval for the treatment of adults with unresectable melanoma that is regionally or distantly metastatic (Stage IIIB, IIIC and IVM1a) with no bone, brain, lung or other visceral disease. [More]
First primate model can help researchers to study mother-to-fetus CMV infections

First primate model can help researchers to study mother-to-fetus CMV infections

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the leading infectious cause of birth defects worldwide, but scientists have been frustrated in their efforts to develop a vaccine to protect against infections. [More]
FDA permits marketing of first CSF nucleic acid-based test for detection of multiple pathogens

FDA permits marketing of first CSF nucleic acid-based test for detection of multiple pathogens

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today allowed marketing of the first cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) nucleic acid-based test for simultaneous detection of multiple pathogens that can cause central nervous system infections. [More]
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