Herpes News and Research RSS Feed - Herpes News and Research

Herpes is an infection caused by two different but closely related viruses — herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) or cold sores and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) or genital herpes. Both are easy to catch. They have similar symptoms (blisters or sores) and both can occur on different parts of the body. When the infection is on the mouth, it is called oral herpes. When it is on or near the sex organs, it is called genital herpes. There is no cure for herpes. Treatments are available to speed up the healing of the genital sores.
Harvard Medical School scientists reveal structure of vesicular stomatitis virus protein

Harvard Medical School scientists reveal structure of vesicular stomatitis virus protein

Viruses need us. In order to multiply, viruses have to invade a host cell and copy their genetic information. To do so, viruses encode their own replication machinery or components that subvert the host replication machinery to their advantage. [More]
Damon Runyon creates new award to increase number of physician-scientists

Damon Runyon creates new award to increase number of physician-scientists

Physician-scientists are crucial to moving scientific discoveries from the lab to patients, but their numbers have been dwindling just when they are needed most, particularly in cancer research, as the number of cancer cases is projected to increase by 45 percent in the next fifteen years and elevate cancer to the leading cause of death in America. [More]
Spinifex Pharmaceuticals enters into agreement to be acquired by Novartis

Spinifex Pharmaceuticals enters into agreement to be acquired by Novartis

Spinifex Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a company focused on the development of new drugs for the treatment of chronic pain, today announces that it has agreed to the sale of Spinifex to Novartis International AG, for an upfront cash consideration of US$200 million plus undisclosed clinical development and regulatory milestone payments. [More]
MIPT researchers develop ultrasensitive nanomechanical sensor to identify tumor markers

MIPT researchers develop ultrasensitive nanomechanical sensor to identify tumor markers

Two young researchers working at the MIPT Laboratory of Nanooptics and Plasmonics, Dmitry Fedyanin and Yury Stebunov, have developed an ultracompact highly sensitive nanomechanical sensor for analyzing the chemical composition of substances and detecting biological objects, such as viral disease markers, which appear when the immune system responds to incurable or hard-to-cure diseases, including HIV, hepatitis, herpes, and many others. [More]
GBD analysis shows over 95% of global population has health problems

GBD analysis shows over 95% of global population has health problems

Just one in 20 people worldwide (4·3%) had no health problems in 2013, with a third of the world's population (2·3 billion individuals) experiencing more than five ailments, according to a major new analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study (GBD) 2013, published in The Lancet. [More]
Anna Nele Meckler and Armelle Corpet to receive SNSF's 2015 Marie Heim-Vögtlin Prize

Anna Nele Meckler and Armelle Corpet to receive SNSF's 2015 Marie Heim-Vögtlin Prize

The biologist Armelle Corpet and paleo-climatologist Anna Nele Meckler will receive the 2015 Marie Heim-Vögtlin (MHV) Prize. This distinction rewards their remarkable scientific work supported by a MHV grant. The prize will be bestowed on 23 September 2015 at the Swiss National Science Foundation. [More]
Roche announces FDA 510(k) clearance for cobas HSV 1 and 2 Test

Roche announces FDA 510(k) clearance for cobas HSV 1 and 2 Test

Roche announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has provided 510(k) clearance for the cobas HSV 1 and 2 Test for the direct detection and differentiation of HSV-1 and HSV-2 DNA in anogenital specimens from symptomatic patients. With dual target detection and automation, the cobas HSV 1 and 2 Test provides laboratories with the capability to report up to 94 results in significantly less time than traditional methods and provides a simplified workflow for sample handling in the laboratory. [More]
Baruch S. Blumberg Institute engaged to conduct study using ContraVir's new HBV therapeutic candidate

Baruch S. Blumberg Institute engaged to conduct study using ContraVir's new HBV therapeutic candidate

ContraVir Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of targeted antiviral therapies, announced today that it has engaged the Baruch S. Blumberg Institute, the non-profit research sister organization of the Hepatitis B Foundation, to conduct a series of experiments using ContraVir's hepatitis B program, CMX157. [More]
Talimogene laherparepvec treatment shows durable clinical responses in advanced-stage melanoma patients

Talimogene laherparepvec treatment shows durable clinical responses in advanced-stage melanoma patients

Research led by Howard L. Kaufman, MD, FACS, associate director for clinical science and chief surgical officer at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and colleagues, shows advanced-stage melanoma patients have significant improvement in durable response rate and a trend toward improved survival when treated with a genetically-modified form of a herpes virus, whose native form causes the common cold sore. [More]
Modified cold sore (herpes) virus improves survival in stage IIIb to IV melanoma patients

Modified cold sore (herpes) virus improves survival in stage IIIb to IV melanoma patients

It's a new weapon in the arsenal of cancer fighting treatments: utilizing genetically modified viruses to invade cancer cells and destroy them from the inside. [More]
Modified herpes virus improves survival in melanoma patients

Modified herpes virus improves survival in melanoma patients

University of Louisville researcher Jason Chesney, M.D., Ph.D., deputy director of the James Graham Brown Cancer Center, and a team of international scientists found that stage IIIb to IV melanoma patients treated with a modified cold sore (herpes) virus had improved survival. [More]
Researchers make important breakthrough in identifying major drivers of excessive coughing

Researchers make important breakthrough in identifying major drivers of excessive coughing

Cough treatments could change dramatically after the herpes virus helped researchers discover that the respiratory tract links to two different parts of the nervous system. [More]
Roche announces FDA clearance for cobas Cdiff Test to detect C. difficile in stool specimens

Roche announces FDA clearance for cobas Cdiff Test to detect C. difficile in stool specimens

Roche announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has provided 510(k) clearance for the cobas Cdiff Test to detect Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) in stool specimens. [More]
UCL-led team develops new technique to find resistant TB faster

UCL-led team develops new technique to find resistant TB faster

The time needed to genetically sequence the bacteria causing tuberculosis (Mtb) from patient samples has been reduced from weeks to days using a new technique developed by a UCL-led team. This could help health service providers to better treat disease, control transmission of this infection, and monitor outbreaks. [More]
Men undergoing circumcision may be at increased risk of infecting female partners with HIV

Men undergoing circumcision may be at increased risk of infecting female partners with HIV

In the midst of an international campaign to slow the spread of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, the World Health Organization recommends male circumcision (the surgical removal of foreskin from the penis) which reduces HIV acquisition by 50-60%. [More]
NanoViricides' anti-viral drug candidates show promise in lethal animal model of dermal herpes infection

NanoViricides' anti-viral drug candidates show promise in lethal animal model of dermal herpes infection

NanoViricides, Inc., a nanomedicine company developing anti-viral drugs, discusses the significance of the strong effectiveness demonstrated by its anti-viral drug candidates in a lethal animal model of dermal herpes infection. [More]
French clinicians diagnose first case of rabies since 2003

French clinicians diagnose first case of rabies since 2003

A team of French clinicians has diagnosed the first case of rabies in that country since 2003. Only 20 cases of human rabies had been diagnosed in France between 1970 and 2003. Moreover, the patient was unaware of having been bitten. [More]
Researchers identify phenomenon that explains effects of oxidative stress on immune cells

Researchers identify phenomenon that explains effects of oxidative stress on immune cells

You're up in the mountains, the snow is blindingly white, and the sun is blazing down from the sky: ideal skiing conditions - but any skiers carrying the herpes virus might also have to reckon with the onset of cold sores after their day out. [More]
Scientists discover molecular switch that ‘turns off’ HCMV

Scientists discover molecular switch that ‘turns off’ HCMV

Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an extremely common virus, which as other members of the herpes virus family causes life-long infections in humans. Most individuals are exposed to HCMV during childhood, yet symptoms can be easily fought off by a healthy immune system. [More]
Rare genetic mutation explains why flu can kill in rare cases

Rare genetic mutation explains why flu can kill in rare cases

Nobody likes getting the flu, but for some people, fluids and rest aren't enough. A small number of children who catch the influenza virus fall so ill they end up in the hospital — perhaps needing ventilators to breathe — even while their family and friends recover easily. New research by Rockefeller University scientists, published March 26 in Science, helps explain why: a rare genetic mutation. [More]
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