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Investigators use computer-assisted approach to identify and rank new clock genes

Over the last few decades researchers have characterized a set of clock genes that drive daily rhythms of physiology and behavior in all types of species, from flies to humans. [More]
GNYHA Services, Essensa incorporate MedSnap ID into technology product portfolio

GNYHA Services, Essensa incorporate MedSnap ID into technology product portfolio

GNYHA Services, Inc. and Essensa, Inc., leading group purchasing organizations serving acute care, alternate care, and non-healthcare markets, have added MedSnap ID to their portfolio of technology offerings. [More]
Penn study clarifies action of potential new class of pain relievers that may benefit and not hurt heart

Penn study clarifies action of potential new class of pain relievers that may benefit and not hurt heart

Nonsteroidal antinflamatory drugs (NSAIDs) that block an enzyme called COX-2 relieve pain and inflammation but can cause heart attacks, stroke, heart failure, and even sudden cardiac death. [More]

Sharing clinical information with other health systems helps avoid diagnostic tests and procedures

An Allina Health study published in the current issue of the journal Applied Clinical Informatics showed that a significant number of diagnostic tests and procedures can be avoided if clinicians exchange health information with other health systems. [More]
Study shows mechanistic link between sleep loss in early life and adult behavior in animal model

Study shows mechanistic link between sleep loss in early life and adult behavior in animal model

Mom always said you need your sleep, and it turns out, she was right. According to a new study published in Science this week from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, lack of sleep in young fruit flies profoundly diminishes their ability to do one thing they do really, really well - make more flies. [More]

Pfizer to highlight Blue Button initiative at DIA 2014 Annual Meeting in San Diego

Craig Lipset, head of clinical innovation at Pfizer Inc., will join advocates of patient data accessibility to highlight the Blue Button initiative at the DIA 2014 50th Annual Meeting in San Diego. [More]

Researchers discover tumor suppressor gene folliculin essential to normal lung function in BHD patients

Researchers at Penn Medicine have discovered that the tumor suppressor gene folliculin (FLCN) is essential to normal lung function in patients with the rare disease Birt-Hogg-Dube (BHD) syndrome, a genetic disorder that affects the lungs, skin and kidneys. [More]
Researchers show development of new cell models that track, report clock gene function

Researchers show development of new cell models that track, report clock gene function

The consequences of modern life -- shift work, cell phone addiction, and travel across time zones -- all disturb internal clocks. These are found in the brain where they regulate sleep and throughout the body where they regulate physiology and metabolism. [More]
Study explores benefits of medication therapy management in Medicare patients

Study explores benefits of medication therapy management in Medicare patients

Low-risk Medicare patients entering home health care who received medication therapy management by phone were three times less likely to be hospitalized within the next two months, while those at greater risk saw no benefit, according to a study led by Purdue University. [More]
Two Penn researchers selected as recipients of prestigious Clinical Research Achievement Award

Two Penn researchers selected as recipients of prestigious Clinical Research Achievement Award

Two researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Penn Cardiovascular Institute are among the 2014 recipients of the prestigious Clinical Research Achievement Award for their work in cardiovascular science. [More]

Researchers discover mechanism that control normal lung function in patients with BHD syndrome

Researchers at Penn Medicine have discovered that the tumor suppressor gene folliculin (FLCN) is essential to normal lung function in patients with the rare disease Birt-Hogg-Dube (BHD) syndrome, a genetic disorder that affects the lungs, skin and kidneys. Folliculin's absence or mutated state has a cascading effect that leads to deteriorated lung integrity and an impairment of lung function, as reported in their findings in the current issue of Cell Reports. [More]

Viewpoints: Sebelius' questionable arithmetic; Rand finds 9.3 million gained insurance; new numbers on your doctor

In setting the 2015 calendar parameters for health plans and employers, Kathleen Sebelius, the secretary of health and human services, quietly did some creative but questionable arithmetic that forced taxpayers to give still more help to businesses and people who buy health insurance (Casey B. Mulligan, 4/9). [More]
Researchers study the impact of "animal interventions" in healthcare settings for children

Researchers study the impact of "animal interventions" in healthcare settings for children

While many people have an opinion on whether animals can help to improve wellbeing and care for patients in hospitals, does anyone really know whether there are benefits both for the patients and the animals themselves? [More]
Penn Medicine to host symposium on regenerative medicine

Penn Medicine to host symposium on regenerative medicine

The University of Pennsylvania's Institute for Regenerative Medicine will host a symposium on Friday, April 11, 2014 to detail the progress researchers are making toward reprogramming human cells to treat a variety of diseases. [More]
Study: Seniors living in community with dementia are more likely to be hospitalized

Study: Seniors living in community with dementia are more likely to be hospitalized

Seniors living in the community who have dementia are more likely to be hospitalized and visit the emergency department than those who do not have dementia, according to a new study by researchers at RTI International. [More]

Study: A record number of elderly people are completing living wills to guide end-of-life medical treatments

A record number of elderly people are completing living wills to guide end-of-life medical treatments - up from 47 percent in 2000 to 72 percent in 2010 - according to new research from the University of Michigan and the Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System. [More]
Study finds that baclofen drug has potential to prevent cocaine relapse

Study finds that baclofen drug has potential to prevent cocaine relapse

Relapse is the most painful and expensive feature of drug addiction-even after addicted individuals have been drug-free for months or years, the likelihood of sliding back into the habit remains high. The National Institute on Drug Abuse estimates that 40 to 60 percent of addicted individuals will relapse, and in some studies the rates are as high as 80 percent at six months after treatment. [More]
Research roundup: New medical coding system; choosing a hospice; revamping Medicare

Research roundup: New medical coding system; choosing a hospice; revamping Medicare

On October 1, 2014, all health plans, health data clearinghouses, and health care providers that transmit health information electronically must use a new, significantly broader, coding system, called ICD-10, for diagnoses and inpatient procedures. [More]
Scientist receives SFI Saint Patrick's Day Science Medal from the prime minister of Ireland

Scientist receives SFI Saint Patrick's Day Science Medal from the prime minister of Ireland

Enda Kenny, the prime minister of Ireland, presented Garret A. FitzGerald, MD, FRS, director of the Institute for Translational Medicine and Therapeutics and chair of the Department of Pharmacology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, with the inaugural St. Patrick's Day Science Medal at an Science Foundation Ireland (SFI)-hosted event in Washington D.C. last week. [More]
Viewpoints: The lesson from Florida's special election; hospital deaths; costs of treating hep C

Viewpoints: The lesson from Florida's special election; hospital deaths; costs of treating hep C

But in recent months, the political landscape has grown bleaker [for Democrats] .... The question, of course, is why so many Republicans turned out [in the Florida special election last week] and why so few Democrats did. The answer among strategists on both sides was: Obamacare. But not in the sense that the healthcare law is so unpopular that Democrats are doomed; in fact, as more people sign up for health coverage, polls suggest that Obamacare is a little less toxic now than it was last fall. Instead, the problem is that a high-decibel debate over Obamacare has the effect of prompting conservatives to come out and vote, but not liberals (Doyle McManus, 3/16). [More]