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Penn scientists explore potential therapeutic target for cerebral cavernous malformations

Penn scientists explore potential therapeutic target for cerebral cavernous malformations

Tens of millions of people around the world have abnormal, leak-prone sproutings of blood vessels in the brain called cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs). These abnormal growths can lead to seizures, strokes, hemorrhages, and other serious conditions, yet their precise molecular cause has never been determined. [More]
Study evaluates link between Medicaid fee bump and appointment availability for Medicaid patients

Study evaluates link between Medicaid fee bump and appointment availability for Medicaid patients

The increase in Medicaid reimbursement for primary care providers, a key provision of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), was associated with a 7.7 percentage points increase in new patient appointment availability without longer wait times, according to results of a new 10-state study — co-authored by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and the Urban Institute, and funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation — published online-first by the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Penn, Spark Therapeutics expand strategic relationship to develop treatment for progressive blindness

Penn, Spark Therapeutics expand strategic relationship to develop treatment for progressive blindness

The University of Pennsylvania has announced an expanded relationship with Spark Therapeutics, a late-stage gene therapy company developing treatments for debilitating, genetic diseases. [More]
Penn researchers make breakthrough on novel anesthetics

Penn researchers make breakthrough on novel anesthetics

Penn Medicine researchers, in a continuation of their groundbreaking work to better understand how anesthesia works in the body, have found the first new class of novel anesthetics since the 1970s. Their findings, published in February issue of Anesthesiology, detail the processes through which the group uncovered these compounds. [More]
EvergreenHealth recognized as Distinguished Hospital for Clinical Excellence

EvergreenHealth recognized as Distinguished Hospital for Clinical Excellence

EvergreenHealth has achieved its sixth designation as a Distinguished Hospital for Clinical Excellence from Healthgrades, placing the health care organization among the top 5 percent of hospitals of the more than 4,500 hospitals evaluated nationwide and based solely on its outstanding clinical performance. [More]
Shield HealthCare announces Colorado winners of 'What Makes Caregiving Rewarding' story contest

Shield HealthCare announces Colorado winners of 'What Makes Caregiving Rewarding' story contest

Shield HealthCare, a leading provider of medical supplies for care at home, is pleased to announce the Colorado winners of its 14th annual "What Makes Caregiving Rewarding" story contest, recognizing the dedicated role of professional and family caregivers. Through this contest, Shield HealthCare provides its caregiving audience a forum to share their stories, inspiring and encouraging others. [More]
Lung cancer rates are lower in higher-elevation counties, new study finds

Lung cancer rates are lower in higher-elevation counties, new study finds

Here's another potential reason to live up in the mountains. Lung cancer rates in both smokers and non-smokers are lower in higher-elevation counties in the western part of the United States, suggesting that oxygen may promote the incidence of lung cancer, according to a new study co-authored by a student at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Leading cardiac specialists propose new guidelines for donor heart allocation

Leading cardiac specialists propose new guidelines for donor heart allocation

A group of leading cardiac specialists has proposed new guidelines for the allocation of donor hearts to patients awaiting transplant. The changes are aimed at improving the organ distribution process to increase the survival rate of patients awaiting transplant and posttransplant. [More]
Latest wearable tracking devices alone may not change health behavior, say Penn researchers

Latest wearable tracking devices alone may not change health behavior, say Penn researchers

New Year's weight loss resolutions are in full swing, but despite all the hype about the latest wearable tracking devices, there's little evidence that this technology alone can change behavior and improve health for those that need it most, according to a new online-first viewpoint piece in JAMA. [More]
CareSouth Health System to commence national rebranding of CareSouth agencies

CareSouth Health System to commence national rebranding of CareSouth agencies

CareSouth Health System, Inc., a national senior living services provider based in Augusta, Ga., announced today that it will begin a national rebranding of its CareSouth agencies across all CareSouth branded business lines including CareSouth Home Health, CareSouth Hospice, CareSouth Private Duty and CS Health & Wellness. [More]
Certain patients with type 2 diabetes, renal impairment discouraged from taking metformin

Certain patients with type 2 diabetes, renal impairment discouraged from taking metformin

Many patients with type 2 diabetes in the United States may be discouraged from taking metformin—a proven, oral diabetes medicine—because the U.S. Food and Drug Administration inappropriately labels the drug unsafe for some patients also suffering from kidney problems, researchers from Penn Medicine and Weill Cornel Medical College report this week in a research letter published in JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
Adding radiation treatment to hormone therapy saves older men with prostate cancer

Adding radiation treatment to hormone therapy saves older men with prostate cancer

Adding radiation treatment to hormone therapy saves more lives among older men with locally advanced prostate therapy than hormone therapy alone, according to a new study in the Journal of Clinical Oncology this week from Penn Medicine researchers. [More]
Findings show effective treatment for type 1 diabetes patients with severe hypoglycemia

Findings show effective treatment for type 1 diabetes patients with severe hypoglycemia

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients who have developed low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) as a complication of insulin treatments over time are able to regain normal internal recognition of the condition after receiving pancreatic islet cell transplantation, according to a new study led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, published online in Diabetes. [More]
Penn study has implications for developing new cell-based treatments for skin disease

Penn study has implications for developing new cell-based treatments for skin disease

As the main component of connective tissue in the body, fibroblasts are the most common type of cell. Taking advantage of that ready availability, scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the Wistar Institute, Boston University School of Medicine, and New Jersey Institute of Technology have discovered a way to repurpose fibroblasts into functional melanocytes, the body's pigment-producing cells. [More]
Inspira, RowanSOM partner to provide quality behavioral health care in South Jersey area

Inspira, RowanSOM partner to provide quality behavioral health care in South Jersey area

Inspira Health Network is pleased to announce a new partnership with Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine for its behavioral health programs in Cumberland, Gloucester and Salem counties. [More]
Penn researchers find effective way to inhibit inflammatory response during kidney dialysis

Penn researchers find effective way to inhibit inflammatory response during kidney dialysis

Frequent kidney dialysis is essential for the approximately 350,000 end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients in the United States. But it can also cause systemic inflammation, leading to complications such as cardiovascular disease and anemia, and patients who rely on the therapy have a five-year survival rate of only 35 percent. Such inflammation can be triggered when the complement cascade, part of the body's innate immune system, is inadvertently activated by modern polymer-based dialysis blood filters. [More]

Hospice of the Western Reserve, Hospice of Dayton partner to provide quality care for all Ohioans

Ohio's two largest hospice care providers - Hospice of the Western Reserve and Hospice of Dayton - have announced a collaborative initiative to ensure delivery of the highest quality of care for all Ohioans. The partnership will focus on creating best practice standards for hospice and palliative care, proactively sharing quality data, benchmarking performance to continuously improve care delivery and creating the most skilled workforce. [More]
STSI researchers launch study to examine root cause of sudden unexpected death

STSI researchers launch study to examine root cause of sudden unexpected death

Researchers at the Scripps Translational Science Institute have launched a clinical trial aimed at cracking one of the toughest mysteries in forensic science -- sudden unexplained death. [More]
Study evaluates effect of 2011 ACGME duty hour reforms on patient outcomes

Study evaluates effect of 2011 ACGME duty hour reforms on patient outcomes

In the first year after the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) reduced the number of continuous hours that residents can work, there was no change in the rate of death or readmission among hospitalized Medicare patients, according to a new study published in JAMA. [More]
New study compares characteristics of hospice patients in nursing homes and community settings

New study compares characteristics of hospice patients in nursing homes and community settings

As hospice for nursing home patients grows dramatically, a new study from the Regenstrief Institute and the Indiana University Center for Aging Research compares the characteristics of hospice patients in nursing homes with hospice patients living in the community. The study also provides details on how hospice patients move in and out of these two settings. [More]