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Findings show effective treatment for type 1 diabetes patients with severe hypoglycemia

Findings show effective treatment for type 1 diabetes patients with severe hypoglycemia

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients who have developed low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) as a complication of insulin treatments over time are able to regain normal internal recognition of the condition after receiving pancreatic islet cell transplantation, according to a new study led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, published online in Diabetes. [More]
Penn study has implications for developing new cell-based treatments for skin disease

Penn study has implications for developing new cell-based treatments for skin disease

As the main component of connective tissue in the body, fibroblasts are the most common type of cell. Taking advantage of that ready availability, scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the Wistar Institute, Boston University School of Medicine, and New Jersey Institute of Technology have discovered a way to repurpose fibroblasts into functional melanocytes, the body's pigment-producing cells. [More]
Inspira, RowanSOM partner to provide quality behavioral health care in South Jersey area

Inspira, RowanSOM partner to provide quality behavioral health care in South Jersey area

Inspira Health Network is pleased to announce a new partnership with Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine for its behavioral health programs in Cumberland, Gloucester and Salem counties. [More]
Penn researchers find effective way to inhibit inflammatory response during kidney dialysis

Penn researchers find effective way to inhibit inflammatory response during kidney dialysis

Frequent kidney dialysis is essential for the approximately 350,000 end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients in the United States. But it can also cause systemic inflammation, leading to complications such as cardiovascular disease and anemia, and patients who rely on the therapy have a five-year survival rate of only 35 percent. Such inflammation can be triggered when the complement cascade, part of the body's innate immune system, is inadvertently activated by modern polymer-based dialysis blood filters. [More]

Hospice of the Western Reserve, Hospice of Dayton partner to provide quality care for all Ohioans

Ohio's two largest hospice care providers - Hospice of the Western Reserve and Hospice of Dayton - have announced a collaborative initiative to ensure delivery of the highest quality of care for all Ohioans. The partnership will focus on creating best practice standards for hospice and palliative care, proactively sharing quality data, benchmarking performance to continuously improve care delivery and creating the most skilled workforce. [More]
STSI researchers launch study to examine root cause of sudden unexpected death

STSI researchers launch study to examine root cause of sudden unexpected death

Researchers at the Scripps Translational Science Institute have launched a clinical trial aimed at cracking one of the toughest mysteries in forensic science -- sudden unexplained death. [More]
Study evaluates effect of 2011 ACGME duty hour reforms on patient outcomes

Study evaluates effect of 2011 ACGME duty hour reforms on patient outcomes

In the first year after the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) reduced the number of continuous hours that residents can work, there was no change in the rate of death or readmission among hospitalized Medicare patients, according to a new study published in JAMA. [More]
New study compares characteristics of hospice patients in nursing homes and community settings

New study compares characteristics of hospice patients in nursing homes and community settings

As hospice for nursing home patients grows dramatically, a new study from the Regenstrief Institute and the Indiana University Center for Aging Research compares the characteristics of hospice patients in nursing homes with hospice patients living in the community. The study also provides details on how hospice patients move in and out of these two settings. [More]
Study: Simeprevir-based therapy proves effective in treating chronic HCV infection

Study: Simeprevir-based therapy proves effective in treating chronic HCV infection

Researchers at Penn Medicine, in collaboration with a multi-center international team, have shown that a protease inhibitor, simeprevir, a once a day pill, along with interferon and ribavirin has proven as effective in treating chronic Hepatitis C virus infection (HCV) as telaprevir with interferon and ribavirin, the standard of care in developing countries. [More]
Abstinence-induced changes in the brain could help predict relapse in smokers

Abstinence-induced changes in the brain could help predict relapse in smokers

Quitting smoking sets off a series of changes in the brain that Penn Medicine researchers say may better identify smokers who will start smoking again—a prediction that goes above and beyond today's clinical or behavioral tools for assessing relapse risk. [More]
DebMed signs contract with Cooley Dickinson Hospital for Group Monitoring System

DebMed signs contract with Cooley Dickinson Hospital for Group Monitoring System

DebMed today announced a three-year agreement with Cooley Dickinson Hospital for the use of its Group Monitoring System, the only electronic hand hygiene monitoring system that complies with the World Health Organization's Five Moments for Hand Hygiene and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines. [More]
Promising new therapeutic strategy for chronic kidney disease

Promising new therapeutic strategy for chronic kidney disease

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects at least one in four Americans who are older than 60 and can significantly shorten lifespan. Yet the few available drugs for CKD can only modestly delay the disease's progress towards kidney failure. Now, however, a team led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has found an aspect of CKD's development that points to a promising new therapeutic strategy. [More]
Cognitive test battery developed to measure impact of spaceflight stressors on cognitive performance

Cognitive test battery developed to measure impact of spaceflight stressors on cognitive performance

Space is one of the most demanding and unforgiving environments. Human exploration of space requires astronauts to maintain consistently high levels of cognitive performance to ensure mission safety and success, and prevent potential errors and accidents. Despite the importance of cognitive performance for mission success, little is known about how cognition is affected by prolonged spaceflight, and what aspects of cognition are primarily affected. [More]
SNTF protein can predict severity of post-concussion symptoms in professional athletes

SNTF protein can predict severity of post-concussion symptoms in professional athletes

New Penn Medicine research has found that elevated levels in the blood of the brain-enriched protein calpain-cleaved αII-spectrin N-terminal fragment, known as SNTF, shortly after sports-related concussion can predict the severity of post-concussion symptoms in professional athletes. [More]

Tips to help children manage grief during holidays

Grieving children experience conflicting emotions during the holiday season. Excitement about presents and parties are coupled with the sadness of knowing they cannot share these special traditions with their deceased loved one. [More]
EvergreenHealth, Valley General Hospital approve final phase of alliance agreement

EvergreenHealth, Valley General Hospital approve final phase of alliance agreement

EvergreenHealth and Valley General Hospital announced today that their respective Boards of Commissioners have voted to approve the third and final phase of an alliance agreement in which Valley General Hospital in Monroe, Washington will become part of the Kirkland-based health care system and managed by EvergreenHealth. [More]

New study investigates patient perspectives on deactivation of ICDs at the end of life

Most patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs)--small devices placed in a person's chest to help treat irregular heartbeats with electrical pulses, or shocks--haven't thought about device deactivation if they were to develop a serious illness from which they were not expected to recover. [More]
Findings illustrate need to monitor all races of heart failure patients for atrial fibrillation

Findings illustrate need to monitor all races of heart failure patients for atrial fibrillation

Black patients who have been diagnosed with heart failure are no less likely than white patients to get atrial fibrillation (an irregular heartbeat, or arrhythmia), according to a new study led by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, which was presented today at the 2014 Scientific Sessions of the American Heart Association. [More]
Hospice care lowers hospitalization, ICU admissions and invasive procedures for Medicare patients

Hospice care lowers hospitalization, ICU admissions and invasive procedures for Medicare patients

Medicare patients with poor­ prognosis cancers who received hospice care had significantly lower rates of hospitalization, intensive care unit (ICU) admissions and invasive procedures at the end of life, along with significantly lower health care expenditures during the last year of life, according to a study in the November 12 issue of JAMA. [More]
Researchers refine diagnostic tools to predict treatment outcomes for children with neuroblastoma

Researchers refine diagnostic tools to predict treatment outcomes for children with neuroblastoma

Oncology researchers studying gene mutations in the childhood cancer neuroblastoma are refining their diagnostic tools to predict which patients are more likely to respond to drugs called ALK inhibitors that target such mutations. Removing some of the guesswork in diagnosis and treatment, the researchers say, may lead to more successful outcomes for children with this often-deadly cancer. [More]