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Penn researchers discover antimicrobial that thwarts Zika viral entry into human cells

Penn researchers discover antimicrobial that thwarts Zika viral entry into human cells

A panel of small molecules that inhibit Zika virus infection, including one that stands out as a potent inhibitor of Zika viral entry into relevant human cell types, was discovered by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
New Apple ResearchKit app from Penn Medicine focuses on sarcoidosis patients

New Apple ResearchKit app from Penn Medicine focuses on sarcoidosis patients

Penn Medicine today launched its first Apple ResearchKit app, focused on patients with sarcoidosis, an inflammatory condition that can affect the lungs, skin, eyes, heart, brain, and other organs. [More]
Researchers identify sub-population of HIV-1 strains with biological properties to transmit new infections

Researchers identify sub-population of HIV-1 strains with biological properties to transmit new infections

Upon sexual exposure, the AIDS virus must overcome some mighty barriers to find the right target cell and establish a new infection. [More]
Penn study reveals key factors that influence treatment choices in women suffering miscarriage

Penn study reveals key factors that influence treatment choices in women suffering miscarriage

How women make decisions about treatment while suffering a miscarriage, and the key factors that influence their choices, are revealed in a study published in Obstetrics & Gynecology from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Orphan Disease Center establishes new initiative that focuses on ALS

Orphan Disease Center establishes new initiative that focuses on ALS

The Orphan Disease Center in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has established a new Program of Excellence for Motor Neuron Disease. [More]
Penn study finds evidence of AD neuropathology in post-mortem brains of LBD patients

Penn study finds evidence of AD neuropathology in post-mortem brains of LBD patients

Patients who had a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) with dementia (PDD) or dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and had higher levels of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology in their donated post-mortem brains also had more severe symptoms of these Lewy body diseases (LBD) during their lives, compared to those whose brains had less AD pathology, according to research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Many nursing home residents with renal disease lack advance directives to address end-of-life care

Many nursing home residents with renal disease lack advance directives to address end-of-life care

A new study indicates that many nursing home residents receiving dialysis do not have advance directives that sufficiently address end-of-life treatment decisions. [More]
Bundled payment models can reduce Medicare, hospital costs without compromising quality of care

Bundled payment models can reduce Medicare, hospital costs without compromising quality of care

Bundled payment models can push Medicare and health system costs down considerably without sacrificing quality of care, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
CHLA Medical Group, Providence Saint John's to provide premium care for fragile newborns

CHLA Medical Group, Providence Saint John's to provide premium care for fragile newborns

Providence Saint John's Health Center is partnering with Children's Hospital Los Angeles Medical Group to raise the level of care for the most fragile newborns in the medical center's Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), bringing world class neonatal care to Santa Monica and the surrounding Westside communities. [More]
Scripps physician first to treat heart attack patients with supersaturated oxygen therapy

Scripps physician first to treat heart attack patients with supersaturated oxygen therapy

A physician at Scripps Health's Prebys Cardiovascular Institute has become the first in the Western United States to treat heart attack patients with a new supersaturated oxygen (SSO2) system in an attempt to reduce permanent damage to their heart muscle. [More]
New molecular imaging technologies can make it easier to treat cancers, minimize side effects

New molecular imaging technologies can make it easier to treat cancers, minimize side effects

New molecular imaging technologies can make it easier to diagnose, monitor, and treat cancers while potentially saving patients from undergoing therapies that are likely to be ineffective and playing a role in minimizing side effects, according to experts from the Abramson Cancer Center and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Penn experts suggest ways for hospitals to improve health care

Penn experts suggest ways for hospitals to improve health care

Leveraging existing relationships with friends and family may be a more effective way to improve patients' health and encourage new healthy habits and behaviors than increasing interactions with physicians or other clinicians. [More]
American Journal of Nursing declares 2016 winners of its annual Book of the Year Awards

American Journal of Nursing declares 2016 winners of its annual Book of the Year Awards

The American Journal of Nursing (AJN) is pleased to announce the 2016 winners of its annual Book of the Year Awards. Winners in 19 categories appear in the journal's January issue. AJN, the "leading voice of nursing since 1900," is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Linking human genome sequences to EHR information could influence clinical medicine, says expert

Linking human genome sequences to EHR information could influence clinical medicine, says expert

The value of intersecting the sequencing of individuals' exomes or full genomes to find rare genetic variants -- on a large scale -- with their detailed electronic health record information has "myriad benefits, including the illumination of basic human biology, the early identification of preventable and treatable illnesses, and the identification and validation of new therapeutic targets," wrote Daniel J. Rader, MD, chair of the Department of Genetics, in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, in Science this week, with Scott M. Damrauer, MD, an assistant professor of Surgery at Penn and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Philadelphia. [More]
Breast cancer patient finds new hope with potentially revolutionary treatment

Breast cancer patient finds new hope with potentially revolutionary treatment

City of Hope patient Susan Young has had a remarkable response to a potentially revolutionary new treatment, a combination of the p53 cancer vaccine and a drug that blocks a specific cancer-aiding protein. [More]
Simple sniff test can enhance accuracy of diagnosing Alzheimer's disease

Simple sniff test can enhance accuracy of diagnosing Alzheimer's disease

Tests that measure the sense of smell may soon become common in neurologists' offices. [More]
Routine blood test can predict survival of cancer patients in palliative care

Routine blood test can predict survival of cancer patients in palliative care

A routine blood test can predict how long cancer patients in palliative care will survive, researchers report at the ESMO Asia 2016 Congress in Singapore. [More]
Surgery within first two weeks after diagnosis increases risk of death for some endometrial cancer patients

Surgery within first two weeks after diagnosis increases risk of death for some endometrial cancer patients

Delaying surgery after a diagnosis of uterine cancer can increase a women's risk of death, but operating too soon can be just as detrimental for some, Penn Medicine physicians report in a new study published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. [More]
Geisinger physicians report opioid therapy to be ineffective in treating chronic pain

Geisinger physicians report opioid therapy to be ineffective in treating chronic pain

A new study by a pair of Geisinger Health System physicians reports that the use of opioid therapy to treat chronic pain is not only ineffective, it can actually increase the likelihood of more harmful consequences, including death. [More]
Simple nutrition care program in hospitals could help reduce patient stays and readmission rates

Simple nutrition care program in hospitals could help reduce patient stays and readmission rates

While proper nutrition is vital to staying healthy, its importance becomes more critical for patients recovering in the hospital. [More]
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