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UF researchers find that people with brain tumor fare better with personal insurance

UF researchers find that people with brain tumor fare better with personal insurance

Brain tumor patients who are uninsured or use Medicaid stay hospitalized longer and develop more medical complications than those with private insurance, University of Florida Health researchers have found. [More]
OTC medications, dietary and herbal supplements cause drug-induced acute liver failure

OTC medications, dietary and herbal supplements cause drug-induced acute liver failure

Drug-induced acute liver failure is uncommon, and over-the-counter medications and dietary and herbal supplements -- not prescription drugs -- are its most common causes, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Scientists find gorilla origins in two human AIDS virus lineages

Scientists find gorilla origins in two human AIDS virus lineages

Two of the four known groups of human AIDS viruses (HIV-1 groups O and P) have originated in western lowland gorillas, according to an international team of scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Montpellier, the University of Edinburgh, and others. [More]
Successful cognitive behavioral therapy for childhood anxiety provides long-term benefits

Successful cognitive behavioral therapy for childhood anxiety provides long-term benefits

Penn Medicine researchers found that patients who did not respond to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety in childhood had more chronic and enduring patterns of suicidal ideation at 7 to 19 years after treatment. [More]
Two widely used targeted therapy drugs not effective in preventing return of kidney cancer

Two widely used targeted therapy drugs not effective in preventing return of kidney cancer

Two widely used targeted therapy drugs— approved by the FDA for use in metastatic kidney cancer —are no more effective than a placebo in preventing return of the disease to increase life spans of patients suffering from advanced kidney cancer after surgery, according to new results to be presented by a researcher at the University of Pennsylvania's Abramson Cancer Center during the 2015 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium. [More]
Study results pave way for new clinical trial for glioblastoma patients

Study results pave way for new clinical trial for glioblastoma patients

Immune cells engineered to seek out and attack a type of deadly brain cancer were found to be both safe and effective at controlling tumor growth in mice that were treated with these modified cells, according to a study published in Science Translational Medicine by a team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research. [More]
Organizational culture may increase use of evidence-based treatments for adolescents with psychiatric disorders

Organizational culture may increase use of evidence-based treatments for adolescents with psychiatric disorders

Many mental health therapists use treatments that have little evidence to support them. A new multi-institution study led by Penn Medicine has found that an organization's culture and climate are better predictors of the use of evidence-based practices than an individual therapist's characteristics in the treatment of children and adolescents with psychiatric disorders. [More]
New study indicates that cancer patients rarely push for unnecessary tests, treatments

New study indicates that cancer patients rarely push for unnecessary tests, treatments

Physicians often blame patient demands for contributing to high medical costs, however, a new study involving more than 5,000 patient-clinician visits indicates that cancer patients rarely push for unnecessary tests and treatments from their health care providers. [More]
Consortium formed to develop program to improve health outcomes for Ebola patients

Consortium formed to develop program to improve health outcomes for Ebola patients

Scripps Translational Science Institute will lead a consortium of four partners to develop a program through which wearable, wireless health sensors, a wireless vital signs monitoring platform and advanced analytics technology will be tested in a new "precision medicine" approach designed to improve health outcomes for Ebola patients, increase the safety of health care workers and reduce risk of spreading the virus to others. [More]
New Penn Medicine study reveals how sleep deprivation increases intake of fat

New Penn Medicine study reveals how sleep deprivation increases intake of fat

Experts have warned for years that insufficient sleep can lead to weight gain. A new Penn Medicine study found that not only do we consume more food following a night of total sleep deprivation, but we also we consume more fat and less carbohydrates and a region of the brain known as the salience network is what may lead us to eat more fat. [More]
Peanut-shaped exercise ball promotes positive labor outcomes, reduces duration of delivery process

Peanut-shaped exercise ball promotes positive labor outcomes, reduces duration of delivery process

According to a new study by nurse researchers at Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, a Phoenix hospital part of Banner Health, a peanut-shaped exercise ball can be a highly effective tool to accelerate the labor process for women with an epidural. The research shows women utilizing the peanut ball were half as likely to undergo a cesarean surgery and delivered babies faster than those who did not use the ball. [More]

NHPCO forms new council to address underutilization of hospice care in diverse populations

As Americans celebrate Black History Month, hospice professionals acknowledge that hospice utilization within African American communities is disproportionately low. [More]
New article assesses 40 years of intensive effort to improve end-of-life care

New article assesses 40 years of intensive effort to improve end-of-life care

After four decades of work - first on patients' rights, then on family and caregiving relationships, and most recently on systemic reform -- we now know that it will take additional efforts in all three areas to improve care at the end of life, concludes an article in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
New study reveals eight highly specific physical signs associated with death in cancer patients

New study reveals eight highly specific physical signs associated with death in cancer patients

While the diagnosis of an impending death is always sad, it can be important for patients, families, and clinicians as they make decisions related to hospital discharge, hospice referral, and treatments. Now a new study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, has revealed eight highly specific physical signs associated with death within three days in cancer patients. [More]
Researchers identify physical, cognitive signs associated with imminent death in patients with cancer

Researchers identify physical, cognitive signs associated with imminent death in patients with cancer

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have identified eight highly specific physical and cognitive signs associated with imminent death in cancer patients. The findings, published in the journal Cancer, could offer clinicians the ability to better communicate with patients and families. [More]
Scripps Green Hospital treats peripheral artery disease patient using new drug-coated balloon

Scripps Green Hospital treats peripheral artery disease patient using new drug-coated balloon

A doctor at Scripps Green Hospital this week became the first in California to use a new drug-coated balloon to treat peripheral artery disease in a patient since regulatory approval of the IN.PACT Admiral device in January by the Food and Drug Administration. [More]
HealthSouth agrees to acquire Cardinal Hill Rehabilitation Hospital from Kentucky Easter Seal Society

HealthSouth agrees to acquire Cardinal Hill Rehabilitation Hospital from Kentucky Easter Seal Society

HealthSouth Corporation today announced it has entered into an agreement to purchase Cardinal Hill Rehabilitation Hospital in Lexington, Kentucky, from the Kentucky Easter Seal Society, Inc. [More]
Perelman School of Medicine opens new medical education center

Perelman School of Medicine opens new medical education center

With the opening of the Henry A. Jordan M'62 Medical Education Center, the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has expanded its urban campus with an innovative new facility that's redefining medical education for 21st century doctors. [More]
Centura Health, DaVita HealthCare Partners jointly unveil FullWell

Centura Health, DaVita HealthCare Partners jointly unveil FullWell

Centura Health and DaVita HealthCare Partners today unveiled FullWell, the brand name of the two partners' recently announced joint venture, a company that aims to bring greater value to health care and lower costs for consumers in Colorado and Kansas. [More]
Menopause does not exacerbate or cause sleep problems, shows study

Menopause does not exacerbate or cause sleep problems, shows study

Women in their late thirties and forties who have trouble sleeping are more than three times more likely to suffer sleep problems during menopause than women who have an easier time getting shut-eye, according to a new study by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]