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New biomaterial allows scientists to study how stem cells sense stiffness of surrounding environment

New biomaterial allows scientists to study how stem cells sense stiffness of surrounding environment

A new biomaterial can be used to study how and when stem cells sense the mechanics of their surrounding environment, found a team led by Robert Mauck, PhD, the Mary Black Ralston Professor for Education and Research in Orthopaedic Surgery, in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Non-coding RNAs play key role in maintaining proper balance between fighting infection and inflammation

Non-coding RNAs play key role in maintaining proper balance between fighting infection and inflammation

Special RNA molecules called long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are key controllers for maintaining immune health when fighting infection or preventing inflammatory disorders, according to research led by Jorge Henao-Mejia, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Acupuncture may be viable option to manage pain in children with complex medical conditions

Acupuncture may be viable option to manage pain in children with complex medical conditions

It appears that acupuncture may be a viable option for pain management when it comes to pediatric patients who have complex medical conditions, according to new research published by Gillette Children's Specialty Healthcare in St. Paul, Minnesota. [More]
Penn study sheds light on role of essential compound in maintaining optimal muscle function

Penn study sheds light on role of essential compound in maintaining optimal muscle function

Maintaining proper levels of an essential helper molecule is crucial for optimal muscle function, according to a study led by Joseph Baur, PhD, an assistant professor of Physiology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Researchers uncover how GWAS-implicated gene affects HDL-cholesterol levels

Researchers uncover how GWAS-implicated gene affects HDL-cholesterol levels

Researchers have uncovered how genes identified from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) affect high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), a biomarker of cardiovascular disease, after comparing several animal models with human patient data. [More]
Penn study shows synchronized refill program enhances medication adherence

Penn study shows synchronized refill program enhances medication adherence

Programs aimed at helping patients adhere to prescription medication regimens have become an area of interest for researchers as nearly half of patients do not take medications as prescribed. [More]
Metabolic-checkpoint inhibitor combination approach may improve cancer therapies

Metabolic-checkpoint inhibitor combination approach may improve cancer therapies

Reprogramming of the molecular pathways underlying normal metabolism is essential for T cell infection-fighting function and for the immune system to form a "memory" of the microbes it has already encountered. But exactly how metabolism in exhausted T cells is maintained in chronic infections and cancer is a missing element in this line of research. [More]
Penn's ADCC receives $8.8 million grant to continue research on treatment for AD and related dementias

Penn's ADCC receives $8.8 million grant to continue research on treatment for AD and related dementias

The University of Pennsylvania's Alzheimer's Disease Core Center has been awarded an estimated $8.8 million over five years from the National Institute on Aging to continue its mission of investigating mechanisms, diagnostics, treatments and strategies for Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and related dementias including Parkinson's disease (PD), Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), Lewy Body dementia (LBD) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). [More]
Study shows diabetes drug ineffective in improving condition of patients with advanced heart failure

Study shows diabetes drug ineffective in improving condition of patients with advanced heart failure

In an attempt to correct defects in the energy generation that contribute to poor pump function among heart failure patients, researchers examined whether the diabetes drug liraglutide, could improve the condition of patients with advanced heart failure. [More]
Study verifies human gene therapy in MPS I animal model

Study verifies human gene therapy in MPS I animal model

Researchers are closer to finding a better way to treat children with a rare metabolic disorder called MPS I. It is caused by a deficiency of the key enzyme IDUA needed to break down complex sugars in cells. [More]
Penn study sheds new light on biology of fatty liver disease

Penn study sheds new light on biology of fatty liver disease

A new appreciation for the interplay between two cell nucleus proteins that lead both intertwined and separate lives is helping researchers better understand fatty liver disease, according to a new study by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Focused therapy may be effective, less toxic way to treat brain tumors

Focused therapy may be effective, less toxic way to treat brain tumors

Physicians from Carolinas HealthCare System's Neurosciences Institute and Levine Cancer Institute are among the authors of a study that was accepted for publication by the Journal of the American Medical Association. The study, released on July 26, 2016, shows that patients with the most common form of brain tumor can be treated in an effective and substantially less toxic way by omitting a widely used portion of radiation therapy. [More]
Scientists receive $2.4 million grant to advance stem cell therapy for Parkinson's disease

Scientists receive $2.4 million grant to advance stem cell therapy for Parkinson's disease

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and Scripps Clinic have received a grant of nearly $2.4 million from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine to support safety and quality tests of a potential stem cell therapy for Parkinson's disease. [More]
Study shows ordering food immediately before eating leads to overall increase in calorie content

Study shows ordering food immediately before eating leads to overall increase in calorie content

Want to cut calories and make healthier meal choices? Try avoiding unhealthy impulse purchases by ordering meals at least an hour before eating. [More]
NorthShore launches first clinical trial to examine GRS test for cancer risk assessment

NorthShore launches first clinical trial to examine GRS test for cancer risk assessment

Researchers at NorthShore University HealthSystem have launched the first clinical trial to investigate a genetic risk score (GRS) test to predict the risk of breast, prostate and colorectal cancer in the primary care setting. [More]
New study highlights role of TANs in regulating T cell responses in patients with early-stage lung cancer

New study highlights role of TANs in regulating T cell responses in patients with early-stage lung cancer

The microenvironment of tumors is a mix of cell types, mostly comprised of inflammatory cells. White blood cells, recruited from the blood and bone marrow, represent a significant portion of these inflammatory cells and influence nearly all steps of tumor progression. [More]
Penn study provides more insights into cardiovascular side effects of breast cancer drug

Penn study provides more insights into cardiovascular side effects of breast cancer drug

A receptor protein that is the target of the breast cancer drug trastuzumab (Herceptin) is needed for proper heart blood-vessel development, reported researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Experts warn about risks involved in home use of tDCS

Experts warn about risks involved in home use of tDCS

The growing trend of "do-it-yourself" transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) poses hidden risks to healthy members of the public who seek to use the technique for cognitive enhancement. [More]
TSRI awarded $20 million for first year of precision medicine initiative cohort program

TSRI awarded $20 million for first year of precision medicine initiative cohort program

As part of the most ambitious medical research program in the history of American medicine, The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) has received an initial award of $20 million for its role in a national precision medicine initiative, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced today. [More]
University report explores efficacy of palliative care in England

University report explores efficacy of palliative care in England

A new report by Sheffield Hallam University has revealed that, despite an abundance of government recommendations on end of life care in England, there is uncertainty as to whether they have led to improvements in patient care. [More]
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