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Two surgical methods safe, effective for healing distal femur fractures

Two surgical methods safe, effective for healing distal femur fractures

A team of orthopedic surgeons from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has found that modern technology for healing distal femur fractures is as safe and effective as its more established alternative, without a potential shortfall of the older approach. [More]

Hospice of the Western Reserve, HMC Hospice of Medina County to jointly support people with progressive illness

Hospice of the Western Reserve and HMC Hospice of Medina County have signed a non-binding letter of intent to explore a strategic partnership of the not-for-profit organizations that offers comprehensive services for those who struggle with progressive illness. No immediate workforce reductions at either agency are planned. [More]
Penn surgeons develop new tools to identify joint replacement patients at risk for serious complications

Penn surgeons develop new tools to identify joint replacement patients at risk for serious complications

Orthopedic surgeons from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have developed two new prediction tools aimed at identifying total hip and knee replacement patients who are at-risk of developing serious complications after surgery. [More]
Roseroot extract may be beneficial for treating major depressive disorder

Roseroot extract may be beneficial for treating major depressive disorder

Rhodiola rosea (R. rosea), or roseroot, may be a beneficial treatment option for major depressive disorder (MDD), according to results of a study in the journal Phytomedicine led by Jun J. Mao, MD, MSCE, associate professor of Family Medicine, Community Health and Epidemiology and colleagues at the Perelman School of Medicine of University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Strategies aimed at reducing childhood obesity should acknowledge individuals' rational taste preferences

Strategies aimed at reducing childhood obesity should acknowledge individuals' rational taste preferences

Strategies aimed at reducing childhood obesity should acknowledge individuals' rational taste preferences and apply insights from behavioral economics to design choice architecture that increases their likelihood of success, say two physician-scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics in an editorial published in JAMA Pediatrics. [More]
New report highlights the need for disclosing Alzheimer's diagnosis to patients

New report highlights the need for disclosing Alzheimer's diagnosis to patients

The Alzheimer's Association's 2015 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures report, released today, found that only 45 percent of people with Alzheimer's disease or their caregivers say they were told the diagnosis by their doctor. [More]
Study shows link between palliative care knowledge and less end-of-life disruption

Study shows link between palliative care knowledge and less end-of-life disruption

When a nursing home patient is dying, aggressive interventions such as inserting a feeding tube or sending the patient to the emergency room can futilely exacerbate, rather than relieve, their distress. Palliative care focuses nursing home resources on providing comfort at the end of life, but nursing directors vary widely in their knowledge of it. [More]
Hypermethylation serves as protective barrier inhibiting development of ALS, FTD

Hypermethylation serves as protective barrier inhibiting development of ALS, FTD

Penn Medicine researchers have discovered that hypermethylation - the epigenetic ability to turn down or turn off a bad gene implicated in 10 to 30 percent of patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Frontotemporal Degeneration (FTD) - serves as a protective barrier inhibiting the development of these diseases. [More]
Living near greened vacant lots reduces stress

Living near greened vacant lots reduces stress

Greening vacant lots may be associated with biologic reductions in stress, according to a new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Residents who walked near newly greened vacant lots had significantly lower heart rates compared to walking near a blighted, or neglected, vacant lot. [More]
Home care and hospice providers set to participate in NAHC's March on Washington

Home care and hospice providers set to participate in NAHC's March on Washington

This weekend, hundreds of home care and hospice providers arrive in Washington, DC, for the National Association for Home Care & Hospice March on Washington taking place March 22-25, 2015. NAHC’s conference will raise awareness of key policy issues impacting providers and their ability to care for the growing number of Americans who rely on home health. [More]
New approach to improve cardiac regeneration

New approach to improve cardiac regeneration

The heart tissue of mammals has limited capacity to regenerate after an injury such as a heart attack, in part due to the inability to reactivate a cardiac muscle cell and proliferation program. Recent studies have indicated a low level of cardiac muscle cell (cardiomyocytes) proliferation in adult mammals, but it is insufficient to repair damaged hearts. [More]
Penn researcher named a recipient of 2015 Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize

Penn researcher named a recipient of 2015 Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize

University of Pennsylvania cancer and HIV expert Carl June, MD, has been named one of two recipients of the 2015 Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize for his outstanding work in cancer immunotherapy. Since 1952, the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize has been awarded to scientists who have made great advancements in the fields in which Paul Ehrlich worked, in particular immunology, cancer research, microbiology, and chemotherapy. [More]
Greystone expands with acquisition of Autumn Health Care's skilled nursing facilities in Ohio

Greystone expands with acquisition of Autumn Health Care's skilled nursing facilities in Ohio

Greystone Healthcare Management Corp. continues to grow its network of healthcare facilities, home health agencies and hospice care services in Florida and Ohio with the acquisition from Autumn Health Care of its 10 skilled nursing facilities, with a total of 614 beds, in the central Ohio area. [More]
Population-based approach to health planning can prevent disparities in access to stroke care, says study

Population-based approach to health planning can prevent disparities in access to stroke care, says study

Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and disability in the United States, but access to rapid EMS care and appropriate stroke care centers with the ability to deliver acute stroke therapies can drastically mitigate the debilitating effects of a stroke. [More]
UF researchers find that people with brain tumor fare better with personal insurance

UF researchers find that people with brain tumor fare better with personal insurance

Brain tumor patients who are uninsured or use Medicaid stay hospitalized longer and develop more medical complications than those with private insurance, University of Florida Health researchers have found. [More]
OTC medications, dietary and herbal supplements cause drug-induced acute liver failure

OTC medications, dietary and herbal supplements cause drug-induced acute liver failure

Drug-induced acute liver failure is uncommon, and over-the-counter medications and dietary and herbal supplements -- not prescription drugs -- are its most common causes, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Scientists find gorilla origins in two human AIDS virus lineages

Scientists find gorilla origins in two human AIDS virus lineages

Two of the four known groups of human AIDS viruses (HIV-1 groups O and P) have originated in western lowland gorillas, according to an international team of scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Montpellier, the University of Edinburgh, and others. [More]
Successful cognitive behavioral therapy for childhood anxiety provides long-term benefits

Successful cognitive behavioral therapy for childhood anxiety provides long-term benefits

Penn Medicine researchers found that patients who did not respond to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety in childhood had more chronic and enduring patterns of suicidal ideation at 7 to 19 years after treatment. [More]
Two widely used targeted therapy drugs not effective in preventing return of kidney cancer

Two widely used targeted therapy drugs not effective in preventing return of kidney cancer

Two widely used targeted therapy drugs— approved by the FDA for use in metastatic kidney cancer —are no more effective than a placebo in preventing return of the disease to increase life spans of patients suffering from advanced kidney cancer after surgery, according to new results to be presented by a researcher at the University of Pennsylvania's Abramson Cancer Center during the 2015 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium. [More]
Study results pave way for new clinical trial for glioblastoma patients

Study results pave way for new clinical trial for glioblastoma patients

Immune cells engineered to seek out and attack a type of deadly brain cancer were found to be both safe and effective at controlling tumor growth in mice that were treated with these modified cells, according to a study published in Science Translational Medicine by a team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research. [More]
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