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Researchers discover how signals from infectious bacteria get to inflammasome sensors

Researchers discover how signals from infectious bacteria get to inflammasome sensors

Researchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have discovered the way signals from infectious bacteria gain entry into the cytoplasm of host cells to activate disease-fighting inflammasomes. [More]
Promedica partners with Kaonsoft to accelerate development of new mobile healthcare apps

Promedica partners with Kaonsoft to accelerate development of new mobile healthcare apps

ProMedica, one of Ohio's largest healthcare systems, is partnering with Kaonsoft, an enterprise mobility software company, to form Kapios Health, a healthcare technology company that will focus on the development of medical applications created by ProMedica Innovations inventors. [More]
Frequent nighttime hot flashes may trigger mild depression symptoms during menopause

Frequent nighttime hot flashes may trigger mild depression symptoms during menopause

A woman's perception that she is experiencing a high number of nighttime hot flashes can trigger mild symptoms of depression during menopause, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
T-Bear brings hope to kids diagnosed with cancer at Seattle Children's Hospital

T-Bear brings hope to kids diagnosed with cancer at Seattle Children's Hospital

He may not be able to fly, or be as fast as the speed of light, but for children who have been diagnosed with cancer at Seattle Children's, the cuddly teddy bear who wears a mask and purple cape is still a super hero to them - he gives them strength. [More]
Wayne State receives NIH funding to address health issues of HIV-positive and at-risk youth

Wayne State receives NIH funding to address health issues of HIV-positive and at-risk youth

A team of researchers led by Wayne State University has been awarded funding as a part of the Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions, a research network devoted to the health and well-being of adolescents and young adults with HIV or at risk for HIV infection. [More]
Additional antibiotic reduces infection rates by 50% for women who have cesarean delivery

Additional antibiotic reduces infection rates by 50% for women who have cesarean delivery

Physicians at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and colleagues have discovered that administering the antibiotic azithromycin alongside the standard recommended antibiotic regimen, cefazolin, reduces infection rates by 50 percent for women who have a non-elective cesarean delivery. [More]
Researchers unravel mystery of first Zika virus-related death in the continental U.S.

Researchers unravel mystery of first Zika virus-related death in the continental U.S.

The first Zika virus-related death in the continental U.S. occurred in June of this year, but even now, months later, two aspects of this case continue to puzzle health experts. [More]
Gene therapy for LPLD patients linked to lower frequency and severity of pancreatitis

Gene therapy for LPLD patients linked to lower frequency and severity of pancreatitis

Up to 6 years after receiving a single treatment with the gene therapy product lipoprotein lipase (LPL), patients with the debilitating genetic disease LPL deficiency (LPLD) had about 50% fewer episodes of pancreatitis than before receiving the treatment. [More]
Penn researchers search twitter for tweets about cardiovascular disease

Penn researchers search twitter for tweets about cardiovascular disease

For years, marketers and other commercial data-miners have been using Twitter's vast database of "tweets" to gauge consumer attitudes and track events. Now medical researchers are getting in on the trend. [More]
Trifocal lenses: the best chance of true spectacle independence?

Trifocal lenses: the best chance of true spectacle independence?

Trifocal intraocular lenses (IOLs) represent the latest in premium lens technology. They are tiny, artificial lenses that are implanted into the eye during a cataract or lens replacement procedure. [More]
Researchers now developing digital support device to help CF sufferers monitor treatment

Researchers now developing digital support device to help CF sufferers monitor treatment

People with cystic fibrosis (CF) need help to ensure they are getting correct nutrition and the right amount of enzymes. They also need constant reminders. Researchers are now developing a digital support device to promote autonomy, but are finding that this is no easy task. [More]
Tau PET imaging in Alzheimer's disease increases opportunities for developing effective drugs

Tau PET imaging in Alzheimer's disease increases opportunities for developing effective drugs

Tau PET is a new and promising imaging method for Alzheimer's disease. A case study from Lund University in Sweden now confirms that tau PET images correspond to a higher degree to actual changes in the brain. According to the researchers behind the study, this increases opportunities for developing effective drugs. [More]
UCLA-led study shows treatment can provide benefits up to 7.3 hours after onset of stroke

UCLA-led study shows treatment can provide benefits up to 7.3 hours after onset of stroke

Time is of the essence when getting people stricken with acute ischemic strokes to treatment. And the use of stent retrievers — devices that remove the blood clot like pulling a cork out of a wine bottle — has proven to be a breakthrough for removing the life-threatening blockage of blood flow to the brain. [More]
Interruptions to rehab program after stroke or brain injury may be preventable, study reports

Interruptions to rehab program after stroke or brain injury may be preventable, study reports

Patients in inpatient rehabilitation after a stroke, brain injury, or spinal cord injury have significant rates of interruptions of their rehab program—often including being transferred back to the hospital for treatment of complications, reports a study in the American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, the official journal of the Association of Academic Physiatrists. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Researchers aim to discover new treatments for triple-negative breast cancer

Researchers aim to discover new treatments for triple-negative breast cancer

The precision medicine approach involving DNA sequencing to pinpoint specific alterations that can be targeted with anti-cancer therapies is becoming an alternate treatment avenue for those with poor-responding cancers. [More]
Experimental PET tracer can diagnose concussion-related brain degeneration in living person

Experimental PET tracer can diagnose concussion-related brain degeneration in living person

An experimental positron emission tomography (PET) tracer can effectively diagnose concussion-related brain degeneration while a person is still alive, according to a proof-of-concept study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published September 27 in the journal Translational Psychiatry. [More]
Clinical study to test efficacy of different formulations of flu vaccine in heart failure patients

Clinical study to test efficacy of different formulations of flu vaccine in heart failure patients

Heart disease patients enrolled in a clinical trial - designed to test whether a stronger dose of the influenza vaccine can prevent death or hospitalization due to a heart attack, heart failure, stroke or pneumonia - have begun receiving their first flu shots in Toronto and Boston. [More]
Radiation boost provides added benefit to DCIS patients following breast-conserving surgery and WBRT

Radiation boost provides added benefit to DCIS patients following breast-conserving surgery and WBRT

A supplemental "boost" of radiation improves local control and provides an incremental benefit in decreasing breast cancer recurrence for patients with Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) who receive whole breast radiation therapy radiation (WBRT) following lumpectomy, according to research presented today at the 58th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
Cryoablation appears to be viable option for early stage breast cancer treatment

Cryoablation appears to be viable option for early stage breast cancer treatment

A deep-freezing technique known as cryoablation is a viable alternative to traditional surgery in many early-stage breast cancers, NewYork-Presbyterian and Weill Cornell Medicine researchers find in a new clinical study. The results are published in the Annals of Surgical Oncology. [More]
Psychological support may be crucial for physical recovery of breast cancer patients

Psychological support may be crucial for physical recovery of breast cancer patients

The words no one wants to hear: "You have breast cancer." Unfortunately, close to 300,000 American women are expected to receive that diagnosis each year. [More]
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