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Hospital-initiated smoking cessation interventions may improve patient outcomes, decrease re-hospitalization

Hospital-initiated smoking cessation interventions may improve patient outcomes, decrease re-hospitalization

A new study from the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, in collaboration with the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, has established that greater adoption of hospital-initiated tobacco cessation interventions improve patient outcomes and decrease further healthcare utilization. [More]
Early diagnosis of lung cancer can increase survival rate by 73%

Early diagnosis of lung cancer can increase survival rate by 73%

The UK Lung cancer screening trial (UKLS) has been successfully completed and demonstrated that patients with a high risk of developing lung cancer can be identified with early stage disease and have up to a 73% chance of surviving for five years or more. The UKLS trial was conducted by experts in the University of Liverpool. [More]
UofL expands oncology research with addition of 33,000 human tissue samples

UofL expands oncology research with addition of 33,000 human tissue samples

The University of Louisville has expanded its oncology research strength through the addition of approximately 33,000 human tissue samples and specimens. The samples were transferred by Catholic Health Initiatives to further the shared commitment and collaboration in advancing research and action in the fight against cancer. [More]
UTHealth to launch clinical study of patients who require abdominal laparotomy

UTHealth to launch clinical study of patients who require abdominal laparotomy

Researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston plan to launch a clinical study looking at complication rates in patients who have experienced severe trauma to the abdominal area and require immediate surgery to diagnose and treat the injuries at Memorial Hermann-Texas Medical Center. [More]
Care-related infection measurements not followed up in hospitals, study finds

Care-related infection measurements not followed up in hospitals, study finds

Suffering from an infection during a hospital stay is a common care-related injury. To prevent spreading and to work preventively, all hospitals measure the occurrence of care-related infections. [More]
SR Instruments launches new SR585i Stand-on Scale for obtaining accurate weight data

SR Instruments launches new SR585i Stand-on Scale for obtaining accurate weight data

SR Instruments, a leading manufacturer of purpose-built scales for hospitals, medical facilities, and long-term care centers today announced the addition of a new stand-on scale, the SR585i, to its SR Scales product line. [More]
New Rutgers research aims at exploring gender differences in lung cancer

New Rutgers research aims at exploring gender differences in lung cancer

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in both men and women. Lung cancer diagnoses have more than doubled among females in the past 38 years, while having fallen 29 percent among males, according to the American Lung Association. [More]
Rapid hand-held troponin blood test for heart attack diagnosis launched by Philips

Rapid hand-held troponin blood test for heart attack diagnosis launched by Philips

Chest pain patients presenting at the emergency department are set to benefit from a major development by Royal Philips. The company today announced that it has CE marked its cardiac troponin I (cTnI) blood test on the Minicare I-20 handheld device. Minicare cTnI delivers its lab comparable test results in less than 10 minutes near the patient, reducing the time for the physician to decide on treatment. [More]
Breast milk may thwart diarrhea and reduce risk of ear infections in infants

Breast milk may thwart diarrhea and reduce risk of ear infections in infants

Feeding at the breast may be healthier than feeding pumped milk from a bottle for reducing the risk of ear infection, and feeding breast milk compared with formula may reduce the risk of diarrhea, according to a recent study by researchers at The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital. [More]
Neighbourhood 'walkability' may influence diabetes risk

Neighbourhood 'walkability' may influence diabetes risk

A Canadian study shows that the walkability of a person's neighbourhood influences their risk of developing diabetes. [More]
Single enzyme doing the work of a trio could offer precise way to treat diseases

Single enzyme doing the work of a trio could offer precise way to treat diseases

Researchers identified a single enzyme doing the work of a trio thought necessary to control a common cellular signaling process being pursued as a therapeutic target. [More]
Pilot program that includes video decision aids improves end-of-life care in Hawaii

Pilot program that includes video decision aids improves end-of-life care in Hawaii

A program encouraging physicians and other providers to discuss with patients their preferences regarding end-of-life care significantly increased the documented incidence of such conversations and the number of patients with late-stage disease who were discharged to hospice. [More]
New smart phone app connects patient and doctor via Facebook

New smart phone app connects patient and doctor via Facebook

Telemedicine, which allows doctors to communicate, diagnose and even treat their patients remotely is on the rise thanks to advances in information technology. It allows healthcare workers to securely monitor patients in inaccessible parts of the world as well as providing more timely responses for patients in many situations. [More]
Study explores incidence of heart failure following myocardial infarction

Study explores incidence of heart failure following myocardial infarction

One in four patients develop heart failure within four years of a first heart attack, according to a study in nearly 25 000 patients presented today at Heart Failure 2016 and the 3rd World Congress on Acute Heart Failure by Dr Johannes Gho, a cardiology resident at the University Medical Center Utrecht, in Utrecht, the Netherlands. [More]
Text messaging intervention may help smokers abstain from smoking relative to controls

Text messaging intervention may help smokers abstain from smoking relative to controls

A new study from The Miriam Hospital's Centers for Behavioral and Preventive Medicine found that smokers who received a text messaging intervention were more likely to abstain from smoking relative to controls. The paper is published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research mHealth and uHealth. [More]
Study highlights disparities in care for disadvantaged children with traumatic brain injuries

Study highlights disparities in care for disadvantaged children with traumatic brain injuries

Children who suffer traumatic brain injuries can face a difficult road to recovery, requiring services such as physical therapy and mental health treatment for months or years to get their young lives back on track. [More]
Food-triggered atopic dermatitis in children may lead to life-threatening anaphylaxis risk

Food-triggered atopic dermatitis in children may lead to life-threatening anaphylaxis risk

Elimination of the food that triggers atopic dermatitis, or eczema, is associated with increased risk of developing immediate reactions to that food, according to the results of a large-scale study recently published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. [More]
School obesity prevention program helps seventh graders lose weight over long-term period

School obesity prevention program helps seventh graders lose weight over long-term period

A five-week obesity prevention program for seventh grade students in Southern California helped obese students lose weight over a long-term period, according to a new study from the RAND Corporation, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School and the Los Angeles Unified School District. [More]
Study links low- and high-birthweight babies to increased cardiovascular disease risk

Study links low- and high-birthweight babies to increased cardiovascular disease risk

For reasons that remain unclear at least in the smaller babies, both birthweight extremes appear to increase the likelihood of early development of dangerous fat around major organs in the abdomen that significantly increases these risks, said Dr. Brian Stansfield, neonatologist at the Children's Hospital of Georgia and the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University. [More]
Rare mutation may reduce risk of developing arteriosclerosis by 34%

Rare mutation may reduce risk of developing arteriosclerosis by 34%

According to new international research, just less than one per cent of the population is naturally protected against developing chronic coronary artery diseases. [More]
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