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MRSA correlated to eczema? An interview with Dr Bjorn Herpers

MRSA correlated to eczema? An interview with Dr Bjorn Herpers

There is a lot of evidence that Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is involved in eczema. Eczema is now thought to be caused by a barrier dysfunction of the skin that allows external triggers to cause an overshoot of inflammation. [More]
Simple steps can improve survival of sepsis patients

Simple steps can improve survival of sepsis patients

Sepsis, commonly called blood poisoning, is a common affliction that can affect people of all ages. A series of simple measures tested at a Norwegian hospital can make a difference in successfully treating sepsis. [More]
Scientists generate functional tissue-engineered liver from adult stem and progenitor cells

Scientists generate functional tissue-engineered liver from adult stem and progenitor cells

A research team led by investigators at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles has generated functional human and mouse tissue-engineered liver from adult stem and progenitor cells. [More]
Research strongly links smoking to bowel condition relapses

Research strongly links smoking to bowel condition relapses

Smoking is strongly linked to relapse of a serious bowel condition, research has confirmed. [More]
MedStar Heart & Vascular Institute offers bioresorbable stent for patients with clogged arteries

MedStar Heart & Vascular Institute offers bioresorbable stent for patients with clogged arteries

A heart stent that slowly dissolves into the body is now available for patients with clogged arteries. [More]
New stem-cell model of heart tissue unravels mechanisms linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

New stem-cell model of heart tissue unravels mechanisms linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

Using advanced stem cell technology, scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have created a model of a heart condition called hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) — an excessive thickening of the heart that is associated with a number of rare and common illnesses, some of which have a strong genetic component. [More]
Investigational biomarker surpasses current gold standard test for identifying brain shunt infections

Investigational biomarker surpasses current gold standard test for identifying brain shunt infections

In a study of children with brain shunts at Children's of Alabama, a University of Alabama at Birmingham investigational biomarker outperformed the current "gold standard" test for detecting bacterial infections in the shunts. [More]
Novel technology LifeVest can help newborns breathe

Novel technology LifeVest can help newborns breathe

LifeVest, a technology being developed at St. Michael's Hospital to help newborns breathe, won the Global Healthcare Innovation Academy's international competition in Calgary. [More]
New study assesses biological impact of meditation and vacation

New study assesses biological impact of meditation and vacation

Scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, the University of California, San Francisco, and Harvard Medical School used a rigorous study design to assess the biological impact of meditation compared to vacation. [More]
Nutrition could be cost-effective treatment to improve health in malnourished older adults

Nutrition could be cost-effective treatment to improve health in malnourished older adults

As a majority of older adults have two or more chronic conditions, finding new ways to improve their health and decrease the cost of care is vital to helping them live healthier, longer lives. [More]
Respiratory viral infection triggering asthma attack in children linked to treatment failure

Respiratory viral infection triggering asthma attack in children linked to treatment failure

The results of a study conducted by Dr. Francine Ducharme, Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics and Social and Preventive Medicine at the University of Montreal, published in the medical journal The Lancet Respiratory Medicine, confirm that respiratory viral detection, not child's age, explains the high rate of hospitalization for asthma attacks in children under six. [More]
Household transmission of C. difficile to children, pets may be cause for community-related infections

Household transmission of C. difficile to children, pets may be cause for community-related infections

Household transmission of Clostridium difficile to pets and children may be a source of community-associated C. difficile infections according to findings from a new study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. [More]
New discovery could lead to effective treatment methods for cystitis

New discovery could lead to effective treatment methods for cystitis

Every year, millions of people are treated for cystitis, but despite its prevalence, the disease is still a scientific mystery. [More]
Transplantation of placenta-derived MSCs can prevent diabetes-related CLI in rats

Transplantation of placenta-derived MSCs can prevent diabetes-related CLI in rats

In an effort to determine if stem cell therapy can prevent or improve a condition called "diabetic foot" caused by poor blood flow in patients with diabetes, a team of researchers in China has found that transplanting human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into rats modeled with diabetes can affect blood vessel growth, potentially improving blood flow and preventing critical limb ischemia (CLI), a condition that results in diabetic foot and frequently leads to amputation. [More]
Study suggests autologous EPC transfusion may prevent miscarriage in high-risk pregnancies

Study suggests autologous EPC transfusion may prevent miscarriage in high-risk pregnancies

In a study focusing on the role of self-donated (autologous) bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in placental vascular development, researchers in Japan have discovered that when transplanted into pregnant mice, EPCs can contribute to better blood vessel growth that helps in forming "normalized" placental vascularization, leading, in turn, to reduced recurrent miscarriages by providing a healthier fetal environment during gestation. [More]
REVERSE II trial validates HERDOO2 rule to help spot women who can discontinue anticoagulants

REVERSE II trial validates HERDOO2 rule to help spot women who can discontinue anticoagulants

A clinical decision rule (CDR) that can be applied to women after a first, unprovoked venous thromboembolism (VTE) was able to identify those with a low-risk of recurrence who could safely discontinue anticoagulant therapy, researchers reported at ESC Congress 2016. [More]
New anticoagulant treatment safe and effective for AF patients before cardioversion

New anticoagulant treatment safe and effective for AF patients before cardioversion

Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) who need anticoagulation before undergoing electrical correction of their abnormal heartbeat (cardioversion) may benefit from treatment with edoxoban - a non-vitamin K antagonist (VKA) oral anticoagulant (NOAC), according to results of the ENSURE-AF trial. [More]
MedUni Vienna scientists aim to identify prognostic markers for cutaneous lymphomas

MedUni Vienna scientists aim to identify prognostic markers for cutaneous lymphomas

Primary cutaneous lymphomas, cancers of the lymphatic system, occur in the skin and originate either from T-lymphocytes (T-cell lymphomas, incidence 75%) or in B-cell lymphocytes (B-cell lymphomas, 25%). [More]
Drug-eluting stents more beneficial to patients undergoing saphenous vein graft angioplasty

Drug-eluting stents more beneficial to patients undergoing saphenous vein graft angioplasty

Drug-eluting stents had a clear advantage over bare metal stents in patients undergoing revascularisation of saphenous (leg) vein grafts, results of the BASKET-SAVAGE trial show. [More]
New study suggests major change in treatment of significant number of ACS patients

New study suggests major change in treatment of significant number of ACS patients

More than one quarter of heart attack patients who are normally treated with stents to re-open their blocked arteries might be able to forgo this procedure and receive anti-thrombotic medications only, according to results of a pilot study. [More]
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