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UC Davis researchers settle long-standing controversy surrounding Canavan disease

UC Davis researchers settle long-standing controversy surrounding Canavan disease

UC Davis investigators have settled a long-standing controversy surrounding the molecular basis of an inherited disorder that historically affected Ashkenazi Jews from Eastern Europe but now also arises in other populations of Semitic descent, particularly families from Saudi Arabia. [More]
Non-powder gun-related pediatric eye injuries on the rise in U.S.

Non-powder gun-related pediatric eye injuries on the rise in U.S.

Over 3000 children were treated in U.S. emergency departments in 2012 for eye injuries related to paintball guns, airsoft guns, BB guns and pellet guns, which are popular non-powder guns. [More]
UW develops new app to wirelessly test sleep apnea events using smartphone

UW develops new app to wirelessly test sleep apnea events using smartphone

Determining whether your snoring is merely annoying, or crosses the threshold into a life-threatening problem, isn't convenient or cheap. [More]
New T1D Prevention Initiative launched to identify pathways to prevent type 1 diabetes

New T1D Prevention Initiative launched to identify pathways to prevent type 1 diabetes

As the incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) rises worldwide, The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust today announced the launch of an ambitious new T1D Prevention Initiative to investigate the early stages of development of the disease and identify new pathways to prevent it. [More]
WCH researchers identify new breast cancer gene

WCH researchers identify new breast cancer gene

A new breast cancer gene has been identified in a study led by Women's College Hospital researcher Dr. Mohammad Akbari, who is also an assistant professor with the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto. [More]
Night shift workers classified as alert insomniacs have highest level of impairment in work productivity

Night shift workers classified as alert insomniacs have highest level of impairment in work productivity

A new study of night shift workers suggests that overnight occupational and cognitive impairment is more strongly correlated to insomnia than it is to sleepiness. [More]
Universal Health Services announces net income of $174.3 million for first quarter 2015

Universal Health Services announces net income of $174.3 million for first quarter 2015

Universal Health Services, Inc. announced today that its reported net income attributable to UHS was $174.3 million, or $1.73 per diluted share, during the first quarter of 2015 as compared to $138.1 million, or $1.38 per diluted share, during the comparable quarter of 2014. [More]
QPID Health included in 'Cool Vendors' for Healthcare Providers report

QPID Health included in 'Cool Vendors' for Healthcare Providers report

QPID Health, a leader in clinical reasoning software, today announced it has been included in the "Cool Vendors" for Healthcare Providers report published by Gartner, Inc on April 3, 2015. QPID's innovative solutions help hospitals and medical groups optimize their investments in the information held within electronic health records to help improve patient outcomes and increase clinical satisfaction. [More]
New report on digital and computed radiography market in Thailand, Indonesia and Malaysia

New report on digital and computed radiography market in Thailand, Indonesia and Malaysia

With recent developments in Asia-Pacific healthcare delivery as well as the growing emphasis on reduced radiation, seamless workflow and safety measures, innovations in the digital and computed radiography market in Thailand, Indonesia and Malaysia (TIM) are inevitable. [More]
Haemonetics' revenue for fourth quarter fiscal 2015 down 6%

Haemonetics' revenue for fourth quarter fiscal 2015 down 6%

Haemonetics Corporation today reported revenue for the fourth quarter fiscal 2015 of $226.5 million, down 6%. Excluding currency impact, revenue was down 4% in the quarter. The Company reported a fourth quarter GAAP net loss of $2.9 million or $0.06 per share. [More]
Shadowing helps clinicians achieve ideal patient care experiences

Shadowing helps clinicians achieve ideal patient care experiences

Patient-centered care is best achieved when the care team understands every moment of the patient and family experience in their journeys through a health care system - from parking in the hospital garage to being treated in the intensive care unit. This is the core value of a novel quality improvement program implemented at a leading U.S. medical center and presented today at the National Quality Summit, sponsored by the National Association for Healthcare Quality. [More]

ACA incentives driving healthcare transition improvements in hospitals

Regardless of one's views on the Affordable Care Act, it has succeeded in placing long-overdue attention on improving management of patient transitions from one care setting to another, according to a leading health care policy analyst speaking today at the National Quality Summit, sponsored by the National Association for Healthcare Quality. [More]
New study suggests that exercise type may be less important in fight against obesity

New study suggests that exercise type may be less important in fight against obesity

Medical experts widely recommended a combined program of diet and fitness to fight obesity. But when it comes to the type of exercise most effective a reducing weight and body mass—strength training, endurance exercise or a combination of both—opinions vary widely on which exercise regimen is best. [More]
Study explores how NYC doctor can perform tele-robotic ultrasound over the Internet on patients in Chicago

Study explores how NYC doctor can perform tele-robotic ultrasound over the Internet on patients in Chicago

A new clinical trial is testing the feasibility and efficiency of a doctor in New York City remotely performing long-distance, tele-robotic ultrasound exams over the Internet on patients in Chicago. [More]
High-skill jobs may increase survival for people with frontotemporal dementia

High-skill jobs may increase survival for people with frontotemporal dementia

Doctors, lawyers and other "high level" professionals may have a built-in survival edge if they're diagnosed with the disease frontotemporal dementia (FTD), according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Large majority of people in the world lack access to safe, affordable surgery and anaesthesia

Large majority of people in the world lack access to safe, affordable surgery and anaesthesia

Millions of people are dying from common, easily treatable conditions like appendicitis, fractures, or obstructed labour because they do not have access to, or can't afford, proper surgical care, according to a major new Commission, published in The Lancet. [More]
Study: Therapeutic hypothermia offers little neurological benefit to children with cardiac arrest

Study: Therapeutic hypothermia offers little neurological benefit to children with cardiac arrest

A new, randomized clinical study co-authored by Cohen Children's Medical Center's chair of pediatrics says there is little neurological benefit to using therapeutic hypothermia to lower a child's core temperature after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. [More]
Emergency body cooling, therapeutic hypothermia yield similar outcomes for children with cardiac arrest

Emergency body cooling, therapeutic hypothermia yield similar outcomes for children with cardiac arrest

A large-scale, multicenter study has shown that emergency body cooling does not improve survival rates or reduce brain injury in infants and children with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest more than normal temperature control. [More]
New study shows how parents may notice early signs of autism in their child

New study shows how parents may notice early signs of autism in their child

As co-director of the University of Alberta's Autism Research Centre, Lonnie Zwaigenbaum has devoted much of his career to understanding how to identify autism as early as possible. But despite his years of experience, Zwaigenbaum says many physicians like him would do well to seek other expert advice when working with children not yet diagnosed--that of the parents of these young patients. [More]
Researchers show potential of stem cell-based therapy in treating brain-metastatic breast cancer

Researchers show potential of stem cell-based therapy in treating brain-metastatic breast cancer

Investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute have developed an imageable mouse model of brain-metastatic breast cancer and shown the potential of a stem-cell-based therapy to eliminate metastatic cells from the brain and prolong survival. [More]
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