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CHOP recognized as 2014 LGBT Healthcare Equality Leader

CHOP recognized as 2014 LGBT Healthcare Equality Leader

The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia has been recognized as a 2014 LGBT Healthcare Equality Leader by the Human Rights Campaign Foundation, the educational arm of the country's largest lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) civil rights organization. [More]
Hydroxyurea therapy offers safe, effective disease management of SCA

Hydroxyurea therapy offers safe, effective disease management of SCA

Conclusive data show that hydroxyurea therapy offers safe and effective disease management of sickle cell anemia (SCA) and reduces the risk of stroke, prompting early termination by the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute of a key clinical trial studying the drug's efficacy. [More]
Endocrine Society issues Clinical Practice Guideline on rare bone condition

Endocrine Society issues Clinical Practice Guideline on rare bone condition

The Endocrine Society today issued a Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) for the diagnosis and treatment of Paget's disease of the bone, a condition where one or more bones in the body become oversized and weak. [More]
Early support and education program has positive impact on people with rheumatoid arthritis

Early support and education program has positive impact on people with rheumatoid arthritis

A study at Hospital for Special Surgery finds that a support group addressing the psychological and educational needs of people recently diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has a strong positive impact on their lives. [More]
Exposure to peanut proteins in household dust may trigger peanut allergy

Exposure to peanut proteins in household dust may trigger peanut allergy

Exposure to peanut proteins in household dust may be a trigger of peanut allergy, according to a study published today in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. [More]
New drug shows promise against treatment-resistant non-small cell lung cancer

New drug shows promise against treatment-resistant non-small cell lung cancer

A new drug that targets not only common cancer-causing genetic mutations in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but also a form of the mutation that causes resistance to treatment, has shown promising results in patients in a phase I/II clinical trial. [More]
Digoxin drug associated with higher risk of death, hospitalization among adults with atrial fibrillation

Digoxin drug associated with higher risk of death, hospitalization among adults with atrial fibrillation

Digoxin, a drug commonly used to treat heart conditions, was associated with a 71 percent higher risk of death and a 63 percent higher risk of hospitalization among adults with diagnosed atrial fibrillation and no evidence of heart failure, according to a Kaiser Permanente study that appears in the current online issue of Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology. [More]
Scientists identify four new genes associated with severe food allergy

Scientists identify four new genes associated with severe food allergy

Scientists have identified four new genes associated with the severe food allergy eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Because the genes appear to have roles in other allergic diseases and in inflammation, the findings may point toward potential new treatments for EoE. [More]
Study sheds light on how HIV medications cause significant damage to fetal hearts

Study sheds light on how HIV medications cause significant damage to fetal hearts

A study by a Wayne State University and Children's Hospital of Michigan, Detroit Medical Center research team is shedding new light on the troubling question of whether the drugs often given to HIV-positive pregnant women can cause significant long-term heart problems for the non-HIV-infected babies they carry. [More]
EDDA Technology to introduce IQQA-BodyImaging, cloud-based OnDemand service at RSNA 2014

EDDA Technology to introduce IQQA-BodyImaging, cloud-based OnDemand service at RSNA 2014

EDDA Technology, a global leading provider in advanced real-time interactive quantitative imaging solutions, announced today that the company has received FDA clearance on IQQA-BodyImaging. [More]
Study explores ethnic group differences in overweight children living in Canada

Study explores ethnic group differences in overweight children living in Canada

South Asian boys are three times as likely to be overweight compared to their peers, according to a new Women's College Hospital study. [More]
Month-long residential program helps young adults stay drug-free

Month-long residential program helps young adults stay drug-free

Residential treatment may be an appropriate first-line option for young adults who are dependent on opioid drugs - including prescription painkillers and heroin - and may result in higher levels of abstinence than does the outpatient treatment that is currently the standard of care. [More]
New app directly connects single ventricle heart defect patients to doctors

New app directly connects single ventricle heart defect patients to doctors

A powerful new app is directly connecting single ventricle heart defect patients to their doctors, dramatically improving their monitoring while they recover from heart surgery at home. Girish Shirali, MBBS, FACC, FASE, Co-Director of the Ward Family Heart Center at Children's Mercy Kansas City, will report today on how the technology is changing patient care at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2014. [More]

High-quality U.S. hospitals also provide low-cost care for children undergoing heart surgery

U.S. children's hospitals delivering the highest-quality care for children undergoing heart surgery, also appear to provide care most efficiently at a low cost, according to research led by the University of Michigan and presented Tuesday at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions in Chicago. [More]
MD Anderson study sheds light on little-known protein complex

MD Anderson study sheds light on little-known protein complex

A study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center led by Mong-Hong Lee, Ph.D., a professor of molecular and cellular oncology, has demonstrated the significance of CSN6 in regulating Myc which may very well open up a new pathway for treating and killing tumors. [More]
MGH investigators develop system to accurately track the process of falling asleep

MGH investigators develop system to accurately track the process of falling asleep

Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have developed a system to accurately track the dynamic process of falling asleep, something has not been possible with existing techniques. In their report in the October issue of the open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology, the research team describes how combining key physiologic measurements with a behavioral task that does not interfere with sleep onset gives a better picture of the gradual process of falling asleep. [More]
New treatment for Marfan syndrome works as well as beta blockers

New treatment for Marfan syndrome works as well as beta blockers

A new treatment for Marfan syndrome, a rare genetic disease that can lead to heart problems, works as well as the currently recommended medical therapy, beta blockers, according to an article in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Obese people experience silent cardiac damage that fuels risk for heart failure

Obese people experience silent cardiac damage that fuels risk for heart failure

Using an ultrasensitive blood test to detect the presence of a protein that heralds heart muscle injury, researchers from Johns Hopkins and elsewhere have found that obese people without overt heart disease experience silent cardiac damage that fuels their risk for heart failure down the road. [More]
Self-acupressure may be effective for treating constipation

Self-acupressure may be effective for treating constipation

About 19 percent of North Americans suffer from constipation, with the digestive condition being more common among women, non-whites, people older than 60, those who are not physically active and the poor. [More]
Training medical students on handheld ultrasound device can enhance their physical diagnosis

Training medical students on handheld ultrasound device can enhance their physical diagnosis

A new study by researchers from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai found that training medical students to use a handheld ultrasound device can enhance the accuracy of their physical diagnosis. [More]