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Study finds strong link between diabetes and TB in tropical Australia

Study finds strong link between diabetes and TB in tropical Australia

A 20-year study by James Cook University scientists has found a strong link between diabetes and tuberculosis in tropical Australia. [More]
Hand washing tips to protect against many infections

Hand washing tips to protect against many infections

As the beginning of the school year approaches, parents need to remind their children about the importance of hand washing. Every day people touch several surfaces including books, desks, door knobs, sink handles, and other people and many of them harbor germs like bacteria and viruses that can cause illnesses. [More]
Researchers question benefits of deworming intervention in school-age children

Researchers question benefits of deworming intervention in school-age children

Deworming children may not improve school attendance and the evidence that informs international policy needs to be re-appraised following a major re-analysis by researchers at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. [More]
Study shows glitazone antidiabetic drug may reduce risk of Parkinson’s disease

Study shows glitazone antidiabetic drug may reduce risk of Parkinson’s disease

A type of drug used to treat diabetes may reduce the risk of developing Parkinson’s disease, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine. [More]
Human activity has jeopardised future human health, say experts

Human activity has jeopardised future human health, say experts

A new report calling for immediate worldwide action to protect the natural systems that support human health has been released by The Rockefeller Foundation-Lancet Commission on Planetary Health. [More]
NHFD initiative significantly improves care, survival of older people with hip fracture in England

NHFD initiative significantly improves care, survival of older people with hip fracture in England

Substantial improvements in the care and survival of older people with hip fracture in England have followed the introduction of a collaborative national initiative to tackle the issue, according to a new study published in the Medical Care journal. [More]
Oxford University performs second phase of experimental Ebola vaccine trial

Oxford University performs second phase of experimental Ebola vaccine trial

Oxford University doctors and scientists are performing the second phase of clinical studies of an experimental Ebola vaccine regimen. The study is part of the EBOVAC2 project, a collaborative programme involving the University of Oxford, French Institute of Health and Medical Research as project coordinator, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Le Centre Muraz, Inserm Transfert and the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson. [More]
Johns Hopkins endocrinologists propose new protocol for inpatient glucose management

Johns Hopkins endocrinologists propose new protocol for inpatient glucose management

Borrowing a page from a winning team’s playbook, Johns Hopkins endocrinologist Nestoras Mathioudakis, M.D., and his colleagues are taking on the topic of managing hospital patients’ diabetes. [More]
Microbiota blocks the immune cells responsible for triggering allergies

Microbiota blocks the immune cells responsible for triggering allergies

The human body is inhabited by billions of symbiotic bacteria, carrying a diversity that is unique to each individual. The microbiota is involved in many mechanisms, including digestion, vitamin synthesis and host defense. [More]
Trial results show routine oral cholera vaccination programme protects people living in endemic regions

Trial results show routine oral cholera vaccination programme protects people living in endemic regions

An oral cholera vaccine given as part of routine health services is safe and protects against severe cholera in children and adults in urban Bangladesh where the disease is endemic, according to the first real-life trial of this vaccine published in The Lancet. [More]
Discovery could pave way to new treatments for malaria

Discovery could pave way to new treatments for malaria

Scientists have discovered new ways in which the malaria parasite survives in the blood stream of its victims, a discovery that could pave the way to new treatments for the disease. [More]
Vitamin B12 supplements offer no benefits for neurological or cognitive function in older people

Vitamin B12 supplements offer no benefits for neurological or cognitive function in older people

Vitamin B12 supplements offer no benefits for neurological or cognitive function in older people with moderate vitamin B12 deficiency, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. [More]
Extreme heat and precipitation events linked to increased risk of Salmonella infections

Extreme heat and precipitation events linked to increased risk of Salmonella infections

Extreme heat and precipitation events, which are expected to increase in frequency and intensity due to climate change, are associated with increased risk of Salmonella infections, according to a study led by researchers from the University of Maryland School of Public Health. [More]
Mandatory targets to reduce salt in processed foods could substantially cut cardiac deaths

Mandatory targets to reduce salt in processed foods could substantially cut cardiac deaths

Mandatory targets to reduce salt in processed food would help tackle inequalities in coronary heart disease that lead to excess deaths in deprived areas of England, according to research by the University of Liverpool. [More]
WHO/UNICEF: Lack of progress on water and sanitation threatens to undermine child survival, health benefits

WHO/UNICEF: Lack of progress on water and sanitation threatens to undermine child survival, health benefits

Lack of progress on sanitation threatens to undermine the child survival and health benefits from gains in access to safe drinking water, warn WHO and UNICEF in a report tracking access to drinking water and sanitation against the Millennium Development Goals. [More]
Patient-reported feedback on health system performance

Patient-reported feedback on health system performance

Patients care about how well pain, nausea, or treatment side effects are managed when evaluating the quality of the medical care they receive, but information about these experiences is not generally collected. To incorporate the values that patients care most about into formal assessments of provider and health system performance, a UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researcher led an expert panel to create a playbook on how to best develop, analyze and use patient-focused measures. [More]
New handbook explores issues associated with medical tourism

New handbook explores issues associated with medical tourism

Patients who travel abroad for medical treatment risk returning with complications or infections that require costly treatment on the NHS and is one of the issues highlighted in a new handbook exploring medical tourism. [More]
NYU physician suggests changes for a healthier home

NYU physician suggests changes for a healthier home

(Family Features) Dirt. Grime. Bacteria. Airborne allergens. As hard as you try to keep your home clean, these types of yucky things are an everyday reality. Taking the necessary steps to create a healthy home can not only give you peace of mind, but also help keep your family healthier. [More]
Hill-Rom Hand Hygiene Compliance Solution increases hand washing among hospital staff

Hill-Rom Hand Hygiene Compliance Solution increases hand washing among hospital staff

New data from Hill-Rom shows its hand-hygiene compliance system dramatically increases hand washing among hospital staff using the system. Analysis of more than 20 million instances of hand washing shows institutions using Hill-Rom's Hand Hygiene Compliance Solution have achieved an average 226% improvement in compliance, with some institutions showing compliance by caregivers nearly tripled. [More]
IPs spend more time in collecting and reporting hospital infection data than protecting patients

IPs spend more time in collecting and reporting hospital infection data than protecting patients

Collecting and reporting hospital infection data to federal health agencies takes more than 5 hours each day, at the expense of time needed to ensure that frontline healthcare personnel are adhering to basic infection prevention practices such as hand hygiene, according to a recent case study, to be presented on Saturday, June 27 at the 42nd Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. [More]
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