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New TB-Profiler tool to find appropriate drugs for TB patients may improve likelihood of cure

New TB-Profiler tool to find appropriate drugs for TB patients may improve likelihood of cure

Finding out what drugs can be used to treat a patient with tuberculosis (TB) can be sped up by days or weeks, thanks to a new free online tool. The new TB-Profiler tool, developed by a team of scientists led by Dr Taane Clark at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, analyses and interprets genome sequence data to predict resistance to 11 drugs used for the treatment of TB. [More]
Study finds Peek eye testing app as accurate as traditional charts

Study finds Peek eye testing app as accurate as traditional charts

An app to test eyesight easily and affordably using a smartphone is as accurate as traditional charts, according to a study published today. [More]
Healthcare workers serve as vector for MRSA transmission in nursing home settings

Healthcare workers serve as vector for MRSA transmission in nursing home settings

Healthcare workers frequently contaminate their gloves and gowns during every day care of nursing homes residents with drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus or MRSA, according to a new study. The findings were published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. [More]
Phages in chicken meat can transfer antimicrobial resistance to bacteria

Phages in chicken meat can transfer antimicrobial resistance to bacteria

Bacteria resistant to antibiotics are on the rise. There are different explanations for how resistances are transferred. Researchers from the Vetmeduni Vienna found phages in chicken meat that are able to transfer antimicrobial resistance to bacteria. Phages are viruses that exclusively infect bacteria. They can contribute to the spread of antimicrobial resistance. [More]
Bronchitis can cause pneumonia, says Loyola physician

Bronchitis can cause pneumonia, says Loyola physician

When a cold has lasted too long or a cough is especially bothersome, it's important to see a medical professional. [More]
New study finds link between father's age at birth and child's risk of blood cancer as an adult

New study finds link between father's age at birth and child's risk of blood cancer as an adult

A new study links a father's age at birth to the risk that his child will develop blood and immune system cancers as an adult, particularly for only children. The study, which appears in the American Journal of Epidemiology, found no association between having an older mother and these cancers. [More]
New research could help predict outbreaks of West Nile virus disease in the U.S.

New research could help predict outbreaks of West Nile virus disease in the U.S.

New research has identified correlations between weather conditions and the occurrence of West Nile virus disease in the United States, raising the possibility of being able to better predict outbreaks. [More]
WHO committed to helping Nepal deliver health care to its citizens, says WHO South-East Asia Regional Director

WHO committed to helping Nepal deliver health care to its citizens, says WHO South-East Asia Regional Director

The World Health Organization is committed to supporting Nepal’s health system to deliver life-saving and essential services to its people and build back resilient health facilities that will be safe in emergencies... [More]
New app may help parents save lives of premature babies

New app may help parents save lives of premature babies

A new app launched by The University of Nottingham is offering parents of newborn infants the chance to play a crucial role in research that could save the lives of premature babies in the developing world. [More]
Intervention to connect low-income uninsured patients to primary care could improve health, reduce costs

Intervention to connect low-income uninsured patients to primary care could improve health, reduce costs

An intervention to connect low-income uninsured and Medicaid patients to a reliable source of primary health care shows promise for reducing avoidable use of hospital emergency departments in Maryland. A University of Maryland School of Public Health study evaluating the results of the intervention was published this week in the May issue of the journal Health Affairs. [More]
Locally procured drugs can be as effective as IQA drugs for treating MDR-TB in Pakistan

Locally procured drugs can be as effective as IQA drugs for treating MDR-TB in Pakistan

Locally-sourced antibiotics can be as effective as 'internationally quality-assured' (IQA) antibiotics for treating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in Pakistan, and may help avoid delays in starting treatment while programmes wait for drugs to arrive from overseas, according to new research published in PLOS ONE. [More]

Michigan researchers explore ways to provide safe drinking water to most remote locations

It is estimated that one in nine people globally lack access to safe water. Michigan State University researchers are looking to fill that critical need and provide safe drinking water to the most remote locations in the world with a new foam water filter that significantly reduces dangerous pathogens in drinking water. [More]
UNICEF working to bring relief for children affected by earthquake in Nepal

UNICEF working to bring relief for children affected by earthquake in Nepal

UNICEF expects children to be among the worst affected by the devastating 7.9 earthquake that struck Nepal today, affecting the area around the capital city of Kathmandu. While the full impact of the disaster is still being assessed, an estimated 40 percent of Nepal's population is children, who are the most vulnerable during emergencies. [More]
Findings suggest development of 'post-infection' vaccine to reduce TB rates in China

Findings suggest development of 'post-infection' vaccine to reduce TB rates in China

A major contributor to the number of tuberculosis infections and cases in China will likely be the elderly over the next few decades, requiring a refocus in efforts to control a disease affecting millions of people in the country, according to preliminary new research presented today at the Fourth Global Forum on TB Vaccines in Shanghai. [More]
Survivors of Ebola epidemic donate plasma to tackle disease outbreaks in West Africa

Survivors of Ebola epidemic donate plasma to tackle disease outbreaks in West Africa

The first donations of plasma, from survivors of the Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone, have been received by an international research team working to help tackle current and future disease outbreaks in West Africa. [More]
Study finds increasing size of elderly population as major contributor to TB infection in China

Study finds increasing size of elderly population as major contributor to TB infection in China

A major contributor to the number of tuberculosis infections and cases in China will likely be the elderly over the next few decades, requiring a refocus in efforts to control a disease affecting millions of people in the country, according to preliminary new research presented today at the Fourth Global Forum on TB Vaccines in Shanghai. [More]

Failure to meet children's basic needs linked to later aggression and delinquency

A new study by two researchers in the University at Buffalo School of Social Work has shown that parents who chronically neglect their children contribute to the likelihood that they will develop aggressive and delinquent tendencies later in adolescence, and the one factor that links neglect with those behaviors appears to be poor social skills. [More]

Kimberly-Clark's net sales decrease 4% to $4.7 billion in first quarter 2015

Kimberly-Clark Corporation today reported first quarter 2015 results and confirmed its previous guidance for full-year 2015 adjusted earnings per share. [More]
Lab-on-paper technique could help detect low quality antimalarial drugs

Lab-on-paper technique could help detect low quality antimalarial drugs

Access to high-quality medicine is a basic human right, but over four billion people live in countries where many medications are substandard or fake. Marya Lieberman of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Notre Dame and Abigail Weaver a postdoctoral associate in the University's Department of Civil Engineering and Environmental and Earth Sciences took up the challenge of how people in developing countries could detect low quality antimalarial drugs without expensive equipment and without handling dangerous chemicals. [More]
UC San Diego study examines counterfeit drug penetration in global medicine supply chains

UC San Diego study examines counterfeit drug penetration in global medicine supply chains

When you take a medication for, say, high cholesterol, do you know that pill is really what the label says it is? Depending upon the type of medicine and where you live, the threat of falsified medications (also referred to as counterfeit, fraudulent, and substandard) can be quite real, yet the full scope and prevalence of the problem is poorly understood, say researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine in a new report published April 20 in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. [More]
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