Hyperactivity News and Research RSS Feed - Hyperactivity News and Research

Neurotherapeutic video game may help improve cognitive abilities in children with genetic disorders

Neurotherapeutic video game may help improve cognitive abilities in children with genetic disorders

A UC Davis researcher has created a video game for children who experience cognitive impairments from genetic disorders with the hope that that it will improve their ability to mentally process information about space and time. [More]
Diabetic mothers three times more likely to have anti-fetal brain autoantibodies

Diabetic mothers three times more likely to have anti-fetal brain autoantibodies

Mothers of children with autism and were diagnosed with metabolic conditions during pregnancy, particularly gestational and type 2 diabetes, were more likely to have anti-fetal brain autoantibodies in their blood compared to healthy women of children with autism. [More]
Exercise can help improve ADHD symptoms in adults

Exercise can help improve ADHD symptoms in adults

Exercise, even a small amount, can help alleviate symptoms of ADHD in adults, according to a new study by University of Georgia researchers. [More]
Shire introduces third annual Excellence in ADHD Patient Group Awards

Shire introduces third annual Excellence in ADHD Patient Group Awards

Shire plc today launches the third annual Excellence in ADHD Patient Group Awards celebrating outstanding work by patient advocacy organisations around the world that aim to improve the lives of people with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). [More]
U-M study compares early-use and longer-duration stimulant medication with nonstimulant therapy for ADHD

U-M study compares early-use and longer-duration stimulant medication with nonstimulant therapy for ADHD

Youth who take Ritalin, Adderall or other stimulant medications for ADHD over an extended period of time early in life are no more at risk for substance abuse in later adolescence than teens without ADHD, according to a University of Michigan study. [More]
Children in foster care still face quality challenges in antipsychotic medication use

Children in foster care still face quality challenges in antipsychotic medication use

Significant quality challenges persist in antipsychotic medication use for children in foster care and other Medicaid-insured children, according to a new Rutgers University-New Brunswick study published in Health Affairs. [More]
Maternal immune dysfunction linked to risk of autism with intellectual disability in children

Maternal immune dysfunction linked to risk of autism with intellectual disability in children

Pregnant women with higher levels of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, proteins that control communication between cells of the immune system, may be at significantly greater risk of having a child with autism combined with intellectual disability, researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute have found. [More]
Children with ADHD experience difficulties in adapting behaviour to given situations

Children with ADHD experience difficulties in adapting behaviour to given situations

Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) often display behaviours that are inappropriate for the situation in which they are in. They might move around in the classroom during a lesson, or talk non-stop and interrupt others' conversations. [More]
Majority youths with autism or intellectual disability receive antipsychotics, study finds

Majority youths with autism or intellectual disability receive antipsychotics, study finds

About one in ten youths treated with an antipsychotic are diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder or intellectual disability. Conversely, one in six youths diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder has been prescribed antipsychotics. [More]
Early exposure to nicotine can affect formation of connections between brain cells long after birth

Early exposure to nicotine can affect formation of connections between brain cells long after birth

Early exposure to nicotine can trigger widespread genetic changes that affect formation of connections between brain cells long after birth, a new Yale-led study has found. The finding helps explains why maternal smoking has been linked to behavioral changes such as attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder, addiction and conduct disorder. [More]
Study assesses trends in antidepressant prescribing for depression

Study assesses trends in antidepressant prescribing for depression

In a study appearing in the May 24/31 issue of JAMA, Jenna Wong, M.Sc., of McGill University, Montreal, Canada, and colleagues analyzed treatment indications for antidepressants and assessed trends in antidepressant prescribing for depression. [More]
Neos announces U.S. launch of Adzenys XR-ODT for ADHD

Neos announces U.S. launch of Adzenys XR-ODT for ADHD

Neos Therapeutics, Inc., a pharmaceutical company with a late‐stage pipeline of innovative extended-release (XR) product candidates for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), today announced that Adzenys XR-ODT™ is in distribution channels and is now available to prescribe for patients with ADHD in the United States. [More]
University of Derby introduces new MOOC to provide better knowledge on autism, Asperger’s and ADHD

University of Derby introduces new MOOC to provide better knowledge on autism, Asperger’s and ADHD

A new Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) to educate anyone interested in learning more about autism, Asperger’s and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) has been launched by the University of Derby. [More]
Researchers agree to test new stem cell gene therapy for Sanfilippo disease in human trial

Researchers agree to test new stem cell gene therapy for Sanfilippo disease in human trial

Scientists in Manchester, who have developed a stem cell gene therapy to reverse a fatal childhood illness, have agreed to work with a new therapeutics company to test it in a human trial. [More]
Neuroimaging studies offer new insights into cognitive vulnerability to depression

Neuroimaging studies offer new insights into cognitive vulnerability to depression

Neuroimaging studies of interconnected brain networks may provide the "missing links" between behavioral and biological models of cognitive vulnerability to depression, according to a research review in the Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Children with ADHD sleep more poorly than normal kids

Children with ADHD sleep more poorly than normal kids

A new study from Aarhus University has now documented that there is some truth to the claim by parents of children with ADHD that their children have more difficulty falling asleep and that they sleep more poorly than other children. [More]
Exposure to SSRI during gestation increases chances of adolescent offspring depression

Exposure to SSRI during gestation increases chances of adolescent offspring depression

A study to be published in the May 2016 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP) reports that use of certain antidepressants during pregnancy can result in offspring depression by early adolescence. [More]
Study reveals new function for CACNA1C gene in psychiatric diseases

Study reveals new function for CACNA1C gene in psychiatric diseases

A new study shows the death of newborn brain cells may be linked to a genetic risk factor for five major psychiatric diseases, and at the same time shows a compound currently being developed for use in humans may have therapeutic value for these diseases by preventing the cells from dying. [More]
ADHD highly prevalent among children with vision problems

ADHD highly prevalent among children with vision problems

Children with vision problems not correctable with glasses or contact lenses may be twice as likely to have a diagnosis of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), suggests a study in the May issue of Optometry and Vision Science, official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Single season of contact sports can cause measurable brain changes

Single season of contact sports can cause measurable brain changes

Repeated impacts to the heads of high school football players cause measurable changes in their brains, even when no concussion occurs, according to research from UT Southwestern Medical Center's Peter O'Donnell Jr. Brain Institute and Wake Forest University School of Medicine. [More]
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