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Hypoxia is a condition in which there is a decrease in the oxygen supply to a tissue. In cancer treatment, the level of hypoxia in a tumor may help predict the response of the tumor to the treatment.
Eisai's Halaven receives FDA approval for treatment of patients with metastatic liposarcoma

Eisai's Halaven receives FDA approval for treatment of patients with metastatic liposarcoma

Eisai Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Halaven (eribulin mesylate) Injection (0.5 mg per mL) for the treatment of patients with unresectable or metastatic liposarcoma who have received a prior anthracycline-containing regimen. [More]
New blood biomarkers could lead to better evaluation of treatment for patients with PAH

New blood biomarkers could lead to better evaluation of treatment for patients with PAH

New blood biomarkers reflecting vasoreactivity in lung blood vessels of patients with heart- and lung disease, can lead to simplified diagnostics and better evaluation of treatment for patients with the condition pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). [More]
Low-oxygen exposure shortly after birth may increase learning and behavioral disorder risks

Low-oxygen exposure shortly after birth may increase learning and behavioral disorder risks

New research published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, shows that the development of white matter in the mouse brains is delayed when they are exposed to chronic low oxygen levels shortly after birth. [More]
Study reveals pathogenetic role of miR-125a in pulmonary hypertension

Study reveals pathogenetic role of miR-125a in pulmonary hypertension

Pulmonary hypertension is an umbrella term used for many conditions that all result in elevation of the pulmonary arterial pressure. Of interest, many of these completely different clinical and pathophysiological entities result in a final common pathway of vasoconstriction, micro thrombosis and vascular remodelling. [More]
New technique may enable in-flight detection of hypoxia in pilots

New technique may enable in-flight detection of hypoxia in pilots

Researchers working in the United States have demonstrated a technique that may enable real-time, in-flight detection of hypoxia in pilots. [More]
Sleep apnea may increase gout risk

Sleep apnea may increase gout risk

Sleep apnea may increase the risk of developing gout, a new study shows. Among 9865 patients with newly-diagnosed sleep apnea and 43,598 comparators of similar weight, investigators identified 270 new cases of gout over one year of follow-up, resulting in incidence rates of 8.4/1000 and 4.8/1000 person-years, respectively. The increased risk of gout was 60% higher among patients with sleep apnea. [More]
Diabetic retinopathy therapy innovations: an interview with Richard Kirk, CEO of Polyphotonix

Diabetic retinopathy therapy innovations: an interview with Richard Kirk, CEO of Polyphotonix

In the UK there are currently over 3.5 million people who have diabetes, with a growth rate exceeding 280,000 people per year. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common complication of diabetes. [More]
Genetic polymorphisms may serve as prognostic markers for lung cancer

Genetic polymorphisms may serve as prognostic markers for lung cancer

Genetic polymorphisms associated with cancer progression lead to variations in gene expression and may serve as prognostic markers for lung cancer. Researchers at the Hiroshima University and Saitama Medical University found that in patients with lung cancer, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) may regulate gene and protein expression and be associated with poor prognosis. [More]
Researchers discover new way to stop cancer cells from spreading

Researchers discover new way to stop cancer cells from spreading

Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute and the University of Copenhagen have discovered a new way to potentially 'fence in' a tumour and help stop cancer cells spreading, according to a Cancer Research UK funded study published in EMBO Reports today, (Thursday). [More]
Terminally ill patients with certain subtypes of delirium show higher probability of imminent death

Terminally ill patients with certain subtypes of delirium show higher probability of imminent death

In cancer patients nearing the end of life, certain subtypes of delirium—specifically, hypoactive and "mixed" delirium—are a strong indicator that death will come soon, reports a study in Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society. [More]
Specific biomarker predicts which HER2-negative breast cancer patients respond to targeted therapy

Specific biomarker predicts which HER2-negative breast cancer patients respond to targeted therapy

A multicenter team led by Case Western Reserve has demonstrated that brief exposure to a targeted therapy can tell doctors which HER2-negative patients will respond — and which should switch to another kind of treatment. [More]
Egalet announces launch of OXAYDO (oxycodone HCI, USP) Tablets and IMPACT-Rx initiative

Egalet announces launch of OXAYDO (oxycodone HCI, USP) Tablets and IMPACT-Rx initiative

Egalet Corporation, a fully integrated specialty pharmaceutical company focused on discovering, developing and commercializing innovative pain treatments, today announced the launch of OXAYDO (oxycodone HCI, USP) tablets -CII in the United States. [More]
Weather and pollution affect outcomes after heart attack

Weather and pollution affect outcomes after heart attack

Pollution and weather influence outcomes after a heart attack, according to research presented at ESC Congress today by Ms Aneta Cislak, research fellow in the Silesian Centre for Heart Diseases, Medical University of Silesia in Zabrze, Poland. [More]
Nitroglycerin can be repurposed to treat cancer, researchers find

Nitroglycerin can be repurposed to treat cancer, researchers find

For over a century, nitroglycerin has been used medically - particularly in the treatment of angina, or chest pain. It is a safe, cheap and effective treatment. Now, according to the latest study in ecancermedicalscience, researchers find that nitroglycerin is the latest in a series of medicines that could be repurposed to treat cancer. [More]
Transplanting multi-layered sheet of liver cells into damaged liver improves function in test animals

Transplanting multi-layered sheet of liver cells into damaged liver improves function in test animals

Liver transplantation is currently the only established treatment for patients with end stage liver failure. However, this treatment is limited by the shortage of donors and the conditional integrity and suitability of the available organs. Transplanting donor hepatocytes (liver cells) into the liver as an alternative to liver transplantation also has drawbacks as the rate of survival of primary hepatocytes is limited and often severe complications can result from the transplantation procedure. [More]
Novel treatment target found for RV failure in PAH

Novel treatment target found for RV failure in PAH

Researchers have identified a molecular pathway by which downregulation of microRNA-126 contributes to right ventricular failure in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. [More]
Scientists use highly specialized X-ray crystallography technique to solve protein structure of HIFs

Scientists use highly specialized X-ray crystallography technique to solve protein structure of HIFs

In a collaborative study between Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute and the Argonne National Laboratory, scientists have used a highly specialized X-ray crystallography technique to solve the protein structure of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), important regulators of a tumor's response to low oxygen (hyopoxia). [More]
Implanted biochemical sensor could allow doctors to better monitor, adjust cancer treatments

Implanted biochemical sensor could allow doctors to better monitor, adjust cancer treatments

In the battle against cancer, which kills nearly 8 million people worldwide each year, doctors have in their arsenal many powerful weapons, including various forms of chemotherapy and radiation. What they lack, however, is good reconnaissance — a reliable way to obtain real-time data about how well a particular therapy is working for any given patient. [More]
Study provides mechanism for EDNRB gene's role in adaptation to life at high altitudes

Study provides mechanism for EDNRB gene's role in adaptation to life at high altitudes

Ethiopians have lived at high altitudes for thousands of years, providing a natural experiment for studying human adaptations to low oxygen, a condition known as hypoxia. One factor that may enable Ethiopians to tolerate high altitudes and hypoxia is the endothelin receptor type B (EDNRB) gene. [More]
Recipients of GSA poster awards announced at 20th International C. elegans Meeting

Recipients of GSA poster awards announced at 20th International C. elegans Meeting

The Genetics Society of America and the C. elegans research community are pleased to announce the recipients of the GSA poster awards at the 20th International C. elegans Meeting, which took place at the University of California, Los Angeles, June 24-28, 2015. [More]
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