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Hypoxia is a condition in which there is a decrease in the oxygen supply to a tissue. In cancer treatment, the level of hypoxia in a tumor may help predict the response of the tumor to the treatment.
John Hopkins researchers create novel optical imaging equipment for use on SARRP research platform

John Hopkins researchers create novel optical imaging equipment for use on SARRP research platform

Researchers from John Hopkins University have created an innovative piece of optical imaging equipment for use on-board the Xstrahl Small Animal Radiation Research Platform. [More]

Akebia completes enrollment in ongoing 200-patient Phase 2b study of AKB-6548

Akebia Therapeutics, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of novel proprietary therapeutics based on hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) biology and the commercialization of these products for patients with kidney disease, today announced it has completed enrollment in its ongoing 200-patient Phase 2b study of AKB-6548 for the treatment of anemia associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in patients who are not dependent on dialysis. [More]
Researchers receive NIH grant for pediatric acute myelogenous leukemia treatment

Researchers receive NIH grant for pediatric acute myelogenous leukemia treatment

​A $1.92 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) was awarded to a research team that focuses on new approaches for treatment of relapsed pediatric acute myelogenous leukemia (rAML), led by Yang Liu, PhD, Bothworth Chair and Director of the Center for Cancer and Immunology Research (CCIR) at Children's Research Institute of Children's National Health System, and Reuven Schore, MD, member of CCIR and attending physician in the Leukemia & Lymphoma Program of the Division of Oncology of the Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders. [More]

Study: Ginsenoside Rb1 attenuates neuronal damage following cerebral ischemia

Activated microglia-mediated inflammation promotes neuronal damage under cerebral hypoxic-ischemic conditions, so it is likely that inhibiting hypoxia-induced activation of microglia will alleviate neuronal damage. [More]

CardioCell receives IND approval for Phase IIa clinical study of itMSC therapy to treat heart failure

CardioCell LLC has just received the FDA's investigational new drug (IND) approval for a United States-based, Phase IIa clinical study using its allogeneic stem-cell therapy to treat subjects with chronic heart failure (CHF), which generates more than 1 million hospitalizations annually. [More]
Misplaced protein provides promising drug target for kidney cancer

Misplaced protein provides promising drug target for kidney cancer

The shortage of oxygen, or hypoxia, created when rapidly multiplying kidney cancer cells outgrow their local blood supply can accelerate tumor growth by causing a nuclear protein called SPOP-which normally suppresses tumor growth-to move out of the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it has the opposite effect, promoting rapid proliferation. [More]
Proteins that regulate energy metabolism are essential for stem cell formation

Proteins that regulate energy metabolism are essential for stem cell formation

Proteins that regulate energy metabolism are essential for stem cell formation, University of Washington researchers find. [More]

Low levels of oxygen, nitric oxide appear to have unfortunate synergy for patients with sickle cell disease

Low levels of both oxygen and the powerful blood vessel dilator nitric oxide appear to have an unfortunate synergy for patients with sickle cell disease, researchers report. [More]

Cytoplasmic HIF-2α linked to poor prognosis in renal cell carcinoma

Cytoplasmic expression of hypoxia inducible factor-2α is associated with poor prognosis in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma, study findings indicate. [More]
Scientists uncover how inflammation and lack of oxygen cause brain damage

Scientists uncover how inflammation and lack of oxygen cause brain damage

Scientists have uncovered how inflammation and lack of oxygen conspire to cause brain damage in conditions such as stroke and Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Research: Beneficial and toxic roles of brain glycogen

Research: Beneficial and toxic roles of brain glycogen

In 2007, in an article published in Nature Neuroscience, scientists at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) headed by Joan Guinovart, an authority on glycogen metabolism, reported that in Lafora Disease (LD), a rare and fatal neurodegenerative condition that affects adolescents, neurons die as a result of the accumulation of glycogen-chains of glucose. [More]

Research explains how cells behave when placed in low oxygen environment

Research at the University of Liverpool has explained how cells behave when placed in a low oxygen environment, a development that could have implications for cancer patients and other serious illnesses. [More]

CardioCell announces new clinical trials using allogeneic stem-cell therapy to treat subjects with AMI

CardioCell LLC announces two new clinical trials using its allogeneic stem-cell therapy to treat subjects with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), a problem facing more than 1.26 million Americans annually. [More]
Aerpio Therapeutics doses first patient in AKB-9778 Phase 2 trial for diabetic macular edema treatment

Aerpio Therapeutics doses first patient in AKB-9778 Phase 2 trial for diabetic macular edema treatment

Aerpio Therapeutics, Inc., a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on advancing innovative therapies for vascular diseases, today announced that it has dosed the first patient in a Phase 2 trial evaluating AKB-9778, a Tie2 activator, alone and in combination with ranibizumab (Lucentis) for the treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME). AKB-9778 is a first-in-class inhibitor of human protein tyrosine phosphatase beta (HPTPβ) that activates the Tie2 pathway to promote vascular stability, preventing abnormal blood vessel growth and vascular leak. [More]

Professor wins Wiley Prize for discovering how cells sense, respond to low oxygen conditions

The 13th annual Wiley Prize in Biomedical Sciences was awarded to Gregg Semenza, M.D., Ph.D., for his contribution to discovering how cells sense and respond to low oxygen conditions. [More]
Study shows melatonin hormone may inhibit tumor growth and cell production

Study shows melatonin hormone may inhibit tumor growth and cell production

An early stage study shows melatonin - a hormone that regulates the body's sleep and awake cycles - may have the potential to help slow the growth of certain breast cancer tumors, according to researchers from Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit and Foundation for Research Support of the State of S-o Paulo. [More]

Blood methylome offers clues to schizophrenia

Researchers show that a methylome-wide association study of the blood can provide a glimpse of past environmental insults that may contribute to the development of schizophrenia. [More]
Study questions widely used method of diagnosing acute mountain sickness

Study questions widely used method of diagnosing acute mountain sickness

A study led by University of British Columbia scientists calls into question a widely used method of diagnosing acute mountain sickness. [More]

Research opens door to new direction of PAH treatment

The development of new, more effective vasodilators to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension has been hampered because of their systemic toxicity and adverse side effects. An international team of investigators seeking to surmount these problems and increase drug efficacy have determined that a vascular homing peptide can selectively target hypertensive pulmonary arteries to boost the pulmonary but not systemic effects of vasodilators. Importantly for potential clinical use, this peptide retains its activity when given sublingually. The results using a rat model of PAH are published in the American Journal of Pathology. [More]

Researchers explore treatment targets for hypobaric hypoxia brain injury

Hypobaric hypoxia can cause severe brain damage and mitochondrial dysfunction, and is involved in hypoxic brain injury. Dr. Jianyu Li and colleagues from Logistics College of Chinese People's Armed Police Forces evaluated the degree of brain damage with different exposure times to hypoxia and further investigate the differential expression of cerebral mitochondrial proteins by comparative proteomic analysis, in a broader attempt to search for treatment targets of hypobaric hypoxia brain injury. [More]