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Hypoxia is a condition in which there is a decrease in the oxygen supply to a tissue. In cancer treatment, the level of hypoxia in a tumor may help predict the response of the tumor to the treatment.
Obstructive sleep apnea can increase risk for PE recurrence

Obstructive sleep apnea can increase risk for PE recurrence

Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a major risk for patients suffering from venous thromboembolism (VTE) and can often be fatal. [More]
Researchers engineer cells with 'built-in genetic circuit' that can inhibit tumour growth

Researchers engineer cells with 'built-in genetic circuit' that can inhibit tumour growth

Researchers at the University of Southampton have engineered cells with a 'built-in genetic circuit' that produces a molecule that inhibits the ability of tumours to survive and grow in their low oxygen environment. [More]
BAG3 protein plays protective role by limiting reperfusion injury to the heart

BAG3 protein plays protective role by limiting reperfusion injury to the heart

The inability of cells to eliminate damaged proteins and organelles following the blockage of a coronary artery and its subsequent re-opening with angioplasty or medications - a sequence known as ischemia/reperfusion - often results in irreparable damage to the heart muscle. [More]
Sleep apnea can make lung cancer more dangerous by increasing tumor growth

Sleep apnea can make lung cancer more dangerous by increasing tumor growth

A team of researchers from the University of Chicago and the University of Barcelona has found that intermittent hypoxia, or an irregular lack of air experienced by people with sleep apnea, can increase tumor growth by promoting the release of circulating exosomes. [More]
Sleep apnea compromises function of biological sensors that regulate blood pressure

Sleep apnea compromises function of biological sensors that regulate blood pressure

A single bout of sleep apnea impacts the human body's ability to regulate blood pressure. [More]
Prenatal cigarette smoke exposure and high temperatures linked to increased SIDS risk

Prenatal cigarette smoke exposure and high temperatures linked to increased SIDS risk

Researchers are a step closer to understanding why cigarette smoke exposure during pregnancy may increase the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). [More]
Researchers find new therapeutic target of biomedical interest in ischemic injury research

Researchers find new therapeutic target of biomedical interest in ischemic injury research

An international scientific team has developed a new small molecule -VH298- which can provoke a hypoxic response controlled from outside the cells, according to a study recently published in the magazine Nature Communications with its first authors being the expert Carles Galdeano, Beatriu de PinĂ³s researcher at the Department of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Technology and Physical Chemistry of the Faculty of Pharmacy and Food Sciences and the Institute of Biomedicine of the University of Barcelona, and Julianty Frost, from the University of Dundee. [More]
Low-oxygen environment promotes heart regeneration in mice

Low-oxygen environment promotes heart regeneration in mice

Normal, healthy heart muscle is well-supplied with oxygen-rich blood. But UT Southwestern Medical Center cardiologists have been able to regenerate heart muscle by placing mice in an extremely low-oxygen environment. [More]
Climbing Mount Kilimanjaro to research oxygen deprivation

Climbing Mount Kilimanjaro to research oxygen deprivation

This expedition was a part of our clinical collaboration with the Mayo Clinic. In short, this particular study focused on the effect of altitude and aging on heart and lung function. [More]
Researchers develop new, highly-specific functional imaging probe to detect hypoxic tumors

Researchers develop new, highly-specific functional imaging probe to detect hypoxic tumors

Tumor detection using targeted fluorescent imaging probes is a promising technology that takes advantage of specific molecular events occurring in cancer tissues. [More]
NAC improves effectiveness of adoptive cell therapy for treating melanoma

NAC improves effectiveness of adoptive cell therapy for treating melanoma

A collaborative team of investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina and Loyola University have demonstrated for the first time that culturing T cells in N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) before they are infused as immunotherapy improves effectiveness and outcomes in a preclinical model of melanoma. These findings were reported in the October 15, 2016 issue of Cancer Research. [More]
Researchers to evaluate new treatment strategy for treating infants with perinatal brain injury

Researchers to evaluate new treatment strategy for treating infants with perinatal brain injury

Perinatal brain injury often results in severe developmental disabilities, including neurodevelopmental delay and cerebral palsy. [More]
Researchers to explore potential roles of tumor-suppressor gene in kidney cancer

Researchers to explore potential roles of tumor-suppressor gene in kidney cancer

Renal cell carcinoma is the most common type of kidney cancer, and African-Americans and males appear most at risk for this disease that can be asymptomatic until it has spread and become highly lethal, said Dr. Vinata B. Lokeshwar, cancer researcher and chair of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University. [More]
Hypofractionated RT can reduce treatment time by half in stage II and III NSCLC patients

Hypofractionated RT can reduce treatment time by half in stage II and III NSCLC patients

For patients with stage II and III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) unable to receive standard treatments of surgery or chemoradiation (CRT), hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT) results in similar overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates, limited severe side effects and shorter treatment times when compared to conventional RT, according to research presented today at the 58th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
Stiff, hypoxic regions of tumors trigger cancer progression

Stiff, hypoxic regions of tumors trigger cancer progression

When Hippocrates first described cancer around 400 B.C., he referred to the disease's telltale tumors as "karkinos" -- the Greek word for crab. [More]
Eating nitrate-rich vegetables may enhance exercise performance

Eating nitrate-rich vegetables may enhance exercise performance

Nitrate supplementation in conjunction with Sprint Interval Training in low oxygen conditions could enhance sport performance a study has found. [More]
HIF-2 inhibitors could be promising target to combat kidney cancer

HIF-2 inhibitors could be promising target to combat kidney cancer

A new class of drugs called HIF-2 inhibitors is more effective and better tolerated than the standard of care drug sunitinib in treating kidney cancer, researchers with the Kidney Cancer Program at Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center have found. [More]
Could a light-listening photonics device detect skin disease? An interview with Prof. Vasilis Ntziachristos

Could a light-listening photonics device detect skin disease? An interview with Prof. Vasilis Ntziachristos

Detection of malignant skin alterations is currently aided by optical microscopes such as dermoscopes or optical microscopes. While the latter offers high resolution, it comes with a major disadvantage, just like any other purely microscopic method: it only provides a partial view of the skin due to the low penetration depth. [More]
Injecting omega-3 fatty acid reduces brain damage in neonatal mouse model of stroke

Injecting omega-3 fatty acid reduces brain damage in neonatal mouse model of stroke

Researchers from Columbia University Medical Center found that omega-3 fatty acids reduced brain damage in a neonatal mouse model of stroke. [More]
Maintaining proper oxygen supply in tumors could be key factor to stop progression of cancer

Maintaining proper oxygen supply in tumors could be key factor to stop progression of cancer

The lack of oxygen in tumor cells changes the cells' gene expression, thereby contributing to the growth of cancer. [More]
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