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ACP supports for eliminating non-medical vaccination exemptions

ACP supports for eliminating non-medical vaccination exemptions

Support for eliminating existing exemptions, except for medical reasons, from immunization laws was among the policy recommendations adopted last weekend at the summer meeting of the Board of Regents of the American College of Physicians. [More]
New white paper provides overview of factors that drive vaccination underutilization in older adults

New white paper provides overview of factors that drive vaccination underutilization in older adults

Today the nonprofit Alliance for Aging Research released a white paper, Our Best Shot: Expanding Prevention through Vaccination in Older Adults, that provides a comprehensive overview of the factors that drive vaccination underutilization in seniors and offers recommendations on how industry, government, and health care experts can improve patient compliance. [More]
Cincinnati Children's doctors remind parents about the importance of immunizing kids before sending them to school

Cincinnati Children's doctors remind parents about the importance of immunizing kids before sending them to school

Doctors at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center want to remind parents about the importance of immunizing their children when preparing to send their children back to school. [More]
New moms don't receive advice on infant care from physicians, study finds

New moms don't receive advice on infant care from physicians, study finds

Many new mothers do not receive advice from physicians on aspects of infant care such as sleep position, breastfeeding, immunization and pacifier use, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Aggressive vaccination effort reduces transmission of measles among North American Amish communities

Aggressive vaccination effort reduces transmission of measles among North American Amish communities

An aggressive vaccination effort in response to the 2014 measles outbreak among North American Amish communities in Ohio significantly reduced the transmission of measles and the expected number of cases, according to a new study, even though under-vaccination among the North American Amish and in other communities around the United States led to the highest national annual number of reported cases in 2014 in the last 20 years. [More]
New issue of FMCH Journal examines evidence-based population health and patient care

New issue of FMCH Journal examines evidence-based population health and patient care

Evidence-Based Approaches to Population Health and Family Practice is the theme of the new issue of Family Medicine and Community Health, an international peer reviewed medical journal with editorial offices in China and the U.S. The Summer 2015 issue includes six original research articles, two educational research articles and two systematic reviews addressing various topics in evidence based population health and patient care. [More]
GSK starts shipping FLUARIX QUADRIVALENT (Influenza Vaccine) to US healthcare providers

GSK starts shipping FLUARIX QUADRIVALENT (Influenza Vaccine) to US healthcare providers

GSK announced today it has begun shipping FLUARIX QUADRIVALENT (Influenza Vaccine) doses to US healthcare providers, following licensing and lot-release approval from the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. [More]
New dissolvable microneedle patch could make flu vaccination easier, safer and less painful

New dissolvable microneedle patch could make flu vaccination easier, safer and less painful

Flu vaccines delivered using microneedles that dissolve in the skin can protect people against infection even better than the standard needle-delivered vaccine, according to new research published in Biomaterials. The authors of the study, from Osaka University in Japan, say their dissolvable patch - the only vaccination system of its kind - could make vaccination easier, safer and less painful. [More]
Only two states in U.S. require HPV vaccination

Only two states in U.S. require HPV vaccination

An examination of state vaccination requirements for adolescents finds that the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is currently required in only two states, many fewer than another vaccine associated with sexual transmission (hepatitis B) and another primarily recommended for adolescents (meningococcal conjugate), according to a study in the July 14 issue of JAMA. [More]
CPhA urges federal government to enhance HPV vaccination programs for young Canadians

CPhA urges federal government to enhance HPV vaccination programs for young Canadians

The Canadian Pharmacists Association (CPhA) urges the federal government to enhance its national immunization strategy to ensure that all Canadians have the opportunity to protect themselves against the common strains of HPV (human papillomavirus) through immunization. [More]
TSRI-led study identifies new immune molecules that protect against Marburg virus

TSRI-led study identifies new immune molecules that protect against Marburg virus

A new study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute identifies new immune molecules that protect against deadly Marburg virus, a relative of Ebola virus. The research provides ingredients needed to develop treatments for future Marburg outbreaks. [More]
GSK welcomes U.S. CDC's vote on use of meningococcal group B vaccines

GSK welcomes U.S. CDC's vote on use of meningococcal group B vaccines

GlaxoSmithKline announced today that the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) voted for a Category B recommendation for meningococcal group B vaccination, including BEXSERO (Meningococcal Group B Vaccine), in individuals aged 16 to 23 (with a preferred age of 16-18). [More]
New research examines antibiotic choice for treating children with community-acquired pneumonia

New research examines antibiotic choice for treating children with community-acquired pneumonia

New Vanderbilt-led research shows hospitals are doing a better job of using antibiotics less commonly associated with antibiotic resistance to treat children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). [More]
Experimental vaccine candidate can stimulate immune system activity to prevent HIV infection

Experimental vaccine candidate can stimulate immune system activity to prevent HIV infection

New research led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI) and The Rockefeller University shows in mice that an experimental vaccine candidate designed at TSRI can stimulate the immune system activity necessary to stop HIV infection. The findings could provide key information for the development of an effective AIDS vaccine. [More]
Planning for first clinical trial of MERS-CoV vaccine candidate now underway

Planning for first clinical trial of MERS-CoV vaccine candidate now underway

Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich have demonstrated, in a preclinical setting, the protective effect of a candidate vaccine directed against the coronavirus that causes Middle East Respiratory Syndrome. Planning for the first clinical trial is now underway. [More]
Three studies describe advances toward development of antibodies to stop HIV

Three studies describe advances toward development of antibodies to stop HIV

A trio of studies being published today in the journals Science and Cell describes advances toward the development of an HIV vaccine. The three study teams all demonstrated techniques for stimulating animal cells to produce antibodies that either could stop HIV from infecting human cells in the laboratory or had the potential to evolve into such antibodies. [More]
Experimental AIDS vaccine candidate stimulates immune system to block infection in animal model

Experimental AIDS vaccine candidate stimulates immune system to block infection in animal model

New research led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute, International AIDS Vaccine Initiative and The Rockefeller University shows that an experimental vaccine candidate can stimulate the immune system to block HIV infection in mice. [More]
Regulatory T cells critical for the immune system's ability to fight off future pathogen attacks

Regulatory T cells critical for the immune system's ability to fight off future pathogen attacks

Just as militaries need to have trained, experienced soldiers ready for future wars, making sure that the immune system has enough battle-ready T cells on hand is important for fast-acting, more effective vaccines, according to Penn State researchers. [More]
WHO and World Bank Group: 400 million people do not have access to essential health services

WHO and World Bank Group: 400 million people do not have access to essential health services

A World Health Organization and World Bank Group report launched today shows that 400 million people do not have access to essential health services and 6% of people in low- and middle-income countries are tipped into or pushed further into extreme poverty because of health spending. [More]
Orange sweet potato reduces prevalence and duration of diarrhea in children

Orange sweet potato reduces prevalence and duration of diarrhea in children

A new study has found that orange sweet potato (OSP) reduced both the prevalence and duration of diarrhea in young children in Mozambique. [More]
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