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Pitt CVR and Sanofi Pasteur join forces to help assess effectiveness of dengue vaccine

Pitt CVR and Sanofi Pasteur join forces to help assess effectiveness of dengue vaccine

The University of Pittsburgh Center for Vaccine Research (CVR) and Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccines division of Sanofi, have entered a scientific collaboration to help assess the effectiveness of a dengue vaccine once introduced for immunization programs. [More]

Criterions EHR certified under Drummond Group's ONC-ACB program

Criterions EHR version 3.0 has been tested and certified under the Drummond Group's Electronic Health Records Office of the National Coordinator Authorized Certification Body program. This EHR software is compliant in accordance with the criteria adopted by the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. [More]
NextGen earns ONC 2014 Edition criteria certification for Emergency Department Solution

NextGen earns ONC 2014 Edition criteria certification for Emergency Department Solution

NextGen Healthcare Information Systems, LLC., a wholly owned subsidiary of Quality Systems, Inc. (NASDAQ: QSII) and a leading provider of healthcare information systems and connectivity solutions, announced today that NextGen® Emergency Department Solution version 6.0 is compliant with the ONC 2014 Edition criteria and was certified as an electronic health record (EHR) Module on March 7, 2014 by the Certification Commission for Health Information Technology (CCHIT®), an ONC-ACB, in accordance with the applicable Hospital certification criteria adopted by the Secretary of Health and Human Services. [More]
New research reveals that immunization can trigger distinct change in body odor

New research reveals that immunization can trigger distinct change in body odor

​Our understanding of the role of body odor in conveying personal information continues to grow. New research from the Monell Chemical Senses Center and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reveals that immunization can trigger a distinct change in body odor. This is the first demonstration of a bodily odor change due to immune activation. [More]
FDA expands age indication of Adacel vaccine for immunization against tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis

FDA expands age indication of Adacel vaccine for immunization against tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis

Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccines division of Sanofi, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has expanded the approved age indication of Adacel® (Tetanus Toxoid, Reduced Diphtheria Toxoid and Acellular Pertussis Vaccine Adsorbed; Tdap) for active booster immunization for the prevention of tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis as a single dose in persons 10 through 64 years of age. [More]
CDC receives 2014 Franz Edelman Award for Achievement in Operations Research and Management Sciences

CDC receives 2014 Franz Edelman Award for Achievement in Operations Research and Management Sciences

​The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which collaborated with Kid Risk, Inc. to use analytics and operations research to combat the remaining pockets of polio around the world, last night won the 2014 Franz Edelman Award for Achievement in Operations Research and the Management Sciences at a banquet sponsored by the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) in Boston. [More]

CDC receives 2014 Franz Edelman Award for Achievement in Operations Research, Management Sciences

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which collaborated with Kid Risk, Inc. to use analytics and operations research to combat the remaining pockets of polio around the world, tonight won the 2014 Franz Edelman Award for Achievement in Operations Research and the Management Sciences at a banquet sponsored by the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) in Boston. [More]

Two doses of HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine Cervarix non-inferior to three-doses

A recent study in the journal Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics, showed that two doses of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline) are non-inferior to three-doses in the current schedule. [More]

Roundup: Calif. malpractice cap ballot measure; Colo. immunizations bill; Fla. cash-only clinic loophole

A selection of health policy stories from California, Colorado, Florida, Arizona, Virginia, Maryland and Massachusetts. [More]
Viewpoints: Mcconnell, Wasserman Schultz, Barasso on Obamacare's 4th anniversary; defending surgeon general nominee

Viewpoints: Mcconnell, Wasserman Schultz, Barasso on Obamacare's 4th anniversary; defending surgeon general nominee

The promises that were made to sell Obamacare -; that it wouldn't disrupt people's previous health care arrangements and that premiums would go down -; are now being exposed for the cheap and deceptive sales pitch they were. It may be tempting for some to brush all this aside as standard politics. [More]

Study suggests that self-administration of influenza vaccine may be feasible with microneedle patch

There are many reasons some people may not get a flu shot, but would they be more likely to do so if there was a simple device that could be mailed directly to them, was easy enough to use by themselves, and provided at least the same level of protection as a traditional flu shot without the pain of a needle jab? A recent NIBIB-funded study, published online February 2014 in the journal Vaccine, suggests the answer is yes. [More]

Highlights: N.Y. veterans' benefits; Ga. rural hospital deal; Ga. anti-Obamacare bill

A selection of health policy stories from New York, Georgia, Maryland, Minnesota and Colorado. [More]
New treatment could halt progression of dementia

New treatment could halt progression of dementia

Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have discovered a way to potentially halt the progression of dementia caused by accumulation of a protein known as tau. [More]
Study: Infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria are on rise in U.S. children

Study: Infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria are on rise in U.S. children

Infections caused by a concerning type of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are on the rise in U.S. children, according to a new study published in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society and available online. [More]
UC baby health innovation wins Gates award

UC baby health innovation wins Gates award

An innovative, colourful and accessible design to improve child health records worldwide has earned a University of Canberra graphic design lecturer a prestigious international award. [More]
Researchers find 69% rise in pertussis vaccination rate among new mothers

Researchers find 69% rise in pertussis vaccination rate among new mothers

Changing the hospital orders for women who have just delivered a child led to a 69% increase in the new mothers' pertussis vaccination rate, providing protection for themselves and their newborns against the disease, commonly known as whooping cough, according to a study in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology. [More]

Study: Self-administration of flu vaccines with microneedle patches may one day be feasible

The annual ritual of visiting a doctor's office or health clinic to receive a flu shot may soon be outdated, thanks to the findings of a new study published in the journal Vaccine. [More]
FDA approves sNDA to include radiographic data updating label of Pfizer XELJANZ for treatment of RA

FDA approves sNDA to include radiographic data updating label of Pfizer XELJANZ for treatment of RA

Pfizer Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) to update the current label of XELJANZ® (tofacitinib citrate) 5 mg tablets to include radiographic data from two Phase 3 studies, ORAL Scan (A3921044) and ORAL Start. [More]
Research roundup: Examining readmissions; easing doctor burnout

Research roundup: Examining readmissions; easing doctor burnout

Despite massive early IT problems, exchange enrollment is accelerating rapidly. While enrollment may not reach 7 million by the end of March, we expect at least 5 million to have enrolled by the close of the initial open-enrollment period. If enrollment falls far short, HHS could extend open enrollment for a fixed period to reach its 7 million target. ... We project that 5 million new beneficiaries will be covered by Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program by the end of 2014. Medicaid managed-care enrollment of non-dual beneficiaries will increase by 20 percent from 2013 to 2014 and by 38 percent from 2013 to 2016. We expect that 75 percent of non-dual Medicaid beneficiaries will be covered by Managed Care Organizations starting in 2015, up from 63 percent in 2012 (Feb. 2014). [More]
Highlights: Vaccine exemption bills rarely become law; Ariz. group urges public hospital changes; Florida foster kids care

Highlights: Vaccine exemption bills rarely become law; Ariz. group urges public hospital changes; Florida foster kids care

Legislation to change whether parents may refuse school vaccinations for their children appears to be common in some states, according to a new analysis. However, those bills are rarely passed into law. Researchers identified 36 bills that were introduced in 18 state legislatures between 2009 and 2012 to change school immunization requirements. Most of those bills aimed to allow more parents the ability to refuse vaccinations for their children (Seaman, 2/12). [More]