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Immunology is the study of the body's immune system.
Novartis gets three FDA approvals for expanded use of biologic drug to treat rare autoinflammatory diseases

Novartis gets three FDA approvals for expanded use of biologic drug to treat rare autoinflammatory diseases

Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has granted three simultaneous approvals for the expanded use of Ilaris (canakinumab) to treat three rare and distinct types of Periodic Fever Syndromes. [More]
Breakthrough research opens door to potential new therapies for inflammatory diseases

Breakthrough research opens door to potential new therapies for inflammatory diseases

Scientists have made a major breakthrough in understanding the workings of the cellular machinery involved in a host of inflammatory diseases. [More]
Scientist develops way to detect BoNT in biological samples

Scientist develops way to detect BoNT in biological samples

Many know Botox as a trendy way to get rid of wrinkles, but the popular drug — made from botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) — can do more than just fill lines. [More]
Skin phenotype of pediatric eczema opens door for personalized treatment of AD in infants

Skin phenotype of pediatric eczema opens door for personalized treatment of AD in infants

Researchers for the first time have identified the skin phenotype of pediatric eczema or atopic dermatitis (AD) in infants, opening the door for personalized treatment approaches for young children with eczema. [More]
Ludwig researchers shed more light on key requirement for function of regulatory T cells

Ludwig researchers shed more light on key requirement for function of regulatory T cells

A Ludwig Cancer Research study published online September 5th in Nature Immunology illuminates a key requirement for the function of regulatory T cells—immune cells that play a critical role in many biological processes, from suppressing inflammation and deadly autoimmunity to helping tumors evade immune attack. [More]
Magnetic bacteria can be promising vehicle for efficiently delivering tumor-fighting drugs

Magnetic bacteria can be promising vehicle for efficiently delivering tumor-fighting drugs

Researchers funded in part by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering have recently shown that magnetic bacteria are a promising vehicle for more efficiently delivering tumor-fighting drugs. They reported their results in the August 2016 issue of Nature Nanotechnology. [More]
New open access journal covers latest research on diseases affecting the head and neck areas

New open access journal covers latest research on diseases affecting the head and neck areas

The American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation is pleased to announce that OTO Open, the Academy's new and official open access journal will be joining the Academy's premier journal, Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, both published by SAGE Publishing. [More]
TSRI scientists shed light on molecular workings of MS drug

TSRI scientists shed light on molecular workings of MS drug

A study by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has helped to de-mystify the molecular workings of the multiple sclerosis (MS) drug Tecfidera. The drug is the most widely prescribed pill-based therapy for MS, but its biological mechanism remains mysterious. [More]
Experts receive $5.2 million NIH grant to develop affordable test for diagnosing Chagas disease

Experts receive $5.2 million NIH grant to develop affordable test for diagnosing Chagas disease

An international team of researchers led by infectious disease experts at the University of Georgia has received $5.2 million from the National Institutes of Health to develop a more accurate, affordable diagnostic test for Chagas disease, a parasitic infection that kills more than 50,000 people each year in Central and South America. [More]
Researchers use computer modelling to identify mechanism behind aggressive brain tumours

Researchers use computer modelling to identify mechanism behind aggressive brain tumours

Researchers at Uppsala University have used computer modelling to study how brain tumours arise. [More]
Researchers underscore importance of immune-based prevention to conquer cancer

Researchers underscore importance of immune-based prevention to conquer cancer

In a Perspective piece published this week in PNAS, cancer researchers from across the country, including faculty at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center, write that a greater emphasis on immune-based prevention should be central to new efforts like the federal Cancer Moonshot program, headed by Vice President Joe Biden. [More]
Memory of heart attack can be stored in genes through epigenetic changes, study shows

Memory of heart attack can be stored in genes through epigenetic changes, study shows

Both heredity and environmental factors influence our risk of cardiovascular disease. A new study, by researches at Uppsala University, shows now that the memory of a heart attack can be stored in our genes through epigenetic changes. [More]
Female sex hormone appears to stave off worst effects of influenza infection

Female sex hormone appears to stave off worst effects of influenza infection

In mouse studies, researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have found that progesterone - a female sex hormone contained in most forms of hormone-based birth control - appears to stave off the worst effects of influenza infection and, in an unexpected finding, help damaged lung cells to heal more quickly. [More]
Research may help explain mechanism by which Zika virus breaches placental barrier

Research may help explain mechanism by which Zika virus breaches placental barrier

New research reveals that in pregnant women, Zika virus infection damages certain cells that affect placental formation and function. Furthermore, herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infection augments placental sensitivity to Zika virus by enhancing the expression of receptors that allow Zika virus to enter cells. [More]
Researchers discover new genes with potential to improve adoptive T cell therapy

Researchers discover new genes with potential to improve adoptive T cell therapy

A Yale Cancer Center research team has identified that two genes, NR4A1 and ABC transporters, mark a distinct subset of quiescent T cells within human tissues, and have developed methods to mobilize them into circulation for potential application in adoptive T cell therapy of cancer. [More]
Allergists show kids can be near food allergy triggers without fear

Allergists show kids can be near food allergy triggers without fear

Allergists realize people who are severely allergic to a food can experience great anxiety when encountering the food in any form. [More]
Research findings may pave way for innovative treatments of multiple sclerosis

Research findings may pave way for innovative treatments of multiple sclerosis

Researchers at the Research Center for Immunotherapy and the Focus Program Translational Neurosciences of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz have identified a new mechanism that is involved in the development of autoimmune diseases. [More]
Study shows possibility to achieve immunological antibody memory with mucosal vaccination

Study shows possibility to achieve immunological antibody memory with mucosal vaccination

If a vaccine is to protect the intestines and other mucous membranes in the body, it also needs to be given through the mucosa, for example as a nasal spray or a liquid that is drunk. [More]
Researchers develop method to predict disease activity in multiple sclerosis

Researchers develop method to predict disease activity in multiple sclerosis

Cells in the immune system of patients with multiple sclerosis behave differently from those of healthy individuals. Researchers at Linköping University in Sweden have exploited this difference to develop a method that can predict disease activity in multiple sclerosis. [More]
Study shows holes in HIV's protective glycan shield could be vital in designing vaccine candidates

Study shows holes in HIV's protective glycan shield could be vital in designing vaccine candidates

A new study from scientists at The Scripps Research Institute shows that "holes" in HIV's defensive sugar shield could be important in designing an HIV vaccine. [More]
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