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Immunology is the study of the body's immune system.
UTMB experts honored with Lifetime Achievement Award for contributions to study of deadly diseases

UTMB experts honored with Lifetime Achievement Award for contributions to study of deadly diseases

The global experts who study the deadliest infectious diseases recognized the contributions of Frederick A. Murphy and Thomas G. Ksiazek, professors at the University of Texas Medical Branch, with a Lifetime Achievement Award at the 6th annual International Symposium on Filoviruses. The filoviruses include Ebola and Marburg viruses that cause death in 50 to 90 percent of people infected. The current outbreak of Ebola virus raging in West Africa has caused more than 100 deaths so far. [More]
Community efforts boost people for HIV testing and reduce new infections

Community efforts boost people for HIV testing and reduce new infections

Communities in Africa and Thailand that worked together on HIV-prevention efforts saw not only a rise in HIV screening but a drop in new infections, according to a new study in the peer-reviewed journal The Lancet Global Health. [More]

Researchers develop more accurate tool for diagnosing even mild cases of asthma

Using just a single drop of blood, a team of University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers has developed a faster, cheaper and more accurate tool for diagnosing even mild cases of asthma. [More]

New study identifies potential target for colorectal cancer treatment

A new study identifies a molecule that is a probable driving force in colorectal cancer and suggests that the molecule could be an important target for colorectal cancer treatment and a valuable biomarker of tumor progression. [More]

Scientists discover how bacterium Y. pestis overwhelms lungs to cause pneumonic plague

​Northwestern Medicine scientists are continuing to unravel the molecular changes that underlie one of the world's deadliest and most infamous respiratory infections. [More]

New data shows that gut microbiota has potential role in development of ALD

Exciting new data presented today at the International Liver Congress- 2014 shows that the gut microbiota has a potential role in the development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). [More]
Findings pave way for potential therapy to combat H1N1 flu virus

Findings pave way for potential therapy to combat H1N1 flu virus

Flu epidemics cause up to half a million deaths worldwide each year, and emerging strains continually threaten to spread to humans and cause even deadlier pandemics. A study by McGill University professor Maziar Divangahi published by Cell Press on April 10 in the journal Immunity reveals that a drug that inhibits a molecule called prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) increases survival rates in mice infected with a lethal dose of the H1N1 flu virus. [More]
Longer looks: Vermont's single payer system; Nevada's cancer cluster; the toll of dementia on a family

Longer looks: Vermont's single payer system; Nevada's cancer cluster; the toll of dementia on a family

Skatchewan is a vast prairie province in the middle of Canada. It's home to hockey great Gordie Howe and the world's first curling museum. But Canadians know it for another reason: it's the birthplace of the country's single-payer health-care system. [More]
Too much of c-FLIPR protein can trigger autoimmune diseases

Too much of c-FLIPR protein can trigger autoimmune diseases

So-called c-FLIP proteins inhibit signaling cascades that can lead to apoptosis. This is important temporarily in the response to pathogens to ensure that lymphocytes, a type of immune cells, can proliferate sufficiently. [More]
EU-funded project aims to find solution to combat hepatitis C epidemic in Egypt

EU-funded project aims to find solution to combat hepatitis C epidemic in Egypt

New ways to differentiate between chronic and self-clearing infections may help towards effective patient management and reduce drug costs. But there are major challenges in implementation. [More]

Scientists identify enzyme that could be a useful target in treating asthma, cancer

In experiments with mice, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists have identified an enzyme involved in the regulation of immune system T cells that could be a useful target in treating asthma and boosting the effects of certain cancer therapies. [More]
Experts and entrepreneurs to gather at 2014 Biotech China on 14-16 May

Experts and entrepreneurs to gather at 2014 Biotech China on 14-16 May

With just one month until 2014 Biotech China, experts, entrepreneurs and decision-makers from the international biotechnology industry will gather at the heart of the Chinese biotechnology industry on May 14-16th, 09:00 AM-06:00 PM in Nanjing China. [More]
Researchers reveal how cells respond to mechanical manipulation

Researchers reveal how cells respond to mechanical manipulation

The push and pull of physical force can cause profound changes in the behavior of a cell. Two studies from researchers working at the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center reveal how cells respond to mechanical manipulation [More]

Research finding sheds more light on cancer development and metastasis

The push and pull of physical force can cause profound changes in the behavior of a cell. Two studies from researchers working at the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center reveal how cells respond to mechanical manipulation, a key factor in addressing the underlying causes of cancer and other diseases. [More]

NIH study could offer clues for developing new antiviral treatments

A National Institutes of Health study reports that a rare genetic disease, while depleting patients of infection-fighting antibodies, may actually protect them from certain severe or recurrent viral infections. [More]
Research uncovers bacteria in breast tissue associated with cancer

Research uncovers bacteria in breast tissue associated with cancer

A unique population of microbes in the female breast may lay the groundwork for understanding how this bacterial community contributes to health and disease, according to a new study out of Western University (London, Canada). [More]
Researchers receive NIH grant for pediatric acute myelogenous leukemia treatment

Researchers receive NIH grant for pediatric acute myelogenous leukemia treatment

​A $1.92 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) was awarded to a research team that focuses on new approaches for treatment of relapsed pediatric acute myelogenous leukemia (rAML), led by Yang Liu, PhD, Bothworth Chair and Director of the Center for Cancer and Immunology Research (CCIR) at Children's Research Institute of Children's National Health System, and Reuven Schore, MD, member of CCIR and attending physician in the Leukemia & Lymphoma Program of the Division of Oncology of the Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders. [More]

MD Anderson forms research alliance with GSK to identify new therapeutic approaches to combat cancer

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center announced today it formed a research alliance with GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), a global leader in pharmaceutical development, to strengthen its efforts in advancing therapies that train the body's immune system to combat cancer. [More]
Study provides insights into why alcohol has negative effect on wound healing

Study provides insights into why alcohol has negative effect on wound healing

People who are injured while binge drinking are much slower to heal from wounds suffered in car accidents, shootings, fires, etc. [More]
SLU researcher receives $608,376 grant to design better clinical treatments for multiple sclerosis

SLU researcher receives $608,376 grant to design better clinical treatments for multiple sclerosis

Saint Louis University researcher Daniel Hawiger, M.D., Ph.D., has been awarded $608,376 from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society to gain a better understanding of how the autoimmune process that causes multiple sclerosis (MS) may be stopped or slowed down. [More]