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Immunology is the study of the body's immune system.
High dew point triggers air quality alert for dangerous levels of mold in the Midwest

High dew point triggers air quality alert for dangerous levels of mold in the Midwest

The heavy rains, hot temperatures and high dew point have triggered an air quality alert for dangerous levels of mold in the Midwest. "The interior mold exposure for homes experiencing flooding or water seepage will be even more toxic," warns Joseph Leija, MD, allergist who performs the Gottlieb Allergy Count, the official daily allergy count for the Midwest. [More]
Researchers show how interplay between nutrition, metabolism, immunity involved in ageing process

Researchers show how interplay between nutrition, metabolism, immunity involved in ageing process

Researchers from UCL (University College London) have demonstrated how an interplay between nutrition, metabolism and immunity is involved in the process of ageing. [More]
TIM-family proteins also have ability to block release of HIV and other viruses

TIM-family proteins also have ability to block release of HIV and other viruses

A family of proteins that promotes virus entry into cells also has the ability to block the release of HIV and other viruses, University of Missouri researchers have found. [More]
Cilag GmbH International acquires biopharmaceutical company, Covagen AG

Cilag GmbH International acquires biopharmaceutical company, Covagen AG

Cilag GmbH International, an affiliate of the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson, announced today that it has acquired Covagen AG, a privately-held, biopharmaceutical company specializing in the development of multispecific protein therapeutics through the FynomAb® technology platform. [More]
New gene therapy protects mice from life-threatening heart condition

New gene therapy protects mice from life-threatening heart condition

A new gene therapy developed by researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine has been shown to protect mice from a life-threatening heart condition caused by muscular dystrophy. [More]
Scientists discover area of brain that could control person's motivation to exercise

Scientists discover area of brain that could control person's motivation to exercise

Scientists at Seattle Children's Research Institute have discovered an area of the brain that could control a person's motivation to exercise and participate in other rewarding activities - potentially leading to improved treatments for depression. [More]
OMRF receives $14.5 million grant from NIH to continue research on anthrax

OMRF receives $14.5 million grant from NIH to continue research on anthrax

The National Institutes of Health has awarded the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation a five-year, $14.5 million grant to continue its research on anthrax and the bacteria's effects on humans. [More]
Study examines national impact of newborn screening test for SCID

Study examines national impact of newborn screening test for SCID

Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a potentially life-threatening, but treatable, disorder affecting infants, is twice as common as previously believed, according to a new study that is the first to examine the national impact of this newborn screening test. [More]
New antibodies could pave way for more effective drugs to combat influenza infection

New antibodies could pave way for more effective drugs to combat influenza infection

Research toward developing new antibodies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Faculty of Medicine could pave the way for more effective drugs to combat influenza infection. [More]
Scientists identify biomarker strongly associated with aggressive breast cancer

Scientists identify biomarker strongly associated with aggressive breast cancer

Two Northwestern University scientists have identified a biomarker strongly associated with basal-like breast cancer, a highly aggressive carcinoma that is resistant to many types of chemotherapy. The biomarker, a protein called STAT3, provides a smart target for new therapeutics designed to treat this often deadly cancer. [More]
Research finds stronger weapon against leprosy and tuberculosis

Research finds stronger weapon against leprosy and tuberculosis

In many parts of the world, leprosy and tuberculosis live side-by-side. Worldwide there are approximately 233,000 new cases of leprosy per year, with nearly all of them occurring where tuberculosis is endemic. [More]
New study shows how immune system developed in the course of evolution

New study shows how immune system developed in the course of evolution

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics (MPI-IE) in Freiburg re-activated expression of an ancient gene, which is not normally expressed in the mammalian immune system, and found that the animals developed a fish-like thymus. [More]
NASA study reveals how spaceflight affects immune system of crew members

NASA study reveals how spaceflight affects immune system of crew members

There is nothing like a head cold to make us feel a little dazed. We get things like colds and the flu because of changes in our immune system. Researchers have a good idea what causes immune system changes on Earth-think stress, inadequate sleep and improper nutrition. [More]
New research finds that early use of antibiotics can alter immunity later on

New research finds that early use of antibiotics can alter immunity later on

New University of British Columbia research found that receiving antibiotic treatments early in life can increase susceptibility to specific diseases later on. [More]
WHO taps UTMB to lead emerging infectious disease vaccine efforts

WHO taps UTMB to lead emerging infectious disease vaccine efforts

The world experts on vaccine development at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have received an international designation acknowledging their unique niche in a sphere where research, government regulation and big pharma often collide. [More]
Young inner-city children appear to suffer from food allergies

Young inner-city children appear to suffer from food allergies

Already known for their higher-than-usual risk of asthma and environmental allergies, young inner-city children appear to suffer disproportionately from food allergies as well, according to results of a study led by scientists at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center. [More]
Food allergies more common in young inner-city children

Food allergies more common in young inner-city children

Already known for their higher-than-usual risk of asthma and environmental allergies, young inner-city children appear to suffer disproportionately from food allergies as well, according to results of a study led by scientists at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center. [More]
AEG-1 protein blocks effects of retinoic acid in leukemia and liver cancer

AEG-1 protein blocks effects of retinoic acid in leukemia and liver cancer

Retinoic acid is a form of vitamin A that is used to treat and help prevent the recurrence of a variety of cancers, but for some patients the drug is not effective. [More]
Ebola virus defeats attempts by interferon to block viral reproduction in infected cells

Ebola virus defeats attempts by interferon to block viral reproduction in infected cells

One of the human body's first responses to a viral infection is to make and release signaling proteins called interferons, which amplify the immune system response to viruses. [More]
Researchers discover new clue to understanding how TB medication attacks dormant TB bacteria

Researchers discover new clue to understanding how TB medication attacks dormant TB bacteria

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health say they have discovered a new clue to understanding how the most important medication for tuberculosis (TB) works to attack dormant TB bacteria in order to shorten treatment. [More]