Immunology News and Research RSS Feed - Immunology News and Research

Immunology is the study of the body's immune system.
Early use of influenza drug in pregnant women with flu may reduce length of stay in hospital

Early use of influenza drug in pregnant women with flu may reduce length of stay in hospital

Pregnant women are at higher risk for serious illness and complications, including death, from influenza. For expectant mothers hospitalized with flu, early treatment with the influenza antiviral drug oseltamivir may shorten their time in the hospital, especially in severe cases, suggests a new study published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases and available online. [More]
Innate lymphoid cells get destroyed in patients infected with HIV

Innate lymphoid cells get destroyed in patients infected with HIV

A research project headed by Henrik Kloeverpris, a postdoc at the Department of Immunology and Microbiology at the University of Copenhagen, shows that the so-called ILCs (innate lymphoid cells) - a component of the immune system crucial to maintaining immune system balance - are destroyed in patients infected with HIV. [More]
Immunological changes during pregnancy may influence response to influenza vaccination

Immunological changes during pregnancy may influence response to influenza vaccination

In a study to be presented on Feb. 5 in an oral concurrent session at 1:15 p.m. EST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting, in Atlanta, researchers will present findings from a study titled, T-follicular helper (Thf) cell expansion varies by trimester after influenza vaccination in pregnancy. [More]
Radiation could increase responses to innovative immune-based therapeutic approaches to fight cancer

Radiation could increase responses to innovative immune-based therapeutic approaches to fight cancer

A team of Georgia State University researchers is fighting cancers using a combination of therapies and recently found ways that radiation could maximize responses to novel immune-based therapeutic approaches to fight cancer. [More]
Study provides vital information about mechanisms governing DNA repair

Study provides vital information about mechanisms governing DNA repair

DNA damage can lead to gene inactivation or deregulation and cause various diseases such as cancer; however, many DNA repair mechanisms allow cells to survive against such damage. A study lead by Antoine Simoneau of the laboratory of Dr. Hugo Wurtele, a researcher in immunology-oncology at the Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital (CIUSS de l'Est-de-l'Île-de-Montréal) and professor at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, and recently published in the prestigious journal Nucleic Acids Research, provides valuable information about certain mechanisms governing DNA repair. [More]
Sphingosine kinase inhibitor slows castration-resistant prostate cancer cell growth

Sphingosine kinase inhibitor slows castration-resistant prostate cancer cell growth

A first-in-class sphingosine kinase 2 inhibitor slowed the growth of castration-resistant prostate cancer cells, in part by inhibiting the enzyme dihydroceramide desaturase (DEGS), but did not kill them, according to the results of preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies published in the December 2015 issue of Molecular Cancer Therapeutics by researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina and others. [More]
Certain viral infections during pregnancy could cause behavioral changes in offspring

Certain viral infections during pregnancy could cause behavioral changes in offspring

A study published in the journal Science found that activation in pregnant mice of a particular immune response, similar to what may occur with certain viral infections during pregnancy, alters the brain structure of the mouse offspring and causes behavioral changes, reminiscent of those observed in humans with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). [More]
Immune signaling molecule in infected mothers linked to behavioral abnormalities in offspring

Immune signaling molecule in infected mothers linked to behavioral abnormalities in offspring

In 2010, a large study in Denmark found that women who suffered an infection severe enough to require hospitalization while pregnant were much more likely to have a child with autism (even though the overall risk of delivering a child with autism remained low). [More]
Genetic mutations could help explain cause of cancer in pediatric patients

Genetic mutations could help explain cause of cancer in pediatric patients

Combined whole exome tumor and blood sequencing in pediatric cancer patients revealed mutations that could help explain the cause of cancer or have the potential to impact clinical cancer care in 40 percent of patients in a study led by researchers from Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Cancer Center. [More]
UAB discovery may offer new therapeutic approaches to asthma

UAB discovery may offer new therapeutic approaches to asthma

University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have found a previously unknown step in the pathway that leads to asthma, a discovery that may offer new therapeutic approaches to this incurable disease. Asthma affects more than 25 million people in the United States, including about 7 million children. [More]
Study identifies potential therapeutic targets for treatment of multiple sclerosis

Study identifies potential therapeutic targets for treatment of multiple sclerosis

Treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) and other inflammatory diseases may benefit by new findings from a study that identified potential therapeutic targets for a devastating disease striking some 2.3 million people worldwide. [More]
The mechanism behind protective cells protecting themselves

The mechanism behind protective cells protecting themselves

Researchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have discovered the mechanism by which immune cells called regulatory T cells keep themselves intact and functional during their demanding task of holding the immune system in check. Such T cells are key to preventing the immune system from attacking the body in autoimmune disease. [More]
Neurons protect intestinal tissue from over-inflammation

Neurons protect intestinal tissue from over-inflammation

The immune system exercises constant vigilance to protect the body from external threats--including what we eat and drink. A careful balancing act plays out as digested food travels through the intestine. Immune cells must remain alert to protect against harmful pathogens like Salmonella, but their activity also needs to be tempered since an overreaction can lead to too much inflammation and permanent tissue damage. [More]
UAB study shows IL-37 protein suppresses inflammatory response after spinal cord injury

UAB study shows IL-37 protein suppresses inflammatory response after spinal cord injury

Spinal cord injuries cause severe functional disabilities in those who sustain them, including paraplegia or tetraplegia, depending on the scale of the injury. This is due to the degeneration of the spinal pathways that carry nerve signals from the brain to the different parts of the body and vice versa, resulting in loss of mobility and sensitivity underneath the injured area. [More]
Beta- and gamma-HPVs associated with development of head and neck cancers, finds Einstein study

Beta- and gamma-HPVs associated with development of head and neck cancers, finds Einstein study

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have found that when human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 is detected in peoples' mouths, they are 22 times more likely than those without HPV-16 to develop a type of head and neck cancer. [More]
Study finds possibility of targeting Orai3 as novel treatment for obesity-related inflammation

Study finds possibility of targeting Orai3 as novel treatment for obesity-related inflammation

A new study by a team of Rosalind Franklin University researchers headed by Carl White, PhD, assistant professor of physiology and biophysics, has discovered that the degree of chronic inflammation caused by obesity is highly dependent on levels of the signaling molecule, hydrogen sulfide, which alters the activity of a calcium channel, Orai3. [More]
MD Anderson and AbbVie join forces to design new immunotherapy cancer patients

MD Anderson and AbbVie join forces to design new immunotherapy cancer patients

The immunotherapy platform at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and the global biopharmaceutical company AbbVie will join forces to find new ways to unleash the immune system's potential to fight cancer. [More]
Immunotherapy could be the future of cancer treatments

Immunotherapy could be the future of cancer treatments

For decades most cancers have been treated with the standard of care treatments which typically include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy. Now there is talk that immunotherapy represents "the future of cancer treatments." [More]
Scientists solve atomic structure of ubiquitin ligase complex that plays key role in protein degradation

Scientists solve atomic structure of ubiquitin ligase complex that plays key role in protein degradation

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have solved the atomic structure of a unique ubiquitin ligase complex. Ubiquitin is best known for its role in protein degradation, but more recently seen as important for cell signaling, DNA repair, anti-inflammatory, and immune responses. [More]
CSU's BioMARC awarded DoD contract to help develop new vaccines to combat encephalitic viruses

CSU's BioMARC awarded DoD contract to help develop new vaccines to combat encephalitic viruses

Colorado State University's Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing and Academic Resource Center has been awarded a 10-month, $4.6 million contract funded by the Department of Defense to help develop and manufacture new vaccines to fight encephalitic viruses that cause inflammation of the brain. [More]
Advertisement