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Immunology is the study of the body's immune system.
UC San Diego Health signs affiliation agreement with La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology

UC San Diego Health signs affiliation agreement with La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology

UC San Diego Health, with the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, has entered into a multi-year affiliation agreement with La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology designed to deepen existing collaborative relationships, boost basic research of diseases of the immune system and more quickly introduce new clinical treatments and therapies. [More]
Twenty Radboud researchers receive Veni grant as part of Innovational Research Incentives Scheme

Twenty Radboud researchers receive Veni grant as part of Innovational Research Incentives Scheme

Twenty young and promising researchers from Nijmegen - eleven from Radboud University and nine from Radboudumc - are each to receive up to 250,000. NWO (The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research) is awarding the Veni grant as part of the Innovational Research Incentives Scheme. [More]
Mix of bacteria living in guts may band together to ward off dangerous infections

Mix of bacteria living in guts may band together to ward off dangerous infections

Like a collection of ragtag villagers fighting off an invading army, the mix of bacteria that live in our guts may band together to keep dangerous infections from taking hold, new research suggests. [More]
Researchers develop dynamic smart drug that targets site-specific inflammation

Researchers develop dynamic smart drug that targets site-specific inflammation

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and University of Colorado researchers have developed a dynamic "smart" drug that targets inflammation in a site-specific manner and could enhance the body's natural ability to fight infection and reduce side effects. [More]
New UTMB study reveals mechanism central to pollen-induced allergies

New UTMB study reveals mechanism central to pollen-induced allergies

A new study from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has uncovered a mechanism that is central to becoming allergic to ragweed pollen and developing allergic asthma or seasonal nasal allergies. The findings are currently available online in the American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology. [More]
Infants born with mutation in PLVAP gene develop severe protein losing enteropathy

Infants born with mutation in PLVAP gene develop severe protein losing enteropathy

Newborn children born with a mutation in the Plasmalemma Vesicle Associated Protein (PLVAP) gene develop severe protein losing enteropathy, according to a case study1 published in Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the basic science journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Researchers report new drug combination that effectively treats HCV patients co-infected with HIV

Researchers report new drug combination that effectively treats HCV patients co-infected with HIV

Roughly 20 to 30 percent of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) are also infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV). Both blood-borne viruses share the same modes of transmission, but many HCV medications currently have significant limitations due to adverse interactions with HIV treatments. Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report a new combination that effectively treats HCV in patients co-infected with HIV. [More]
Inova Diagnostics announces FDA clearance for QUANTA Flash assays, QUANTA Flash Beta-2GP1 Domain1

Inova Diagnostics announces FDA clearance for QUANTA Flash assays, QUANTA Flash Beta-2GP1 Domain1

Inova Diagnostics, a worldwide leader in autoimmune diagnostic reagents and systems for the clinical laboratory, announced today that it has received 510(k) clearance by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on key QUANTA Flash assays for use with Inova Diagnostics' BIO-FLASH chemiluminescent analyzer for autoimmune testing. [More]
Natural supplement may improve quality of life for people who have celiac disease and gluten intolerance

Natural supplement may improve quality of life for people who have celiac disease and gluten intolerance

University of Alberta researchers may have found a way to help people with celiac disease enjoy the wide variety of foods they normally have to shun. [More]
Canadian researchers discover how HIV evades the body's antiviral responses

Canadian researchers discover how HIV evades the body's antiviral responses

A Canadian research team at the IRCM in Montreal, led by molecular virologist Eric A. Cohen, PhD, made a significant discovery on how HIV escapes the body's antiviral responses. The team uncovered how an HIV viral protein known as Vpu tricks the immune system by using its own regulatory process to evade the host's first line of defence. [More]
Emory University immunologists identify long-lived antibody-producing cells in bone marrow

Emory University immunologists identify long-lived antibody-producing cells in bone marrow

Immunologists from Emory University have identified a distinct set of long-lived antibody-producing cells in the human bone marrow that function as an immune archive. [More]
UAB researchers find therapeutic target for treatment of acute spinal cord injuries

UAB researchers find therapeutic target for treatment of acute spinal cord injuries

UAB researchers have identified a therapeutic target for the treatment of acute spinal cord injuries. According to this research, conducted on mice, the administration of a drug that prevents loss of myelin - the insulating sheath around nerve fibres that allows signals to be transmitted - increases the mobility of the mice after an injury. [More]
Study shows possibility of using embryonic stem cells to repair damaged lung tissue

Study shows possibility of using embryonic stem cells to repair damaged lung tissue

Collectively, such diseases of the airways as emphysema, bronchitis, asthma and cystic fibrosis are the second leading cause of death worldwide. More than 35 million Americans alone suffer from chronic respiratory disease. Weizmann Institute scientists have now proposed a new direction that could, in the future, lead to the development of a method for alleviating some of their suffering. [More]
VUMC becomes Human Vaccines Project's first scientific hub

VUMC becomes Human Vaccines Project's first scientific hub

Vanderbilt University Medical Center, the Human Vaccines Project and the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative are pleased to announce that VUMC has become the Project's first scientific hub. [More]

University of Leicester to celebrate achievements of leaders and pioneers at summer graduation ceremonies

The University of Leicester will celebrate the achievements of leaders and pioneers in their fields by conferring them with honorary degrees at ceremonies this week (14-17 July). [More]
Vanderbilt receives $12.8 million federal grant to develop better ways to predict effects of drugs in patients

Vanderbilt receives $12.8 million federal grant to develop better ways to predict effects of drugs in patients

Vanderbilt University Medical Center has received a five-year, $12.8 million grant from the federal government to develop better ways to predict how patients will respond to the drugs they're given. [More]
Potential molecular link identified between excess fat in the blood and blood vessel recovery in ischemia

Potential molecular link identified between excess fat in the blood and blood vessel recovery in ischemia

The buildup of fat in the blood makes a bad situation worse - it not only raises a person's risk for heart attack or stroke but also impairs the growth of new blood vessels. How excess fat in the blood - a condition known as hyperlipidemia - blocks vessel growth was unclear, but new work by researchers at Temple University School of Medicine shows that a molecule known as caspase-1 plays a central role and that preventing its activity could be the key to building new blood vessels and restoring blood supply to oxygen-starved tissues. [More]
TSRI researchers awarded grant to study how environmental factors trigger autoimmune diseases

TSRI researchers awarded grant to study how environmental factors trigger autoimmune diseases

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, at least 1.5 million Americans suffer from rheumatoid arthritis and 322,000 have lupus, a chronic and potentially life-threatening disease that can damage skin, joints and organs. [More]
Isis Innovation, Ludwig Cancer Research announce launch of new cancer immunotherapy spinout

Isis Innovation, Ludwig Cancer Research announce launch of new cancer immunotherapy spinout

Isis Innovation, the University of Oxford's technology commercialisation company, and Ludwig Cancer Research are proud to announce the launch of a new spinout company, iOx Therapeutics. iOx Therapeutics will develop a novel cancer immunotherapy discovered through a collaboration between Ludwig Cancer Research and Professor Vincenzo Cerundolo, the director of the MRC Human Immunology Unit within the University of Oxford's Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine. [More]
Janssen-sponsored Phase 2b trial shows guselkumab effective in treating moderate to severe plaque psoriasis

Janssen-sponsored Phase 2b trial shows guselkumab effective in treating moderate to severe plaque psoriasis

Results published today in The New England Journal of Medicine from a Janssen Research & Development, LLC (Janssen)-sponsored Phase 2b trial showed up to 86 percent of patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis receiving guselkumab (CNTO 1959) achieved a Physician's Global Assessment (PGA) score of cleared psoriasis or minimal psoriasis at week 16, the study's primary endpoint. [More]
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