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Immunology is the study of the body's immune system.
Nuvo Research collaborates with Ferndale to develop 2 topical dermatology products

Nuvo Research collaborates with Ferndale to develop 2 topical dermatology products

Nuvo Research Inc., a specialty pharmaceutical company with a diverse portfolio of topical and immunology products, today announced a collaboration involving Ferndale Laboratories, Inc. and a leading Contract Research Organization with significant dermatology experience to develop two topical dermatology products based on Nuvo's patented Multiplexed Molecular Penetration Enhancer technology. [More]

Vaccine against H. pylori infection is within reach

Researchers from the University of Rhode Island are championing a recent breakthrough in the laboratory with hopes it could lead to a vaccine against the pathogen responsible for stomach cancer and to therapeutics for inflammatory diseases. [More]
Researchers investigate impact of nutrition in resource-poor regions on infant brain development

Researchers investigate impact of nutrition in resource-poor regions on infant brain development

Brain activity of babies in developing countries could be monitored from birth to reveal the first signs of cognitive dysfunction, using a new technique piloted by a London-based university collaboration. [More]
New hypothesis about emergence of Parkinson's disease

New hypothesis about emergence of Parkinson's disease

The cause of neuronal death in Parkinson's disease is still unknown, but a new study proposes that neurons may be mistaken for foreign invaders and killed by the person's own immune system, similar to the way autoimmune diseases like type I diabetes, celiac disease, and multiple sclerosis attack the body's cells. [More]

FDA and EC grant Orphan Drug Designation to Boehringer’s volasertib for acute myeloid leukemia

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Commission (EC) have granted Orphan Drug Designation to volasertib for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). [More]

BRI scientists receive grant to study new approach to blocking metastatic breast cancer

Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason recently received a grant to research how blocking a particular molecule in metastatic breast cancer reduces both the growth of primary tumors and the number of lung metastases. [More]

Study: Maternal diet could have impact on food allergy in later life of children

About 20 million Europeans are subject to food allergies. Now scientists are looking at these allergies in new ways. It involves the food industry in its work and pays special attention to the link between early diets and allergy in later life. Clare Mills, professor of allergy in the university's Institute of Inflammation and Repair, at the University of Manchester, UK, is the coordinator of iFAAM. [More]
Study suggests that improving newborns' bacterial environment could fend off infections

Study suggests that improving newborns' bacterial environment could fend off infections

Mothers give a newborn baby a gift of germs-germs that help to kick-start the infant's immune system. But antibiotics, used to fend off infection, may paradoxically interrupt a newborn's own immune responses, leaving already-vulnerable premature babies more susceptible to dangerous pathogens. [More]
New research may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever

New research may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever

Two recent papers by a University of Colorado School of Medicine researcher and colleagues may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever, West Nile virus, Yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and other disease-causing flaviviruses. [More]
Research sheds new light on the development of HPV-associated cancer

Research sheds new light on the development of HPV-associated cancer

It's long been known that certain strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) cause cancer. Now, researchers at The Ohio State University have determined a new way that HPV might spark cancer development - by disrupting the human DNA sequence with repeating loops when the virus is inserted into host-cell DNA as it replicates. [More]
Researchers uncover mechanism that may help explain severe forms of schistosomiasis

Researchers uncover mechanism that may help explain severe forms of schistosomiasis

​Researchers at the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts and Tufts University School of Medicine (TUSM) have uncovered a mechanism that may help explain the severe forms of schistosomiasis, or snail fever, which is caused by schistosome worms and is one of the most prevalent parasitic diseases in the world. The study in mice, published online in The Journal of Immunology, may also offer targets for intervention and amelioration of the disease. [More]

Allergist says people allergic to multiple trees may have tough allergy this spring

The polar vortex may be on its way out, but it's certainly leaving its footprints behind. As spring rolls in, people allergic to multiple trees may have a tough allergy season - a consequence of the cold winter, says Mark Dykewicz, M.D., professor of allergy and immunology at Saint Louis University. [More]
UTMB experts honored with Lifetime Achievement Award for contributions to study of deadly diseases

UTMB experts honored with Lifetime Achievement Award for contributions to study of deadly diseases

The global experts who study the deadliest infectious diseases recognized the contributions of Frederick A. Murphy and Thomas G. Ksiazek, professors at the University of Texas Medical Branch, with a Lifetime Achievement Award at the 6th annual International Symposium on Filoviruses. The filoviruses include Ebola and Marburg viruses that cause death in 50 to 90 percent of people infected. The current outbreak of Ebola virus raging in West Africa has caused more than 100 deaths so far. [More]
Community efforts boost people for HIV testing and reduce new infections

Community efforts boost people for HIV testing and reduce new infections

Communities in Africa and Thailand that worked together on HIV-prevention efforts saw not only a rise in HIV screening but a drop in new infections, according to a new study in the peer-reviewed journal The Lancet Global Health. [More]
Researchers develop more accurate tool for diagnosing even mild cases of asthma

Researchers develop more accurate tool for diagnosing even mild cases of asthma

Using just a single drop of blood, a team of University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers has developed a faster, cheaper and more accurate tool for diagnosing even mild cases of asthma. [More]

New study identifies potential target for colorectal cancer treatment

A new study identifies a molecule that is a probable driving force in colorectal cancer and suggests that the molecule could be an important target for colorectal cancer treatment and a valuable biomarker of tumor progression. [More]

Scientists discover how bacterium Y. pestis overwhelms lungs to cause pneumonic plague

​Northwestern Medicine scientists are continuing to unravel the molecular changes that underlie one of the world's deadliest and most infamous respiratory infections. [More]

New data shows that gut microbiota has potential role in development of ALD

Exciting new data presented today at the International Liver Congress- 2014 shows that the gut microbiota has a potential role in the development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). [More]
Findings pave way for potential therapy to combat H1N1 flu virus

Findings pave way for potential therapy to combat H1N1 flu virus

Flu epidemics cause up to half a million deaths worldwide each year, and emerging strains continually threaten to spread to humans and cause even deadlier pandemics. A study by McGill University professor Maziar Divangahi published by Cell Press on April 10 in the journal Immunity reveals that a drug that inhibits a molecule called prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) increases survival rates in mice infected with a lethal dose of the H1N1 flu virus. [More]
Longer looks: Vermont's single payer system; Nevada's cancer cluster; the toll of dementia on a family

Longer looks: Vermont's single payer system; Nevada's cancer cluster; the toll of dementia on a family

Skatchewan is a vast prairie province in the middle of Canada. It's home to hockey great Gordie Howe and the world's first curling museum. But Canadians know it for another reason: it's the birthplace of the country's single-payer health-care system. [More]