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Immunology is the study of the body's immune system.
Researchers develop vaccine against potentially deadly tick-transmitted disease

Researchers develop vaccine against potentially deadly tick-transmitted disease

Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine researchers have made an important advancement toward developing a vaccine against the debilitating and potentially deadly tick-transmitted disease, human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA). [More]
Five-year $10.7M grant to study control, prevention of sexually-transmitted infections

Five-year $10.7M grant to study control, prevention of sexually-transmitted infections

The University of Maryland Schools of Dentistry (UM SOD) and Medicine (UM SOM) jointly announced today that they have received a five-year $10.7 million grant award from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) of the National Institutes of Health to study the causes, prevention and treatment of sexually-transmitted diseases (STDs). [More]
EMD Serono begins MSB0010718C Phase II study in mMCC patients

EMD Serono begins MSB0010718C Phase II study in mMCC patients

EMD Serono, Inc., a subsidiary of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, today announced the initiation of an international Phase II study designed to assess the efficacy and safety of MSB0010718C, an investigational fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that binds to programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1). [More]
New stem-cell discovery may lead to more streamlined process for tissue regeneration

New stem-cell discovery may lead to more streamlined process for tissue regeneration

A new stem-cell discovery might one day lead to a more streamlined process for obtaining stem cells, which in turn could be used in the development of replacement tissue for failing body parts, according to UC San Francisco scientists who reported the findings in the current edition of Cell. [More]
Norovirus vaccines: an interview with Dr Benjamin Lopman, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, USA

Norovirus vaccines: an interview with Dr Benjamin Lopman, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, USA

Noroviruses are a group of viruses. They're the leading cause of gastroenteritis, which causes diarrhea and vomiting. They affect the whole age range from young children to the elderly, and, in the US, they cause about 20 million cases annually. [More]
Researchers provide global genotype prevalence estimates for HCV

Researchers provide global genotype prevalence estimates for HCV

In one of the largest prevalence studies to date, researchers from the U.K. provide national, regional, and global genotype prevalence estimates for the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Findings published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, indicate that genotype 1 is the most prevalent worldwide, with over 83 million patients infected of which one-third reside in East Asia. [More]
Researchers exploring ways to stimulate patients' immune system to attack tumors

Researchers exploring ways to stimulate patients' immune system to attack tumors

Researchers at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Norris Cotton Cancer Center are exploring ways to wake up the immune system so it recognizes and attacks invading cancer cells. Tumors protect themselves by tricking the immune system into accepting everything as normal, even while cancer cells are dividing and spreading. [More]
Immunologic mechanism makes broadly neutralizing antibodies in people infected with HIV

Immunologic mechanism makes broadly neutralizing antibodies in people infected with HIV

Scientists at Duke Medicine have found an immunologic mechanism that makes broadly neutralizing antibodies in people who are HIV-1 infected. [More]
Researchers working to develop new drugs for treating chronic inflammatory diseases

Researchers working to develop new drugs for treating chronic inflammatory diseases

Science and industry are collaborating to develop future pharmaceuticals for treating chronic inflammatory diseases. The medicines will combat immunological processes that have gone wrong. [More]
New treatment fights respiratory syncytial virus in children

New treatment fights respiratory syncytial virus in children

Researchers at Le Bonheur Children's Hospital and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center announced results of a clinical trial of a new drug shown to safely reduce the viral load and clinical illness of healthy adult volunteers intranasally infected with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). [More]
Study provides insights into interplay among bacteria, viruses and immune system during HIV infection

Study provides insights into interplay among bacteria, viruses and immune system during HIV infection

A new study led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute provides insights into the interplay among bacteria, viruses and the immune system during HIV infection. [More]
AMSBIO-Trevigen prize winner announced

AMSBIO-Trevigen prize winner announced

AMSBIO, regular sponsor of the annual Beatson International Cancer Conference announces that the winner of the AMSBIO-Trevigen prize for the best poster was Katarzyna Grzes - a PhD researcher specialising in Cell Signaling and Immunology at the University of Dundee (Scotland, UK).
Miss Grzes was named as winner of the Poster Prize for the best presented and most interesting poster for her work entitled 'Metabolic regulation in PTEN null T lymphoma / leukemia'. [More]
Tackling hepatitis C: an interview with Gaston Picchio, Global Hepatitis Disease Area Leader at Janssen

Tackling hepatitis C: an interview with Gaston Picchio, Global Hepatitis Disease Area Leader at Janssen

Gaston Picchio outlines the major findings of the recent report published by The Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU): ‘Tackling hepatitis C: Moving towards an integrated policy approach’ [More]
Immunosignaturing holds promise for accurate diagnosis of Valley Fever

Immunosignaturing holds promise for accurate diagnosis of Valley Fever

On July 5, 2011, a massive wall of dust, ("haboob," in Arabic), blanketed Phoenix, Arizona, creating an awesome spectacle, (or stubborn nuisance, depending on your perspective). Dust storms are a common occurrence in the arid desert environments of the American Southwest. [More]
Surrogate marker identified for airway obstruction and asthma control

Surrogate marker identified for airway obstruction and asthma control

Researchers have identified a potential biomarker for airway obstruction in patients with asthma that not only reflects airflow limitation but also asthma control. [More]
Researchers collaborate to tackle rare diseases

Researchers collaborate to tackle rare diseases

Support from a network of leading researchers across Europe specialised in a rare auto-immune disease with unmet medical needs could help test several novel treatments [More]
New molecules and biopharmaceuticals enhance patient's immune response against tumors

New molecules and biopharmaceuticals enhance patient's immune response against tumors

Researchers at the University of Arkansas have been awarded $1.5 million from the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health to develop new molecules and biopharmaceuticals that enhance a patient's immune response against tumors. [More]
Scientists identify genes that may help predict steroid responsiveness in people with EoE

Scientists identify genes that may help predict steroid responsiveness in people with EoE

Results from a clinical trial show that high doses of the corticosteroid fluticasone propionate safely and effectively induce remission in many people with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), a chronic inflammatory disease of the esophagus characterized by high levels of white blood cells called eosinophils. [More]
Learning role of immune-system cells in digestive tracts may lead to new treatments for IBS

Learning role of immune-system cells in digestive tracts may lead to new treatments for IBS

Learning the role of immune-system cells in healthy digestive tracts and how they interact with neighboring nerve cells may lead to new treatments for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). [More]
Researchers find viable immunotherapy option for HIV-1 using fossil virus

Researchers find viable immunotherapy option for HIV-1 using fossil virus

The road to finding a cure for HIV-1 is not without obstacles. However, thanks to cutting-edge research by Douglas Nixon, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues, performed at the George Washington University (GW), Oregon Health & Science University, the University of Rochester, and UC San Francisco, the scientific community is one step closer to finding a viable immunotherapy option for HIV-1, using an immune attack against a fossil virus buried in the genome. [More]