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DePuy Synthes Trauma launches new system to treat hand fractures and correct deformities

Today DePuy Synthes Trauma announced the launch of the Variable Angle Locking Hand System, a comprehensive and versatile system of anatomically contoured and low-profile plates to treat hand fractures and correct deformities. The system features the company’s proprietary Variable Angle Locking technology. [More]
Gold standard for artificial joints can be improved by adding actual gold to titanium, study suggests

Gold standard for artificial joints can be improved by adding actual gold to titanium, study suggests

Titanium is the leading material for artificial knee and hip joints because it's strong, wear-resistant and nontoxic, but an unexpected discovery by Rice University physicists shows that the gold standard for artificial joints can be improved with the addition of some actual gold. [More]
Buprenorphine implants could be effective option to treat adults with opioid dependence

Buprenorphine implants could be effective option to treat adults with opioid dependence

While buprenorphine has long been used to treat adults with opioid dependence, its efficacy can be hindered by lack of adherence to daily, sublingual (beneath the tongue) doses of the medication. [More]
Thread-based device could be sutured through tissues to gather real time diagnostic data

Thread-based device could be sutured through tissues to gather real time diagnostic data

For the first time, researchers led by Tufts University engineers have integrated nano-scale sensors, electronics and microfluidics into threads - ranging from simple cotton to sophisticated synthetics - that can be sutured through multiple layers of tissue to gather diagnostic data wirelessly in real time, according to a paper published online July 18 in Microsystems & Nanoengineering. [More]
Scientists develop new way to resurface arthritic hip joint

Scientists develop new way to resurface arthritic hip joint

With a goal of treating worn, arthritic hips without extensive surgery to replace them, scientists have programmed stem cells to grow new cartilage on a 3-D template shaped like the ball of a hip joint. [More]
Researchers bring idea for transparent skull implant closer to reality

Researchers bring idea for transparent skull implant closer to reality

Researchers at the University of California, Riverside are bringing their idea for a 'Window to the Brain' transparent skull implant closer to reality through the findings of two studies that are forthcoming in the journals Lasers in Surgery and Medicine and Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine. [More]
Mussels inspire scientists to attach biologically active molecule to titanium surface

Mussels inspire scientists to attach biologically active molecule to titanium surface

Titanium is used medically in applications such as artificial joints and dental implants. While it is strong and is not harmful to tissues, the metal lacks some of the beneficial biological properties of natural tissues such as bones and natural teeth. [More]
Study suggests final fusion surgery in children with early-onset scoliosis can be eliminated

Study suggests final fusion surgery in children with early-onset scoliosis can be eliminated

In a look-back study of medical records, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine concluded that a major operation to fuse the spines of children with a rare form of severe, early-onset scoliosis can be eliminated in many cases. [More]
Scientists develop light-activated injectable device to stimulate nerve cells

Scientists develop light-activated injectable device to stimulate nerve cells

In the campy 1966 science fiction movie "Fantastic Voyage," scientists miniaturize a submarine with themselves inside and travel through the body of a colleague to break up a potentially fatal blood clot. Right. Micro-humans aside, imagine the inflammation that metal sub would cause. [More]
Scientists explore why some kids respond better to cochlear implants than others

Scientists explore why some kids respond better to cochlear implants than others

Four-year-old William Wootton was born profoundly deaf, but thanks to cochlear implants fitted when he was about 18 months old, the Granite Bay preschooler plays with a keyboard synthesizer and reacts to the sounds of airplanes and trains, while still learning American Sign Language. [More]
FDA approves Raindrop Near Vision Inlay device for patients with presbyopia

FDA approves Raindrop Near Vision Inlay device for patients with presbyopia

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the Raindrop Near Vision Inlay, a device implanted in the cornea (the clear, front surface) of one eye to improve near vision in certain patients with presbyopia. [More]
New research could pave way for improving retinal implants

New research could pave way for improving retinal implants

Engineers and neuroscientists at the University of Sheffield have demonstrated for the first time that the cells in the retina carry out key processing tasks. This could pave the way for improving retinal implants and therefore the sight of thousands of people suffering from retinal disorders. [More]
NYU dentists receive grant to test whether non-viral gene delivery can effectively treat oral cancer pain

NYU dentists receive grant to test whether non-viral gene delivery can effectively treat oral cancer pain

The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded Drs. Brian Schmidt and Seiichi Yamano a $1.2M (3-year) grant to test whether their non-viral gene delivery method can effectively and safely treat oral cancer pain. [More]
Novel stem cell-containing bio-ink allows 3D printing of complex tissues for surgical implants

Novel stem cell-containing bio-ink allows 3D printing of complex tissues for surgical implants

Scientists at the University of Bristol have developed a new kind of bio-ink, which could eventually allow the production of complex tissues for surgical implants. [More]
Metal ions released by implant wear can damage progenitors of bone-forming cells

Metal ions released by implant wear can damage progenitors of bone-forming cells

In metal-on-metal pairings, both the shell and head of an implant consist of a cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy. The release of metal ions into the body has been reported as a result of implant wear. Bone loss (osteolysis) was observed in many cases. [More]
Researchers develop new technique for coating polymer implants with bioactive film

Researchers develop new technique for coating polymer implants with bioactive film

Researchers have developed a technique for coating polymer implants with a bioactive film that significantly increases bonding between the implant and surrounding bone in an animal model. [More]
New, implantable device offers promise for patients with OSA

New, implantable device offers promise for patients with OSA

Since the 1980s, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) - in which positive pressure is pushed through the nasal airways to help users breathe while sleeping - has been by far the most widely used treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). [More]
Study sheds new light on the brain’s decision-making processes

Study sheds new light on the brain’s decision-making processes

Netflix binge-watching versus a hike in the woods. A cheeseburger versus kale salad. Fentanyl versus Tylenol. New UC research from the University California, Berkeley, suggests our brain activity could be influenced to make the healthier choice. [More]
Unlocking the first gene to cause otosclerosis: an interview with Dr Ralph Holme

Unlocking the first gene to cause otosclerosis: an interview with Dr Ralph Holme

Otosclerosis is a common cause of hearing loss, particularly amongst young adults. It normally starts in their 20s or 30s and it affects about 1 in 200 hundred people. In the UK, about 300,000 people are affected by the condition. [More]
New osseointegrated press-fit implant reduces infection risk for above knee amputees

New osseointegrated press-fit implant reduces infection risk for above knee amputees

A new study in today's issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery found minimal risk for severe infection with osseointegrated implants--a newer prosthetic system, press-fitted directly into the femur bone--that enables bone growth over a metal, robotic prosthetic limb in patients with above knee amputations. [More]
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