Impotence News and Research RSS Feed - Impotence News and Research

Erectile dysfunction, sometimes called "impotence," is the repeated inability to get or keep an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse. The word "impotence" may also be used to describe other problems that interfere with sexual intercourse and reproduction, such as lack of sexual desire and problems with ejaculation or orgasm. Using the term erectile dysfunction makes it clear that those other problems are not involved.
Expert lectures doctors about hidden dangers of wireless radiation from patients' cell phones, Wifi

Expert lectures doctors about hidden dangers of wireless radiation from patients' cell phones, Wifi

An American public health expert will lecture Canadian doctors tomorrow about the hidden dangers of wireless radiation from their patients' cell phones, Wifi and other wireless consumer devices. [More]
Experts share tips on prevention of prostate cancer

Experts share tips on prevention of prostate cancer

Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. One in seven men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and 233,000 new cases are diagnosed annually. [More]
Prostate cancer screening could cut deaths by one fifth

Prostate cancer screening could cut deaths by one fifth

Routine screening for prostate cancer could reduce the number of people who die from the illness by around a fifth, according to findings from a major European trial. [More]
Research roundup: ACA lawsuit primer; ACA strategies in 4 states; competitive plans for those eligible for Medicare and Medicaid

Research roundup: ACA lawsuit primer; ACA strategies in 4 states; competitive plans for those eligible for Medicare and Medicaid

In 2012, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of the ACA, but that did not end attacks against the law. Since the decision in National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius, objecting parties have filed more than 100 cases in federal courts nationwide. [More]
Genetic variants linked with greater risk for radiation-driven side effects in cancer patients

Genetic variants linked with greater risk for radiation-driven side effects in cancer patients

Key genetic variants may affect how cancer patients respond to radiation treatments, according to a study published this week in Nature Genetics. [More]
Study supports proposal to screen all men with gout for presence of ED

Study supports proposal to screen all men with gout for presence of ED

A new study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress showed that erectile dysfunction (ED) is present in most men with gout and is frequently severe. [More]
ProMark test for prostate cancer meets primary endpoint

ProMark test for prostate cancer meets primary endpoint

Today, for the first time, Metamark presents results from the clinical validation study that showed ProMark, the first and only proteomic-based imaging biopsy test, achieved its primary endpoint by accurately differentiating between aggressive and non-aggressive forms of prostate cancer at early stages of disease. [More]
Treating older men with early-stage prostate cancer does not help live longer

Treating older men with early-stage prostate cancer does not help live longer

Treating older men with early-stage prostate cancer who also have other serious underlying health problems with aggressive therapies such as surgery or radiation therapy does not help them live longer and, in fact, can be detrimental, according to a study by UCLA researchers. [More]
Scientists develop new procedure using ultrasound energy to "ablate" prostate cancer

Scientists develop new procedure using ultrasound energy to "ablate" prostate cancer

Men with prostate cancer face tough choices: when, or even if, to treat their cancer; what procedure to use; and how to balance their chosen treatment with their quality of life. Now, a new multicenter clinical trial seeks to offer men another option - one that physicians hope will treat prostate cancers with fewer side effects. [More]
Researchers develop personalized tool to predict likelihood of prostate cancer overdiagnosis

Researchers develop personalized tool to predict likelihood of prostate cancer overdiagnosis

Studies have found that prostate cancer is overdiagnosed in up to 42 percent of cases, prompting men to receive unnecessary treatment that can cause devastating side effects, including impotence and incontinence. [More]
Forest Laboratories to acquire exclusive rights in the U.S. for Saphris sublingual tablets

Forest Laboratories to acquire exclusive rights in the U.S. for Saphris sublingual tablets

Forest Laboratories Holdings Limited, a wholly owned subsidiary of Forest Laboratories, Inc. today announced that the company is acquiring exclusive rights in the United States for Saphris (asenapine) sublingual tablets, a treatment for adult patients with schizophrenia or acute bipolar mania, from Merck Sharp & Dohme B.V., a wholly owned subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc. [More]
UTMB researchers find high variability in PSA-ordering practice among primary care physicians

UTMB researchers find high variability in PSA-ordering practice among primary care physicians

Many primary care doctors continue to administer the prostate-specific antigen test to even their oldest patients despite the fact that no medical organization recommends prostate cancer screening for men older than 75, according to new research from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. [More]
Researchers show that men experience more harm than good from routine PSA screening

Researchers show that men experience more harm than good from routine PSA screening

Prostate cancer screening using the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test is widely used in France despite a lack of evidence showing that it reduces cancer deaths. Now, researchers have shown that men experience more harm than good from routine PSA screening, according to research to be presented on Monday by Professor Mathieu Boniol, at the 2013 European Cancer Congress (ECC2013). [More]
Men with prostate cancer experience more harm than good from routine PSA screening

Men with prostate cancer experience more harm than good from routine PSA screening

Prostate cancer screening using the prostate-specific antigen test is widely used in France despite a lack of evidence showing that it reduces cancer deaths. Now, researchers have shown that men experience more harm than good from routine PSA screening, according to research to be presented today (Monday) by Professor Mathieu Boniol, at the 2013 European Cancer Congress. [More]
Three-gene biomarker can help determine treatment option for early prostate cancer

Three-gene biomarker can help determine treatment option for early prostate cancer

The level of expression of three genes associated with aging can be used to predict whether seemingly low-risk prostate cancer will remain slow-growing, according to researchers at the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center at Columbia University Medical Center. [More]
Metamark reports positive results from clinical validation study of prostate cancer prognostic test

Metamark reports positive results from clinical validation study of prostate cancer prognostic test

Metamark Genetics, Inc., a privately-held biotechnology company, today announced positive results from a large clinical validation study of ProMark, its biopsy-based prostate cancer prognostic test. [More]
'Quest to Cure MSA in Honor of Rex Griswold' drives in-depth genomic investigation of rare nerve disorder

'Quest to Cure MSA in Honor of Rex Griswold' drives in-depth genomic investigation of rare nerve disorder

Rex Griswold, Vice President of Sales for Nestl- Waters North America, was a driving force at the company for more than two decades until Multiple System Atrophy (MSA) suddenly struck him. [More]
PSA screening shows low-grade prostate cancers do not progress to higher grade over time

PSA screening shows low-grade prostate cancers do not progress to higher grade over time

Prostate cancer aggressiveness may be established when the tumor is formed and not alter with time, according to a study published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. [More]
Weekend reading: Mental illness stigma, health insurance mazes and female libido

Weekend reading: Mental illness stigma, health insurance mazes and female libido

Linneah sat at a desk at the Center for Sexual Medicine at Sheppard Pratt in the suburbs of Baltimore and filled out a questionnaire. She read briskly, making swift checks beside her selected answers, and when she was finished, she handed the pages across the desk to Martina Miller, who gave her a round of pills. [More]
Study shows brachytherapy is underused in the UK

Study shows brachytherapy is underused in the UK

Better outcomes can be achieved for prostate cancer patients using brachytherapy, a highly targeted form of radiotherapy, compared to surgery - this is the finding of a new study conducted by PANAXEA, The University of Twente, Netherlands. [More]