Impotence News and Research RSS Feed - Impotence News and Research

Erectile dysfunction, sometimes called "impotence," is the repeated inability to get or keep an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse. The word "impotence" may also be used to describe other problems that interfere with sexual intercourse and reproduction, such as lack of sexual desire and problems with ejaculation or orgasm. Using the term erectile dysfunction makes it clear that those other problems are not involved.
UT Arlington, UNTHSC researchers develop user-friendly system alerts for people with sleep apnea

UT Arlington, UNTHSC researchers develop user-friendly system alerts for people with sleep apnea

Masks worn by those with sleep apnea can leak at night and be so uncomfortable that they often drive users away from treatment. But a new system being developed by researchers at UNT Health Science Center and The University of Texas at Arlington could make it easier for the estimated 18 million people with sleep apnea to get a good night's rest. [More]
Gene responsible for cancer growth plays unexpected role in prostate cancer

Gene responsible for cancer growth plays unexpected role in prostate cancer

A gene that is responsible for cancer growth plays a totally unexpected role in prostate cancer. The gene Stat3 is controlled by the immune modulator interleukin 6 and normally supports the growth of cancer cells. The international research team led by Prof. Lukas Kenner from the Medical University of Vienna, the Veterinary University of Vienna, and the Ludwig Boltzmann Institiute for Cancer Research (LBI-CR) discovered a missing link for an essential role of Stat3 and IL-6 signalling in prostate cancer progression. [More]
Allergan announces U.S. availability of SAPHRIS 2.5 mg tablets for children with bipolar I disorder

Allergan announces U.S. availability of SAPHRIS 2.5 mg tablets for children with bipolar I disorder

Allergan plc today announced that SAPHRIS (asenapine) 2.5 mg sublingual (placed under the tongue) black-cherry flavored tablets are available in pharmacies throughout the U.S. In March 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved SAPHRIS for the acute treatment of manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder in pediatric patients (ages 10 – 17). [More]
Drugs used against impotence does not increase risk of malignant melanoma

Drugs used against impotence does not increase risk of malignant melanoma

Using drugs for impotence does not increase the risk of malignant melanoma, researchers from Umeå University in Sweden conclude in a publication in JAMA, a top US medical journal. These results contradict previous research indicating such an association. [More]
Pathology expert shares vital information about prostate cancer

Pathology expert shares vital information about prostate cancer

Requesting a copy of your pathology report, asking questions of your doctor and playing an active role in decision-making are important ways that men should take control of their health. [More]
Ebola survivors face long-term adverse health effects: Study

Ebola survivors face long-term adverse health effects: Study

Ebola survivors experienced negative health effects that persisted more than two years after the 2007-2008 Bundibugyo ebolavirus (BDBV) outbreak in Uganda that claimed 39 lives. These findings are detailed in a paper published online today in Lancet ID. [More]
Study: Viagra, other related drugs not a universal 'cure-all' for impotence

Study: Viagra, other related drugs not a universal 'cure-all' for impotence

Viagra and other related drugs are not a universal 'cure-all' for impotence, according to a new study from The University of Manchester and NatCen Social Research. [More]
Graphic warning labels can motivate smokers to quit

Graphic warning labels can motivate smokers to quit

Young adults are more likely to appreciate the dangers of smoking when warnings are presented in images as well as text, according to a new study by a Washington State University Vancouver psychologist. [More]
Research opens door to new prostate cancer treatment

Research opens door to new prostate cancer treatment

Researchers from the Centenary Institute’s Origins of Cancer Program have discovered new links between nutrition and prostate cancer. [More]
Scientists examine effect of clothing on preterm babies' behavior

Scientists examine effect of clothing on preterm babies' behavior

Scientists at the Laboratoire éthologie Animale et Humaine (CNRS/Université de Rennes 1), working in collaboration with a neonatologist from Brest University Hospital, observed the effect of preterm babies' clothing on their behavior. Newborns placed in a sleep sack were less active and touched parts of their bodies less frequently than those dressed in a simple bodysuit. [More]
Breakthrough treatment option for men with benign prostatic hyperplasia

Breakthrough treatment option for men with benign prostatic hyperplasia

Men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a condition in which the prostate is enlarged but not cancerous, have a new, breakthrough treatment option that is less invasive and has fewer complications than other minimally invasive treatments, such as transurethral resection of the prostate and surgical options, according to research presented at the Society of Interventional Radiology's Annual Scientific Meeting. [More]
GenomeDx announces publication of positive validation study for Decipher Prostate Cancer Classifier

GenomeDx announces publication of positive validation study for Decipher Prostate Cancer Classifier

GenomeDx Biosciences today announced the publication of a positive validation study for the Decipher® Prostate Cancer Classifier, a genomic test for prostate cancer. The study, published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, showed that patients with low genomic risk (as determined by Decipher) may be optimally managed with observation after radical prostatectomy (prostate surgery), while those with high genomic risk (as determined by Decipher) may be better managed earlier with adjuvant radiotherapy. [More]
Study demonstrates that pelvic floor muscle training improves erectile function

Study demonstrates that pelvic floor muscle training improves erectile function

Preliminary results of a four-month clinical trial offer hope for the thousands of baby boomer men turning 50 every minute, with nearly 6-in-10 of them experiencing erectile dysfunction. Proving pelvic floor exercise can help turn back the clock on sexual decline, the study demonstrates that weighted resistance training improves erectile function in both healthy men and those with erectile dysfunction. [More]
Testosterone therapy suppresses some advanced prostate cancers, find Johns Hopkins scientists

Testosterone therapy suppresses some advanced prostate cancers, find Johns Hopkins scientists

In a surprising paradox, the male hormone testosterone, generally thought to be a feeder of prostate cancer, has been found to suppress some advanced prostate cancers and also may reverse resistance to testosterone-blocking drugs used to treat prostate cancer. [More]
Study: Common prostate cancer therapy exposes low-risk patients to more adverse side effects

Study: Common prostate cancer therapy exposes low-risk patients to more adverse side effects

A common prostate cancer therapy should not be used in men whose cancer has not spread beyond the prostate, according to a new study led by researchers at Henry Ford Hospital. [More]
Metamark expands prostate cancer test services to include PROGENSAPCA3 assay

Metamark expands prostate cancer test services to include PROGENSAPCA3 assay

Metamark announced today the expansion of its prostate cancer test services to now include the PROGENSA® PCA3 assay, a urine-based test that can help confirm negative prostate biopsies, and ERG, a companion test to the company's existing PTEN assay. [More]
Guidelines recommending routine prostate cancer screening for elderly men have minimal effect

Guidelines recommending routine prostate cancer screening for elderly men have minimal effect

The effect of guidelines recommending that elderly men should not be routinely screened for prostate cancer "has been minimal at best," according to a new study led by researchers at Henry Ford Hospital. [More]
Expert lectures doctors about hidden dangers of wireless radiation from patients' cell phones, Wifi

Expert lectures doctors about hidden dangers of wireless radiation from patients' cell phones, Wifi

An American public health expert will lecture Canadian doctors tomorrow about the hidden dangers of wireless radiation from their patients' cell phones, Wifi and other wireless consumer devices. [More]
Experts share tips on prevention of prostate cancer

Experts share tips on prevention of prostate cancer

Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. One in seven men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and 233,000 new cases are diagnosed annually. [More]
Prostate cancer screening could cut deaths by one fifth

Prostate cancer screening could cut deaths by one fifth

Routine screening for prostate cancer could reduce the number of people who die from the illness by around a fifth, according to findings from a major European trial. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement