Indigestion News and Research RSS Feed - Indigestion News and Research

Indigestion, known as ''upset stomach'' or ''dyspepsia'', meaning hard or difficult digestion, is a medical condition characterized by chronic or recurrent pain in the upper abdomen, upper abdominal fullness and feeling full earlier than expected when eating. It can be accompanied by bloating, belching, nausea, or heartburn.
Viewpoints: Baker and Dingell urge efforts to cut gun deaths; Doctors as union workers

Viewpoints: Baker and Dingell urge efforts to cut gun deaths; Doctors as union workers

Gun violence now rivals traffic accidents as the leading cause of death by injury in the United States. Quite simply, gun violence threatens to overwhelm us. Americans are grappling for strategies to make sure that the horror that occurred in Newtown isn't repeated. [More]
Juxtapid receives FDA approval for treatment of rare cholesterol disorder

Juxtapid receives FDA approval for treatment of rare cholesterol disorder

On Dec. 21, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Juxtapid (lomitapide) to reduce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, total cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, and non-high-density lipoprotein (non-HDL) cholesterol in patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH). Juxtapid is intended for use in combination with a low fat diet and other lipid-lowering treatments. [More]
Holiday stress and cold temperatures could lead to heart attacks if left unchecked

Holiday stress and cold temperatures could lead to heart attacks if left unchecked

Amid the frenzy of decorating, planning and shopping for the holidays, health may take a backseat. However, the stress brought on by these activities plus cold temperatures could lead to heart attacks or heart-related complications if left unchecked. [More]
Lone star tick causes alpha-gal meat sensitivity in regional population

Lone star tick causes alpha-gal meat sensitivity in regional population

Meat lovers living in the central and southern regions of the country might be opting for a vegetarian lifestyle if meat comes with an unwanted side of a life-threatening allergic reaction. According to a study presented at the Annual Scientific Meeting of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), the lone star tick inhabiting these regions is the primary reason for what's known as a meat induced alpha-gal allergic reaction. [More]
Gentle chiropractic care improves child's overall health and well-being

Gentle chiropractic care improves child's overall health and well-being

Irritation to a young person's nervous system can begin in utero. The baby's position during delivery (natural or cesarean) can create stress on their nervous system. Even a "normal, healthy" birth can induce 40-50 pounds of pressure on a newborn's neck and spine. [More]
Amylin, Alkermes announce results from BYDUREON clinical study on type 2 diabetes

Amylin, Alkermes announce results from BYDUREON clinical study on type 2 diabetes

Amylin Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Alkermes plc today announced results from the long-term extension of the DURATION-1 study, which showed that BYDUREON (exenatide extended-release for injectable suspension), the first and only once-weekly treatment for type 2 diabetes, was associated with clinically significant and sustained improvements in glycemic control during four years of treatment in adults with type 2 diabetes. [More]
Data from Alvine’s ALV003 Phase 2A trial on celiac disease presented at DDW 2012

Data from Alvine’s ALV003 Phase 2A trial on celiac disease presented at DDW 2012

Alvine Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced the presentation of data from a Phase 2A trial of its lead compound, ALV003, at the 2012 Digestive Diseases Week (DDW) meeting held in San Diego, California. The study results met the primary endpoint of demonstrating that oral ALV003, administered in the context of a gluten free diet (GFD), can diminish gluten-induced intestinal mucosal injury in well-controlled celiac disease patients. The company plans to initiate a Phase 2B trial later this year. [More]
Study finds negative health effects of anti-depressants

Study finds negative health effects of anti-depressants

Commonly prescribed anti-depressants appear to be doing patients more harm than good, say researchers who have published a paper examining the impact of the medications on the entire body. [More]
Boniva generics receive FDA approval for treatment, prevention of osteoporosis

Boniva generics receive FDA approval for treatment, prevention of osteoporosis

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the first generic versions of Boniva (ibandronate) tablets, a once-monthly product to treat or prevent osteoporosis in women after menopause. [More]
Detailed CT scan can safely and quickly rule out possibility of heart attack

Detailed CT scan can safely and quickly rule out possibility of heart attack

A highly detailed CT scan of the heart can safely and quickly rule out the possibility of a heart attack among many patients who come to hospital emergency rooms with chest pain, according to the results of a study that will be presented by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania today at the American College of Cardiology's 61st Annual Scientific Session and published concurrently in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Heart burn drugs and hip fractures in postmenopausal women smokers: Study establishes link

Heart burn drugs and hip fractures in postmenopausal women smokers: Study establishes link

A new study shows that postmenopausal women with a history of smoking who take heartburn drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) for two years or longer may be more likely to sustain a hip fracture. The risk rises with longer use say researchers. But the risk does disappear after women stop taking these drugs for two years. Further women who never smoked were not at increased risk for hip fracture even if they took PPIs regularly, the study showed. The new findings appear in the journal BMJ. [More]
Experts share 10 symptoms of cervical and other gynecologic cancers

Experts share 10 symptoms of cervical and other gynecologic cancers

Pelvic pain and abnormal bleeding aren't the only signs of gynecologic cancer. As part of Cervical Health Awareness Month in January, experts at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center share other symptoms that often are overlooked. [More]
Heart-related deaths, other emergencies peak in holiday season

Heart-related deaths, other emergencies peak in holiday season

Steven Polevoi, MD, has seen it all. During his 23-year career, the medical director of the UCSF Emergency Department has done everything from treat traumatic injuries to deliver babies. While medical emergencies occur throughout the year, Polevoi sees the winter season and its related overindulgence as a pivotal time for preventing emergencies by listening to our bodies. [More]
Observer bias increases likelihood of GERD diagnosis

Observer bias increases likelihood of GERD diagnosis

Patients who complain of upper gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms often face a diagnosis of either gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or functional dyspepsia. Because the two conditions often overlap, it can be difficult to distinguish between them and diagnose them properly. Yet ambulatory care facilities and hospitals have reported a dramatic increase in the number of GERD-related visits/discharges in recent years. [More]
VeganZyme supplement may aid in reducing digestive discomfort and symptoms

VeganZyme supplement may aid in reducing digestive discomfort and symptoms

Every year the American public spends billions of dollars on food and beverages that are toxic to the body and devoid of natural enzymes. These may include processed, microwaved or cooked food, meat, cereal grains, milk, gluten, soy, refined sugar, and more. But are they really getting their money's worth? Not without a little extra help, says Dr. Edward F. Group III, DC, ND, a world-renowned authority on natural medicine and digestive health. [More]
Large clinical trial to test new device for detecting Barrett's oesophagus

Large clinical trial to test new device for detecting Barrett's oesophagus

CANCER RESEARCH UK has launched a large multi-centre trial to test a new device for detecting Barrett's oesophagus - a condition that puts sufferers at increased risk of developing cancer of the oesophagus, one of the most deadly cancers. [More]
New data from JANUMET clinical study on type 2 diabetes presented at ADA 2011

New data from JANUMET clinical study on type 2 diabetes presented at ADA 2011

In a new post-hoc analysis based on the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE/ACE) diabetes algorithm presented at the American Diabetes Association (ADA) 71st Annual Scientific Sessions, significantly more patients with type 2 diabetes treated with JANUMET-tablets achieved blood sugar goals after 18 weeks compared to metformin as initial therapy. [More]
Canadian women more aware of ovarian cancer now, but misconceptions remain

Canadian women more aware of ovarian cancer now, but misconceptions remain

Canadian women know more about ovarian cancer than they did six years ago, but misconceptions remain that could lead to late diagnosis of the country's most fatal gynecologic cancer - a disease that claims the lives of 70% of those diagnosed. [More]
Study examines long-term GI complications in childhood cancer survivors

Study examines long-term GI complications in childhood cancer survivors

Individuals who are treated for cancer during childhood have a significantly higher risk of developing gastrointestinal complications - from mild to severe - later in life, according to a study led by the University of California, San Francisco. The findings underscore the need for childhood cancer survivors and their physicians to be aware of these risk factors to ensure patients' ongoing health care needs are met. [More]
Perrigo's ANDA for generic Zantac 150 receives FDA final approval to treat heartburn

Perrigo's ANDA for generic Zantac 150 receives FDA final approval to treat heartburn

Perrigo Company today announced that it has received final approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its abbreviated new drug application for over-the-counter Ranitidine 150, a generic version of Zantac 150. [More]