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BD launches new, wireless rapid diagnostic system for detection of flu, RSV and group A strep

BD launches new, wireless rapid diagnostic system for detection of flu, RSV and group A strep

BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company), a leading global medical technology company, today announced the launch of its next generation wireless rapid diagnostic system for detection of influenza A and B, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and group A strep, with new traceability and secure patient health record documentation features and functionality. [More]
SLU receives HRSA grant for training family physicians and medical family therapists in behavioral health

SLU receives HRSA grant for training family physicians and medical family therapists in behavioral health

Saint Louis University has received a $1.87 million grant to strengthen behavioral health training for family physicians, who often are the primary physician seen by many adults and children, and for medical family therapists who practice alongside them. [More]
Progesterone treatment protects female mice against consequences of influenza infection

Progesterone treatment protects female mice against consequences of influenza infection

Over 100 million women are on hormonal contraceptives. All of them contain some form of progesterone, either alone or in combination with estrogen. [More]
Novel nanosensor could rapidly detect pathogens that cause foodborne illnesses

Novel nanosensor could rapidly detect pathogens that cause foodborne illnesses

It seems like almost every week another food product is being recalled because of contamination. [More]
First case-control study examines link between microcephaly and in utero Zika virus infection

First case-control study examines link between microcephaly and in utero Zika virus infection

The relation between Zika virus and microcephaly is widely assumed to be causal because of strong evidence of an association. However, evidence so far comes from case reports, case series, modelling studies, and preliminary reports from cohort studies – none of which have included appropriate control groups. [More]
New global health strategy aims to eliminate HCV as global public health threat by 2030

New global health strategy aims to eliminate HCV as global public health threat by 2030

Chronic infection by the hepatitis C virus (HCV) proved fatal for over 700,000 people worldwide in 2013, mainly as a result of liver damage. Although information on the epidemiology of transmission and infection is sparse, recent estimates put the global prevalence of HCV infection at 130-150 million people. [More]
Contaminated poultry may be source of human exposure to MRSA, research shows

Contaminated poultry may be source of human exposure to MRSA, research shows

A new study offers compelling evidence that a novel form of the dangerous superbug Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can spread to humans through consumption or handling of contaminated poultry. [More]
New less invasive method could detect bacterial infection in young febrile infants

New less invasive method could detect bacterial infection in young febrile infants

Physicians from Children's Hospital of Michigan, Wayne State University, UC Davis Medical Center and Nationwide Children's Hospital, in collaboration with 19 other pediatric emergency departments around the country, have established a "proof of principle" for measuring patterns of ribonucleic acid (RNA) expression in the bloodstream that can enable clinicians to distinguish bacterial infections from other causes of fever in infants up to two months old. [More]
New study shows how increase in medication-resistant bacteria impedes treatment of kidney infections

New study shows how increase in medication-resistant bacteria impedes treatment of kidney infections

The increase in illnesses and deaths linked to medication-resistant bacteria has been well-documented by researchers and received extensive public attention in recent years. Now, UCLA-led research shows how these bacteria are making it more difficult to treat a common but severe kidney infection. [More]
Researchers identify and treat new variant of antibiotic-resistant E. coli

Researchers identify and treat new variant of antibiotic-resistant E. coli

Researchers at Massachusetts Eye and Ear have discovered a new mutation in a highly antibiotic-resistant strain of E. coli that resists clearance by the body's own immune system by inhibiting white blood cells that ordinarily kill and remove bacteria. [More]
Female sex hormone appears to stave off worst effects of influenza infection

Female sex hormone appears to stave off worst effects of influenza infection

In mouse studies, researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have found that progesterone - a female sex hormone contained in most forms of hormone-based birth control - appears to stave off the worst effects of influenza infection and, in an unexpected finding, help damaged lung cells to heal more quickly. [More]
Bloomberg Philanthropies to donate $300 million to create Bloomberg American Health Initiative

Bloomberg Philanthropies to donate $300 million to create Bloomberg American Health Initiative

The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health today announced that Bloomberg Philanthropies, founded by businessman, philanthropist, World Health Organization Global Ambassador for Noncommunicable Diseases, and three-term mayor of New York City Michael R. Bloomberg, will give $300 million to create the Bloomberg American Health Initiative. [More]
Single-dose of anibiotic gel could provide easy and safe treatment for common childhood illness

Single-dose of anibiotic gel could provide easy and safe treatment for common childhood illness

A single-application bioengineered gel, squirted in the ear canal, could deliver a full course of antibiotic therapy for middle ear infections, making treatment of this common childhood illness much easier and potentially safer, finds a preclinical study led by Boston Children's Hospital in collaboration with investigators at Boston Medical Center and Massachusetts Eye and Ear. [More]
MDR-TB cure rates in Europe may be higher than previously thought

MDR-TB cure rates in Europe may be higher than previously thought

Cure rates for multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in Europe have been estimated to be twice as high as previously thought, according to a research team at Queen Mary University of London. [More]
Americans believe cancer to be major health care challenge, Mayo Clinic survey reveals

Americans believe cancer to be major health care challenge, Mayo Clinic survey reveals

While Zika remains a hot topic in the news, a new survey by Mayo Clinic reveals that Americans believe the country's most significant health care challenge is cancer. [More]

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health lists 100 objects that shape public health

In recognition of its Centennial, the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has compiled a list of 100 objects that tell some of the most compelling stories of public health over the last century and help us appreciate its vast reach. [More]
Study shows pig farm workers as main source of LA-MRSA in Norwegian herds of swine

Study shows pig farm workers as main source of LA-MRSA in Norwegian herds of swine

Norway is the only country to have implemented a "search and destroy" strategy against LA-MRSA among pig herds to date. [More]
SLUCare cancer doctor offers advice to manage anxiety after cancer diagnosis

SLUCare cancer doctor offers advice to manage anxiety after cancer diagnosis

The first few days after a cancer diagnosis can feel overwhelming. At the very moment when you must make key decisions about your treatment and care, your brain may feel overloaded processing the distressing news you've just received. [More]
Research reveals how Zika virus arrests fetal brain development in pigtail macaque

Research reveals how Zika virus arrests fetal brain development in pigtail macaque

For the first time, abnormal brain development following a Zika infection during pregnancy has been documented experimentally in the offspring of a non-human primate. [More]
Rare pattern of gut microbes in newborns linked to higher risk of later allergies and asthma

Rare pattern of gut microbes in newborns linked to higher risk of later allergies and asthma

The microbes living in a baby's gut during its first month of life may directly impact the developing immune system, leading to a higher risk of allergies and asthma later in childhood, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco and the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit. [More]
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