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Promising clinical trial results for ebola vaccines

Promising clinical trial results for ebola vaccines

Interim findings from a clinical trial (PREVAIL) in which two experimental Ebola vaccines were given to more than 600 people in Liberia indicate that the vaccines are safe for use in humans. Based on these positive results, the vaccines may continue into the next stage of clinical evaluation; a phase 3 trial sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Aridis Pharmaceuticals begins Aerucin Phase 1 clinical study for treatment of acute pneumonia

Aridis Pharmaceuticals begins Aerucin Phase 1 clinical study for treatment of acute pneumonia

Aridis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company applying proprietary technologies to produce novel therapies for infectious diseases, announced today the initiation of a Phase 1 clinical study of Aerucin, the Company's fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, which is being developed as an adjunctive treatment for acute pneumonia. [More]
Study: HBV exposure increases immune system maturation of infants

Study: HBV exposure increases immune system maturation of infants

A Singapore led study has shown that Hepatitis B Virus Infection (HBV) exposure increases the immune system maturation of infants, which may give a better survival advantage to counteract bacterial infection during early life. These findings radically modify the way that HBV vertical infection of neonates (mother-to-child) is portrayed, and present a paradigm shift in the approach to treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis B. [More]
FDA approves Quadracel vaccine to protect young children from life-threatening diseases

FDA approves Quadracel vaccine to protect young children from life-threatening diseases

Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccines division of Sanofi, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved use of Quadracel (Diphtheria and Tetanus Toxoids and Acellular Pertussis Absorbed and Inactivated Poliovirus; DTaP-IPV) vaccine for active immunization against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and poliomyelitis in children 4 through 6 years of age. [More]
Researchers discover new way to attract, kill pregnant malaria-transmitting mosquitoes

Researchers discover new way to attract, kill pregnant malaria-transmitting mosquitoes

The battle against malaria is also a battle against its natural host, the mosquito, which means disrupting the insect's lifecycle is every bit as important as putting nets over beds. Now, an international research team has discovered what attracts mosquitos to lay their eggs in specific places. [More]
Mayo Clinic Center for Tuberculosis introduces new medical journal

Mayo Clinic Center for Tuberculosis introduces new medical journal

The Mayo Clinic Center for Tuberculosis, a regional training and consultation center at Mayo Clinic's campus in Rochester, Minn, is today launching a new medical journal, the Journal of Clinical Tuberculosis and Other Mycobacterial Diseases. [More]
Norovirus vaccine may be available in the future

Norovirus vaccine may be available in the future

A multivalent candidate vaccine elicits broad antibody responses to a range of norovirus strains, including strains not included in the vaccine or previously encountered by participants, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine. [More]
Cepheid's Xpert Ebola diagnostic test granted FDA Emergency Use Authorization

Cepheid's Xpert Ebola diagnostic test granted FDA Emergency Use Authorization

Cepheid today announced it has received Emergency Use Authorization from the U.S. Food & Drug Administration for Xpert Ebola, a molecular diagnostic test for Ebola Zaire Virus that delivers results in less than two hours. [More]
Researchers use genetic information to track the fatal spread of multidrug-resistant TB

Researchers use genetic information to track the fatal spread of multidrug-resistant TB

Scientists have for the first time used DNA sequencing to trace the fatal spread of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis between patients in the UK. [More]
Scientists identify key molecules that trigger immune system to fight tularemia

Scientists identify key molecules that trigger immune system to fight tularemia

Research led by scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital has identified key molecules that trigger the immune system to launch an attack on the bacterium that causes tularemia. [More]

Co-infection reduces severity of East Coast fever, can help curb human malaria

When calves are infected by two parasite species at the same time, one parasite renders the other far less deadly, according to a new study published in the current journal of Science Advances. [More]
EMA approves Baylor's hollow fiber system for development of TB drugs

EMA approves Baylor's hollow fiber system for development of TB drugs

The European Medicines Agency (EMA), the equivalent of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, has approved the use of the hollow fiber system for the development of drugs to treat and prevent tuberculosis (TB). [More]
Home-exercise plan for HIV patients

Home-exercise plan for HIV patients

In addition to antiretroviral medications, people with HIV may soon begin receiving a home exercise plan from their doctors, according to a researcher at Case Western Reserve University's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. [More]
Globavir, BioManguinhos partner to jointly evaluate PanGlob RT-PCR Dengue diagnostic assay

Globavir, BioManguinhos partner to jointly evaluate PanGlob RT-PCR Dengue diagnostic assay

Globavir Biosciences, Inc., a biotechnology company developing diagnostic and therapeutic technologies to treat infectious diseases, has announced a partnership with BioManguinhos, a division of the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, for a joint evaluation of Globavir's PanGlob RT-PCR Dengue diagnostic assay. [More]
Researchers examine why joint infections persist despite standards of care

Researchers examine why joint infections persist despite standards of care

Researchers at Thomas Jefferson University and the National Institutes of Health are building on their research which seeks to understand why joint infections persist despite standards of care designed to stop them. [More]
New analysis of medieval cesspit in Jerusalem provides window into spread of infectious diseases

New analysis of medieval cesspit in Jerusalem provides window into spread of infectious diseases

A new analysis of a medieval cesspit in the Christian quarter of the old city of Jerusalem has revealed the presence of a number of ancient parasite eggs, providing a window into the nature and spread of infectious diseases in the Middle East during the 15th century. [More]
Pathogen may cause high levels of virulence in closely-related hosts

Pathogen may cause high levels of virulence in closely-related hosts

When viruses such as influenza and Ebola jump from one species to another, their ability to cause harm can change dramatically, but research from the University of Cambridge shows that it may be possible to predict the virus's virulence by looking at how deadly it is in closely-related species. [More]
Climate change could accelerate emergence of vector-borne diseases in UK

Climate change could accelerate emergence of vector-borne diseases in UK

Climate change could accelerate the emergence of vector-borne diseases such as chikungunya, dengue fever, and West Nile virus in the UK, warn leading public health experts Dr Jolyon Medlock and Professor Steve Leach from the Emergency Response Department at Public Health England, writing in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal. [More]
Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust deploys OpenText to manage patient medical care records

Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust deploys OpenText to manage patient medical care records

OpenText, the global leader in Enterprise Information Management (EIM), today announced that the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust has implemented OpenText Content Suite to store and manage digitised copies of patient medical care records. [More]
Case Western Reserve professor urges action to eliminate yaws

Case Western Reserve professor urges action to eliminate yaws

Half a century ago, a concentrated global effort nearly wiped a disfiguring tropical disease from the face of the earth. Now, says Case Western Reserve's James W. Kazura, MD, it's time to complete the work. [More]
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