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Study provides proof of concept for developing antibodies against human pathogens

Study provides proof of concept for developing antibodies against human pathogens

Scientists investigating the potentially deadly hantavirus have used a novel approach to developing protective antibodies against it. Their work, published in today's online edition of Science Translational Medicine, provides proof of concept for producing antibodies against a broad range of human pathogens. [More]
SLU researcher discovers way to block pain pathway

SLU researcher discovers way to block pain pathway

In research published in the medical journal Brain, Saint Louis University researcher Daniela Salvemini, Ph.D. and colleagues within SLU, the National Institutes of Health and other academic institutions have discovered a way to block a pain pathway in animal models of chronic neuropathic pain including pain caused by chemotherapeutic agents and bone cancer pain suggesting a promising new approach to pain relief. [More]
Experimental Ebola vaccine appears safe, produces immune system responses in NIH phase 1 trial

Experimental Ebola vaccine appears safe, produces immune system responses in NIH phase 1 trial

An experimental vaccine to prevent Ebola virus disease was well-tolerated and produced immune system responses in all 20 healthy adults who received it in a Phase 1 clinical trial conducted by researchers from the National Institutes of Health. The candidate vaccine, which was co-developed by the NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and GlaxoSmithKline, was tested at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. [More]
UTSA's Bernard Arulanandam named fellow of AAAS

UTSA's Bernard Arulanandam named fellow of AAAS

Bernard Arulanandam, UTSA Jane and Roland Blumberg Professor in Biology and Assistant Vice President for Research Support, has been named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Arulanandam was elected by his peers for the honor, recognizing his scientific and socially distinguished efforts to advance science and its applications. [More]
New hybrid vehicle to improve delivery of DNA vaccines is under development

New hybrid vehicle to improve delivery of DNA vaccines is under development

Described recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the technology is a biomedical advancement that could help unleash the potential of DNA vaccines, which despite two decades of research, have yet to make a significant impact in the treatment of major illnesses. [More]
New NIH funding to help researchers develop drug delivery system to prevent HIV infection in women

New NIH funding to help researchers develop drug delivery system to prevent HIV infection in women

The University of Texas Medical Branch is part of a collaboration led by the Oak Crest Institute of Science that received a $20 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop a novel intravaginal ring capable of delivering powerful antiretroviral drugs to prevent the spread of sexually transmitted HIV in women. The total award to UTMB is approximately $2.5 million. [More]
Study finds that starting ART treatment soon after HIV infection improves immune health

Study finds that starting ART treatment soon after HIV infection improves immune health

HIV-1-infected U.S. military members and beneficiaries treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) soon after infection were half as likely to develop AIDS and were more likely to reconstitute their immune-fighting CD4+ T-cells to normal levels, researchers reported Nov. 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
Gates Foundation provides $2 million grant to help fight major parasitic diseases

Gates Foundation provides $2 million grant to help fight major parasitic diseases

Almost $2 million is being invested by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to help fight major parasitic diseases of the developing world. [More]
Merck, NewLink Genetics sign exclusive worldwide license agreement for Ebola vaccine candidate

Merck, NewLink Genetics sign exclusive worldwide license agreement for Ebola vaccine candidate

Merck, known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, and NewLink Genetics Corporation, announced today that they have entered into an exclusive worldwide license agreement to research, develop, manufacture, and distribute NewLink's investigational rVSV-EBOV (Ebola) vaccine candidate. [More]
Unique ability helps prolific bacterium to afflict humans, animals and even plants

Unique ability helps prolific bacterium to afflict humans, animals and even plants

New research has found that one of the world's most prolific bacteria manages to afflict humans, animals and even plants by way of a mechanism not before seen in any infectious microorganism -- a sense of touch. This unique ability helps make the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa ubiquitous, but it also might leave these antibiotic-resistant organisms vulnerable to a new form of treatment. [More]
Digoxin drug associated with higher risk of death, hospitalization among adults with atrial fibrillation

Digoxin drug associated with higher risk of death, hospitalization among adults with atrial fibrillation

Digoxin, a drug commonly used to treat heart conditions, was associated with a 71 percent higher risk of death and a 63 percent higher risk of hospitalization among adults with diagnosed atrial fibrillation and no evidence of heart failure, according to a Kaiser Permanente study that appears in the current online issue of Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology. [More]
UTMB researchers receive awards at American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene meeting

UTMB researchers receive awards at American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene meeting

Scientists at the University of Texas Medical Branch were recognized with prestigious awards for their contributions in research at the annual American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene meeting. [More]
A new method for determining onset of elevated influenza activity at community level

A new method for determining onset of elevated influenza activity at community level

Predicting the beginning of influenza outbreaks is notoriously difficult, and can affect prevention and control efforts. [More]
Gene therapy transforms life for men with severe form of hemophilia B

Gene therapy transforms life for men with severe form of hemophilia B

Gene therapy developed at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, University College London and the Royal Free Hospital has transformed life for men with a severe form of hemophilia B by providing a safe, reliable source of the blood clotting protein Factor IX that has allowed some to adopt a more active lifestyle, researchers reported. [More]
Three-drug regimen taken during pregnancy prevents mother-to-child HIV transmission

Three-drug regimen taken during pregnancy prevents mother-to-child HIV transmission

For HIV-infected women in good immune health, taking a three-drug regimen during pregnancy prevents mother-to-child HIV transmission more effectively than taking one drug during pregnancy, another during labor and two more after giving birth, an international clinical trial has found. [More]
Janssen announces submission of NDA for three-month paliperidone palmitate

Janssen announces submission of NDA for three-month paliperidone palmitate

Janssen Research & Development, LLC today announced the submission of a New Drug Application (NDA) for three-month atypical antipsychotic paliperidone palmitate to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The NDA seeks approval for the medication as a treatment for schizophrenia in adults. [More]
Great Basin Scientific seeks FDA approval for Group B Strep assay

Great Basin Scientific seeks FDA approval for Group B Strep assay

Great Basin Scientific, Inc., a molecular diagnostics company, today announced it has submitted its Group B Strep assay to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for 510(k) clearance. [More]
Poor young people with positive perceptions report better health than people with worse perceptions

Poor young people with positive perceptions report better health than people with worse perceptions

Young people growing up in impoverished neighborhoods who perceive their poor communities in a positive light report better health and well-being than those with worse perceptions of where they live, new research led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests. [More]
Scientists call for public to help monitor spread of flu across the UK

Scientists call for public to help monitor spread of flu across the UK

People taking part in this year's Flusurvey, the UK's biggest crowd-sourced study of influenza will for the first time be offered a swab to confirm if their symptoms are caused by a flu virus or not as part of a new collaboration with i-sense. Data from social media and internet searches will also be combined with Flusurvey, allowing flu trends to be monitored across the UK more accurately and earlier than ever before. [More]
Strategy to stem infections in livestock, endangered species

Strategy to stem infections in livestock, endangered species

When a viral infection spread through five genetically identical mice in a row, the virus replicated faster and became more virulent or severe. But when the infection spread one-by-one through five genetically diverse mice, the virus had trouble adapting and became less virulent. [More]