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Kinesiology, derived from the Greek words kinesis (movement) and kinein (to move), also known as human kinetics, is the science of human movement. It is a discipline that focuses on Physical Activity.
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Exercise helps mitigate side effects of AIs in breast cancer survivors

Exercise helps mitigate side effects of AIs in breast cancer survivors

A researcher at Syracuse University has simple advice for breast cancer survivors struggling with the side effects of Aromatase Inhibitors (AIs): exercise. [More]
Diet and exercise can help lessen damage caused by malaria, UTA study suggests

Diet and exercise can help lessen damage caused by malaria, UTA study suggests

The right amount of diet and exercise can help lessen damage to the heart and skeletal muscles brought on by malaria, according to a new UTA study. [More]
Air pollution exposure and sedentary lifestyle pose serious health threats to children in China

Air pollution exposure and sedentary lifestyle pose serious health threats to children in China

Children and adolescents in mainland China are facing two serious and conflicting public health threats: ongoing exposure to air pollution and an increasingly sedentary lifestyle with little regular physical activity outside school. [More]
Sedentary older adults likely to develop dementia as those with genetic risk factors, research finds

Sedentary older adults likely to develop dementia as those with genetic risk factors, research finds

Sedentary older adults with no genetic risk factors for dementia may be just as likely to develop the disease as those who are genetically predisposed, according to a major study which followed more than 1,600 Canadians over five years. [More]
New report proposes updated revisions to WIC for better adherence to Dietary Guidelines for Americans

New report proposes updated revisions to WIC for better adherence to Dietary Guidelines for Americans

A new congressionally mandated report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine proposes updated revisions to the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children to better align with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and promote and support breast-feeding. [More]
UOW researchers testing therapeutic values of Ashtanga yoga for breast cancer survivors

UOW researchers testing therapeutic values of Ashtanga yoga for breast cancer survivors

Canada’s University of Windsor researchers are testing therapeutic values of Ashtanga yoga for survivors of breast cancer. [More]
Research aims to incorporate cardiorespiratory fitness measurements into clinical practice

Research aims to incorporate cardiorespiratory fitness measurements into clinical practice

A new Scientific Statement from the American Heart Association led by Queen's University professor Robert Ross provides unequivocal evidence to confirm that cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), a reflection of overall cardiovascular health, should be measured in clinical practice to provide additional information for patient management. [More]
Young adults with ADHD may display unique physiological signs that could lead to accurate diagnosis

Young adults with ADHD may display unique physiological signs that could lead to accurate diagnosis

Young adults diagnosed with ADHD may display subtle physiological signs that could lead to a more precise diagnosis, according to Penn State researchers. [More]
Three low-carb meals in a day can reduce insulin resistance by more than 30%, U-M study shows

Three low-carb meals in a day can reduce insulin resistance by more than 30%, U-M study shows

Three low-carb meals within 24 hours lowers post-meal insulin resistance by more than 30 percent, but high-carb meals sustain insulin resistance, a condition that leads to high blood pressure, prediabetes and diabetes, according to a University of Michigan study. [More]
Experts evaluate messages about dietary behaviors and feeding strategies in picture books

Experts evaluate messages about dietary behaviors and feeding strategies in picture books

Feeding children can be a challenging process for many parents. A previous study found 46% of preschoolers were picky eaters and 40% of picky eaters remained picky for two or more years. [More]
Health researchers find increasing obesity rates among baseball players

Health researchers find increasing obesity rates among baseball players

Major League Baseball players have become overwhelmingly overweight and obese during the last quarter century, say health researchers. [More]
Decrease in physical activity and concentration of fish oil linked to depressed mood among veterans

Decrease in physical activity and concentration of fish oil linked to depressed mood among veterans

Low concentration of fish oil in the blood and lack of physical activity may contribute to the high levels of depressed mood among soldiers returning from combat, according to researchers, including a Texas A&M University professor and his former doctoral student. [More]
Study links Spring Loaded Technology’s Levitation Knee Brace to significant reduction in muscle fatigue

Study links Spring Loaded Technology’s Levitation Knee Brace to significant reduction in muscle fatigue

Spring Loaded Technology today reports the findings of a recent third-party study which links its Levitation, the world’s first compact bionic knee brace, to a significant reduction in factors that can lead to muscle fatigue. [More]
New research finds decrease in brain blood flow after stopping exercise in healthy older adults

New research finds decrease in brain blood flow after stopping exercise in healthy older adults

We all know that we can quickly lose cardiovascular endurance if we stop exercising for a few weeks, but what impact does the cessation of exercise have on our brains? New research led by University of Maryland School of Public Health researchers examined cerebral blood flow in healthy, physically fit older adults (ages 50-80 years) before and after a 10-day period during which they stopped all exercise. [More]
Study finds football players may suffer from heat-related illness during first two weeks of practice

Study finds football players may suffer from heat-related illness during first two weeks of practice

As the college football season heats up, a new University of Georgia study finds players are more likely to suffer from heat-related illness during the first two weeks of practice, especially those in the Southeast. [More]
Scientists examine how neural responses change over time in patients with Parkinson's disease

Scientists examine how neural responses change over time in patients with Parkinson's disease

Neuroscientists peered into the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease and two similar conditions to see how their neural responses changed over time. [More]
New, non-invasive way to monitor progression of Parkinson's disease may help improve treatment

New, non-invasive way to monitor progression of Parkinson's disease may help improve treatment

A new, non-invasive way to track the progression of Parkinson's disease could help evaluate experimental treatments to slow or stop the disease's progression. [More]
Health tips to keep children safe and active in summer heat

Health tips to keep children safe and active in summer heat

During the dog days of summer, when temperatures are holding steady around 90 degrees, it can be easy to let your children sit in front of the television while enjoying the cool of the air conditioning. [More]
Football players sustain more serious head impacts when hitting another player, study shows

Football players sustain more serious head impacts when hitting another player, study shows

In football, player-vs.-player hits will likely cause more severe head impacts than other impacts, according to a new study by a University of Georgia researcher. [More]
Pap tests may be beneficial for preventing cervical cancer in older women

Pap tests may be beneficial for preventing cervical cancer in older women

A new study from the University of Illinois confirms a link between Pap smear screenings and a lower risk of developing cervical cancer in women over age 65. However, most American health guidelines discourage women in that age range from receiving screenings unless they have pre-existing risk factors. [More]
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