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Kinesiology, derived from the Greek words kinesis (movement) and kinein (to move), also known as human kinetics, is the science of human movement. It is a discipline that focuses on Physical Activity.
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Excess dietary sodium can adversely affect organs

Excess dietary sodium can adversely affect organs

You may think you're one of the lucky ones who can eat all the salty snacks and convenience foods you want and still register low numbers on the blood pressure cuff. But, new research suggests you may not be so lucky after all. [More]
Indiana University study reveals connection between mussels and muscles

Indiana University study reveals connection between mussels and muscles

An Indiana University study has revealed that there may be a greater connection between mussels and muscles than previously thought. [More]
Penn State researchers explore hydrogen sulfide's probable role in regulating blood pressure

Penn State researchers explore hydrogen sulfide's probable role in regulating blood pressure

Widely considered simply a malodorous toxic gas, hydrogen sulfide is now being studied for its probable role in regulating blood pressure, according to researchers. [More]
Researchers conduct environmental scan to understand physical activity services offered by FHTs

Researchers conduct environmental scan to understand physical activity services offered by FHTs

To better understand the current use of physical activity as medicine among Family Health Teams (FHTs) in Ontario, researchers at the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Waterloo and the Centre for Family Medicine Family Health Team conducted an environmental scan of 102 FHTs. [More]
Penn State researchers explore benefits of beet juice

Penn State researchers explore benefits of beet juice

Athletes who down beet juice before exercising to increase blood flow and improve performance may be surprised at the results of a recent study conducted at Penn State's Noll Laboratory. While beetroot juice rich in nitrates did not enhance muscle blood flow or vascular dilation during exercise, researchers found that it did "de-stiffen" blood vessels under resting conditions, potentially easing the workload of the heart. [More]
Simple training exercise of catching a medicine ball may help prevent falls in the elderly

Simple training exercise of catching a medicine ball may help prevent falls in the elderly

The simple training exercise of catching a weighted medicine ball can improve balance and may help prevent falls in the elderly, according to research at the University of Illinois at Chicago. [More]
New study investigates ways to help people with MS respond to sudden balance challenge

New study investigates ways to help people with MS respond to sudden balance challenge

Many people with multiple sclerosis (MS) have trouble with balance and a fear of falling, which can have severe negative effects on their quality of life by keeping them away from social events, regular exercise and community activities. And, if they do get out, the fatigue and anxiety of walking can be very taxing. [More]
Physical activity linked to children's brain and cognitive development, scholastic achievement

Physical activity linked to children's brain and cognitive development, scholastic achievement

Over the past thirty years, physical activity among children has declined markedly. The public health implications of this decline include a growing prevalence of obesity and chronic diseases such as diabetes and hypertension. A new issue of Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development expands the focus to ask whether physical activity is also related to children's brain and cognitive development and achievement in school. [More]

Boys engage in relationally aggressive behavior more often than girls, shows UGA study

Debunking the myth of the "mean girl," new research from the University of Georgia has found that boys use relational aggression--malicious rumors, social exclusion and rejection--to harm or manipulate others more often than girls. [More]
Most U.S. adults fail to meet recommended levels of key nutrients

Most U.S. adults fail to meet recommended levels of key nutrients

A new study finds that most U.S. adults fail to meet recommended daily levels of 10 key nutrients, and those with disabilities have even worse nutrition than average. [More]
Study finds that beetroot can improve athletic performance, benefit heart failure patients

Study finds that beetroot can improve athletic performance, benefit heart failure patients

Football teams are claiming it improves their athletic performance, and according to new research from Kansas State University, it also benefits heart failure patients. The special ingredient: beetroot. [More]
Simple test based on movement and thought can help identify Alzheimer's risk before signs of dementia

Simple test based on movement and thought can help identify Alzheimer's risk before signs of dementia

York University researchers say a simple test that combines thinking and movement can help to detect heightened risk for developing Alzheimer's disease in a person, even before there are any telltale behavioural signs of dementia. [More]
Different regions of brain help to visually locate objects relative to one's own body

Different regions of brain help to visually locate objects relative to one's own body

Serena Williams won her third consecutive US Open title a few days ago, thanks to reasons including obvious ones like physical strength and endurance. But how much did her brain and its egocentric and allocentric functions help the American tennis star retain the cup? [More]
Aerobic activities before school help reduce symptoms of ADHD in children

Aerobic activities before school help reduce symptoms of ADHD in children

Paying attention all day in school as a kid isn't easy, especially for those who are at a higher risk of ADHD, or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. [More]
5-minute walks can reverse harm caused to leg arteries from prolonged sitting

5-minute walks can reverse harm caused to leg arteries from prolonged sitting

An Indiana University study has found that three easy -- one could even say slow -- 5-minute walks can reverse harm caused to leg arteries during three hours of prolonged sitting. [More]
Professor receives grant from NIH to test effects of high-intensity functional training

Professor receives grant from NIH to test effects of high-intensity functional training

Katie Heinrich, assistant professor of kinesiology at Kansas State University, has been awarded an investigator-initiated grant from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases for more than $2.52 million. [More]
Study measures quality indicators in cardiac rehabilitation programs across Canada

Study measures quality indicators in cardiac rehabilitation programs across Canada

The quality of cardiac rehabilitation programs across Canada is strong, with specific criteria areas now identified as requiring further enhancement to improve patient outcomes, according to a new study conducted by researchers at the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, York University and UHN. [More]
Higher-fit children have more compact white-matter tracts in the brain than lower-fit peers

Higher-fit children have more compact white-matter tracts in the brain than lower-fit peers

A new study of 9- and 10-year-olds finds that those who are more aerobically fit have more fibrous and compact white-matter tracts in the brain than their peers who are less fit. "White matter" describes the bundles of axons that carry nerve signals from one brain region to another. More compact white matter is associated with faster and more efficient nerve activity. [More]
University of Kansas researcher earns grant to study role of dietary supplement in muscle growth

University of Kansas researcher earns grant to study role of dietary supplement in muscle growth

A University of Kansas professor has been chosen to take part in a grant project that will test the role of a dietary supplement in muscle growth for everyone from athletes to the elderly and has also been named educator of the year by the granting agency. [More]
Hatha yoga improves sedentary older adults' cognitive performance

Hatha yoga improves sedentary older adults' cognitive performance

Practicing hatha yoga three times a week for eight weeks improved sedentary older adults' performance on cognitive tasks that are relevant to everyday life, researchers report. [More]
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