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Kinesiology, derived from the Greek words kinesis (movement) and kinein (to move), also known as human kinetics, is the science of human movement. It is a discipline that focuses on Physical Activity.
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Researchers developing cryotherapy device to reduce tissue damage

Researchers developing cryotherapy device to reduce tissue damage

Cold therapy has long been prescribed for those recovering from orthopedic surgery, muscle inflammation and sports-related injuries, with treatments ranging from ice baths to immersion in whole-body cryotherapy chambers. [More]
Simple blood test could help eliminate B12 deficiencies among older adults in long-term care homes

Simple blood test could help eliminate B12 deficiencies among older adults in long-term care homes

A high proportion of older adults entering long-term care homes in Ontario are B12 deficient, with more developing deficiencies over the course of their first year in residence, according to research from the University of Waterloo. There is a connection between B12 deficiency and several serious health conditions. [More]
Specialized oral nutrition supplement associated with 50% lower death rate in older patients

Specialized oral nutrition supplement associated with 50% lower death rate in older patients

Results from a new clinical trial show that a specialized oral nutrition supplement was associated with a 50 percent lower death rate in older malnourished patients with a heart or lung disease 90 days following hospitalization. [More]
Fitness DVDs could diminish user's hope and potentially cause psychological harm

Fitness DVDs could diminish user's hope and potentially cause psychological harm

Using fitness DVDs to work out at home may seem like a good way to get started on new exercise goals this year, but those DVDs may also include negative imagery and demotivating language. [More]
Helmetless-tackling drills effective in reducing head impacts by 28%

Helmetless-tackling drills effective in reducing head impacts by 28%

The national debate around football-related head impacts, and their relationship to concussions and spinal injuries, continues to raise concern in the United States. Sparked by efforts to help make the sport safer for players, research at the University of New Hampshire has found that a novel set of helmetless-tackling drills are effective in reducing head impacts by 28 percent in one season. [More]
Coffee may help improve athletic endurance

Coffee may help improve athletic endurance

The caffeine in a morning cup of coffee could help improve athletic endurance, according to a new University of Georgia review study. [More]
Older adults experience problems in processing multisensory information

Older adults experience problems in processing multisensory information

Much like trying to watch a video with the audio out of synch, older adults may have difficulty combining the stimuli they see and hear, and it could have implications for rapid decision-making tasks such as driving, according to new research. [More]
New study reveals link between tinnitus severity and emotion processing in the brain

New study reveals link between tinnitus severity and emotion processing in the brain

Tinnitus, otherwise known as ringing in the ears, affects nearly one-third of adults over age 65. The condition can develop as part of age-related hearing loss or from a traumatic injury. In either case, the resulting persistent noise causes varying amounts of disruption to everyday life. [More]
Employers pay billions of dollars for health care tied to unhealthy lifestyle choices

Employers pay billions of dollars for health care tied to unhealthy lifestyle choices

One out of every four dollars employers pay for health care is tied to unhealthy lifestyle choices or conditions like smoking, stress and obesity, despite the fact that most large employers have workplace wellness programs. [More]
New report reviews current WIC food packages

New report reviews current WIC food packages

Women and children who participate in the WIC program have low or inadequate intakes of several key nutrients that could be addressed with changes to the program's food packages, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. [More]
Exercise can impact cortical thickness in older adults with mild cognitive impairment

Exercise can impact cortical thickness in older adults with mild cognitive impairment

Older adults that improved their fitness through a moderate intensity exercise program increased the thickness of their brain's cortex, the outer layer of the brain that typically atrophies with Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study from the University of Maryland School of Public Health. [More]
Age-related differences in brain health vary with fitness level in older adults

Age-related differences in brain health vary with fitness level in older adults

A new study shows that age-related differences in brain health - specifically the strength of connections between different regions of the brain - vary with fitness level in older adults. The findings suggest that greater cardiorespiratory fitness - a measure of aerobic endurance - relates to stronger brain connections and likely improves long-term brain function in aging populations. [More]
New study finds how African immigrants stigmatized during recent Ebola crisis

New study finds how African immigrants stigmatized during recent Ebola crisis

The deadly Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa also took its toll socially on one of the fastest growing populations in the United States, African immigrants. Guy-Lucien Whembolua, a University of Cincinnati assistant professor of Africana studies, leads an analysis of national news coverage of the Ebola scare in a poster presentation on Nov. 2, at the 143rd American Public Health Association Annual Meeting and Expo, in Chicago. [More]
Research sheds new light on the fight against tonsil cancer

Research sheds new light on the fight against tonsil cancer

Researchers at Simon Fraser University and the BC Cancer Agency have developed a groundbreaking method to identify and separate stem cells that reside in the tonsils. Their research, which sheds new light on the fight against oral cancer, is published today in the journal Stem Cell Reports. [More]
Conventional methods may underestimate cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular strength in people with MS

Conventional methods may underestimate cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular strength in people with MS

Conventional methods of assessing cardiorespiratory fitness and muscular strength among people with multiple sclerosis may underestimate participants' capabilities, prompting clinicians to prescribe exercise therapies that are less effective than they could be, according to new research by scientists at the University of Illinois. [More]
Expectant mothers need to avoid certain cosmetics, cleaning agents and medicines during first trimester

Expectant mothers need to avoid certain cosmetics, cleaning agents and medicines during first trimester

Expectant mothers in their first trimester should avoid certain cosmetics, cleaning agents and medicines, to protect the developing fetal brain from chemicals that can trigger autism, York U health researchers have found. [More]
Cost effectiveness, health benefits of implementing rebate program for low-income households

Cost effectiveness, health benefits of implementing rebate program for low-income households

Providing low-income households that receive federal food assistance benefits with financial incentives to buy fruits and vegetables would encourage them to purchase and consume more healthy food, and slightly increase their longevity, a new study suggests. [More]
Millennials need to eat less and exercise more to prevent obesity

Millennials need to eat less and exercise more to prevent obesity

If you are struggling with weight gain, you might be surprised to know that your parents had it easier - they could eat more and exercise less, and still avoid obesity, according to a recent study out of York University's Faculty of Health. [More]
Study shows diet beverage drinkers compensate by consuming high-calorie foods

Study shows diet beverage drinkers compensate by consuming high-calorie foods

Want fries with that diet soda? You aren't alone, and you may not be "saving" as many calories as you think by consuming diet drinks. [More]
Guilting middle-schoolers into exercising may not increase activity, new study finds

Guilting middle-schoolers into exercising may not increase activity, new study finds

Just like attempts at influencing hairstyles or clothing can backfire, adults who try to guilt middle-schoolers into exercising won't get them to be any more active, according to a new study by University of Georgia researchers. [More]
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