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Kinesiology, derived from the Greek words kinesis (movement) and kinein (to move), also known as human kinetics, is the science of human movement. It is a discipline that focuses on Physical Activity.
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Older runners consume similar rate of metabolic energy as young runners, study finds

Older runners consume similar rate of metabolic energy as young runners, study finds

If you're an avid runner, logging dozens of miles every week and you happen to be over 65, odds are you're burning oxygen at nearly the same rate as a runner in her 20s. [More]
Obese individuals who consume aspartame may have worse glucose management

Obese individuals who consume aspartame may have worse glucose management

Artificial sweeteners help individuals with obesity to cut calories and lose weight but may have negative health effects, according to researchers at York University's Faculty of Health. [More]
Higher aerobic fitness in childhood may reduce metabolic syndrome risks in early adulthood

Higher aerobic fitness in childhood may reduce metabolic syndrome risks in early adulthood

A new study from a group of international researchers has identified a potentially effective tool to reduce the long-term health risks of childhood obesity—aerobic exercise. [More]
Culturally sensitive lifestyle intervention promotes healthy-living behaviors among Latinas

Culturally sensitive lifestyle intervention promotes healthy-living behaviors among Latinas

A culturally sensitive lifestyle intervention showed promise at motivating Latinas living in the U.S. to eat better and exercise more by connecting healthy-living behaviors with the lives of saints and prominent religious figures, new studies found. [More]
New method measures LCO in person's standing posture to diagnose neuromuscular disorders

New method measures LCO in person's standing posture to diagnose neuromuscular disorders

A new technique might be used to diagnose neuromuscular disorders such as multiple sclerosis or impairment from concussions by detecting and measuring subtle oscillations in a person's standing posture. [More]

Modifying nutritional intake may improve sleep

A review of 21 studies that analyzed the effectiveness of modifying nutritional intake as a treatment for improving sleep found mixed results, as reported in the article "Systematic Review of Dietary Interventions Targeting Sleep Behavior (http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/acm.2015.0238)" in The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/acm.2015.0238) website until May 21, 2016. [More]
Toddlers with mobility disabilities less likely to engage in physical activity

Toddlers with mobility disabilities less likely to engage in physical activity

Typical toddlers simultaneously spend about three hours a day in physical activity, play and engagement with objects such as toys, while their peers with mobility disabilities are less likely to engage in all of those behaviors at the same time, new research from Oregon State University shows. [More]
Exercise can lower blood glucose levels among patients taking metformin

Exercise can lower blood glucose levels among patients taking metformin

Exercise can help enhance the effects of blood glucose-lowering medication, according to an award-winning study by a University of Georgia graduate student. [More]
New SPOR Network launched to transform health outcomes of diabetes patients

New SPOR Network launched to transform health outcomes of diabetes patients

A new national research network was launched today to transform the health outcomes of individuals with diabetes and its related complications. It will be led by two of Canada's top researchers in the field and includes researchers conducting leading-edge health and biomedical research at nine institutions across the country. [More]
IUPUI assistant professor to study role of deficient pain modulatory systems on post-traumatic headaches

IUPUI assistant professor to study role of deficient pain modulatory systems on post-traumatic headaches

An assistant professor in the Department of Kinesiology in the IU School of Physical Education and Tourism Management at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis has been awarded a grant to study the role of deficient pain modulatory systems on chronic post-traumatic headaches afflicting hundreds of thousands of people with mild traumatic brain injuries. [More]
High-intensity workout could do more harm than good

High-intensity workout could do more harm than good

High-intensity 'sprint training' may be gaining popularity at gyms, but if you're new to this form of exercise, the workout could do more harm than good. [More]

Sports specialization in high school athletes increases injury risk

There is a sense among those who pay attention to youth and high school athletics that more and more young athletes today are focusing on excelling at a single sport instead of playing a variety. [More]
Research sheds light on healthy cardiac parameters, blood pressure levels of college football players

Research sheds light on healthy cardiac parameters, blood pressure levels of college football players

Ensuring the health and safety of student athletes is a top priority at Texas A&M, especially in the Department of Health and Kinesiology and the Health Science Center College of Medicine. Recent research published in The American Journal of Cardiology and led by Stephen Crouse, Ph.D., is shedding light on the healthy cardiac parameters and blood pressure levels of collegiate American-style football (ASF) athletes. [More]
Walking on two legs can be a challenging task even for young, healthy adults

Walking on two legs can be a challenging task even for young, healthy adults

"The most commonly cited statistic is that one in three older adults falls each year due to age-related changes in balance, and in this four-month study, more than half of the college students fell during daily activities," said Shirley Rietdyk, a professor of health and kinesiology, who only looked at young adults in this study. "The fall rate may be lower for older adults because they are more cautious due to the higher risk of serious, even fatal, injuries from falls. These findings also highlight that walking on two legs is a challenging task that is mechanically unstable, even for young, healthy adults." [More]
Nearly half of African-American adults at risk of developing hypertension

Nearly half of African-American adults at risk of developing hypertension

The stats are too familiar: Nearly half of African-American adults are at risk of developing hypertension, a rate significantly higher than that of any other group in the United States. Hypertension-related ailments, such as strokes and end-stage renal disease, account for 20 percent of all deaths among African-Americans. [More]
Prebiotic may help curb obesity in moms and babies

Prebiotic may help curb obesity in moms and babies

Obesity is a global epidemic and the evidence is clear: if a mother is obese or gains too much weight during pregnancy chances are the child will be at higher risk of being obese throughout its life. [More]
Study finds benefits of drinking plain water

Study finds benefits of drinking plain water

For people who want to control their weight or reduce their intakes of sugar, sodium and saturated fat, tap water may be what the doctor ordered. [More]
Researchers developing cryotherapy device to reduce tissue damage

Researchers developing cryotherapy device to reduce tissue damage

Cold therapy has long been prescribed for those recovering from orthopedic surgery, muscle inflammation and sports-related injuries, with treatments ranging from ice baths to immersion in whole-body cryotherapy chambers. [More]
Simple blood test could help eliminate B12 deficiencies among older adults in long-term care homes

Simple blood test could help eliminate B12 deficiencies among older adults in long-term care homes

A high proportion of older adults entering long-term care homes in Ontario are B12 deficient, with more developing deficiencies over the course of their first year in residence, according to research from the University of Waterloo. There is a connection between B12 deficiency and several serious health conditions. [More]
Specialized oral nutrition supplement associated with 50% lower death rate in older patients

Specialized oral nutrition supplement associated with 50% lower death rate in older patients

Results from a new clinical trial show that a specialized oral nutrition supplement was associated with a 50 percent lower death rate in older malnourished patients with a heart or lung disease 90 days following hospitalization. [More]
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