Leukemia News and Research RSS Feed - Leukemia News and Research

Leukemia (Leukaemia) is a cancer of the blood cells. It is the most common type of blood cancer and affects 10 times as many adults as children. Most people diagnosed with leukemia are over 50 years old. No one knows why some people develop leukemia and others do not. However, scientists have identified some risk factors for the disease. Most people who have known risk factors do not get leukemia, while many who do get the disease have none of these risk factors. During the early stages of leukemia, there may be no symptoms. Many of the symptoms of leukemia don't become apparent until a large number of normal blood cells are crowded out by leukemia cells.
Enzyme identified in baker's yeast can efficiently annihilate leukemia cells

Enzyme identified in baker's yeast can efficiently annihilate leukemia cells

An enzyme identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, commonly known as brewer's or baker's yeast, has passed in vitro trials, demonstrating its capacity to kill acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. [More]
Research offers new clues to prolong lifespan of the body's disease-fighting NK cells

Research offers new clues to prolong lifespan of the body's disease-fighting NK cells

A team of researchers from Australia and France have uncovered new insights into how to prolong the lifespan of the body's disease-fighting natural killer (NK) cells. [More]
Novel treatment can effectively inhibit development of GVHD in mice, study shows

Novel treatment can effectively inhibit development of GVHD in mice, study shows

Graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) is the leading cause of non-relapse associated death in patients who receive stem cell transplants. [More]
Roswell Park study provides new insights into gene mutations that can lead to cancer

Roswell Park study provides new insights into gene mutations that can lead to cancer

​Predisposition to cancer and cancer progression can result from gene mutations that cause elevated rates of genetic damage. [More]
NCCN publishes new easy-to-understand patient education resources focused on brain cancer

NCCN publishes new easy-to-understand patient education resources focused on brain cancer

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network has published the NCCN Guidelines for Patients and NCCN Quick Guide sheets for Brain Cancer - Gliomas—the first in a series of patient education resources focused on Brain Cancer. [More]
Northwestern Medicine scientists identify targeted molecular therapy that halts childhood leukemia

Northwestern Medicine scientists identify targeted molecular therapy that halts childhood leukemia

Northwestern Medicine scientists have discovered the genetic driver of a rare and lethal childhood leukemia and identified a targeted molecular therapy that halts the proliferation of leukemic cells. [More]
Study shows promising results for treating lymphoma patients with immune cell therapy

Study shows promising results for treating lymphoma patients with immune cell therapy

Lymphoma is the most common blood cancer. The disease occurs when immune cells called lymphocytes multiply uncontrollably. Cancerous lymphocytes can travel throughout the body and form lymph node tumors. [More]
Yoga during active treatment can provide QOL benefits for pediatric cancer patients and parents

Yoga during active treatment can provide QOL benefits for pediatric cancer patients and parents

A yoga program for children with cancer can be carried out even during cancer treatment, and has quality of life (QOL) benefits for the children as well as their parents, suggests a study in Rehabilitation Oncology, official journal of the Oncology Section of the American Physical Therapy Association. [More]
Scientists reveal chemical process behind anti-cancer properties of spicy pepper plant

Scientists reveal chemical process behind anti-cancer properties of spicy pepper plant

UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists have uncovered the chemical process behind anti-cancer properties of a spicy Indian pepper plant called the long pepper, whose suspected medicinal properties date back thousands of years. [More]
Persistent infection in infant reveals mutation that helps bacteria tolerate antibiotic therapy

Persistent infection in infant reveals mutation that helps bacteria tolerate antibiotic therapy

The quest to understand a prolonged infection in an infant being treated for leukemia has led to the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital discovery of a mutation that allows bacteria to tolerate normally effective antibiotic therapy. The report appears today in the scientific journal mBio. [More]
Researchers identify possible treatment targets for myelodysplasia syndromes

Researchers identify possible treatment targets for myelodysplasia syndromes

Cincinnati Children's researchers report in Nature Immunology a new mechanism that controls blood cell function and several possible molecular targets for treating myelodysplasia syndromes (MDS) - a group of pre-malignant disorders in which bone marrow does not produce enough healthy blood cells. [More]
Fred Hutch’s new Evergreen Fund to promote commercialization of research into lifesaving therapies

Fred Hutch’s new Evergreen Fund to promote commercialization of research into lifesaving therapies

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center announced its first-ever grants from its newly established Evergreen Fund to spur researchers' efforts to advance bold ideas toward creating or partnering with a commercial entity. [More]
Combination of diabetes and hypertension drugs can effectively treat cancer

Combination of diabetes and hypertension drugs can effectively treat cancer

A combination of a diabetes medication and an antihypertensive drug can effectively combat cancer cells. [More]
UC researchers uncover obesity-related protein's role in leukemia development

UC researchers uncover obesity-related protein's role in leukemia development

Cancer researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine have found an obesity-associated protein's role in leukemia development and drug response which could lead to more effective therapies for the illness. [More]
FDA awards accelerated approval to new ovarian cancer drug

FDA awards accelerated approval to new ovarian cancer drug

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today granted accelerated approval to Rubraca (rucaparib) to treat women with a certain type of ovarian cancer. [More]
New clinical study for children with AML aims to kill leukemia cells and minimize cardiac damage

New clinical study for children with AML aims to kill leukemia cells and minimize cardiac damage

Imagine conquering childhood cancer, only to find out that years down the road your heart may fail. [More]
Mayo Clinic creates genetic test to help guide diagnosis, treatment of lymphoma patients

Mayo Clinic creates genetic test to help guide diagnosis, treatment of lymphoma patients

Mayo Clinic has created a genetic test to help guide diagnosis and treatment of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, the most common type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. [More]
Newborns with CMV may have increased risk of developing acute lymphocytic leukemia

Newborns with CMV may have increased risk of developing acute lymphocytic leukemia

Newborns with congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) -- a common virus in the herpes family -- may have an increased risk of developing acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), according to new research published online today in Blood, the Journal of the American Society of Hematology. The study suggests the risk is even greater in Hispanic children. [More]
Scientists isolate and characterize therapy-resistant dormant leukemia cells

Scientists isolate and characterize therapy-resistant dormant leukemia cells

Dr. Irmela Jeremias from Helmholtz Zentrum München and her colleagues have succeeded in finding a small population of inactive leukemia cells that is responsible for relapse of the disease. [More]
Scientists develop first functional biological pacemaker from human stem cells

Scientists develop first functional biological pacemaker from human stem cells

Scientists from the McEwen Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University Health Network, have developed the first functional pacemaker cells from human stem cells, paving the way for alternate, biological pacemaker therapy. [More]
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