Leukemia News and Research RSS Feed - Leukemia News and Research

Leukemia (Leukaemia) is a cancer of the blood cells. It is the most common type of blood cancer and affects 10 times as many adults as children. Most people diagnosed with leukemia are over 50 years old. No one knows why some people develop leukemia and others do not. However, scientists have identified some risk factors for the disease. Most people who have known risk factors do not get leukemia, while many who do get the disease have none of these risk factors. During the early stages of leukemia, there may be no symptoms. Many of the symptoms of leukemia don't become apparent until a large number of normal blood cells are crowded out by leukemia cells.
Study holds promise for new alternatives to treat leukemia

Study holds promise for new alternatives to treat leukemia

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have discovered that a type of cancer found primarily in children can grow only when signaled to do so by other nearby cells that are noncancerous. [More]
Researchers use hydrogel to prevent stem cells and human embryos from differentiating

Researchers use hydrogel to prevent stem cells and human embryos from differentiating

Unlike normal cells, stem cells are pluripotent -- they can become any cell type, which makes them powerful potential treatments for diseases such as diabetes, leukemia and age-related blindness. However, maintaining this versatility until the time is right is a major challenge. [More]
Pediatric ALL patients treated with chemotherapy alone at risk for neurocognitive deficits

Pediatric ALL patients treated with chemotherapy alone at risk for neurocognitive deficits

Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients treated with chemotherapy alone remain at risk for attention and learning problems that persist after treatment ends, according to St. Jude Children's Research Hospital investigators. [More]
Some heart disease drugs, antibiotics show promising perspectives in treating cancers

Some heart disease drugs, antibiotics show promising perspectives in treating cancers

North American researchers have identified drugs that showed promising perspectives in treating cancers, according to a recent study published in Cancer Research. [More]
Abnormal breakage of chromosomes in white blood cells triggers aggressive form of ALL

Abnormal breakage of chromosomes in white blood cells triggers aggressive form of ALL

A research team led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists has discovered details of how the abnormal breakage and rearrangement of chromosomes in white blood cells triggers a particularly aggressive form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Such leukemias are cancers of white blood cells, in which genetic mutations trigger overproduction of immature cells, called lymphoblasts. [More]
New personalized DNA-based digital assay has potential to dramatically impact CML management

New personalized DNA-based digital assay has potential to dramatically impact CML management

The outcomes of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) have dramatically improved as the result of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment. Use of a TKI regimen can lower the blood CML biomarker to levels imperceptible by current detection methods. For patients in "molecular remission," however, uncertainties remain regarding whether they will relapse or if treatment should be discontinued. [More]
Bone loss linked with ALL therapy occurs during first month of treatment

Bone loss linked with ALL therapy occurs during first month of treatment

Investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have found that significant bone loss - a side effect of chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) - occurs during the first month of treatment, far earlier than previously assumed. Results of the study will be available online February 4, in advance of publication in the journal Bone. [More]
Researchers discover potential candidates for development of novel targeted therapies for blood cancers

Researchers discover potential candidates for development of novel targeted therapies for blood cancers

A research team from the Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics at Roswell Park Cancer Institute has discovered a new class of small-molecule compounds that are good candidates for development of novel targeted therapies in the treatment of leukemia and lymphoma. [More]
Newly drafted consensus statement promotes widespread use of HPV vaccines to prevent cancer

Newly drafted consensus statement promotes widespread use of HPV vaccines to prevent cancer

Leaders of several cancer centers designated by the National Cancer Institute have united to support human papillomavirus vaccination. Among them is Cheryl Willman, MD, Director and CEO of the University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center. [More]
Researchers explore ways to use light to combat cancer

Researchers explore ways to use light to combat cancer

Immunotherapy is one of the hottest emerging areas of cancer research. After all, using the body's own cells to fight cancer can be more effective and less invasive than flooding the entire system with toxic chemicals. [More]
Northwestern researchers use fruit fly genetics to understand how things may go wrong in cancer

Northwestern researchers use fruit fly genetics to understand how things may go wrong in cancer

Cancer cells are normal cells that go awry by making bad developmental decisions during their lives. In a study involving the fruit fly equivalent of an oncogene implicated in many human leukemias, Northwestern University researchers have gained insight into how developing cells normally switch to a restricted, or specialized, state and how that process might go wrong in cancer. [More]
Health Canada approves immunotherapy clinical study to treat Epstein-Barr virus-related lymphomas

Health Canada approves immunotherapy clinical study to treat Epstein-Barr virus-related lymphomas

Health Canada recently approved, for the first time in Canada, a clinical project for a Phase I study aimed at treating lymphomas associated with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) through adoptive cellular immunotherapy that is specific to EBV. [More]
Researchers reveal totally new biological mechanism that underlies cancer

Researchers reveal totally new biological mechanism that underlies cancer

In a landmark study, researchers from the Broad Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital reveal a completely new biological mechanism that underlies cancer. By studying brain tumors that carry mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) genes, the team uncovered some unusual changes in the instructions for how the genome folds up on itself. [More]
New mechanism of differentiation may offer novel therapeutic approaches to blood malignancies, solid tumors

New mechanism of differentiation may offer novel therapeutic approaches to blood malignancies, solid tumors

In humans the differentiation of stem cells into hundreds of specialized cell types is vital. Differentiation drives development from fertilized egg to a newborn, and it underlies the continuous replacement of the 5 billion cells that die every hour in an adult. On the downside, mutations in differentiation pathways of different cell types can be drivers of cancers. [More]
McMaster University researchers take a giant leap in detecting early stages of leukemia

McMaster University researchers take a giant leap in detecting early stages of leukemia

McMaster University researchers have taken a giant leap in identifying the early stages of a deadly cancer and predicting how it will develop in individuals. [More]
Cancer mortality continues to drop in the U.S.

Cancer mortality continues to drop in the U.S.

Steady reductions in smoking combined with advances in cancer prevention, early detection, and treatment have resulted in a 23% drop in the cancer death rate since its peak in 1991. The drop translates to more than 1.7 million cancer deaths averted through 2012. [More]
People with low sunlight exposure and vitamin D deficiency at greater risk of developing leukemia

People with low sunlight exposure and vitamin D deficiency at greater risk of developing leukemia

Epidemiologists at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that persons residing at higher latitudes, with lower sunlight/ultraviolet B (UVB) exposure and greater prevalence of vitamin D deficiency, are at least two times at greater risk of developing leukemia than equatorial populations. [More]
Scientists demonstrate workings of CCL2 mechanism that stimulates nerve regeneration

Scientists demonstrate workings of CCL2 mechanism that stimulates nerve regeneration

The peripheral nervous system is a vast network of nerves that exists primarily outside of brain and spinal cord and connects to the far reaches of the body. The very expanse of peripheral nerves makes them highly vulnerable to injuries such as blunt-force blows, cuts, and leg and arm fractures, as well as diseases that attack peripheral nerves such as diabetes, Charcot-Marie-Tooth, and Guillain-Barre syndrome. [More]
Immune enters into exclusive license with Atlante Biotech for new format of bispecific antibodies

Immune enters into exclusive license with Atlante Biotech for new format of bispecific antibodies

Immune Pharmaceuticals Inc. a clinical-stage company developing novel therapies for the treatment of immuno-inflammatory diseases and cancer, today announced it has entered into an exclusive license with Atlante Biotech SAS, to the patents and know-how for a new format of bispecific antibodies. [More]
Rich Pharmaceuticals obtains FDA approval to begin Phase 1/2 study in AML and MDS patients

Rich Pharmaceuticals obtains FDA approval to begin Phase 1/2 study in AML and MDS patients

Rich Pharmaceuticals, Inc. is pleased to announce that the Company has received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to commence its Phase 1/2 clinical for the treatment of Acute Myelocytic Leukemia (AML) and Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) patients. [More]
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