Lymphoma News and Research RSS Feed - Lymphoma News and Research

Lymphoma is cancer that begins in cells of the immune system. There are two basic categories of lymphomas. One kind is Hodgkin lymphoma, which is marked by the presence of a type of cell called the Reed-Sternberg cell. The other category is non-Hodgkin lymphomas, which includes a large, diverse group of cancers of immune system cells. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas can be further divided into cancers that have an indolent (slow-growing) course and those that have an aggressive (fast-growing) course. These subtypes behave and respond to treatment differently. Both Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas can occur in children and adults, and prognosis and treatment depend on the stage and the type of cancer.
New study links cathepsin S protein to tear secretion in Sjogren's syndrome patients

New study links cathepsin S protein to tear secretion in Sjogren's syndrome patients

The autoimmune disorder Sjogren's syndrome is often overlooked or misdiagnosed because the symptoms are similar to other conditions. Its characteristic symptoms are dry eyes and dry mouth, and reduced tear production is used as part of the diagnosis. [More]
New investigational inhibitor JQEZ5 can block specific molecular malfunctions driving cancer

New investigational inhibitor JQEZ5 can block specific molecular malfunctions driving cancer

In a step forward in the push for targeted treatments that can block the specific molecular malfunctions driving cancer, University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have demonstrated how a genetic mutation can drive the most common type of lymphoma as well as melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. [More]
Ibrutinib shows added benefit for refractory mantle cell lymphoma patients

Ibrutinib shows added benefit for refractory mantle cell lymphoma patients

Ibrutinib is a drug for the treatment of rare diseases. It has been approved for the treatment of adults with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) or with relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) since 2014, and since 2015 also for the treatment of adults with Waldenström macroglobulinaemia. Regarding the treatment of patients with CLL or MCL, the Federal Joint Committee (G-BA) already conducted a benefit assessment and made a decision in 2015. [More]
Stereotactic body radiation therapy for NSCLC patients may raise non-cancer mortality risk

Stereotactic body radiation therapy for NSCLC patients may raise non-cancer mortality risk

Researchers have found that treating patients who have early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with a type of radiotherapy called stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is associated with a small but increased risk of death from causes other than cancer. [More]
NCCN publishes series of patient education materials for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

NCCN publishes series of patient education materials for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

It is estimated that more than 72,000 people in the United States will be diagnosed with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas (NHL) in 2016. The sixth leading cancer diagnosis in U.S. men and women, NHL has more than 30 sub-types, each featuring unique treatment choices and challenges. [More]
TJP1 protein could help determine multiple myeloma patients who may best benefit from proteasome inhibitors

TJP1 protein could help determine multiple myeloma patients who may best benefit from proteasome inhibitors

A gene known as TJP1 (tight junction protein 1) could help determine which multiple myeloma patients would best benefit from proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib, as well as combination approaches to enhance proteasome inhibitor sensitivity, according to a study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Residential radon exposure may lead to hematologic cancer risk in women

Residential radon exposure may lead to hematologic cancer risk in women

A new report finds a statistically-significant, positive association between high levels of residential radon and the risk of hematologic cancer (lymphoma, myeloma, and leukemia) in women. The study is the first prospective, population-based study of residential radon exposure and hematologic cancer risk, leading the authors to caution that it requires replication to better understand the association and whether it truly differs by sex. It appears early online in Environmental Research. [More]
Gut bacteria linked to risk of bloodstream infections after chemotherapy

Gut bacteria linked to risk of bloodstream infections after chemotherapy

A new study led by researchers at the University of Minnesota and Nantes University Hospital in France shows that the bacteria in people's gut may predict their risk of life-threatening blood infections following high-dose chemotherapy. [More]
Janssen gets positive CHMP opinion for IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) to treat patients with previously untreated CLL

Janssen gets positive CHMP opinion for IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) to treat patients with previously untreated CLL

Janssen-Cilag International NV today announced that the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use of the European Medicines Agency has adopted a Positive Opinion, recommending broadening the existing marketing authorisation for ibrutinib as a single agent for the treatment of adult patients with previously untreated chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). [More]
Musashi-2 protein regulates function, development of blood stem cells

Musashi-2 protein regulates function, development of blood stem cells

Researchers at McMaster University's Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institute have made significant steps forward in understanding the stem cells of the human blood system after discovering how a key protein allows for better control and regeneration of these cells. [More]
Study on HDAC enzymes could lead to development of better drugs for treatment of cancer, Alzheimer’s

Study on HDAC enzymes could lead to development of better drugs for treatment of cancer, Alzheimer’s

New knowledge about the mechanism of specific protein complexes in the body could help in the development of better drugs for the treatment of diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer’s, according to research led by the University of Leicester. [More]
Rab inhibition may be a promising antimyeloma strategy

Rab inhibition may be a promising antimyeloma strategy

Roswell Park Cancer Institute researchers are investigating agents that target and disrupt the trafficking of monoclonal antibodies in multiple myeloma, a cancer of the bone marrow. The results will be presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016, to be held April 16-20 in New Orleans. [More]
BCR-ABL halving time indicates CML prognosis during front-line TKI

BCR-ABL halving time indicates CML prognosis during front-line TKI

Calculating halving time of the BCR-ABL transcript after 3 months may help determine prognosis in chronic myeloid leukaemia patients undergoing first-line tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy, say researchers. [More]
Novel combination of cancer drugs can have therapeutic impact on diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

Novel combination of cancer drugs can have therapeutic impact on diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

New research from Roswell Park Cancer Institute shows that promising cancer drugs used in combination can have significant therapeutic impact on a particularly aggressive subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DH-DLBCL) in preclinical studies. The researchers will present their findings at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2016, to be held April 16-20 in New Orleans. [More]
Imatinib-related symptom burden linked to adherence in Indian CML patients

Imatinib-related symptom burden linked to adherence in Indian CML patients

Research shows low adherence to imatinib in Indian patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia, with an association between nonadherence and worse symptom burden related to treatment. [More]
Intestinal bacteria can be used to reduce cancer risk, reveals UCLA study

Intestinal bacteria can be used to reduce cancer risk, reveals UCLA study

Researchers have shown that various types of intestinal bacteria might be factors in both causing and preventing obesity, and in other conditions and diseases. Now, a UCLA study suggests that it could also potentially be used to reduce the risk for some types of cancer. [More]
RedHill Biopharma initiates phase II study of BEKINDA for irritable bowel syndrome

RedHill Biopharma initiates phase II study of BEKINDA for irritable bowel syndrome

RedHill Biopharma Ltd. (NASDAQ; RDHL) (TASE: RDHL) (“RedHill” or the “Company”), a biopharmaceutical company primarily focused on development and commercialization of late clinical-stage, proprietary, orally-administered, small molecule drugs for inflammatory and gastrointestinal diseases, including cancer, today announced that it has initiated a randomized, double-blind, 2-arm parallel group Phase II clinical study in the U.S. evaluating the safety and efficacy of BEKINDA™ 12 mg in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D). [More]
Alternative splicing regulates MALT1 protein to have stronger or weaker effect on immune system

Alternative splicing regulates MALT1 protein to have stronger or weaker effect on immune system

The protein MALT1 is an important switch in immune cells and affects their activity. Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München report in 'Nature Communications' that this activation is not always equally strong. Through alternative splicing, two variants of the protein may arise which have a stronger or weaker effect on the immune system. Understanding this process is important for the pharmacological use of MALT1. [More]
Added benefit of crizotinib drug for first-line treatment of advanced bronchial carcinoma not proven

Added benefit of crizotinib drug for first-line treatment of advanced bronchial carcinoma not proven

The drug crizotinib (trade name: Xalkori) has been available since 2012 for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (bronchial carcinoma) who have a high activity of the enzyme anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and have already received another treatment. In November 2015, the approval was extended to first-line treatment. [More]
Autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation promise for myasthenia gravis

Autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation promise for myasthenia gravis

Study findings in seven patients with severe myasthenia gravis support the use of autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for achieving long-term remission. [More]
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