Lymphoma News and Research RSS Feed - Lymphoma News and Research

Lymphoma is cancer that begins in cells of the immune system. There are two basic categories of lymphomas. One kind is Hodgkin lymphoma, which is marked by the presence of a type of cell called the Reed-Sternberg cell. The other category is non-Hodgkin lymphomas, which includes a large, diverse group of cancers of immune system cells. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas can be further divided into cancers that have an indolent (slow-growing) course and those that have an aggressive (fast-growing) course. These subtypes behave and respond to treatment differently. Both Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas can occur in children and adults, and prognosis and treatment depend on the stage and the type of cancer.
Adolescents and young adults have lower cancer survival rates compared to children

Adolescents and young adults have lower cancer survival rates compared to children

More young people of all ages are surviving cancer than ever before, but new research published today in The Lancet Oncology journal shows that adolescents and young adults have a lower chance of surviving eight relatively common types of cancer than children, according to the latest data from a long-running study of cancer survival across Europe. [More]
Sylvester researchers test new KTE-C19 therapy for patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

Sylvester researchers test new KTE-C19 therapy for patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

Researchers at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine are testing a novel cellular immunotherapy approach to treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma who have failed standard therapy. [More]
Researchers identify potential ways in which cancer cells may develop resistance to BET inhibitors

Researchers identify potential ways in which cancer cells may develop resistance to BET inhibitors

A team of Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers has worked out how a new class of anti-cancer drugs kills cancer cells, a finding that helps explain how cancer cells may become resistant to treatment. [More]
Phase I study of triple drug combination shows promise in multiple myeloma patients

Phase I study of triple drug combination shows promise in multiple myeloma patients

PharmaMar announces the positive results from a Phase I study of plitidepsin in combination with bortezomib and dexamethasone in patients with relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma. [More]
Penn State researchers link mutation in common virus to fatal brain disease

Penn State researchers link mutation in common virus to fatal brain disease

Why people on immunosuppressant drugs for autoimmune conditions have a higher incidence of an often-fatal brain disease may be linked to a mutation in a common virus, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. [More]
Phase 2 results of AbbVie’s venetoclax in patients with R/R CLL with 17p deletion published in The Lancet Oncology

Phase 2 results of AbbVie’s venetoclax in patients with R/R CLL with 17p deletion published in The Lancet Oncology

AbbVie, a global biopharmaceutical company, today announced The Lancet Oncology published results from the Phase 2, single arm, open label trial studying venetoclax in patients with relapsed/refractory (R/R) chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) with 17p deletion. [More]
Simple, cheap chemical sensors may detect developing cancers in future

Simple, cheap chemical sensors may detect developing cancers in future

Many cancers could be successfully treated if the patient consulted the doctor sufficiently early. But how can a developing cancer be detected if it doesn't give rise to any symptoms? In the near future, suitably early diagnosis could be provided by simple and cheap chemical sensors - thanks to special recognizing polymer films developed at the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw. [More]
University of Glasgow-led study could lead to improved treatments for lymphoma, other cancers

University of Glasgow-led study could lead to improved treatments for lymphoma, other cancers

A study by scientists at the University of Glasgow, which reveals the critical role a common cancer-associated gene plays in lymphoma development, could lead to improved treatments for a range of cancers. [More]
New study links cathepsin S protein to tear secretion in Sjogren's syndrome patients

New study links cathepsin S protein to tear secretion in Sjogren's syndrome patients

The autoimmune disorder Sjogren's syndrome is often overlooked or misdiagnosed because the symptoms are similar to other conditions. Its characteristic symptoms are dry eyes and dry mouth, and reduced tear production is used as part of the diagnosis. [More]
New investigational inhibitor JQEZ5 can block specific molecular malfunctions driving cancer

New investigational inhibitor JQEZ5 can block specific molecular malfunctions driving cancer

In a step forward in the push for targeted treatments that can block the specific molecular malfunctions driving cancer, University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have demonstrated how a genetic mutation can drive the most common type of lymphoma as well as melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. [More]

Ibrutinib shows added benefit for refractory mantle cell lymphoma patients

Ibrutinib is a drug for the treatment of rare diseases. It has been approved for the treatment of adults with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) or with relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) since 2014, and since 2015 also for the treatment of adults with Waldenström macroglobulinaemia. Regarding the treatment of patients with CLL or MCL, the Federal Joint Committee (G-BA) already conducted a benefit assessment and made a decision in 2015. [More]
Stereotactic body radiation therapy for NSCLC patients may raise non-cancer mortality risk

Stereotactic body radiation therapy for NSCLC patients may raise non-cancer mortality risk

Researchers have found that treating patients who have early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with a type of radiotherapy called stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is associated with a small but increased risk of death from causes other than cancer. [More]
NCCN publishes series of patient education materials for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

NCCN publishes series of patient education materials for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

It is estimated that more than 72,000 people in the United States will be diagnosed with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas (NHL) in 2016. The sixth leading cancer diagnosis in U.S. men and women, NHL has more than 30 sub-types, each featuring unique treatment choices and challenges. [More]
TJP1 protein could help determine multiple myeloma patients who may best benefit from proteasome inhibitors

TJP1 protein could help determine multiple myeloma patients who may best benefit from proteasome inhibitors

A gene known as TJP1 (tight junction protein 1) could help determine which multiple myeloma patients would best benefit from proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib, as well as combination approaches to enhance proteasome inhibitor sensitivity, according to a study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Residential radon exposure may lead to hematologic cancer risk in women

Residential radon exposure may lead to hematologic cancer risk in women

A new report finds a statistically-significant, positive association between high levels of residential radon and the risk of hematologic cancer (lymphoma, myeloma, and leukemia) in women. The study is the first prospective, population-based study of residential radon exposure and hematologic cancer risk, leading the authors to caution that it requires replication to better understand the association and whether it truly differs by sex. It appears early online in Environmental Research. [More]
Gut bacteria linked to risk of bloodstream infections after chemotherapy

Gut bacteria linked to risk of bloodstream infections after chemotherapy

A new study led by researchers at the University of Minnesota and Nantes University Hospital in France shows that the bacteria in people's gut may predict their risk of life-threatening blood infections following high-dose chemotherapy. [More]
Janssen gets positive CHMP opinion for IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) to treat patients with previously untreated CLL

Janssen gets positive CHMP opinion for IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) to treat patients with previously untreated CLL

Janssen-Cilag International NV today announced that the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use of the European Medicines Agency has adopted a Positive Opinion, recommending broadening the existing marketing authorisation for ibrutinib as a single agent for the treatment of adult patients with previously untreated chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). [More]
Musashi-2 protein regulates function, development of blood stem cells

Musashi-2 protein regulates function, development of blood stem cells

Researchers at McMaster University's Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institute have made significant steps forward in understanding the stem cells of the human blood system after discovering how a key protein allows for better control and regeneration of these cells. [More]
Study on HDAC enzymes could lead to development of better drugs for treatment of cancer, Alzheimer’s

Study on HDAC enzymes could lead to development of better drugs for treatment of cancer, Alzheimer’s

New knowledge about the mechanism of specific protein complexes in the body could help in the development of better drugs for the treatment of diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer’s, according to research led by the University of Leicester. [More]
Rab inhibition may be a promising antimyeloma strategy

Rab inhibition may be a promising antimyeloma strategy

Roswell Park Cancer Institute researchers are investigating agents that target and disrupt the trafficking of monoclonal antibodies in multiple myeloma, a cancer of the bone marrow. The results will be presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016, to be held April 16-20 in New Orleans. [More]
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