Lymphoma News and Research RSS Feed - Lymphoma News and Research

Lymphoma is cancer that begins in cells of the immune system. There are two basic categories of lymphomas. One kind is Hodgkin lymphoma, which is marked by the presence of a type of cell called the Reed-Sternberg cell. The other category is non-Hodgkin lymphomas, which includes a large, diverse group of cancers of immune system cells. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas can be further divided into cancers that have an indolent (slow-growing) course and those that have an aggressive (fast-growing) course. These subtypes behave and respond to treatment differently. Both Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas can occur in children and adults, and prognosis and treatment depend on the stage and the type of cancer.
Persistent enlarged lymph glands in the neck may indicate cancer

Persistent enlarged lymph glands in the neck may indicate cancer

Referring patients with unexplained swollen neck glands for specialist investigations could help to avoid some of the thousands of deaths each year from lymphoma, a type of cancer. [More]
Study: Cancer rates in HCV patients significantly increase compared to non-HCV cohort

Study: Cancer rates in HCV patients significantly increase compared to non-HCV cohort

Results announced today at The International Liver Congress 2015 show that cancer rates in patients with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) were significantly increased compared to the non-HCV cohort. The researchers suggest an extrahepatic manifestation of HCV may be an increased risk of cancer. [More]
Lilly receives fourth FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Lilly receives fourth FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Eli Lilly and Company has received its fourth U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab). CYRAMZA (ramucirumab injection 10 mg/mL solution) is now also indicated in combination with FOLFIRI (irinotecan, folinic acid, and 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with disease progression on or after prior therapy with bevacizumab, oxaliplatin, and a fluoropyrimidine. [More]
Study shows that Hodgkin lymphoma patients can remain disease-free with just chemotherapy alone

Study shows that Hodgkin lymphoma patients can remain disease-free with just chemotherapy alone

In a paper published in the New England Journal of Medicine, the scientists show that a positron-emission tomography (PET) scan immediately after treatment with chemotherapy can identify patients who have a very good outcome without additional radiotherapy. [More]
Scientists identify missing genetic link in common variable immunodeficiency disorder

Scientists identify missing genetic link in common variable immunodeficiency disorder

In the largest genetic study to date of a challenging immunodeficiency disorder, scientists have identified a gene that may be a "missing link" between overactive and underactive immune activity. The gene candidate also plays a key role in autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and allergies. [More]
Data from pacritinib Phase 3 PERSIST-1 trial in patients with myelofibrosis to be highlighted at ASCO

Data from pacritinib Phase 3 PERSIST-1 trial in patients with myelofibrosis to be highlighted at ASCO

CTI BioPharma Corp. and Baxter International Inc. today announced that data from the randomized Phase 3 PERSIST-1 trial evaluating the investigational agent pacritinib in patients with myelofibrosis will be highlighted in a late-breaking oral presentation at the upcoming American Society of Clinical Oncology 2015 Meeting (May 29-June 2, 2015 in Chicago, Ill). [More]
New study sheds light on mechanism that affects AID enzyme

New study sheds light on mechanism that affects AID enzyme

A new study by immunology researchers at the IRCM led by Javier M. Di Noia, PhD, sheds light on a mechanism affecting AID, a crucial enzyme for the immune response. The scientific breakthrough, published in the latest issue of The Journal of Experimental Medicine, could eventually improve the way we treat the common flu, as well as lymphoma and leukemia. [More]
Global changes in cancer cells' epigenome may determine disease progression

Global changes in cancer cells' epigenome may determine disease progression

Genomic studies have illuminated the ways in which malfunctioning genes can drive cancer growth while stunting the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy and other treatments. But new findings from Weill Cornell Medical College investigators indicate that these genes are only partly to blame for why treatment that was at one point effective ultimately fails for about 40 percent of patients diagnosed with the most common form of non-Hodgkin Lymphoma. [More]
Ibrutinib (IMBRUVICA) may be effective for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

Ibrutinib (IMBRUVICA) may be effective for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

Ibrutinib (IMBRUVICA) data presented yesterday by Pharmacyclics, Inc. at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting suggest that ibrutinib may be an effective therapeutic option for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), as shown in both a transgenic mouse model and an in-vivo model of patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mice (grafts of tissue taken from a pancreatic cancer patient and grafted into a mouse). [More]
May issue of Red Journal focuses on role of radiation therapy in current lymphoma treatment

May issue of Red Journal focuses on role of radiation therapy in current lymphoma treatment

The "Radiation and the Modern Management of Lymphoma" issue (May 1, 2015) of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics (Red Journal), the official scientific journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology, is focused on the integral role of radiation therapy in current lymphoma treatment. [More]
Changes in JAK/STAT3 cell signaling pathway drive ALK-negative ALCL

Changes in JAK/STAT3 cell signaling pathway drive ALK-negative ALCL

The first-ever systematic study of the genomes of patients with ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), a particularly aggressive form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, shows that many cases of the disease are driven by alterations in the JAK/STAT3 cell signaling pathway. [More]
Newly approved drug for rare blood cancer shows sustained benefit for 2 years

Newly approved drug for rare blood cancer shows sustained benefit for 2 years

The most recent results from a clinical trial show that ibrutinib, a newly approved drug for Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia, continued to control the rare blood cancer, with 95 percent of patients surviving for two years, report investigators from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. [More]
Pharmacyclics announces positive results from IMBRUVICA Phase II study in WM patients

Pharmacyclics announces positive results from IMBRUVICA Phase II study in WM patients

Pharmacyclics, Inc. today announced longer-term data from a Phase II investigator-initiated study showing Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM) patients treated with IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) experienced sustained disease control with an overall response rate (ORR) of 91% after a median of 19.1 months of treatment and a 2-year overall survival (OS) rate of 95%. [More]
Study: Key signaling pathway in B-cell lymphoma can be blocked using compounds

Study: Key signaling pathway in B-cell lymphoma can be blocked using compounds

Cancer researchers from the University of Zurich have identified a key signaling pathway in B-cell lymphoma, a malignant type of blood cancer. [More]
Pseudogenes may play role in cancer development, shows study

Pseudogenes may play role in cancer development, shows study

Pseudogenes, a sub-class of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) that developed from the genome's 20,000 protein-coding genes but lost the ability to produce proteins, have long been considered nothing more than genomic "junk." Yet the retention of these 20,000 mysterious remnants during evolution has suggested that they may in fact possess biological functions and contribute to the development of disease. [More]
Genetic markers may predict tumor samples that respond to treatment

Genetic markers may predict tumor samples that respond to treatment

Patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia have limited treatment options, and those that exist are effective only in fewer than half of patients. Now, a new study identifies a panel of genetic markers that predicted which tumor samples would likely respond to treatment. [More]
New drug shows potential against rare type of acute leukemia

New drug shows potential against rare type of acute leukemia

Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have developed a new drug that shows potential in laboratory studies against a rare type of acute leukemia. And additional studies suggest the same compound could play a role in prostate cancer treatment as well. [More]
Hospira announces availability of INFLECTRA (infliximab) in Canada

Hospira announces availability of INFLECTRA (infliximab) in Canada

Hospira, Inc., a global leader in biosimilars and the world's leading provider of injectable drugs and infusion technologies, announces the availability of INFLECTRA (infliximab) in Canada, the country's first subsequent entry biologic (SEB) monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapy. [More]
Amgen receives FDA priority review designation for Kyprolis to treat relapsed multiple myeloma

Amgen receives FDA priority review designation for Kyprolis to treat relapsed multiple myeloma

Amgen today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted the supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) of Kyprolis® (carfilzomib) for Injection for the treatment of patients with relapsed multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy. [More]
New faculty members join UNC Lineberger to help launch immunotherapy clinical trials

New faculty members join UNC Lineberger to help launch immunotherapy clinical trials

Two new faculty members have joined the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center to help launch groundbreaking immunotherapy clinical trials testing an experimental treatment in which patients' own immune cells are genetically engineered to fight their cancer. [More]
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