Lymphoma News and Research RSS Feed - Lymphoma News and Research

Lymphoma is cancer that begins in cells of the immune system. There are two basic categories of lymphomas. One kind is Hodgkin lymphoma, which is marked by the presence of a type of cell called the Reed-Sternberg cell. The other category is non-Hodgkin lymphomas, which includes a large, diverse group of cancers of immune system cells. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas can be further divided into cancers that have an indolent (slow-growing) course and those that have an aggressive (fast-growing) course. These subtypes behave and respond to treatment differently. Both Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas can occur in children and adults, and prognosis and treatment depend on the stage and the type of cancer.
TUM researchers discover new mechanism for regulating programmed cell death

TUM researchers discover new mechanism for regulating programmed cell death

Programmed cell death is a mechanism that causes defective and potentially harmful cells to destroy themselves. It serves a number of purposes in the body, including the prevention of malignant tumor growth. Now, researchers at Technische Universität München have discovered a previously unknown mechanism for regulating programmed cell death. [More]
Lilly receives FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Lilly receives FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Eli Lilly and Company has received its third U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab). [More]
UC Davis researchers uncover complex relationship between p53 and Rbm38 proteins

UC Davis researchers uncover complex relationship between p53 and Rbm38 proteins

Scientists have long known the p53 protein suppresses tumors. However, a recent animal study by UC Davis researchers has uncovered a complicated relationship between p53 and another protein, Rbm38, highlighting how the body calibrates protein levels. Too much Rbm38 reduces p53 levels, increasing the risk of cancer. [More]
Apheresis: A potent therapeutic in extracorporeal photopherisis

Apheresis: A potent therapeutic in extracorporeal photopherisis

Apheresis, the simple process of drawing blood, becomes a powerful therapeutic in extracorporeal photopherisis (ECP) according to clinicians and scientists who met at the NIH State of the Science Symposium in Therapeutic Apheresis. Nora Ratcliffe, MD, of Dartmouth Hitchcock, looked at current methodology and opportunities for research in a paper recently published in Transfusion Medicine Review, titled "National Institutes of Health State of the Science Symposium in Therapeutic Apheresis: Scientific Opportunities in Extracorporeal Photopheresis." [More]
Pharmacyclics receives BayBio's 2014 Pantheon DiNA Award for Outstanding Company

Pharmacyclics receives BayBio's 2014 Pantheon DiNA Award for Outstanding Company

Pharmacyclics, Inc. today announced that it has been awarded BayBio's 2014 Pantheon DiNA Award for Outstanding Company for its rapid development and commercialization of IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib). The award was presented at BayBio's 11th Annual Pantheon DiNA Awards ceremony in San Francisco. [More]
Epizyme's PRMT5 inhibitor shows efficacy in pre-clinical models of mantle cell lymphoma

Epizyme's PRMT5 inhibitor shows efficacy in pre-clinical models of mantle cell lymphoma

Epizyme, Inc., a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company creating innovative personalized therapeutics for patients with genetically defined cancers, announced today the results from a preclinical study showing in vitro and in vivo activity of its first-in-class PRMT5 inhibitor EPZ015666 in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), an aggressive form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). [More]
PD-1, PD-L1 differentially expressed in NSCLC

PD-1, PD-L1 differentially expressed in NSCLC

The expression of the immune checkpoint protein programmed death-1 receptor and its ligand varies according to tumour and patient characteristics in oncogene-addicted non-small-cell lung cancer, research indicates. [More]
Study finds that disarray in methylation helps tumors adapt to changing circumstances

Study finds that disarray in methylation helps tumors adapt to changing circumstances

The genetic tumult within cancerous tumors is more than matched by the disorder in one of the mechanisms for switching cells' genes on and off, scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard report in a new study. [More]
CTI BioPharma presents data from Phase 3 trial of pacritinib in AML patients at ASH 2014

CTI BioPharma presents data from Phase 3 trial of pacritinib in AML patients at ASH 2014

CTI BioPharma Corp. today announced data showing treatment with pacritinib, an investigational oral multikinase inhibitor in Phase 3 clinical development, preferentially killed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells with FLT3 mutations, overcame stromal protection and suppressed leukemic outgrowth from stroma adherent AML cells in both medium-term (7-14 days) and long-term (5-6 weeks) assays. [More]
IMBRUVICA-rituximab combination well tolerated in patients with relapsed or refractory MCL

IMBRUVICA-rituximab combination well tolerated in patients with relapsed or refractory MCL

New IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) Phase II data announced by Pharmacyclics, Inc. today demonstrates its potential utility as a combination therapy when used with rituximab. Data suggest that the overall efficacy and safety profile of IMBRUVICA is well tolerated when combined with rituximab in patients with relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). [More]
Phase 2 RESONATE-17 study: IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) improves survival in CLL patients with del 17p

Phase 2 RESONATE-17 study: IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) improves survival in CLL patients with del 17p

Results from the Phase 2 RESONATE-17 (PCYC-1117) study show IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) was associated with an 82.6 percent investigator-assessed overall response rate (ORR; the primary endpoint) and a 79 percent progression-free survival (PFS) rate at 12 months in people living with relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) who have a genetic mutation known as deletion 17p (del 17p). [More]
Findings open new avenues for research to predict risk of therapy-related AML

Findings open new avenues for research to predict risk of therapy-related AML

For a small percentage of cancer patients, treatment aimed at curing the disease leads to a form of leukemia with a poor prognosis. Conventional thinking goes that chemotherapy and radiation therapy induce a barrage of damaging genetic mutations that kill cancer cells yet inadvertently spur the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a blood cancer. [More]
Studies presented at ASH meeting compare new, standard-of-care treatments for blood clots

Studies presented at ASH meeting compare new, standard-of-care treatments for blood clots

Studies presented at the 56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition compare new and standard-of-care treatments for blood clots and further illuminate clot risks in vulnerable populations, such as cancer patients. [More]
Amgen's XGEVA (denosumab) receives FDA approval for treatment of hypercalcemia of malignancy

Amgen's XGEVA (denosumab) receives FDA approval for treatment of hypercalcemia of malignancy

Amgen today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a new indication for XGEVA (denosumab) for the treatment of hypercalcemia of malignancy (HCM) refractory to bisphosphonate therapy. [More]
Cornerstone Pharmaceuticals initiates CPI-613 Phase I trial in patients with B-cell NHL

Cornerstone Pharmaceuticals initiates CPI-613 Phase I trial in patients with B-cell NHL

Cornerstone Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a clinical stage company and leader in the growing field of cancer metabolism-based therapeutics, today announced the initiation of a Phase I clinical trial assessing the safety and efficacy of escalating doses of CPI-613, in combination with bendamustine and rituximab, in patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). [More]
Subsets of cells drive spread of multiple myeloma

Subsets of cells drive spread of multiple myeloma

Although it is among the most highly metastatic of all cancers, multiple myeloma is driven to spread by only a subset of the myeloma cells within a patient's body, researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have found in a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology. [More]
AbbVie reports results from venetoclax Phase 2 clinical trial in AML at ASH 2014

AbbVie reports results from venetoclax Phase 2 clinical trial in AML at ASH 2014

AbbVie presented during an oral presentation at the American Society of Hematology's 56th Annual Meeting new results from a Phase 2 study of investigational compound venetoclax (ABT-199/GDC-0199) in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). AML is an aggressive and deadly type of blood cancer, in which the body produces too many of a specific type of white blood cell (myeloblast), which can crowd out healthy blood cells. [More]
Novel targeted therapies and treatment combinations for leukemia

Novel targeted therapies and treatment combinations for leukemia

Recognizing that leukemia cannot be conquered with a "one-size-fits-all" approach, researchers are pursuing novel targeted therapies and combinations of existing treatment regimens with new agents for patient populations with historically poor prognoses, according to data presented today during the 56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition. [More]
Breakthrough therapy shows promise in resistant forms of Hodgkin lymphoma

Breakthrough therapy shows promise in resistant forms of Hodgkin lymphoma

A therapy that liberates the immune system to attack cancer cells drove Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) into complete or partial remission in fully 87 percent of patients with resistant forms of the disease who participated in an early-phase clinical trial, investigators at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and partnering institutions report in a study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine and simultaneously presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology in San Francisco. [More]
Pembrolizumab shows promising results in patients with classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

Pembrolizumab shows promising results in patients with classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

Merck, known as MSD outside of Canada and the United States, announced today early study findings demonstrating that patients treated with pembrolizumab, the company's investigational anti-PD-1 cancer therapy, achieved an overall response rate of 66 percent, as assessed by International Harmonization Project response criteria (n=19/29: 95% CI, 46-82). [More]