Marriage News and Research RSS Feed - Marriage News and Research

Oncofertility complications reviewed for US patients

Oncofertility complications reviewed for US patients

Three articles published in JAMA Oncology highlight the legal and clinical care issues surrounding fertility preservation in US patients with cancer. [More]
SLU clinical psychologist helps patients battle fears, phobias

SLU clinical psychologist helps patients battle fears, phobias

Some fear is rational, keeping us appropriately cautious in the face of dangerous animals, hot stoves and contagions that could make us ill. But rational caution can turn to irrational panic about imagined terrors that are unlikely to occur or cause much actual damage if they did. [More]
Using centrifugal elutriation and flow cytometry to answer biological questions: an interview with Peter Lopez

Using centrifugal elutriation and flow cytometry to answer biological questions: an interview with Peter Lopez

Flow Cytometry, the measurement of various cellular characteristics as they flow through a measuring apparatus, has so many applications that it's hard to know where to begin. [More]
Spouses could play key role in helping patients lose weight

Spouses could play key role in helping patients lose weight

Spouses ideally could play a key role in helping patients lose pounds and keep them off after weight-loss surgery, but being married might actually work against patients, researchers from The Ohio State University have found. [More]
Online intervention tool helps rural veteran women suffering from postpartum depression

Online intervention tool helps rural veteran women suffering from postpartum depression

A University of Iowa researcher is working with the Veterans Administration on a pilot program to help female veterans suffering from postpartum depression. [More]
Researchers to undertake long-term clinical trial of artificial pancreas system for type 1 diabetes patients

Researchers to undertake long-term clinical trial of artificial pancreas system for type 1 diabetes patients

Researchers will soon undertake one of the largest-ever long-term clinical trials of a system designed to help regulate blood sugar levels of individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus. If the so-called artificial pancreas system performs in patients as hoped, it could lead to commercial trials and eventual regulatory approval in the United States and abroad. [More]
Childhood family breakup can affect girls more than boys

Childhood family breakup can affect girls more than boys

A childhood family breakup can have long-term negative consequences for the children. Recent University of Illinois research looks at overall health, depression, and smoking as a health-related behavior and finds that, for girls, all three are worse. [More]
Timing of marriage and first childbirth affects women's health at midlife

Timing of marriage and first childbirth affects women's health at midlife

A new study finds some surprising ways in which women's health at midlife is connected to when they had their first child and to their marital history. [More]
Commercialization of health and beauty can lead to Angelina Jolie syndrome

Commercialization of health and beauty can lead to Angelina Jolie syndrome

The politicization and commercialization of health issues in today's Western culture have led to growing healthism -- a peremptory idea of self-preserving behaviour. This approach criticizes everything that fails to fit into the glamorous standards of a beautiful, young and slim body. [More]
New approach helps Group Health to increase rates of lifesaving screening for colon cancer

New approach helps Group Health to increase rates of lifesaving screening for colon cancer

Mailing yearly stool kits--an alternative to the often-dreaded colonoscopy--has helped Group Health to boost rates of lifesaving screening for colon cancer, according to new research from Group Health Research Institute. [More]
Cancer survivors' journeys chronicled by Bethlehem artist and cancer survivor Susan Schaffer

Cancer survivors' journeys chronicled by Bethlehem artist and cancer survivor Susan Schaffer

Chronicling the journeys of cancer survivors, friends and family has been an emotional process, one filled with joy and shared sorrow for Bethlehem artist and cancer survivor Susan H. Schaffer. As part of her Visions of Hope series of acrylic paintings, Susan offers insight into the windows of the soul - her collection captures the eyes of the people willing to share their respective cancer journeys with her. [More]
Couples who share household work have satisfying sex life

Couples who share household work have satisfying sex life

Looking for more and better sex? If you're a man, you might consider doing the dishes once in a while. A new study out of the University of Alberta reveals that couples enjoyed more frequent and satisfying sex for both partners when men made a fair contribution to housework. The same study also found there's no relationship between the amount of housework male partners completed and the sexual functioning of a couple. [More]
Around 20% of ethnic school girls not vaccinated against HPV

Around 20% of ethnic school girls not vaccinated against HPV

Around 20 per cent of girls from ethnic minority backgrounds are not being vaccinated against the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) because they feel they don't need to have it, according to a Cancer Research UK survey presented today at the National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference in Liverpool*. [More]
Marriage status linked to survival outcomes following cardiac surgery

Marriage status linked to survival outcomes following cardiac surgery

People are at a greater risk of death or serious disability following cardiac surgery if they are divorced, separated or widowed, according to new research published in JAMA Surgery. [More]
Penn Medicine study shows that married people fare better following heart surgery

Penn Medicine study shows that married people fare better following heart surgery

Patients who are divorced, separated or widowed had an approximately 40 percent greater chance of dying or developing a new functional disability in the first two years following cardiac surgery than their married peers, according to a new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania published in this week's JAMA Surgery. [More]
UGA awarded $8.2 million grant to improve lives of children and families in Georgia' child welfare system

UGA awarded $8.2 million grant to improve lives of children and families in Georgia' child welfare system

A team of University of Georgia faculty members, led by a researcher in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences, has received an $8.2 million grant from the Administration for Children and Families, a division of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, to improve the lives of children and families in the child welfare system in Georgia. [More]

Renowned therapist available to comment on importance of caring for caregivers

Caregiving is an important and widespread responsibility that is becoming more common as our society's elderly population grows. Much of this caregiving role is shifting onto families, increasing the need for professional help for those caring for their loved ones. [More]
Population Council findings highlight strategies to delay child marriage

Population Council findings highlight strategies to delay child marriage

Today the Population Council released new evidence on what works to delay the age of marriage for extremely vulnerable girls in sub-Saharan Africa. Researchers also shared rarely available data on the cost of interventions that were tested, and issued recommendations for policymakers, donors, and organizations concerned about child marriage. [More]
Netrin1 protein acts as cellular "marriage broker"

Netrin1 protein acts as cellular "marriage broker"

Scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital -The Neuro, at McGill University and the McGill University Health Centre, have made a breakthrough in understanding an important protein that appears to act as a kind of cellular "marriage broker." [More]

Marriage can cause dramatic drinking reductions among people with severe drinking problems

Research on alcohol-use disorders consistently shows problem drinking decreases as we age. Also called, "maturing out," these changes generally begin during young adulthood and are partially caused by the roles we take on as we become adults. Now, researchers collaborating between the University of Missouri and Arizona State University have found evidence that marriage can cause dramatic drinking reductions even among people with severe drinking problems. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement