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Applying quantitative microscopy to live cells

Applying quantitative microscopy to live cells

Microscopy's got a long history. It was developed about 350 years ago for scientists to visualize things they could discern, but not describe. The two pioneers of microscopy were Antoine van Leeuwenhoek, who developed the first microscope and soon after the renowned scientist, Robert Hooke. [More]
‘Nudges’ could be effective way for encouraging patients to complete health care programs

‘Nudges’ could be effective way for encouraging patients to complete health care programs

Keeping messages brief and simple can produce gains when trying to encourage patients to complete a health care program, says research co-written by a University of Illinois expert in social psychology. [More]
Study examines conflict behavior among military couples with and without PTSD

Study examines conflict behavior among military couples with and without PTSD

Research conducted at The Family Institute at Northwestern University detected clear interpersonal behavior differences between couples with and without posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). [More]
Achieving equality in mental health for all

Achieving equality in mental health for all

“What is the most important thing in the world? The people, the people, the people.” A beautiful Mauri translation given by Professor Dinesh Bhugra, of the World Psychiatric Association (WPA), to sum up the work of Careif and celebrate its 10 year anniversary at a recent House of Lords reception on ‘Equality in mental health for all.’ [More]
New IU study finds neutral attitudes toward bisexual men and women

New IU study finds neutral attitudes toward bisexual men and women

While positive attitudes toward gay men and lesbians have increased over recent decades, a new study led by researchers at IU's Center for Sexual Health Promotion shows attitudes toward bisexual men and women are relatively neutral, if not ambivalent. [More]
Breakthrough Award supports research on role of chronic stress in breast cancer development

Breakthrough Award supports research on role of chronic stress in breast cancer development

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey resident research member Wenwei Hu, PhD, has received a $596,250 Breakthrough Award from the U.S. Department of Defense through its Breast Cancer Research Program to study the role of chronic stress in breast cancer development. [More]
Study investigates link between skin tone, marriage attitudes and sexual behavior across ethnic groups

Study investigates link between skin tone, marriage attitudes and sexual behavior across ethnic groups

Risky sexual behaviors among adolescents and young adults has long been a major public health concern, due to their prevalence and negative consequences for health, such as increased risk for sexually transmitted infections, unintended pregnancies, and cervical cancer. [More]
Warm childhood environments linked to secure marriages in late life

Warm childhood environments linked to secure marriages in late life

Growing up in a warm family environment in childhood is associated with feeling more secure in romantic relationships in one's 80s, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. [More]
Biomedical engineers develop artificial blood vessels capable of growth within recipient

Biomedical engineers develop artificial blood vessels capable of growth within recipient

In a groundbreaking new study led by University of Minnesota biomedical engineers, artificial blood vessels bioengineered in the lab and implanted in young lambs are capable of growth within the recipient. [More]
WPA-funded global survey reveals level of discrimination faced by people with mental health problems

WPA-funded global survey reveals level of discrimination faced by people with mental health problems

On World Mind Matters Day 2016, a global survey funded by the World Psychiatric Association (WPA), of laws and policies in 193 United Nations (UN) member states reveals the level of discrimination faced by people with mental illness in the areas of marriage, voting rights employment and right to contract. [More]
New study reveals physicians not discouraging Egyptian women from practicing female circumcision

New study reveals physicians not discouraging Egyptian women from practicing female circumcision

Women in Egypt are seeking out doctors' opinions on whether they should circumcise their daughters and, though it is illegal there, physicians are not discouraging the practice, giving legitimacy to a procedure that has serious medical risks, according to a new study led by a former Stanford University School of Medicine researcher. [More]
Research reveals people in Sub-Saharan Africa satisfied with their sex lives

Research reveals people in Sub-Saharan Africa satisfied with their sex lives

People in Africa's Sub-Sahara region, a relatively undeveloped area, are generally satisfied with their sex lives, with the most common rating -- reported by 18 percent of survey respondents -- being a perfect "10," according to Baylor University research to be presented Monday, Aug. 22, at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association in Seattle. [More]
Viewing pornography may have negative effects on marital stability, study shows

Viewing pornography may have negative effects on marital stability, study shows

Beginning pornography use is associated with a substantial increase in the probability of divorce for married Americans, and this increase is especially large for women, finds a new study that will be presented at the 111th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association. [More]

Closeness to family members linked to decreased risk of death for older adults

For older adults, having more or closer family members in one's social network decreases his or her likelihood of death, but having a larger or closer group of friends does not, finds a new study that will be presented at the 111th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association. [More]

Primary breadwinner status may affect psychological well-being and health of men

Gendered expectations in marriage are not just bad for women, they are also bad for men, according to a new study by University of Connecticut sociologists. [More]
Study finds potential gap in access to fertility services by LGBT persons

Study finds potential gap in access to fertility services by LGBT persons

With the recent one-year anniversary of Obergefell vs Hodges--the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision legalizing same-sex marriage--researchers at Boston University School of Medicine have published a report that identifies unequal online availability of educational materials regarding assisted reproductive technology (ART). [More]

Researchers find less sexual activity among millennials

Since time immemorial, older generations have fretted over the sexual habits of young people. In today's world, however, elders might just be wondering why young people are having so little sex, according to a new study by San Diego State University psychology professor Jean M. Twenge. [More]
Medical journalist describes slow journey to recovery from traumatic brain injuries

Medical journalist describes slow journey to recovery from traumatic brain injuries

Eleven years ago in the New England Journal of Medicine, medical journalist Susan Okie, MD, first introduced readers to two U.S. Army veterans who suffered traumatic brain injuries in Iraq, and the challenges they faced in the recovery period after returning home. [More]
Research shows how breastfeeding rates differ among white, black and Hispanic mothers

Research shows how breastfeeding rates differ among white, black and Hispanic mothers

Chapman University has published research on how breastfeeding rates differ among white, black and Hispanic mothers. [More]
Study highlights ongoing global epidemic of HIV among gay men

Study highlights ongoing global epidemic of HIV among gay men

Gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men continue to have disproportionately high burdens of HIV infection in countries of low, middle and high income around the world, a new study led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests. [More]
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