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New study reveals physicians not discouraging Egyptian women from practicing female circumcision

New study reveals physicians not discouraging Egyptian women from practicing female circumcision

Women in Egypt are seeking out doctors' opinions on whether they should circumcise their daughters and, though it is illegal there, physicians are not discouraging the practice, giving legitimacy to a procedure that has serious medical risks, according to a new study led by a former Stanford University School of Medicine researcher. [More]
Research reveals people in Sub-Saharan Africa satisfied with their sex lives

Research reveals people in Sub-Saharan Africa satisfied with their sex lives

People in Africa's Sub-Sahara region, a relatively undeveloped area, are generally satisfied with their sex lives, with the most common rating -- reported by 18 percent of survey respondents -- being a perfect "10," according to Baylor University research to be presented Monday, Aug. 22, at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association in Seattle. [More]
Viewing pornography may have negative effects on marital stability, study shows

Viewing pornography may have negative effects on marital stability, study shows

Beginning pornography use is associated with a substantial increase in the probability of divorce for married Americans, and this increase is especially large for women, finds a new study that will be presented at the 111th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association. [More]
Closeness to family members linked to decreased risk of death for older adults

Closeness to family members linked to decreased risk of death for older adults

For older adults, having more or closer family members in one's social network decreases his or her likelihood of death, but having a larger or closer group of friends does not, finds a new study that will be presented at the 111th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association. [More]

Primary breadwinner status may affect psychological well-being and health of men

Gendered expectations in marriage are not just bad for women, they are also bad for men, according to a new study by University of Connecticut sociologists. [More]
Study finds potential gap in access to fertility services by LGBT persons

Study finds potential gap in access to fertility services by LGBT persons

With the recent one-year anniversary of Obergefell vs Hodges--the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision legalizing same-sex marriage--researchers at Boston University School of Medicine have published a report that identifies unequal online availability of educational materials regarding assisted reproductive technology (ART). [More]

Researchers find less sexual activity among millennials

Since time immemorial, older generations have fretted over the sexual habits of young people. In today's world, however, elders might just be wondering why young people are having so little sex, according to a new study by San Diego State University psychology professor Jean M. Twenge. [More]
Medical journalist describes slow journey to recovery from traumatic brain injuries

Medical journalist describes slow journey to recovery from traumatic brain injuries

Eleven years ago in the New England Journal of Medicine, medical journalist Susan Okie, MD, first introduced readers to two U.S. Army veterans who suffered traumatic brain injuries in Iraq, and the challenges they faced in the recovery period after returning home. [More]
Research shows how breastfeeding rates differ among white, black and Hispanic mothers

Research shows how breastfeeding rates differ among white, black and Hispanic mothers

Chapman University has published research on how breastfeeding rates differ among white, black and Hispanic mothers. [More]
Study highlights ongoing global epidemic of HIV among gay men

Study highlights ongoing global epidemic of HIV among gay men

Gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men continue to have disproportionately high burdens of HIV infection in countries of low, middle and high income around the world, a new study led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests. [More]
Google Glass shows promising plastic surgical application in operating room

Google Glass shows promising plastic surgical application in operating room

Plastic surgeons see some clear advantages of using Google Glass in the operating room, reports a survey study in the July issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery,the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. [More]

SAGE encyclopedia provides more insight into lives of LGBTQ individuals

Despite recent advancements, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) individuals continue to face discrimination and other challenges related to school experiences, family formation, aging, and more. [More]
Married people less likely to die following heart attack than single people

Married people less likely to die following heart attack than single people

Being married could improve your likelihood of surviving a heart attack and is associated with reduced length of hospital stay, according to research presented at the British Cardiovascular Society Conference in Manchester today. [More]
Raging with anger may increase risk of cardiovascular problems

Raging with anger may increase risk of cardiovascular problems

Those who rage with frustration during a marital spat have an increased risk of cardiovascular problems such as chest pain or high blood pressure later in life, according to new research from Northwestern University and the University of California, Berkeley. [More]
Sexual abstinence, marital fidelity programs not effective in reducing HIV risk

Sexual abstinence, marital fidelity programs not effective in reducing HIV risk

The U.S. government has invested $1.4 billion in HIV prevention programs that promote sexual abstinence and marital fidelity, but there is no evidence that these programs have been effective at changing sexual behavior and reducing HIV risk, according to a new Stanford University School of Medicine study. [More]
Older women at increased risk of receiving inappropriate prescription medicines, study shows

Older women at increased risk of receiving inappropriate prescription medicines, study shows

Nearly one in three British Columbia women over age 65 received inappropriate prescription medicines in 2013, according to a University of British Columbia study. One in four men of the same age received similar prescriptions. [More]
Researchers find no link between frequency of sex and self-reported relationship satisfaction

Researchers find no link between frequency of sex and self-reported relationship satisfaction

Newlywed couples who have a lot of sex don't report being any more satisfied with their relationships than those who have sex less often, but their automatic behavioral responses tell a different story, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. [More]
Study finds no difference in outcomes for children raised by same-sex parents

Study finds no difference in outcomes for children raised by same-sex parents

Children raised by same-sex female parents with a stable family life show no difference in general health, emotional difficulties, coping and learning behavior, compared to children of different-sex parents in similarly stable relationships, concludes a study in the April Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, the official journal of the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Marriage may help prolong survival in cancer patients

Marriage may help prolong survival in cancer patients

New research has uncovered a link between being married and living longer among cancer patients, with the beneficial effect of marriage differing by race/ethnicity and place of birth. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings have important public health implications, given the rising numbers of unmarried individuals in the United States in addition to the growing aging population. [More]
Study links cancer survivorship to marriage, birthplace, race and ethnicity

Study links cancer survivorship to marriage, birthplace, race and ethnicity

Previous studies have shown that married patients with cancer fare better than unmarried cancer patients, surviving more often and longer. In a new study, published April 11 in the journal Cancer, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that the benefits of being married vary by race and ethnicity, with male non-Hispanic white bachelors experiencing the worst outcome. This group had a 24 percent higher mortality rate than their married counterparts. [More]
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