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Medicaid is the United States health program for eligible individuals and families with low incomes and resources. It is a means-tested program that is jointly funded by the states and federal government, and is managed by the states.
Experts call to make parenting a national priority

Experts call to make parenting a national priority

Ask any mom or dad and they will tell you: parenting is hard work. For those parents and caregivers who struggle with the nature or the demands of child rearing, sometimes help is hard to find. [More]

Nearly one-third of Hispanic Texans remain uninsured, new report reveals

The percentage of Hispanics in Texas without health insurance has dropped by 30 percent since the Affordable Care Act went into effect, but almost one-third of Hispanic Texans ages 18 to 64 remain uninsured. [More]
UCLA-led study finds wide acceptance of end-of-life care orders among California nursing home residents

UCLA-led study finds wide acceptance of end-of-life care orders among California nursing home residents

UCLA-led research finds broad acceptance of written end-of-life care orders among California nursing home residents, with nearly half completing a Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment, or POLST, form in 2011. [More]
Bariatric surgery becomes safer in accredited surgical centers, research shows

Bariatric surgery becomes safer in accredited surgical centers, research shows

Patients who have weight-loss operations at nonaccredited bariatric surgical facilities in the United States are up to 1.4 times likelier to experience serious complications and more than twice as likely to die after the operation compared with patients who undergo these procedures at accredited bariatric surgical centers, researchers conclude. [More]
Aelan's researchers develop novel epigenetic biomarker for diagnosis of AD

Aelan's researchers develop novel epigenetic biomarker for diagnosis of AD

Aelan Cell Technologies today announced the development of a novel epigenetic biomarker. An early human clinical feasibility study has indicated that serological tests using the biomarker alongside other proprietary components developed by Aelan's researchers could potentially help physicians diagnose Alzheimer's disease (AD). [More]
Medical marijuana reduces use of prescription drugs, research finds

Medical marijuana reduces use of prescription drugs, research finds

Medical marijuana is having a positive impact on the bottom line of Medicare's prescription drug benefit program in states that have legalized its use for medicinal purposes, according to University of Georgia researchers in a study published today in the July issue of Health Affairs. [More]
Study highlights ongoing global epidemic of HIV among gay men

Study highlights ongoing global epidemic of HIV among gay men

Gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men continue to have disproportionately high burdens of HIV infection in countries of low, middle and high income around the world, a new study led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests. [More]
Study shows wealthier Americans receive more health care than lower-income groups

Study shows wealthier Americans receive more health care than lower-income groups

Inequality in the use of health care has increased dramatically in recent years, with wealthier Americans, who tend to be healthier, now consuming the most care, according to a study published today [Wednesday, July 6] in the July issue of Health Affairs. [More]
BMC receives grant to optimally support child wellbeing from preconception period through age 5

BMC receives grant to optimally support child wellbeing from preconception period through age 5

Boston Medical Center's Vital Village Network has received a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation aimed at developing the infrastructure to support all children entering kindergarten at a healthy weight. [More]
Study finds similar care for Medicaid and non-Medicaid pediatric asthma inpatients

Study finds similar care for Medicaid and non-Medicaid pediatric asthma inpatients

Children covered by Medicaid and equally sick children not covered by Medicaid received essentially similar asthma treatment in a given pediatric hospital, according to a new study. [More]
Annual repeat CT scans can eliminate need for biopsy or surgery in NSNs

Annual repeat CT scans can eliminate need for biopsy or surgery in NSNs

Annual low-dose computed-tomography (CT) screening can eliminate the need for biopsy or surgery in nonsolid lung nodules, according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology. [More]
Depression reduces COPD maintenance medication adherence in older adults

Depression reduces COPD maintenance medication adherence in older adults

A recent study in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society found that in a nationally representative sample of Medicare beneficiaries who were newly diagnosed with COPD, adherence to maintenance medications decreased with new episodes of depression. [More]
Study examines changes in coverage among hospitalized nonelderly adults after Medicaid expansion

Study examines changes in coverage among hospitalized nonelderly adults after Medicaid expansion

In a study appearing in the June 21 issue of JAMA, Matthew M. Davis, M.D., M.A.P.P., of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and colleagues examined changes in insurance coverage among hospitalized nonelderly adults after Michigan expanded Medicaid coverage in 2014 under the Affordable Care Act. [More]
VentureMed Group receives FDA 510(k) clearance for FLEX Scoring Catheter

VentureMed Group receives FDA 510(k) clearance for FLEX Scoring Catheter

VentureMed Group, Ltd., a medical device company based in northwest Ohio, has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the commercial distribution of a new surgical device for treating peripheral artery disease (PAD). [More]
Study emphasizes need for Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program to receive basic HIV care

Study emphasizes need for Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program to receive basic HIV care

A Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine study of insurance coverage of more than 28,000 people with HIV concludes that a decades-old program that offers free medical care remains a critical necessity despite the availability of coverage under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). [More]
Study finds nearly half of older Americans spend heavily on end-of-life care

Study finds nearly half of older Americans spend heavily on end-of-life care

Last-ditch, high-tech heroic treatments. Days in the hospital intensive care unit. You might think this is what makes dying in America so expensive - and that it's where we should focus efforts to spend the nation's healthcare dollars more wisely. [More]
Study shows for-profit hospices have persistently high rates of hospitalization

Study shows for-profit hospices have persistently high rates of hospitalization

Patients who were asked where they wanted to die upon entering hospice had lower rates of hospitalization at the end of life, as did those in hospices that monitored symptoms more frequently, according to a new study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
Many family doctors have poor knowledge about LDCT lung cancer screening

Many family doctors have poor knowledge about LDCT lung cancer screening

Although clinical trials have shown that lung cancer screening using low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) can detect lung cancers early and reduce lung cancer mortality, less than half of family physicians in a recent survey agreed that screening reduces lung cancer–related deaths. [More]
New study finds underutilization of PR therapy among older COPD patients

New study finds underutilization of PR therapy among older COPD patients

A new study from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston investigating trends on the use of pulmonary rehabilitation therapy among older adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease found that this therapy was underutilized, despite its health benefits and cost effectiveness. [More]
Children in foster care still face quality challenges in antipsychotic medication use

Children in foster care still face quality challenges in antipsychotic medication use

Significant quality challenges persist in antipsychotic medication use for children in foster care and other Medicaid-insured children, according to a new Rutgers University-New Brunswick study published in Health Affairs. [More]
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