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Medicaid is the United States health program for eligible individuals and families with low incomes and resources. It is a means-tested program that is jointly funded by the states and federal government, and is managed by the states.
Study looks at how incentives in Medicare Shared Savings Program may influence radiology practices

Study looks at how incentives in Medicare Shared Savings Program may influence radiology practices

A new study by the Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute examines how the incentives in an alternative payment model (APM) - the Accountable Care Organization Shared Savings Program - might influence cost, quality, utilization and technological investment for radiology practices. [More]
U-M study finds increase in health insurance coverage for justice-involved individuals

U-M study finds increase in health insurance coverage for justice-involved individuals

Every year, millions of people in prison or jail struggle with mental health issues and substance use disorders. And after they get out, those issues can increase their chances of another arrest if they don't receive treatment. [More]
Study finds one in nine people admitted to ERs for violent injuries end up with recurrent visits

Study finds one in nine people admitted to ERs for violent injuries end up with recurrent visits

Approximately one in nine people sent to Florida emergency rooms (ERs) for injuries caused by acts of intentional violence - including shootings, stabbings, assaults, etc. - in 2010 ended up being violently injured again within two years. [More]
Study shows increasing healthcare costs for infections linked to premise plumbing pathogens

Study shows increasing healthcare costs for infections linked to premise plumbing pathogens

A new analysis of 100 million Medicare records from U.S. adults aged 65 and older reveals rising healthcare costs for infections associated with opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens--disease-causing bacteria, such as Legionella--which can live inside drinking water distribution systems, including household and hospital water pipes. [More]
Study finds uneven Medicaid coverage for children's key mental health services in many states

Study finds uneven Medicaid coverage for children's key mental health services in many states

A national study by researchers at the National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP), Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health--- shows an uneven picture of states' use of Medicaid to help families with young children gain access to mental health services [More]
Exposure to antibiotics in early life linked to increased food allergy risk

Exposure to antibiotics in early life linked to increased food allergy risk

Antibiotic treatment within the first year of life may wipe out more than an unwanted infection: exposure to the drugs is associated with an increase in food allergy diagnosis, new research from the University of South Carolina suggests. [More]
Hospitals with high readmission rates more likely to show better mortality scores

Hospitals with high readmission rates more likely to show better mortality scores

A group of Johns Hopkins physicians and researchers today published an article in the Journal of Hospital Medicine suggesting that data on mortality and hospital readmission used by the United States Centers for Medicare and Medicaid suggest a potentially problematic relationship. [More]
Exclusion of farmworkers from standard labor protection contributes to heat-related deaths

Exclusion of farmworkers from standard labor protection contributes to heat-related deaths

With this summer slated to be the hottest on record, more and more people, especially farmworkers, are at even higher risks of heatstroke. [More]
Study highlights burden of increasing patient volume in emergency departments

Study highlights burden of increasing patient volume in emergency departments

The average monthly emergency department visit increased by 5.7 percent in Illinois after the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, although the population remained essentially flat. [More]
New NCCN Imaging AUC released for eight new cancers

New NCCN Imaging AUC released for eight new cancers

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network, a Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services-approved provider-led entity for imaging appropriate use criteria, continues to build its library of AUC and has published NCCN Imaging Appropriate Use Criteria for eight new cancer types. Launched in June 2016, NCCN Imaging AUC currently are available for 20 cancer types. [More]
Cleft palate repair costs the same for internationally adopted children

Cleft palate repair costs the same for internationally adopted children

Since 2009, United States residents have adopted more children from China than any other country. Since China has a high prevalence of cleft lip and palate, some of these children require extra medical care early in their lives. Many prospective families are fearful of the treatment costs needed by a child affected by cleft lip and palate. However, recent research suggests that the costs are not nearly as high as previously thought. [More]
Organogenesis' PuraPly and PuraPly AM wound care products now eligible for Medicare coverage in 10 states

Organogenesis' PuraPly and PuraPly AM wound care products now eligible for Medicare coverage in 10 states

Organogenesis Inc., a global leader in advanced wound care innovations and technologies, today announced that its PuraPly and PuraPly Antimicrobial (AM) wound management products are now eligible for Medicare coverage and reimbursement in 10 states, providing coverage for an additional 7.5 million Medicare beneficiaries, following the decision by National Government Services (NGS) to retire its local coverage determination (LCD) for cellular and tissue-based products (CTPs) effective September 1, 2016. [More]
Higher continuity of care for seniors linked to lower risk of visiting emergency department

Higher continuity of care for seniors linked to lower risk of visiting emergency department

Seniors with traditional Medicare coverage who have more continuity of care - defined as consistently seeing the same physician in an outpatient setting - have lower chances of visiting an emergency department, according to the results of a study published online earlier this month in Annals of Emergency Medicine. [More]
ISCT announces reasons for opposing current version of REGROW Act on cell therapies

ISCT announces reasons for opposing current version of REGROW Act on cell therapies

The International Society for Cellular Therapy, the global society of clinicians, researchers, regulatory specialists, technologists, and industry partners dedicated to the translation of cellular therapy into safe and effective therapies to improve patients’ lives, today announces its reasons for opposition to the current version of the REGROW Act - the US government’s legislative efforts to promote faster patient access to effective new cellular therapies. [More]
Uninsured rate among young adults in Texas dropped by 35%, new report reveals

Uninsured rate among young adults in Texas dropped by 35%, new report reveals

The percentage of young adults ages 18 to 34 in Texas without health insurance has dropped by 35 percent since the Affordable Care Act went into effect, according to a new report released today by Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy and the Episcopal Health Foundation. [More]
Socioeconomic factors may contribute to survival of young, white patients with multiple myeloma

Socioeconomic factors may contribute to survival of young, white patients with multiple myeloma

Advances in the treatment of multiple myeloma, a cancer that forms in a type of white blood cell, have led to improved survival predominantly among young and white patients, with less of an increase in survival observed in patients of other ethnicities. [More]
Breast cancer screening provides framework for radiologist-led bundled payment models, study reports

Breast cancer screening provides framework for radiologist-led bundled payment models, study reports

According to a new report by the Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute, mammography may present an opportunity for the expanded use of bundled payments in radiology. [More]
Children living in poor communities less likely to receive diagnosis for strabismus, study shows

Children living in poor communities less likely to receive diagnosis for strabismus, study shows

Children are less likely to be diagnosed with crossed eyes, a condition known as strabismus, if they live in poor communities, according to an analysis led by researchers at the University of Michigan's Kellogg Eye Center. [More]
Tips to help older adults maintain lifelong oral health

Tips to help older adults maintain lifelong oral health

Seventy million people in this country - 20 percent of the US population -- will be 65 or older by 2030. If you're one of them, you probably think often about how to stay as fit and healthy as possible. But, you may not be giving as much thought to the health of your teeth. [More]
Study shows universal health insurance may mitigate surgical disparities for African Americans

Study shows universal health insurance may mitigate surgical disparities for African Americans

A new study from Brigham and Women's Hospital utilized claims data from more than 630,000 patients living in the state of California and found no significant differences in post-operative complications or mortality between African American patients and White patients who were treated in a universally insured military health system. [More]
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