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Researchers find molecule that irreversibly interferes with activity of mutated cancer gene

Researchers find molecule that irreversibly interferes with activity of mutated cancer gene

UT Southwestern Medical Center cancer researchers have found a molecule that selectively and irreversibly interferes with the activity of a mutated cancer gene common in 30 percent of tumors. [More]
Little-known supportive cells in brain may play major role in cognitive function

Little-known supportive cells in brain may play major role in cognitive function

When you're expecting something-like the meal you've ordered at a restaurant-or when something captures your interest, unique electrical rhythms sweep through your brain. [More]
Non-endoscopic procedure effective in treating severe chronic migraine headaches

Non-endoscopic procedure effective in treating severe chronic migraine headaches

A revised version of a surgical procedure to treat severe chronic migraine headaches led to significant symptom relief more than 90 percent of the time in patients treated at Massachusetts General Hospital. [More]
Childhood obesity linked to early puberty

Childhood obesity linked to early puberty

A new link has been identified between obesity in childhood and the lowering of the age of puberty. [More]
GW researcher awarded SFARI grant for autism research

GW researcher awarded SFARI grant for autism research

The link between autism and disrupted brain development is an essential part of the puzzle of the disease, and is largely unknown. However, thanks to funding from the Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative, George Washington University researcher Anthony-Samuel LaMantia, Ph.D. may be able to offer truly integrative and in-depth answers to these key questions in the field of autism research. [More]
Health care organizations partner to improve patient care, health care delivery and reduce costs

Health care organizations partner to improve patient care, health care delivery and reduce costs

The American Society of Anesthesiologists- (ASA-) today announced the launch of its ASA Perioperative Surgical Home Learning Collaborative, a national initiative designed to improve the patient experience before, during and after surgery. More than 40 leading health care organizations from across the country will participate in the collaborative, which will convene for the first time at the ASA's PSH Learning Collaborative Launch, July 25-26, in Schaumburg, Ill. [More]
RI Defeats Hepatitis C project aims to eliminate HCV in Rhode Island

RI Defeats Hepatitis C project aims to eliminate HCV in Rhode Island

Lynn E. Taylor, M.D., director of The Miriam Hospital's HIV/Viral Hepatitis Coinfection program, states in the July, 2014 Rhode Island Medical Journal special edition, "RI Defeats Hep C" that eliminating hepatitis c virus infection (hep c or HCV) is feasible, can provide economic benefits, enhance capacity to address other health challenges, and improve health care disparities. [More]
Discovery could lead to new therapies for treating Type 2 diabetes, obesity

Discovery could lead to new therapies for treating Type 2 diabetes, obesity

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified neural pathways that increase understanding of how the brain regulates body weight, energy expenditure, and blood glucose levels - a discovery that can lead to new therapies for treating Type 2 diabetes and obesity. [More]
Scientists discover new pathway to manipulate, maintain human ESCs in a "na-ve"

Scientists discover new pathway to manipulate, maintain human ESCs in a "na-ve"

For years, researchers and patients have hoped that embryonic stem cells (ESCs)-capable of forming nearly any cell type in the body-could provide insight into numerous diseases perhaps even be used to treat them. Yet progress has been hampered by the inability to transfer research and tools from mouse ESC studies to their human counterparts, in part because human ESCs are "primed" and slightly less plastic than the mouse cells. [More]
Genetics involved with menarche may hold keys to preventing diabetes or osteoporosis in later life

Genetics involved with menarche may hold keys to preventing diabetes or osteoporosis in later life

A novel study shows that the age girls reach puberty is influenced by 'imprinted genes'-a subset of genes whose activity differs depending on which parent contributes the gene. [More]
Researchers demonstrate novel approach in cervical cancer prevention

Researchers demonstrate novel approach in cervical cancer prevention

A study published online in the International Journal of Cancer earlier this month describes a novel approach to preventing cervical cancer based on findings showing successful reduction in the risk of cervical cancer after removal of a discrete population of cells in the cervix. [More]

Medical students' perceptions of health policy education improving: Study

Students graduating from U.S. medical schools in 2012 feel they've received a better education in health policy issues than graduates surveyed in 2008, according to a multi-center study led by the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and published online this month in Academic Medicine. [More]
UTHealth scientists identify inhibitory switch to prevent peripheral vascular disease

UTHealth scientists identify inhibitory switch to prevent peripheral vascular disease

Millions of people in the United States have a circulatory problem of the legs called peripheral vascular disease. It can be painful and may even require surgery in serious cases. This disease can lead to severe skeletal muscle wasting and, in turn, limb amputation. [More]
UTHealth's Bhavani Iyer awarded grant to help Harris County residents with vision problems

UTHealth's Bhavani Iyer awarded grant to help Harris County residents with vision problems

Bhavani Iyer, O.D., a low vision specialist at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School, has been awarded a grant to help Harris County residents whose vision problems cannot be corrected with eyeglasses, medication or surgery. [More]
Incisionless TAVR surgery cuts length of hospital stay by 30%

Incisionless TAVR surgery cuts length of hospital stay by 30%

New research from Penn Medicine shows that incisionless transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) surgery cuts length of hospital stay by 30 percent and has no impact on post-operative vascular complication rates when compared with conventional transfemoral TAVR, which requires an incision in the groin. [More]
Deleting enzyme favorably impacts behaviors associated with autistic behaviors

Deleting enzyme favorably impacts behaviors associated with autistic behaviors

Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a genetic disorder that causes obsessive-compulsive and repetitive behaviors, and other behaviors on the autistic spectrum, as well as cognitive deficits. It is the most common inherited cause of mental impairment and the most common cause of autism. [More]
Short movie shows development of dressing promotes wound healing

Short movie shows development of dressing promotes wound healing

Someone suffers second- or third-degree burns: The wound must immediately be dressed and the dressing is to be changed regularly. A short movie made by the group of Prof. Dr.-Ing. Stephan Barcikowski shows the development of a dressing that promotes wound healing - from the materials research laboratory until the first practical trial (in English). [More]
Autoimmune diseases share certain pathogenic mechanisms with cancer

Autoimmune diseases share certain pathogenic mechanisms with cancer

Autoimmune disorders may share certain pathogenic mechanisms with cancer, according to a new report by George Washington University researcher Linda Kusner, Ph.D., published in PLOS ONE on July 22. [More]
Research findings could lead to new approaches for treating schizophrenia

Research findings could lead to new approaches for treating schizophrenia

As part of a multinational, collaborative effort, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have helped identify over 100 locations in the human genome associated with the risk of developing schizophrenia, in the largest genomic study published on any psychiatric disorder to date, conducted with 80,000 people. [More]
Stimulating specific brain pathway may induce active emergence from anesthesia

Stimulating specific brain pathway may induce active emergence from anesthesia

Researchers may be one step closer to better understanding how anesthesia works. A study in the August issue of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists- (ASA-), found stimulating a major dopamine-producing region in the brain, the ventral tegmental area (VTA), caused rats to wake from general anesthesia, suggesting that this region plays a key role in restoring consciousness after general anesthesia. [More]