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Scientists discover genetic pathway responsible for brain development

Scientists discover genetic pathway responsible for brain development

Scientists at A*STAR's Institute of Medical Biology and Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology have identified a genetic pathway that accounts for the extraordinary size of the human brain. [More]
Shriners Hospitals for Children-Chicago, UI Health to provide specialized pediatric medical services

Shriners Hospitals for Children-Chicago, UI Health to provide specialized pediatric medical services

Shriners Hospitals for Children-Chicago and the University of Illinois Hospital & Health Sciences System have signed an affiliation agreement to enhance their existing partnership and provide expanded pediatric specialty medical services to their patients. [More]
Bloodstream infections differ based on distance from the equator, health care spending

Bloodstream infections differ based on distance from the equator, health care spending

Where you live affects the type of bacteria that cause bloodstream infections, according to researchers at Rhode Island Hospital and an international team of investigators. The closer you live to the equator, the greater the likelihood of a bloodstream infection caused by a group of bacteria called Gram-negative bacteria, which thrive in warm and moist environments, compared to another group of bacteria referred to as Gram-positive bacteria. [More]
Knowledge and access barriers bar epilepsy patients from surgery

Knowledge and access barriers bar epilepsy patients from surgery

The unfamiliarity of some neurologists with recommended practice standards, coupled with access barriers, may be preventing eligible patients with epilepsy from undergoing surgical treatment, survey findings suggest. [More]
Findings show effective treatment for type 1 diabetes patients with severe hypoglycemia

Findings show effective treatment for type 1 diabetes patients with severe hypoglycemia

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients who have developed low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) as a complication of insulin treatments over time are able to regain normal internal recognition of the condition after receiving pancreatic islet cell transplantation, according to a new study led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, published online in Diabetes. [More]
Maternal exposure to fine particulate air pollution contributes to autism risk

Maternal exposure to fine particulate air pollution contributes to autism risk

Women exposed to high levels of fine particulate matter specifically during pregnancy--particularly during the third trimester--may face up to twice the risk of having a child with autism than mothers living in areas with low particulate matter, according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health. [More]
Eight researchers to receive 2015 Leibniz Prize

Eight researchers to receive 2015 Leibniz Prize

The new recipients of Germany's most prestigious research funding prize have been announced. In Bonn today, the Joint Committee of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) decided to award the 2015 Leibniz Prize to eight researchers. [More]
Research findings may lead to new treatment strategies for Ewing sarcoma

Research findings may lead to new treatment strategies for Ewing sarcoma

The genetic abnormality that drives the bone cancer Ewing sarcoma operates through two distinct processes - both activating genes that stimulate tumor growth and suppressing those that should keep cancer from developing. These findings by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators, published in the November issue of Cancer Cell, may lead to new therapies targeting these aberrant mechanisms. [More]
Intra-arterial stroke treatment more effective than medical management with tPA, study finds

Intra-arterial stroke treatment more effective than medical management with tPA, study finds

Penumbra, Inc., the market leader in intra-arterial stroke treatment, announced that an independent study published online today in the New England Journal of Medicine found that intra-arterial stroke treatment, including the company's clot extraction technology, was shown to be significantly more effective than medical management with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), which is the current standard of care. [More]
Study finds increasing shortage of stroke specialists in the U.S.

Study finds increasing shortage of stroke specialists in the U.S.

Although stroke is the No. 4 cause of death and a leading cause of disability in the United States, there's an increasing shortage of neurologists who specialize in stroke care. [More]
Diabetes drug can boost efficacy of TB medication without causing drug resistance

Diabetes drug can boost efficacy of TB medication without causing drug resistance

A more effective treatment for tuberculosis (TB) could soon be available as scientists have discovered that Metformin (MET), a drug for treating diabetes, can also be used to boost the efficacy of TB medication without inducing drug resistance. [More]
Researchers identify 53 existing drugs that may block Ebola virus from entering human cells

Researchers identify 53 existing drugs that may block Ebola virus from entering human cells

Researchers found 53 existing drugs that may keep the Ebola virus from entering human cells, a key step in the process of infection, according to a study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the National Institutes of Health, and published today in the Nature Press journal Emerging Microbes and Infections. [More]
New study shows that people may inherit intestinal bacteria that cause inflammatory bowel disease

New study shows that people may inherit intestinal bacteria that cause inflammatory bowel disease

A new study by an international team of researchers shows for the first time that people may inherit some of the intestinal bacteria that cause Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, collectively know as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The study, recently published in Genome Medicine, also confirmed that antibiotics could worsen the imbalance in the gut microbes. [More]
Study: Low glycemic diet does not improve insulin sensitivity or cardiovascular risk factors

Study: Low glycemic diet does not improve insulin sensitivity or cardiovascular risk factors

Nutrition experts are continually debating the nutritional value of carbohydrate-containing foods and whether some are healthier than others. High carbohydrate foods are classified by how much they increase blood sugar; known as glycemic index. In new findings led by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, researchers looked at glycemic index' effect on cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes and found that low glycemic diets did not improve insulin sensitivity or cardiovascular risk factors. [More]
Penn study has implications for developing new cell-based treatments for skin disease

Penn study has implications for developing new cell-based treatments for skin disease

As the main component of connective tissue in the body, fibroblasts are the most common type of cell. Taking advantage of that ready availability, scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the Wistar Institute, Boston University School of Medicine, and New Jersey Institute of Technology have discovered a way to repurpose fibroblasts into functional melanocytes, the body's pigment-producing cells. [More]
U of M poll: Parents doubt older teens are ready to manage their health care

U of M poll: Parents doubt older teens are ready to manage their health care

Most parents agree their children should be ready to move out of the pediatrician's office into adult-focused care by age 18 - but just 30 percent actually make that transition by that age, according to the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health. [More]
Joslin study could lead to improved anti-aging drugs

Joslin study could lead to improved anti-aging drugs

In a study published today by Nature, researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center used a microscopic worm (C. elegans) to identify a new path that could lead to drugs to slow aging and the chronic diseases that often accompany it--and might even lead to better cosmetics. [More]
Centenary researchers find potential way to stop spread of tumors

Centenary researchers find potential way to stop spread of tumors

By blocking a widespread enzyme, Centenary researchers have shown they can slow down the movement of cells and potentially stop tumours from spreading and growing. [More]
Researchers use functional MRI to understand how the brain functions

Researchers use functional MRI to understand how the brain functions

University of Nevada, Reno neuroscientists are working with Renown Health to bring new research capabilities to northern Nevada. The research group, led by University Professor of Psychology Michael Webster, has purchased equipment that augments the existing 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology at Renown Health for studies of human brain function. [More]
Two-drug combination before surgery benefits women with triple-negative breast cancer

Two-drug combination before surgery benefits women with triple-negative breast cancer

A breast cancer specialist and clinical researcher at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island presented research yesterday at the 2014 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium showing that adding either the chemotherapy drug carboplatin or the blood vessel-targeting drug bevacizumab to the standard treatment of chemotherapy before surgery helped women who have the basal-like subtype of triple-negative breast cancer. [More]