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Researchers seek to better understand sequence of events that leads people to develop MS

Researchers seek to better understand sequence of events that leads people to develop MS

A team of investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has launched a study of individuals at risk for multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
UM SOM researchers reveal genetic makeup of various strains of E. coli

UM SOM researchers reveal genetic makeup of various strains of E. coli

A multi-disciplinary group of researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine have for the first time determined the genetic makeup of various strains of E. coli, which every year kills hundreds of thousands of people around the world. [More]
FDA clears Sangamo BioSciences' SB-318 IND application for treatment of MPS I

FDA clears Sangamo BioSciences' SB-318 IND application for treatment of MPS I

Sangamo BioSciences, Inc., the leader in therapeutic genome editing, announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has cleared the Company's Investigational New Drug (IND) application for SB-318, a single treatment strategy intended to provide a life-long therapy for Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I (MPS I). [More]
Positive data on ability of MyoKardia’s MYK-461 to prevent development of HCM published in Science

Positive data on ability of MyoKardia’s MYK-461 to prevent development of HCM published in Science

MyoKardia, Inc., a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company pioneering a precision medicine approach for the treatment of heritable cardiovascular diseases, today announced the publication of an article in the leading medical journal Science. [More]
LouLou Foundation, Penn Med set up Program of Excellence to develop treatments for children with CDKL5

LouLou Foundation, Penn Med set up Program of Excellence to develop treatments for children with CDKL5

The London-based LouLou Foundation and the Orphan Disease Center of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have established a Program of Excellence to develop effective treatments for children with CDKL5, a rare X-chromosome-linked genetic disorder that causes severe neuro-developmental impairment and early-onset, difficult-to-control seizures. [More]
New method could help physicians detect infection in wounds in less than a minute

New method could help physicians detect infection in wounds in less than a minute

A new method for detection of infection in wounds could take physicians less than a minute to complete, rather than the current 24 hours it takes to plate bacteria and leave it to incubate overnight, according to research by the George Washington University's Victoria Shanmugam, M.D. [More]
Scientists develop potential treatment to prevent hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

Scientists develop potential treatment to prevent hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

More than 15 years ago, David Warshaw, Ph.D., and coworkers discovered the precise malfunction of a specific protein in the heart that leads to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a common culprit in cases of sudden death in young athletes. [More]
UTHealth researchers demonstrate new way to reduce preterm birth

UTHealth researchers demonstrate new way to reduce preterm birth

Using nanoparticles to engineer a special drug, a team of researchers from McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston has demonstrated in pre-clinical trials a new way to both reduce preterm birth and avoid the risks of medication in pregnancy to unborn babies. [More]
Incidence and severity emerging CVD risk factors may differ between genders

Incidence and severity emerging CVD risk factors may differ between genders

The incidence and severity of both traditional and emerging cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors as well as the response to treatment may differ between genders. In this narrative review, several emerging CVD risk factors (i.e. inflammatory and haemostatic markers, endothelial dysfunction, homocysteine, lipid disorders, microalbuminuria/proteinuria, coronary artery calcium score, arterial stiffness, periodontitis, inflammatory bowel syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea, impaired glucose metabolism, metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease) are discussed in the context of gender differences. [More]
Lamin nucleoskeleton disordered in Alzheimer's

Lamin nucleoskeleton disordered in Alzheimer's

Brain cell death in Alzheimer's disease is linked to disruption of a skeleton that surrounds the nucleus of the cells, a researcher in the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio said. [More]
Novel non-invasive method of vagus nerve stimulation reduces depressive symptoms

Novel non-invasive method of vagus nerve stimulation reduces depressive symptoms

Researchers of a new study published in the current issue of Biological Psychiatry report successful reduction of depressive symptoms in patients using a novel non-invasive method of vagus nerve stimulation, or VNS. [More]
New research shows link between childhood ADHD and obesity development during adulthood

New research shows link between childhood ADHD and obesity development during adulthood

The incidence of childhood and adult obesity has increased significantly over the past three decades. New research shows that there is an association between obesity development during adulthood and childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). [More]
Using corticosteroids before late preterm delivery reduces respiratory complications in babies

Using corticosteroids before late preterm delivery reduces respiratory complications in babies

A multicenter clinical trial led by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center and NewYork-Presbyterian has found that the use of corticosteroids in mothers at risk for late preterm delivery significantly reduced the incidence of severe respiratory complications in their babies. [More]
CMU joins $12 million research project to reverse-engineer the brain's secret algorithms

CMU joins $12 million research project to reverse-engineer the brain's secret algorithms

Carnegie Mellon University is embarking on a five-year, $12 million research effort to reverse-engineer the brain, seeking to unlock the secrets of neural circuitry and the brain's learning methods. Researchers will use these insights to make computers think more like humans. [More]
NJHF awards 30 grants for NJ researchers working on health-related research

NJHF awards 30 grants for NJ researchers working on health-related research

New Jersey Health Foundation has awarded 30 grants totaling more than $1 million for researchers in New Jersey who are working on health-related research that demonstrates exciting potential. [More]
American Diabetes Association issues statement to address diabetes management in LTC facilities

American Diabetes Association issues statement to address diabetes management in LTC facilities

The care of adults over age 65 with type 2 diabetes is a growing concern: the prevalence of diabetes is highest in this age group and is expected to grow as the U.S. population ages, with many needing care at long-term care (LTC) facilities. [More]

Flexible duty hours safe for patients and beneficial for surgical residents

A new landmark national study led by Northwestern Medicine showed allowing surgical residents the flexibility to work longer hours in order to stay with their patients through the end of an operation or stabilize them during a critical event did not pose a greater risk to patients. [More]
Height affects risk of major non-communicable diseases

Height affects risk of major non-communicable diseases

Height is largely genetically determined, but in recent decades the height of children and adults has steadily increased throughout the world: In adulthood the children are almost always significantly taller than their parents. [More]
New drug cocktail may show promise in NSCLC patients

New drug cocktail may show promise in NSCLC patients

A drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration for melanoma in combination with a common cholesterol-lowering drug may show promise in controlling cancer growth in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to new research from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
New way to more efficiently deliver CRISPR/Cas9 therapeutic to mice with Tyrosinemia type I

New way to more efficiently deliver CRISPR/Cas9 therapeutic to mice with Tyrosinemia type I

University of Massachusetts Medical School researchers have found a way to more efficiently delivery a CRISPR/Cas9 therapeutic to adult mice with the metabolic disease Tyrosinemia type I that may also prove to be safer for use in humans. [More]
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