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New drug shows potential against rare type of acute leukemia

New drug shows potential against rare type of acute leukemia

Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have developed a new drug that shows potential in laboratory studies against a rare type of acute leukemia. And additional studies suggest the same compound could play a role in prostate cancer treatment as well. [More]
Patient with severe Alzheimer's shows promising benefits during treatment with Bryostatin drug

Patient with severe Alzheimer's shows promising benefits during treatment with Bryostatin drug

Researchers at the Blanchette Rockefeller Neurosciences Institute and the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine announced their findings from a new study entitled, "PSEN1 Variant in a Family with Atypical AD." An Alzheimer patient with very severe disease, genetically confirmed to have a known variant of PSEN1, showed promising benefits during treatment with the drug Bryostatin 1. [More]
Cantrixil proves highly effective at killing human ovarian stem cells in pre-clinical study

Cantrixil proves highly effective at killing human ovarian stem cells in pre-clinical study

US-Australian drug discovery company, Novogen Ltd, and its subsidiary, CanTx, Inc., and Yale University, on March 27 released pre-clinical data on experimental anti-cancer drug, Cantrixil. The data was presented as an oral presentation by Professor Gil Mor MD PhD of Yale Medical School to the 62nd Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society of Reproductive Investigation in San Francisco, CA. [More]
Ebola epidemic reveals critical weaknesses in global public health system

Ebola epidemic reveals critical weaknesses in global public health system

In the year since the World Health Organization (WHO) was first notified of an outbreak of what proved to be Ebola virus disease in the west African country of Guinea, more than 24,000 cases have been reported and over 10,000 individuals have died - primarily in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. [More]
Columbia licenses exclusive worldwide rights to novel intra-vaginal ring technology

Columbia licenses exclusive worldwide rights to novel intra-vaginal ring technology

Columbia Laboratories, Inc., a specialty pharmaceutical company focused on the development of therapeutics for women's health, has licensed exclusive worldwide rights to a novel intra-vaginal ring technology for the delivery of one or more pharmaceuticals at different dosages and release rates in a single segmented ring. [More]
Two surgical methods safe, effective for healing distal femur fractures

Two surgical methods safe, effective for healing distal femur fractures

A team of orthopedic surgeons from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has found that modern technology for healing distal femur fractures is as safe and effective as its more established alternative, without a potential shortfall of the older approach. [More]
Study: Use of hand disinfection, aseptic techniques during risk-prone invasive procedures is very low

Study: Use of hand disinfection, aseptic techniques during risk-prone invasive procedures is very low

An observational study by Sahlgrenska Academy researchers at a large Swedish hospital found 2,393 opportunities for hand disinfection and/or aseptic techniques. Doctors and nurses missed 90% of the opportunities. [More]
Wearable collision warning device may help patients with peripheral vision loss

Wearable collision warning device may help patients with peripheral vision loss

People who have lost some of their peripheral vision, such as those with retinitis pigmentosa, glaucoma, or brain injury that causes half visual field loss, often face mobility challenges and increased likelihood of falls and collisions. [More]
Penn surgeons develop new tools to identify joint replacement patients at risk for serious complications

Penn surgeons develop new tools to identify joint replacement patients at risk for serious complications

Orthopedic surgeons from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have developed two new prediction tools aimed at identifying total hip and knee replacement patients who are at-risk of developing serious complications after surgery. [More]
DFG Senate approves establishment of one Clinical Research Unit, five Research Units

DFG Senate approves establishment of one Clinical Research Unit, five Research Units

At its spring meeting in Bonn, the Senate of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) approved the establishment of one new Clinical Research Unit and five new Research Units. [More]
AACR to honor Lewis C. Cantley with Princess Takamatsu Memorial Lectureship

AACR to honor Lewis C. Cantley with Princess Takamatsu Memorial Lectureship

The American Association for Cancer Research will honor Lewis C. Cantley, PhD, with the ninth annual Princess Takamatsu Memorial Lectureship at the AACR Annual Meeting 2015, to be held in Philadelphia, April 18-22. [More]
Roseroot extract may be beneficial for treating major depressive disorder

Roseroot extract may be beneficial for treating major depressive disorder

Rhodiola rosea (R. rosea), or roseroot, may be a beneficial treatment option for major depressive disorder (MDD), according to results of a study in the journal Phytomedicine led by Jun J. Mao, MD, MSCE, associate professor of Family Medicine, Community Health and Epidemiology and colleagues at the Perelman School of Medicine of University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Griffith research examines GPs’ confidence in providing nutritional advice to patients

Griffith research examines GPs’ confidence in providing nutritional advice to patients

The role of nutrition as part of a healthy lifestyle is well understood by the medical profession but whether this information is easily conveyed to patients is another matter. How much confidence GPs have in providing nutritional advice to their patients is now the subject of research by Griffith University’s Dr Lauren Ball. [More]
Top scientists to attend 3rd annual Helmholtz-Nature Medicine Diabetes Conference

Top scientists to attend 3rd annual Helmholtz-Nature Medicine Diabetes Conference

As a unique scientific panel it brings together top scientists as well as promising young researchers from different disciplines in a personal and selected ambience. [More]
New Autism-Causing Genetic Variant Identified

New Autism-Causing Genetic Variant Identified

Using a novel approach that homes in on rare families severely affected by autism, a Johns Hopkins-led team of researchers has identified a new genetic cause of the disease. The rare genetic variant offers important insights into the root causes of autism, the researchers say. And, they suggest, their unconventional method can be used to identify other genetic causes of autism and other complex genetic conditions. [More]
Study finds gaps in information-sharing strategies between hospitalists and PCPs

Study finds gaps in information-sharing strategies between hospitalists and PCPs

Coordinating patient care between hospital clinicians and primary-care physicians is a significant challenge due to poor communication and gaps in information-sharing strategies, according to a study led by physicians at the School of Medicine of the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. [More]
Study: HBV exposure increases immune system maturation of infants

Study: HBV exposure increases immune system maturation of infants

A Singapore led study has shown that Hepatitis B Virus Infection (HBV) exposure increases the immune system maturation of infants, which may give a better survival advantage to counteract bacterial infection during early life. These findings radically modify the way that HBV vertical infection of neonates (mother-to-child) is portrayed, and present a paradigm shift in the approach to treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis B. [More]
Mount Sinai researchers reprogram blood cells into iPSCs to study genetic origins of MDS

Mount Sinai researchers reprogram blood cells into iPSCs to study genetic origins of MDS

Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) -- adult cells reprogrammed back to an embryonic stem cell-like state--may better model the genetic contributions to each patient's particular disease. In a process called cellular reprogramming, researchers at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have taken mature blood cells from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and reprogrammed them back into iPSCs to study the genetic origins of this rare blood cancer. [More]
Researchers identify possible blood biomarkers for concussion

Researchers identify possible blood biomarkers for concussion

By looking at the molecular aftermath of concussion in an unusual way, a team of researchers at Brown University and the Lifespan health system has developed a candidate panel of blood biomarkers that can accurately signal mild traumatic brain injury within hours using standard, widely available lab arrays. [More]
Eight students to continue medical education in St. Luke’s Graduate Medical Education programs

Eight students to continue medical education in St. Luke’s Graduate Medical Education programs

Friday, March 20 was the end of a long process for medical students, said Dr. Joel Rosenfeld, MD, M.Ed, FACS, Chief Academic Officer, St. Luke’s University Health Network. “National Match Day is truly a milestone for every medical student across the country. This is the day when medical residency programs match with their highest-ranked medical students, and medical students learn where they will continue their medical training as residents.” [More]
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