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Clinical study examines efficacy of new interactive software game to treat pediatric food allergies

Clinical study examines efficacy of new interactive software game to treat pediatric food allergies

Elizabeth McQuaid, Ph.D., a staff psychologist from the Bradley Hasbro Children's Research Center, is leading the Phase II trial of an interactive software game developed to help children with food allergies better manage allergy symptoms, social situations and proper food avoidance. [More]
Studies explore possible link between pediatric cancer and light therapy for newborn jaundice

Studies explore possible link between pediatric cancer and light therapy for newborn jaundice

Two new studies raise enough questions about a possible link between childhood cancer and light therapy for newborn jaundice that clinicians should exercise caution in prescribing the treatment for infants whose jaundice is likely to resolve on its own, a pediatric oncologist from Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center argues in an editorial published today by the journal Pediatrics. [More]
Scientists create computational network model to understand human physiology and disease

Scientists create computational network model to understand human physiology and disease

Scientists at UMass Medical School have created a computational network model that will enable the unraveling of the mechanisms by which different macro- and micronutrients contribute to the physiology of the nematode C. elegans, which is a primary model for understanding human physiology and disease. [More]
Researchers developing web-based, decision-support tool for osteoarthritis patients

Researchers developing web-based, decision-support tool for osteoarthritis patients

Researchers at UMass Medical School are developing a web-based, decision-support tool for osteoarthritis patients that will provide individualized, evidence-based information in real time to guide optimal knee and hip care, including joint replacement. [More]
Inhibiting palmitate-adding enzyme can make cancer cells sensitive to EGFR inhibitors

Inhibiting palmitate-adding enzyme can make cancer cells sensitive to EGFR inhibitors

The mistaken activation of certain cell-surface receptors contributes to a variety of human cancers. Knowing more about the activation process has led researchers to be able to induce greater vulnerability by cancer cells to an existing first-line treatment for cancers (mainly lung) driven by a receptor called EGFR. [More]
Health professionals should make parents aware of SIDS risk factors

Health professionals should make parents aware of SIDS risk factors

New research indicates parents want paediatricians to give them detailed information about their child's death. [More]
Two-way communication between cancer cells may be key to tumor metastasis

Two-way communication between cancer cells may be key to tumor metastasis

Two-way communication between cancer cells appears to be key to their becoming motile, clustering and spreading through metastasis, according to Rice University scientists. [More]
Research provides pathway toward creation of first broad-spectrum antiviral drug

Research provides pathway toward creation of first broad-spectrum antiviral drug

By studying the rare person -- about one in a million -- who can fight off viral infections more effectively than everyone else, investigators at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have developed a strategy to help the rest of us achieve this enhanced anti-viral state. [More]
Intensive blood pressure lowering therapies can cut heart disease risk in older adults

Intensive blood pressure lowering therapies can cut heart disease risk in older adults

Intensive therapies to reduce high blood pressure can cut the risk of heart disease in older adults without increasing the risk for falls, according to doctors at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. [More]
New experimental model may predict eventual cardiac phenotype in pediatric patients

New experimental model may predict eventual cardiac phenotype in pediatric patients

An experimental model uses genetics-guided biomechanics and patient-derived stem cells to predict what type of inherited heart defect a child will develop, according to authors of a new study in the journal Cell. [More]
Researchers urge specific guidelines for fertility, sexual function counseling in at-risk pediatric patients

Researchers urge specific guidelines for fertility, sexual function counseling in at-risk pediatric patients

The drugs and therapies used to treat medical conditions often come with side effects. Doctors, pharmacists and other health care professionals strive to be sure we are made aware. [More]
Combined public health intervention could help manage CKD in developing countries

Combined public health intervention could help manage CKD in developing countries

A simple and inexpensive public health intervention helped prevent many cases of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Pakistan. The intervention, which is described in a study in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, will be especially helpful for protecting the kidney health of people living in developing countries. [More]
Gene editing technology helps excise segment of HIV-1 DNA from genomes of living animals

Gene editing technology helps excise segment of HIV-1 DNA from genomes of living animals

Using gene editing technology, researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University have, for the first time, successfully excised a segment of HIV-1 DNA - the virus responsible for AIDS - from the genomes of living animals. [More]
Maternal pregabalin exposure linked to major birth defect risk

Maternal pregabalin exposure linked to major birth defect risk

First trimester exposure to pregabalin may be associated with an increased risk of major birth defects, an observational study suggests. [More]
OpenZika project uses supercomputing power to identify potential drug candidates to cure Zika virus

OpenZika project uses supercomputing power to identify potential drug candidates to cure Zika virus

Rutgers is taking a leading role in an IBM-sponsored World Community Grid project that will use supercomputing power to identify potential drug candidates to cure the Zika virus. [More]
Allogeneic HSCT offers good survival for select TKI-refractory CML patients

Allogeneic HSCT offers good survival for select TKI-refractory CML patients

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is associated with a high rate of survival for carefully chosen chronic myeloid leukaemia patients who do not respond well to tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy, research suggests. [More]
Wyss Institute partners with ReWalk to accelerate development of wearable, soft exosuits

Wyss Institute partners with ReWalk to accelerate development of wearable, soft exosuits

The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University has entered into a collaboration with ReWalk Robotics Ltd., to accelerate the development of the Institute's lightweight, wearable soft exosuit technologies for assisting people with lower limb disabilities. [More]
Closely related molecule can mimic effect of PKMzeta in mice

Closely related molecule can mimic effect of PKMzeta in mice

New research led by SUNY Downstate Medical Center shows that mice devoid of PKMzeta, a molecule previously identified by SUNY Downstate scientists as essential to memory formation and storage, recruit a closely related molecule, PKCiota/lambda, to make up for the missing PKMzeta. [More]
Maintaining balance of P1 and P2 isoforms vital for reducing colon cancer, colitis risk

Maintaining balance of P1 and P2 isoforms vital for reducing colon cancer, colitis risk

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), of which Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are the main types, is on the increase in the United States, affecting more than 1.6 million people and explaining perhaps the increase in advertisements offering treatments and cures. [More]
Study shows non-Hispanic blacks less likely to receive treatment for schizophrenia

Study shows non-Hispanic blacks less likely to receive treatment for schizophrenia

Non-Hispanic blacks are almost twice as likely as non-Hispanic whites to be diagnosed with schizophrenia, but they're significantly less likely to receive medication for treatment, according to researchers. [More]
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