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Research with UWF imaging may change how diabetic eye disease is assessed and treated

Research with UWF imaging may change how diabetic eye disease is assessed and treated

For decades, clinicians have detected and monitored diabetic eye disease with standard retinal photographs that cover about a third of the retina. In recent years, an emerging class of ultrawide field (UWF) cameras has given a substantially larger view of the retina, providing new insight on the presentation and natural history of retinal disease. [More]
Isolated tauopathy ‘surprisingly common’ in AD dementia

Isolated tauopathy ‘surprisingly common’ in AD dementia

A study shows that about a quarter of people with clinically diagnosed mild or moderate Alzheimer’s disease have only minimal β-amyloid deposition on autopsy. [More]
People who eat high protein foods have lower blood pressure and arterial stiffness

People who eat high protein foods have lower blood pressure and arterial stiffness

Eating foods rich in amino acids could be as good for your heart as stopping smoking or getting more exercise - according to new research from the University of East Anglia. [More]
Use of observation stays may lead to financial burden for some Medicare patients

Use of observation stays may lead to financial burden for some Medicare patients

In the midst of a growing trend for Medicare patients to receive observation care in the hospital to determine if they should be formally admitted, a new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania shows that for more than a quarter of beneficiaries with multiple observation stays, the cumulative out-of-pocket costs of these visits exceeds the deductible they would have owed for an inpatient hospital admission. [More]
Women's Medicine Collaborative primary care team earns NCQA recognition

Women's Medicine Collaborative primary care team earns NCQA recognition

The Women's Medicine Collaborative primary care team has been designated a Level 3 Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) by the National Committee for Quality Assurance. The patient-centered medical home model of care emphasizes using coordination and communication to transform primary care to accommodate patients' needs. Having a nurse care manager work one on one with high-risk patients who have chronic conditions leads to a higher quality, better patient experience and reduced costs. Level 3 is NCQA's highest designation in its recognition program. [More]
Breakthrough antibody therapy shows significant promise against drug-resistant multiple myeloma

Breakthrough antibody therapy shows significant promise against drug-resistant multiple myeloma

In its first clinical trial, a breakthrough antibody therapy produced at least partial remissions in a third of patients with multiple myeloma who had exhausted multiple prior treatments, investigators at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and other organizations report today online in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Individuals having high blood levels of two closely related proteins experience few adverse health events

Individuals having high blood levels of two closely related proteins experience few adverse health events

Individuals previously diagnosed with heart disease may be less likely to experience heart failure, heart attacks, or stroke, or to die from these events, if they have higher blood levels of two very closely related proteins, according to a new study led by a UC San Francisco research team. [More]
New study reveals effect of light exposure at night on the biology of teen sleep

New study reveals effect of light exposure at night on the biology of teen sleep

A new study has an important implication for tweens and young teens as they head back to school: Taking a gadget to bed could really hurt their sleep. [More]
Scientists reveal how a common gene mutation in ALS and FTD disrupts normal cell function

Scientists reveal how a common gene mutation in ALS and FTD disrupts normal cell function

Researchers have determined how the most common gene mutation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) disrupts normal cell function, providing insight likely to advance efforts to develop targeted therapies for these brain diseases. [More]
Research reveals why older adults who undergo general anesthesia experience postoperative delirium

Research reveals why older adults who undergo general anesthesia experience postoperative delirium

Newly published research from the Department of Geriatrics and Gerontology at the Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine explains why up to half of older adults who undergo general anesthesia develop postoperative delirium - the sudden onset of confusion, aggression or agitated behavior that could progress to dementia. The findings indicate that older patients who are undergoing surgery may benefit from a less-potent, slower-acting anesthetic. [More]
New research could potentially yield novel platform for cancer vaccines

New research could potentially yield novel platform for cancer vaccines

New research led by Wyss Core Faculty member David Mooney, Ph.D., in collaboration with researchers at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute could potentially yield a new platform for cancer vaccines. Leveraging a biologically inspired sponge-like gel called "cryogel" as an injectable biomaterial, the vaccine delivers patient-specific tumor cells together with immune-stimulating biomolecules to enhance the body's attack againstcancer. [More]
TUHS, GE Healthcare collaborate to provide high-quality radiologic imaging services

TUHS, GE Healthcare collaborate to provide high-quality radiologic imaging services

Academic medical centers across the U.S. are experiencing increasing pressure to enhance value - deliver higher quality at lower cost - as they continue to face challenges related to outcomes, cost control, market competition, and other dynamics. Initiatives to promote value typically involve reimbursement arrangements between health insurers and providers that align financial, efficiency and quality incentives. [More]
CONRAD announces new funding agreement to increase HIV prevention products for high risk women in Africa

CONRAD announces new funding agreement to increase HIV prevention products for high risk women in Africa

CONRAD is pleased to announce a new funding agreement, in collaboration with the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief and the U.S. Agency for International Development, in support of a human centered design (HCD) strategy to increase demand, use and adherence of HIV prevention products for high risk women in Africa. [More]
Electronic triggers can help identify, reduce follow-up delays in evaluation for cancer diagnosis

Electronic triggers can help identify, reduce follow-up delays in evaluation for cancer diagnosis

Electronic triggers designed to search for key data, developed by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, were able to identify and reduce follow-up delays for patients being evaluated for a diagnosis of colon or prostate cancer. [More]
Gerard E. Francisco to be honored with AAPM&R Distinguished Member Award

Gerard E. Francisco to be honored with AAPM&R Distinguished Member Award

Gerard E. Francisco, M.D., chairman of physical medicine and rehabilitation at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School and chief medical officer at TIRR Memorial Hermann, will be recognized at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Oct. 1 - 4 in Boston. [More]
Researchers reveal new electrical mechanism that can control molecular switches regulating cancer cell growth

Researchers reveal new electrical mechanism that can control molecular switches regulating cancer cell growth

The molecular switches regulating human cell growth do a great job of replacing cells that die during the course of a lifetime. But when they misfire, life-threatening cancers can occur. Research led by scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) has revealed a new electrical mechanism that can control these switches. [More]
Researchers evaluate use of pharmacy-based naloxone education and distribution to fight opioid overdoses

Researchers evaluate use of pharmacy-based naloxone education and distribution to fight opioid overdoses

In response to the growing opioid crisis, several states, including Massachusetts and Rhode Island, have granted pharmacists the authority to provide naloxone rescue kits without a prescription to at-risk patients. This model of pharmacy-based naloxone (PBN) education and distribution is one of the public health strategies currently being evaluated at hundreds of pharmacies in both states to determine the impact on opioid overdose death rates. [More]
New study affirms value of influenza vaccination among older people

New study affirms value of influenza vaccination among older people

A new study of the records of millions of nursing home residents affirms the value of influenza vaccination among the elderly. The Brown University analysis found that between 2000 and 2009, the better matched the vaccine was for the influenza strain going around, the fewer nursing home residents died or were hospitalized. [More]
Veritas Genetics obtains CE mark approval for myBRCA genetic screening test

Veritas Genetics obtains CE mark approval for myBRCA genetic screening test

Boston-based Veritas Genetics, a pioneer in accessible genetic screening for disease prevention and early detection, received its first European CE mark approval for the company's hereditary breast and ovarian cancer genetic screening test, myBRCA. Veritas introduced myBRCA, which sequences BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes using proprietary gene-targeting technology and Next Generation Sequencing, in North America in May 2015. [More]
Variation in genetic mechanism increases fat storage and drives obesity

Variation in genetic mechanism increases fat storage and drives obesity

A specific gene region has long been suspected of contributing to obesity in humans but the precise mechanisms behind this were previously unclear. Now, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Harvard Medical School and other partners have been able to show that a single genetic alteration in this region reduces thermogenesis (fat burning), instead increasing lipid storage. [More]
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