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Reducing incorrect gene expression can extend lifespan of cells

Reducing incorrect gene expression can extend lifespan of cells

Working with yeast and worms, researchers found that incorrect gene expression is a hallmark of aged cells and that reducing such "noise" extends lifespan in these organisms. The team published their findings this month in Genes & Development. [More]
New synthetic gene drives could one day improve human health and the environment

New synthetic gene drives could one day improve human health and the environment

Gene drives are genetic elements - found naturally in the genomes of most of the world's organisms - that increase the chance of the gene they carry being passed on to all offspring, and thus, they can quickly spread through populations. Looking to these natural systems, researchers around the world, including some Wyss Institute scientists, are developing synthetic gene drives that could one day be leveraged by humans to purposefully alter the traits of wild populations of organisms to prevent disease transmission and eradicate invasive species. [More]
Researchers reconstruct ancient virus to improve gene therapy

Researchers reconstruct ancient virus to improve gene therapy

Researchers at Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Schepens Eye Research Institute have reconstructed an ancient virus that is highly effective at delivering gene therapies to the liver, muscle, and retina. This discovery, published July 30 in Cell Reports, could potentially be used to design gene therapies that are not only safer and more potent than therapies currently available, but may also help a greater number of patients. [More]
New Penn study questions relevance of fish oil-derived SPMs and their anti-inflammatory effects in humans

New Penn study questions relevance of fish oil-derived SPMs and their anti-inflammatory effects in humans

The importance of a diet rich in fish oils - now a billion dollar food-supplement industry -- has been debated for over half a century. A few large clinical trials have supported the idea that fish oils confer therapeutic benefits to patients with cardiovascular disease. Researchers think that hearts and blood vessels may benefit in part from their anti-inflammatory properties. [More]
Psychotropic medication use widespread among older adults, new study finds

Psychotropic medication use widespread among older adults, new study finds

Older Americans receive prescriptions for mental health medications at more than twice the rate that younger adults do, a new study finds. [More]
GW Cancer Institute receives Eugene Washington PCORI Engagement Award to create online site for patient-centered care

GW Cancer Institute receives Eugene Washington PCORI Engagement Award to create online site for patient-centered care

The George Washington University Cancer Institute has been approved for a $250,000 Eugene Washington PCORI Engagement Award by the Patient-centered Outcomes Research Institute to create the first-ever online Community of Practice for patient-centered care. [More]
Intracellular microlasers may allow accurate measurement of small changes occurring within cells

Intracellular microlasers may allow accurate measurement of small changes occurring within cells

Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators have induced structures incorporated within individual cells to produce laser light. [More]
Detailed molecular analyses reveal new treatment options for aggressive childhood leukemia

Detailed molecular analyses reveal new treatment options for aggressive childhood leukemia

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) leukemia is the most common type of cancer in children. It can occur in various forms, differing not only by specific changes in the genetic material of the leukemia cells but also by their response to therapies. Now, an international team of scientists from Berlin, Düsseldorf, Hannover, Heidelberg, Kiel, and Zurich have succeeded in decoding the molecular characteristics of an as yet incurable subtype of leukemia, paving the way for new therapeutic approaches. [More]
Innovative course helps make medical students more confident about dealing with health disparities

Innovative course helps make medical students more confident about dealing with health disparities

An innovative three-month elective course has helped make some first-year medical students at Albert Einstein College of Medicine more confident about dealing with health disparities they'll likely encounter as physicians, according to a follow-up study published online today in the journal Academic Medicine. [More]
Discovery paves way for new therapeutic approaches to treat fatal leukemia in children

Discovery paves way for new therapeutic approaches to treat fatal leukemia in children

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common type of cancer in children. It can occur in various forms, differing not only by specific changes in the genetic material of the leukemia cells but also by their response to therapies. [More]
AAN's Behavioral Neurology Section Group provides recommendations for improving clinical cognitive testing

AAN's Behavioral Neurology Section Group provides recommendations for improving clinical cognitive testing

Recommendations for improving clinical cognitive testing were reported by the American Academy of Neurology's Behavioral Neurology Section Group, led by Kirk R. Daffner, MD, of Boston, Mass. The Group focused on the Neurobehavioral Status Exam (NBSE), conducting evidence-based reviews of testing used for five domains - attention, language, memory, spatial cognition, and executive function). [More]
Possible link discovered between common medications and falls in older men

Possible link discovered between common medications and falls in older men

Serious falls are more than twice as likely in older men who take medicines with anti-cholinergic properties - according to new research from the University of East Anglia. [More]
New polymer gel could help create swallowable devices for ultra-long drug delivery

New polymer gel could help create swallowable devices for ultra-long drug delivery

Medical devices designed to reside in the stomach have a variety of applications, including prolonged drug delivery, electronic monitoring, and weight-loss intervention. However, these devices, often created with nondegradable elastic polymers, bear an inherent risk of intestinal obstruction as a result of accidental fracture or migration. As such, they are usually designed to remain in the stomach for a limited time. [More]
CHOP surgeons successfully complete world's first bilateral hand transplant on child

CHOP surgeons successfully complete world's first bilateral hand transplant on child

Surgeons at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia joined with colleagues from Penn Medicine recently to complete the world's first bilateral hand transplant on a child. Earlier this month, the surgical team successfully transplanted donor hands and forearms onto eight-year-old Zion Harvey who, several years earlier, had undergone amputation of his hands and feet and a kidney transplant following a serious infection. [More]
Sham-controlled trial of deep brain stimulation treatment for depression fails to show efficacy

Sham-controlled trial of deep brain stimulation treatment for depression fails to show efficacy

Depression is a leading cause of disability worldwide, and treatment-resistant symptoms of depression have a terrible personal and societal cost. They can devastate lives, careers, and families. Some severely ill patients may be unable to attend to even the basic elements of self-care, while others attempt or complete suicide. [More]
Rowan receives $2.55 million HRSA grant to create New Jersey Geriatrics Workforce Enhancement Program

Rowan receives $2.55 million HRSA grant to create New Jersey Geriatrics Workforce Enhancement Program

Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine has received a three-year, $2.55 million dollar grant from the Health Resources Services Administration to establish the New Jersey Geriatrics Workforce Enhancement Program (NJGWEP). [More]
Low-dose lithium lowers involuntary motor movements in mouse model of Parkinson's disease

Low-dose lithium lowers involuntary motor movements in mouse model of Parkinson's disease

Low-dose lithium reduced involuntary motor movements - the troubling side effect of the medication most commonly used to treat Parkinson's disease (PD) - in a mouse model of the condition that is diagnosed in about 60,000 Americans each year. The third in a series of studies from the Andersen lab involving PD and low-dose lithium, the results add to mounting evidence that low-doses of the psychotropic drug could benefit patients suffering from the incurable, degenerative condition. [More]
Inflammation plays role in onset of delirium in older adults

Inflammation plays role in onset of delirium in older adults

Delirium is an acute state of confusion that often affects older adults following surgery or serious illness. Now a study led by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center confirms that inflammation - an immune response that develops when the body attempts to protect itself from harmful stimuli -- plays a role in the onset of delirium. [More]
Research sheds light on new therapeutic options for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Research sheds light on new therapeutic options for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

In industrialized countries like in Europe, acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common form of cancer in children. An international research consortium lead by pediatric oncologists from the Universities of Zurich and Hannover has now succeeded in decoding a specific form of this leukemia, which is regarded as incurable, and in obtaining insights for new therapeutic possibilities. [More]
Study reveals impact of patient navigator program on no-show rates for cervical cancer screening

Study reveals impact of patient navigator program on no-show rates for cervical cancer screening

Researchers at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital reported a 20% decline in the rate of missed appointments for cervical cancer evaluation following a Pap smear when a patient navigator program was initiated at the referral center. [More]
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