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Medical students' perceptions of health policy education improving: Study

Students graduating from U.S. medical schools in 2012 feel they've received a better education in health policy issues than graduates surveyed in 2008, according to a multi-center study led by the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and published online this month in Academic Medicine. [More]
UTHealth scientists identify inhibitory switch to prevent peripheral vascular disease

UTHealth scientists identify inhibitory switch to prevent peripheral vascular disease

Millions of people in the United States have a circulatory problem of the legs called peripheral vascular disease. It can be painful and may even require surgery in serious cases. This disease can lead to severe skeletal muscle wasting and, in turn, limb amputation. [More]
UTHealth's Bhavani Iyer awarded grant to help Harris County residents with vision problems

UTHealth's Bhavani Iyer awarded grant to help Harris County residents with vision problems

Bhavani Iyer, O.D., a low vision specialist at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School, has been awarded a grant to help Harris County residents whose vision problems cannot be corrected with eyeglasses, medication or surgery. [More]
Incisionless TAVR surgery cuts length of hospital stay by 30%

Incisionless TAVR surgery cuts length of hospital stay by 30%

New research from Penn Medicine shows that incisionless transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) surgery cuts length of hospital stay by 30 percent and has no impact on post-operative vascular complication rates when compared with conventional transfemoral TAVR, which requires an incision in the groin. [More]
Deleting enzyme favorably impacts behaviors associated with autistic behaviors

Deleting enzyme favorably impacts behaviors associated with autistic behaviors

Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a genetic disorder that causes obsessive-compulsive and repetitive behaviors, and other behaviors on the autistic spectrum, as well as cognitive deficits. It is the most common inherited cause of mental impairment and the most common cause of autism. [More]
Short movie shows development of dressing promotes wound healing

Short movie shows development of dressing promotes wound healing

Someone suffers second- or third-degree burns: The wound must immediately be dressed and the dressing is to be changed regularly. A short movie made by the group of Prof. Dr.-Ing. Stephan Barcikowski shows the development of a dressing that promotes wound healing - from the materials research laboratory until the first practical trial (in English). [More]
Autoimmune diseases share certain pathogenic mechanisms with cancer

Autoimmune diseases share certain pathogenic mechanisms with cancer

Autoimmune disorders may share certain pathogenic mechanisms with cancer, according to a new report by George Washington University researcher Linda Kusner, Ph.D., published in PLOS ONE on July 22. [More]
Research findings could lead to new approaches for treating schizophrenia

Research findings could lead to new approaches for treating schizophrenia

As part of a multinational, collaborative effort, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have helped identify over 100 locations in the human genome associated with the risk of developing schizophrenia, in the largest genomic study published on any psychiatric disorder to date, conducted with 80,000 people. [More]
Stimulating specific brain pathway may induce active emergence from anesthesia

Stimulating specific brain pathway may induce active emergence from anesthesia

Researchers may be one step closer to better understanding how anesthesia works. A study in the August issue of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists- (ASA-), found stimulating a major dopamine-producing region in the brain, the ventral tegmental area (VTA), caused rats to wake from general anesthesia, suggesting that this region plays a key role in restoring consciousness after general anesthesia. [More]
Brain stimulation effective for treating depression

Brain stimulation effective for treating depression

Brain stimulation treatments, like electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), are often effective for the treatment of depression. Like antidepressant medications, however, they typically have a delayed onset. [More]
Scientists develop next-generation platelet bioreactor to generate functional human platelets

Scientists develop next-generation platelet bioreactor to generate functional human platelets

Scientists at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) have developed a scalable, next-generation platelet bioreactor to generate fully functional human platelets in vitro. The work is a major biomedical advancement that will help address blood transfusion needs worldwide. [More]
Study aims at best way to treat deep vein thrombosis

Study aims at best way to treat deep vein thrombosis

Patients who have a clot in their legs and are considering whether to be treated with traditional blood-thinning medication or undergo a minimally-invasive catheter-based clot removal procedure should feel comfortable that there is no difference in death rates between the two treatments, although there are more bleeding risks with the catheter procedure, according to a study by Temple University School of Medicine researchers. [More]
Epigenetic test helps eliminate unnecessary repeat prostate biopsies

Epigenetic test helps eliminate unnecessary repeat prostate biopsies

More than one million prostate biopsies are performed each year in the U.S. alone, including many repeat biopsies for fear of cancer missed. Therefore there is a need to develop diagnostic tests that will help avoid unnecessary repeat biopsies. [More]
Experts join MD Anderson to end cancer

Experts join MD Anderson to end cancer

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center is pleased to announce that one of the world's preeminent experts in breast cancer research and treatment, V. Craig Jordan, Ph.D., will join the institution's efforts to end cancer. Jordan is considered the "Father of Tamoxifen," the groundbreaking therapeutic drug that has saved countless lives. [More]
First diagnostic criteria proposed for Christianson Syndrome

First diagnostic criteria proposed for Christianson Syndrome

Because the severe autism-like condition Christianson Syndrome was only first reported in 1999 and some symptoms take more than a decade to appear, families and doctors urgently need fundamental information about it. A new study that doubles the number of cases now documented in the scientific literature provides the most definitive characterization of CS to date. [More]
Iodine supplement can reduce central foveal swelling in RP patients with CME

Iodine supplement can reduce central foveal swelling in RP patients with CME

Cystoid macular edema (CME) is a common complication of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a family of retinal diseases in which patients typically lose night and side vision first and then develop impaired central vision. CME can also decrease central vision. [More]
A personalized approach for patients with ccRCC-related mutations

A personalized approach for patients with ccRCC-related mutations

In an analysis of small molecules called metabolites used by the body to make fuel in normal and cancerous cells in human kidney tissue, a research team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania identified an enzyme key to applying the brakes on tumor growth. [More]
Early-career physicians receive National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis

Early-career physicians receive National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis

Twelve residents and medical students each received a one-year, $50,000 National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis. [More]
Drug for reduction of abdominal fat in HIV patients may also reduce fatty liver disease

Drug for reduction of abdominal fat in HIV patients may also reduce fatty liver disease

The only drug to receive FDA approval for reduction of the abdominal fat deposits that develop in some patients receiving antiviral therapy for HIV infection may also reduce the incidence of fatty liver disease in such patients. [More]
Growth hormone reduces liver fat in HIV-infected patients with excess abdominal fat

Growth hormone reduces liver fat in HIV-infected patients with excess abdominal fat

In a preliminary study, HIV-infected patients with excess abdominal fat who received the growth hormone-releasing hormone analog tesamorelin for 6 months experienced modest reductions in liver fat, according to a study in the July 23/30 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on HIV/AIDS. [More]