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Scientists use innovative exome sequencing strategy to identify new gene associated with ALS

Scientists use innovative exome sequencing strategy to identify new gene associated with ALS

Using an innovative exome sequencing strategy, a team of international scientists led by John Landers, PhD, at the University of Massachusetts Medical School has shown that TUBA4A, the gene encoding the Tubulin Alpha 4A protein, is associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurological disorder also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease. [More]
HRQoL goals may improve outcome in PAH

HRQoL goals may improve outcome in PAH

Health-related quality of life before and during treatment for pulmonary arterial hypertension is significantly associated with survival, Brazilian researchers report. [More]
Novel way for treating non-cardiac chest pain due to esophageal hypersensitivity

Novel way for treating non-cardiac chest pain due to esophageal hypersensitivity

Chest pain doesn't necessarily come from the heart. An estimated 200,000 Americans each year experience non-cardiac chest pain, which in addition to pain can involve painful swallowing, discomfort and anxiety. Non-cardiac chest pain can be frightening for patients and result in visits to the emergency room because the painful symptoms, while often originating in the esophagus, can mimic a heart attack. [More]
Study: Automated EEG biofeedback as effective as clinician-run system in addiction treatment

Study: Automated EEG biofeedback as effective as clinician-run system in addiction treatment

An automated EEG biofeedback system works just as well as a clinician-run system in helping reduce attention deficits in those with substance use disorders, according to an independent joint study from researchers at UCLA and UNC Wilmington. [More]
Finding could help improve treatment of hearing loss caused by noise, normal aging

Finding could help improve treatment of hearing loss caused by noise, normal aging

Scientists have restored the hearing of mice partly deafened by noise, using advanced tools to boost the production of a key protein in their ears. [More]
BIDMC investigators develop three-minute assessment that identifies delirium in older hospital patients

BIDMC investigators develop three-minute assessment that identifies delirium in older hospital patients

Delirium is a state of confusion that develops suddenly, often following an acute medical illness, a surgical procedure or a hospitalization. Although delirium is estimated to complicate hospital stays for over 2.5 million elderly individuals in the U.S. each year, this common condition often goes undetected. The end result can be serious complications with sometimes devastating consequences for vulnerable hospitalized elders. [More]
Researchers unravel separate biological responses of the eye to blue light

Researchers unravel separate biological responses of the eye to blue light

Blue light can both set the mood and set in motion important biological responses. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Medicine and School of Arts and Sciences have teased apart the separate biological responses of the human eye to blue light, revealing an unexpected contest for control. [More]
Study reveals that people with stress-related inflammation may suffer from depression

Study reveals that people with stress-related inflammation may suffer from depression

Preexisting differences in the sensitivity of a key part of each individual's immune system to stress confer a greater risk of developing stress-related depression or anxiety, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published October 20 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [More]
Ebola worries renew push for Surgeon General pick

Ebola worries renew push for Surgeon General pick

More than two dozen House Democrats have called on the Senate to confirm Dr. Vivek Murthy, the Obama administration's pick for U.S. Surgeon General, so he could help lead the nation's Ebola response. But Senate support remains shaky because of Murthy's outspoken views on gun violence, which have drawn the wrath of the National Rifle Association. [More]
Newborns of mothers who smoke during pregnancy have altered stress hormones, DNA

Newborns of mothers who smoke during pregnancy have altered stress hormones, DNA

Researchers from The Miriam Hospital have studied the effects of smoking during pregnancy and its impact on the stress response in newborn babies. Their research indicates that newborns of mothers who smoke cigarettes during pregnancy show lower levels of stress hormones, lowered stress response, and alterations in DNA for a gene that regulates passage of stress hormones from mother to fetus. [More]
Viewpoints: Abortion and birth control issues in N.C. Senate race; replacing Obamacare; cancellations

Viewpoints: Abortion and birth control issues in N.C. Senate race; replacing Obamacare; cancellations

But on Wednesday in Charlotte, Kay Hagan stood without hesitation next to Janet Colm, chief executive of the Planned Parenthood Action Fund of Central North Carolina, and proudly bashed her opponent, Thom Tillis, for reducing women's rights on abortion and birth control. [More]
Researchers find poor access to outpatient psychiatric care in Boston, Chicago, Houston metro areas

Researchers find poor access to outpatient psychiatric care in Boston, Chicago, Houston metro areas

Obtaining access to private outpatient psychiatric care in the Boston, Chicago and Houston metropolitan areas is difficult, even for those with private insurance or those willing to pay out of pocket, a new study by Harvard researchers shows. [More]
Despite rise in use of hospice care, hospital-based services increase for ovarian cancer patients

Despite rise in use of hospice care, hospital-based services increase for ovarian cancer patients

There have been widespread efforts to improve the quality of life of terminally ill patients. As more patients choose to spend their final days and weeks in hospice care rather than a hospital, the hope is the use of intensive and costly hospital services would decline. [More]
Researchers receive NIH grant to study mechanisms of auditory hypersensitivity in fragile X syndrome

Researchers receive NIH grant to study mechanisms of auditory hypersensitivity in fragile X syndrome

Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a genetic disorder in humans that causes social impairments and repetitive behaviors, and other behaviors on the autistic spectrum, as well as cognitive deficits. [More]
Longer Looks: An Alabama Judge's Dismantling Of Roe V. Wade; The Mystery Of Enterovirus; Mutating Ebola

Longer Looks: An Alabama Judge's Dismantling Of Roe V. Wade; The Mystery Of Enterovirus; Mutating Ebola

In the nine years Parker has now served on the court, he has made the most of his opportunities. Child custody disputes, for instance, have made good occasions to expound on the role of religion in parental rights. [More]
Cadaver instruction better than computer-simulation instruction when learning human anatomy

Cadaver instruction better than computer-simulation instruction when learning human anatomy

Despite the growing popularity of using computer simulation to help teach college anatomy, students learn much better through the traditional use of human cadavers, according to new research that has implications for health care. [More]
New oral biologic medication successfully treats precancerous intestinal inflammation

New oral biologic medication successfully treats precancerous intestinal inflammation

An oral biologic medication has successfully treated chronic, precancerous inflammation in the intestine, according to results of an animal study authored by an MD/PhD student in the University at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. [More]
Cell transplantation treatment may benefit people with spinal cord injury

Cell transplantation treatment may benefit people with spinal cord injury

Two studies recently published in Cell Transplantation reveal that cell transplantation may be an effective treatment for spinal cord injury (SCI), a major cause of disability and paralysis with no current restorative therapies. [More]
Myths, misconceptions about seasonal flu and flu vaccine

Myths, misconceptions about seasonal flu and flu vaccine

It's that time of year again. As days shorten, evenings become chilly and the trees start a showy display of color, it's time to roll up your sleeve and get your annual flu vaccine. [More]
Half-day educational program can help educate women on side effects of cancer prevention surgery

Half-day educational program can help educate women on side effects of cancer prevention surgery

More women are having ovary-removing surgery as a cancer prevention measure, but many are often unaware of sexual or psychological side effects of the procedure. A new study by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute shows a half-day educational program can help successfully deal with these issues by educating women on how to address them. [More]