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Digoxin drug associated with higher risk of death, hospitalization among adults with atrial fibrillation

Digoxin drug associated with higher risk of death, hospitalization among adults with atrial fibrillation

Digoxin, a drug commonly used to treat heart conditions, was associated with a 71 percent higher risk of death and a 63 percent higher risk of hospitalization among adults with diagnosed atrial fibrillation and no evidence of heart failure, according to a Kaiser Permanente study that appears in the current online issue of Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology. [More]
Study sheds light on how HIV medications cause significant damage to fetal hearts

Study sheds light on how HIV medications cause significant damage to fetal hearts

A study by a Wayne State University and Children's Hospital of Michigan, Detroit Medical Center research team is shedding new light on the troubling question of whether the drugs often given to HIV-positive pregnant women can cause significant long-term heart problems for the non-HIV-infected babies they carry. [More]
Month-long residential program helps young adults stay drug-free

Month-long residential program helps young adults stay drug-free

Residential treatment may be an appropriate first-line option for young adults who are dependent on opioid drugs - including prescription painkillers and heroin - and may result in higher levels of abstinence than does the outpatient treatment that is currently the standard of care. [More]
MGH investigators develop system to accurately track the process of falling asleep

MGH investigators develop system to accurately track the process of falling asleep

Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have developed a system to accurately track the dynamic process of falling asleep, something has not been possible with existing techniques. In their report in the October issue of the open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology, the research team describes how combining key physiologic measurements with a behavioral task that does not interfere with sleep onset gives a better picture of the gradual process of falling asleep. [More]
Training medical students on handheld ultrasound device can enhance their physical diagnosis

Training medical students on handheld ultrasound device can enhance their physical diagnosis

A new study by researchers from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai found that training medical students to use a handheld ultrasound device can enhance the accuracy of their physical diagnosis. [More]
University of Texas student receives Robert D. Watkins Graduate Research Fellowship

University of Texas student receives Robert D. Watkins Graduate Research Fellowship

Veronica Garcia, a student at The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, has been awarded a Robert D. Watkins Graduate Research Fellowship from the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
BIDMC informatrician receives Morris F. Collen Award for achievements in medical informatics

BIDMC informatrician receives Morris F. Collen Award for achievements in medical informatics

Charles Safran, MD, FACMI, Chief of the Division of Clinical Informatics at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), has received the American College of Medical Informatics' 2014 Morris F. Collen Award in recognition of his commitment to and achievements in medical informatics. [More]
New combination therapy improves survival in patients with advanced ovarian cancer

New combination therapy improves survival in patients with advanced ovarian cancer

Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most lethal cancer of the female reproductive organs, with more than 200,000 new cases and more than 125,000 deaths each year worldwide. [More]
Study shows how stem cells can help regenerate damaged muscle after heart attack

Study shows how stem cells can help regenerate damaged muscle after heart attack

Delivering stem cell factor directly into damaged heart muscle after a heart attack may help repair and regenerate injured tissue, according to a study led by researchers from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai presented November 18 at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2014 in Chicago, IL. [More]
Scientists discover second wave of heart muscle inflammation within a week after heart attack

Scientists discover second wave of heart muscle inflammation within a week after heart attack

Results of a new study challenge the current consensus in cardiology that peak myocardial edema, or heart muscle swelling, only occurs just after a myocardial infarction, or heart attack. In the study, presented as a Late-Breaking Clinical Trial at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2014 and published simultaneously in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, scientists discovered a second wave of swelling and inflammation occurs within a week of a heart attack. [More]
'Spillover' of henipaviruses into humans underway, study finds

'Spillover' of henipaviruses into humans underway, study finds

Another family of viruses, deadly in some cases, may have already jumped from fruit bats into humans in Africa, according to a study published today in the journal Nature Communications. The study provides the first, preliminary scientific evidence that "spillover" of henipaviruses into human populations is underway. [More]
Investigational treatment shows promise against Marfan syndrome

Investigational treatment shows promise against Marfan syndrome

An investigational treatment for Marfan syndrome is as effective as the standard therapy at slowing enlargement of the aorta, the large artery of the heart that delivers blood to the body, new research shows. The findings indicate a second treatment option for Marfan patients, who are at high risk of sudden death from tears in the aorta. [More]
New research suggests potential role for MEK inhibitors in type 2 diabetes

New research suggests potential role for MEK inhibitors in type 2 diabetes

A research team led by Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute has uncovered surprising new findings that underscore the role of an important signaling pathway, already known to be critical in cancer, in the development of type 2 diabetes. [More]
New study investigates patient perspectives on deactivation of ICDs at the end of life

New study investigates patient perspectives on deactivation of ICDs at the end of life

Most patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs)--small devices placed in a person's chest to help treat irregular heartbeats with electrical pulses, or shocks--haven't thought about device deactivation if they were to develop a serious illness from which they were not expected to recover. [More]
Study shows how phthalates linked with complications of pregnancy

Study shows how phthalates linked with complications of pregnancy

In recent years, scientists have linked chemicals known as phthalates with complications of pregnancy and fetal development. [More]
Findings illustrate need to monitor all races of heart failure patients for atrial fibrillation

Findings illustrate need to monitor all races of heart failure patients for atrial fibrillation

Black patients who have been diagnosed with heart failure are no less likely than white patients to get atrial fibrillation (an irregular heartbeat, or arrhythmia), according to a new study led by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, which was presented today at the 2014 Scientific Sessions of the American Heart Association. [More]
UMMS scientists awarded $9.5 million grant to study Fragile X syndrome

UMMS scientists awarded $9.5 million grant to study Fragile X syndrome

The National Institutes of Health has awarded a $9.5 million grant to investigators at the University of Massachusetts Medical School to establish a Center for Collaborative Research in Fragile X, one of three centers designated by the NIH. [More]
Vital exhaustion may increase risk of first-time cardiovascular disease by 36%

Vital exhaustion may increase risk of first-time cardiovascular disease by 36%

Fatigue, increased irritability, and feeling demoralized, may raise a healthy man or woman's risk of first-time cardiovascular disease by 36 percent, according to a study led by researchers at Mount Sinai St. Luke's and Mount Sinai Roosevelt hospitals presented on Nov. 17 at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014 in Chicago, IL. [More]
Research finding points to potential new treatment for metabolic disorders

Research finding points to potential new treatment for metabolic disorders

Researchers at the University of Michigan have discovered how a previously unknown hormone serves as a messenger from fat cells to the liver and are investigating the potential of developing a new treatment for metabolic disorders. [More]
Spinal cord injuries can cause brain degeneration, find UM SOM researchers

Spinal cord injuries can cause brain degeneration, find UM SOM researchers

Most research on spinal cord injuries has focused on effects due to spinal cord damage and scientists have neglected the effects on brain function. University of Maryland School of Medicine researchers have found for the first time that spinal cord injuries (SCI) can cause widespread and sustained brain inflammation that leads to progressive loss of nerve cells, with associated cognitive problems and depression. [More]