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Exposure to certain chemicals may lead to early menopause

Exposure to certain chemicals may lead to early menopause

Women who are exposed to certain chemicals are more likely to experience menopause at a younger age, according to a newly published study by a researcher from the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus. [More]
Jersey Shore University Medical Center offers robotic-assisted laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy

Jersey Shore University Medical Center offers robotic-assisted laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy

For many people, losing weight is a personal and ongoing battle. At the Center for Weight-Loss Surgery at Jersey Shore University Medical Center, new options are available for those making the life changing decision to lose weight, including minimally invasive techniques such as robotic-assisted laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. [More]
Nanoscale DNA tool to detect molecular behavior

Nanoscale DNA tool to detect molecular behavior

A complex interplay of molecular components governs almost all aspects of biological sciences - healthy organism development, disease progression, and drug efficacy are all dependent on the way life's molecules interact in the body. Understanding these bio-molecular interactions is critical for the discovery of new, more effective therapeutics and diagnostics to treat cancer and other diseases, but currently requires scientists to have access to expensive and elaborate laboratory equipment. [More]
Temple University Hospital participating in trial to test vibrating capsule for chronic constipation treatment

Temple University Hospital participating in trial to test vibrating capsule for chronic constipation treatment

Chronic constipation is a common problem that affects approximately 15 percent of the U.S. population, according to the American Gastroenterological Association. It can be painful and lead to a reduction in a patient's quality of life. Temple University Hospital is the only hospital in the Philadelphia region participating in a nationwide clinical trial to test an innovative, vibrating capsule for patients with chronic constipation. [More]
Prone position linked to epilepsy sudden death risk

Prone position linked to epilepsy sudden death risk

Around three-quarters of patients who have a sudden unexpected death in epilepsy are found lying in the prone position, show meta-analysis findings. [More]
Menopause does not exacerbate or cause sleep problems, shows study

Menopause does not exacerbate or cause sleep problems, shows study

Women in their late thirties and forties who have trouble sleeping are more than three times more likely to suffer sleep problems during menopause than women who have an easier time getting shut-eye, according to a new study by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Negative communication between doctor and patient could make symptoms worse

Negative communication between doctor and patient could make symptoms worse

Doctors who unintentionally communicate to patients that they don't believe or understand them could actually make symptoms worse, a new study suggests. [More]
Study: Common pesticide may alter the development of brain's dopamine system

Study: Common pesticide may alter the development of brain's dopamine system

A commonly used pesticide may alter the development of the brain's dopamine system -- responsible for emotional expression and cognitive function - and increase the risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children, according to a new Rutgers study. [More]
Cardiologist promotes the importance of controlling high blood pressure

Cardiologist promotes the importance of controlling high blood pressure

During Heart Month, the Cardiovascular Institute of New Jersey at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School is promoting the importance of controlling high blood pressure, also called hypertension, in order to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease and other related chronic disorders in adults. [More]
AP39 compound could help lower heart rate, blood pressure, and blood vessel stiffness

AP39 compound could help lower heart rate, blood pressure, and blood vessel stiffness

A gas that gives rotten eggs their distinctive odour could one day form the basis of new cardiovascular therapies. [More]
Scientists publish catalog of genetic mutations found in head and neck cancers

Scientists publish catalog of genetic mutations found in head and neck cancers

Scientists have published the first comprehensive catalog of genetic mutations and other abnormal changes found in 279 cancers of the head and neck, and have identified several broken molecular pathways that might be targeted by existing and future cancer drugs. [More]
Researchers explore KRAS pathway to find potential target for treating lung cancer

Researchers explore KRAS pathway to find potential target for treating lung cancer

Despite the promise of the gene KRAS as a target for treating lung cancer, finding effective therapies has been challenging. Now researchers are traveling down the pathway to find what makes KRAS cancerous. [More]
Developmental salivary biomarkers linked to feeding success in newborns

Developmental salivary biomarkers linked to feeding success in newborns

Results from a study published online in the Journal of Pediatrics hold the potential to substantially improve clinical decision-making to determine when a premature newborn is ready for oral feeding. The study describes developmental salivary biomarkers associated with feeding success in newborns, markers that could lead to development of objective assessment tools for caregivers. [More]
Study finds no evidence that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular risk

Study finds no evidence that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular risk

Fears of a link between testosterone replacement therapy and cardiovascular risk are misplaced, according to a review published in this month's Mayo Clinic Proceedings. The therapy has come under widespread scrutiny in recent months, including by a federal Food and Drug Administration panel convened last fall. [More]
Raiing Medical, Boston Children's Hospital sign license agreement for Thermia education platform

Raiing Medical, Boston Children's Hospital sign license agreement for Thermia education platform

Raiing Medical Inc. and Boston Children's Hospital entered a license agreement for Boston Children's Thermia education platform, designed to assist parents in learning more about fever, illness and fever management. The online educational framework will be integrated with Raiing's iThermonitor device, a wearable thermometer with US FDA 510(k) clearance. [More]
Penn scientists explore potential therapeutic target for cerebral cavernous malformations

Penn scientists explore potential therapeutic target for cerebral cavernous malformations

Tens of millions of people around the world have abnormal, leak-prone sproutings of blood vessels in the brain called cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs). These abnormal growths can lead to seizures, strokes, hemorrhages, and other serious conditions, yet their precise molecular cause has never been determined. [More]
PKC enzymes categorized as cancer promoters are actually tumor suppressors

PKC enzymes categorized as cancer promoters are actually tumor suppressors

Upending decades-old dogma, a team of scientists at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine say enzymes long categorized as promoting cancer are, in fact, tumor suppressors and that current clinical efforts to develop inhibitor-based drugs should instead focus on restoring the enzymes' activities. [More]
Study finds relationship between menopausal symptoms, bone health in postmenopausal women

Study finds relationship between menopausal symptoms, bone health in postmenopausal women

The first large prospective cohort study to examine the relationship between menopausal symptoms and bone health in postmenopausal women has found that those who experience moderate to severe hot flashes and night sweats during menopause tend to have lower bone mineral density and higher rates of hip fracture than peers with no menopausal symptoms. [More]
Study: 20% of very-low-birth-weight babies born in California not referred for follow-up care

Study: 20% of very-low-birth-weight babies born in California not referred for follow-up care

The tiniest babies need special follow-up care when they go home from the hospital after birth. But, of the thousands of very-low-birth-weight babies born in California during 2010 and 2011, 20 percent were not referred to the state's high-risk infant follow-up program, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
Commonwealth Fund grant to support BIDMC's work on OurNotes

Commonwealth Fund grant to support BIDMC's work on OurNotes

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center has received a $450,000 grant from The Commonwealth Fund to develop OurNotes, an initiative to promote active patient engagement in health and illness that invites patients to contribute to their own electronic medical records. [More]