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People with diabetes more prone to depression, anxiety

People with diabetes more prone to depression, anxiety

People with diabetes are more prone to anxiety and depression than those with other chronic diseases that require similar levels of management. The reasons for this aren't well understood, but Joslin Diabetes Center researchers have discovered one potential explanation. [More]
U-M researchers reveal key role of two enzymes that help the body to remove cholesterol, other lipids

U-M researchers reveal key role of two enzymes that help the body to remove cholesterol, other lipids

With the aid of X-ray crystallography, researchers at the University of Michigan have revealed the structures of two closely related enzymes that play essential roles in the body's ability to metabolize excess lipids, including cholesterol. [More]
Pediatricians, health care providers encounter requests to postpone vaccinations

Pediatricians, health care providers encounter requests to postpone vaccinations

Pediatricians are facing increasing pressure from some parents who want to spread out the recommended vaccine schedule for their children by postponing vaccines, pointing to a need for improved programs that support timely vaccinations, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus. [More]
Study reports 10% reduction in overall C-section births in Portugal

Study reports 10% reduction in overall C-section births in Portugal

A new study reports a significant decline in the rate of cesarean section (C-section) births in Portugal. Findings published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, a journal of the Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology, indicate a 10% reduction in overall C-section rates between 2009 and 2014, with a 14% reduction in state-hospitals during the same time period. [More]
Study shows only 44% of black males prefer to be investigated for prostate cancer

Study shows only 44% of black males prefer to be investigated for prostate cancer

The incidence of prostate cancer among men of Afro-Caribbean origin is higher than in white men, they are more likely to be diagnosed as emergencies and their mortality rates are higher. [More]
Final agenda for upcoming HxRefactored Conference announced

Final agenda for upcoming HxRefactored Conference announced

Health 2.0 and Mad*Pow announce the final agenda for the upcoming HxRefactored Conference, April 1-2 in Boston, Massachusetts. HxRefactored is a revolutionary design and technology conference gathering over 600 designers, developers, and entrepreneurs in health care for two days of thought provoking panels, workshops and discussions on how to improve the quality of the health experience. [More]
Drosophila Research Conference to highlight recent advances in genetics research

Drosophila Research Conference to highlight recent advances in genetics research

Over 1,500 scientists from 30 countries and 46 states will attend next week's 56th Annual Drosophila Research Conference organized by the Genetics Society of America, March 4–8 in Chicago, IL. [More]
Patients who receive chemotherapy after bladder cancer surgery demonstrate 30% lower risk of death

Patients who receive chemotherapy after bladder cancer surgery demonstrate 30% lower risk of death

Patients that received chemotherapy after bladder cancer surgery demonstrated an approximately 30% lower risk of death than those that underwent surgery alone, according to an analysis to be presented by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai at the 2015 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium. [More]
New pharmacological compounds block nerve cell damage in mouse models of MS

New pharmacological compounds block nerve cell damage in mouse models of MS

A newly characterized group of pharmacological compounds block both the inflammation and nerve cell damage seen in mouse models of multiple sclerosis, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published online this week in the journal Nature Neuroscience. [More]
FAA to issue new obstructive sleep apnea guidance for aviation medical examiners

FAA to issue new obstructive sleep apnea guidance for aviation medical examiners

The Federal Aviation Administration has announced that it will issue new guidance for aviation medical examiners (AMEs) regarding the screening and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in commercial pilots. The new guidance, which hopes to treat pilots fairly while at the same time increasing aviation safety, was created and approved with input from the industry, Congress, and the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB). [More]
Feast-or-famine diet may extend lifespan, improve age-related diseases

Feast-or-famine diet may extend lifespan, improve age-related diseases

University of Florida Health researchers have found that putting people on a feast-or-famine diet may mimic some of the benefits of fasting, and that adding antioxidant supplements may counteract those benefits. [More]
Researchers reveal that mosquitoes’ sexual biology may key to malaria transmission

Researchers reveal that mosquitoes’ sexual biology may key to malaria transmission

Sexual biology may be the key to uncovering why Anopheles mosquitoes are unique in their ability to transmit malaria to humans, according to researchers at Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health and University of Perugia, Italy. [More]
Active shooter incidents growing in U.S. hospitals

Active shooter incidents growing in U.S. hospitals

A new Viewpoint article in The Journal of the American Medical Association questions whether the notion of the community hospital as a sanctuary from violence may have become too quaint. The fatal shooting death of a Boston surgeon Jan. 20, 2015, the authors note, was another in what appears to be an increasingly frequent series of "active shooter" incidents in U.S. health care facilities. [More]
Pain from social rejection lasts longer for people with untreated depression

Pain from social rejection lasts longer for people with untreated depression

Rejected by a person you like? Just "shake it off" and move on, as music star Taylor Swift says. [More]
Insurance coverage expansion in Massachusetts increases knee, hip replacement procedures by 4.7%

Insurance coverage expansion in Massachusetts increases knee, hip replacement procedures by 4.7%

Researchers at Boston Medical Center have found that the expansion of insurance coverage in Massachusetts increased the number of elective knee and hip replacement procedures by 4.7 percent, with greater increases among black and Hispanic patients. [More]
Study finds link between violence during Guatemala civil war and mental health problems

Study finds link between violence during Guatemala civil war and mental health problems

Violence during the civil war in Guatemala from 1960 to 1996 resulted in the development of significant mental health problems and conditions for the county's people, according to a new multi-institution study from researchers under the Guatemala-Penn Partnership. [More]
RowanSOM researcher awarded NINDS grant to develop stem cell-based therapy for Canavan disease

RowanSOM researcher awarded NINDS grant to develop stem cell-based therapy for Canavan disease

Paola Leone, PhD, the director of the Cell and Gene Therapy Center and a professor of Cell Biology at the Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine, has been awarded a three-year, $477,000 grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke to develop a stem cell-based therapy for Canavan disease, a rare but devastating neurological disorder in children that typically takes a child's life by age 10. [More]
Fat cell transplantation benefits systemic sclerosis patients with non-healing digital ulcers

Fat cell transplantation benefits systemic sclerosis patients with non-healing digital ulcers

Digital ulcers (DUs) are a frequent, painful, and quality of life altering complication for patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), a connective tissue disease causing a progressive loss of small blood vessels and resulting changes in organs and tissues. DUs on the fingertips of SSc patients are slow to heal, if they heal at all, as many are unresponsive to any therapies. [More]
Researchers reveal how malaria parasite deploys genetic trickery to escape immune system attack

Researchers reveal how malaria parasite deploys genetic trickery to escape immune system attack

Up to one million people -- mainly pregnant woman and young children -- are killed each year by the Plasmodium falciparum parasite, which causes the most devastating form of human malaria. [More]
Simple paper strip test can rapidly diagnose Ebola

Simple paper strip test can rapidly diagnose Ebola

When diagnosing a case of Ebola, time is of the essence. However, existing diagnostic tests take at least a day or two to yield results, preventing health care workers from quickly determining whether a patient needs immediate treatment and isolation. [More]