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Oncotype DX assay linked to decrease in chemotherapy use in younger patients

Oncotype DX assay linked to decrease in chemotherapy use in younger patients

In what's believed to be one of the largest population-based studies of Oncotype DX ever conducted, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have found that the commercial diagnostic tool, Oncotype DX, was associated with a decrease in chemotherapy use in younger patients, but not in those over 66 years of age. [More]
U-M researchers to evaluate Medicaid expansion in Michigan

U-M researchers to evaluate Medicaid expansion in Michigan

Since its launch in April, 481,863 Michiganders have signed up for a new Medicaid health insurance option offered by the state, called the Healthy Michigan Plan. Now, University of Michigan researchers will study how well the new plan works, and advise the state government on how well it's living up to what lawmakers intended. [More]
U.S. taxpayers bear 60% of the cost of smoking-related diseases, study finds

U.S. taxpayers bear 60% of the cost of smoking-related diseases, study finds

Cigarette smoking generates as much as $170 billion in annual health care spending in the United States, according to a new study co-authored by researchers at Georgia State University's School of Public Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and RTI International. [More]
Use of HF-WBI for patients with early-stage breast cancer increases 17.4%, study finds

Use of HF-WBI for patients with early-stage breast cancer increases 17.4%, study finds

The use of hypofractionated whole-breast irradiation (HF-WBI) for patients with early-stage breast cancer increased 17.4 percent from 2004 to 2011, and patients are more likely to receive HF-WBI compared to conventionally fractionated whole-breast irradiation (CF-WBI) when they are treated at an academic center or live ≥50 miles away from a cancer center, according to a study published in the December 1, 2014 issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics (Red Journal), the official scientific journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
Study evaluates effect of 2011 ACGME duty hour reforms on patient outcomes

Study evaluates effect of 2011 ACGME duty hour reforms on patient outcomes

In the first year after the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) reduced the number of continuous hours that residents can work, there was no change in the rate of death or readmission among hospitalized Medicare patients, according to a new study published in JAMA. [More]
New study compares characteristics of hospice patients in nursing homes and community settings

New study compares characteristics of hospice patients in nursing homes and community settings

As hospice for nursing home patients grows dramatically, a new study from the Regenstrief Institute and the Indiana University Center for Aging Research compares the characteristics of hospice patients in nursing homes with hospice patients living in the community. The study also provides details on how hospice patients move in and out of these two settings. [More]
Highly-paid doctors make more money by ordering multiple procedures for patients: UCLA

Highly-paid doctors make more money by ordering multiple procedures for patients: UCLA

In results characterized as "very surprising," UCLA researchers found for the first time that higher-earning clinicians make more money by ordering more procedures and services per patient rather than by seeing more patients, which may not be in patients' best interest. [More]
CareCore, MedSolutions complete merger agreement

CareCore, MedSolutions complete merger agreement

CareCore National, LLC and MedSolutions, Inc., two leading providers of Specialty Benefits Management (SBM) services to managed care organizations and risk-bearing provider organizations, today announced the completion of a merger that will help advance the companies' collective commitment to containing healthcare costs and achieving quality medical outcomes. [More]
Study: Common prostate cancer therapy exposes low-risk patients to more adverse side effects

Study: Common prostate cancer therapy exposes low-risk patients to more adverse side effects

A common prostate cancer therapy should not be used in men whose cancer has not spread beyond the prostate, according to a new study led by researchers at Henry Ford Hospital. [More]

FSMB receives NCQA certification for second time

The Federation of State Medical Boards announced that it has recently been certified for a second time by the National Committee for Quality Assurance. The FSMB, which received its initial NCQA Certification in 2012, is certified under NCQA's Credentials Verification Organization Certification Program for the following credentials elements: Education and Training, Ongoing Monitoring of Sanctions, Medicare/Medicaid Sanctions, and Medical Board Sanctions. [More]

When private health care prices decrease, Medicare utilization increases

When private prices for health care services decrease, Medicare spending increases, according to a new study. The finding raises the possibility that physicians and hospitals may be shifting some services to Medicare when they stand to make more money by doing so -- though further research will be needed to clearly identify the cause, according to the study's authors. [More]
Prostate cancer patients with life expectancies of less than 10 years receive aggressive treatment

Prostate cancer patients with life expectancies of less than 10 years receive aggressive treatment

National guidelines recommend that men with low- and intermediate -risk prostate cancer and life expectancies of less than 10 years should not be treated with radiation or surgery, since they are unlikely to live long enough to benefit from treatment. Yet it is unknown whether such men are unnecessarily receiving these aggressive local treatments, putting them at risk for potentially debilitating side effects. [More]
National Association of ACOs praises new proposed rules for MSSP

National Association of ACOs praises new proposed rules for MSSP

The National Association of ACOs is pleased CMS has released the new proposed rules for the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP). [More]

Fifth civil lawsuit filed against Illinois area doctor for sexual assault

The Law Offices of Michael J. Gravlin filed suit on behalf of another alleged victim of a sexual assault and battery committed by her physician in Rockford, Illinois. [More]
FDA takes immediate steps to help reduce risk of spreading unsuspected uterine cancer

FDA takes immediate steps to help reduce risk of spreading unsuspected uterine cancer

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is taking immediate steps to help reduce the risk of spreading unsuspected cancer in women being treated for uterine fibroids, which is in keeping with Kalorama Information's view that in the female health market there is much room for improvement both in the development of products and the treatment of diseases. [More]
Many older adults with memory problems and dementia go unscreened, untreated

Many older adults with memory problems and dementia go unscreened, untreated

Despite clear signs that their memory and thinking abilities have gone downhill, more than half of seniors with these symptoms haven't seen a doctor about them, a new study finds. [More]
UT Arlington researcher receives grant to educate Hispanic patients about depression, treatment options

UT Arlington researcher receives grant to educate Hispanic patients about depression, treatment options

A University of Texas at Arlington researcher hopes to dispel myths about depression and its treatment, as well as reduce the stigma associated with receiving mental health care among Hispanics. [More]
Advanced practice clinicians more likely to prescribe imaging exam for patients

Advanced practice clinicians more likely to prescribe imaging exam for patients

Advanced practice clinicians, such as nurse practitioners and physician assistants, are 34 percent more likely than primary care physicians to prescribe an imaging exam for patients, according to a Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute study published in JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
Higher Medicaid reimbursements for routine office visits linked to more cancer screening tests

Higher Medicaid reimbursements for routine office visits linked to more cancer screening tests

Medicaid reimbursements for office visits to the doctor and for cancer screening tests vary substantially from state to state. New research in the journal Cancer finds that Medicaid recipients are more likely to receive cancer screening tests when their doctors receive higher reimbursements for routine office visits. In contrast, increased reimbursement rates for screening tests do not have a uniform effect on whether Medicaid beneficiaries get screened. [More]
Cyberonics' worldwide net sales increase 5% to $73.4M in Q2 of fiscal 2015

Cyberonics' worldwide net sales increase 5% to $73.4M in Q2 of fiscal 2015

Cyberonics, Inc. today announced results for the quarter ended October 24, 2014. [More]