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SCS therapy can be key to reducing use of opioids in patients battling chronic pain, study finds

SCS therapy can be key to reducing use of opioids in patients battling chronic pain, study finds

New research has found spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy can be key to reducing or stabilizing the use of opioids in patients battling chronic pain. [More]
Access to anesthesia care not increased when states ‘opt-out’ of Medicare rule, study finds

Access to anesthesia care not increased when states ‘opt-out’ of Medicare rule, study finds

Patient access to anesthesia care for seven common surgical procedures is not increased when states "opt-out" of the Medicare rule that requires anesthesia to be administered with physician supervision, reports a study published in the Online First edition of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists. [More]
Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator improves survival rate in older patients, study finds

Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator improves survival rate in older patients, study finds

Of patients over age 65 who received an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) after surviving sudden cardiac arrest or a near-fatal arrhythmia, almost 80 percent survived two years--a higher rate than found in past trials performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the devices in this situation, according to a study today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
Technology and cost barriers hinder real-time reporting of cancer patients' symptoms

Technology and cost barriers hinder real-time reporting of cancer patients' symptoms

Capturing real-time reports of cancer patients' symptoms between doctor's visits has proven health benefits, but technology and cost barriers are getting in the way of widespread adoption of the practice, reports a University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researcher. [More]
VisionCare receives FDA approval to begin clinical study of telescope implant in post-cataract patients

VisionCare receives FDA approval to begin clinical study of telescope implant in post-cataract patients

VisionCare, Inc. ("VisionCare"), a developer of advanced visual prosthetic devices for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the company's investigational device exemption for a new U.S. clinical study. [More]
Study finds decline in rate of prostate cancer treatment after change in screening recommendations

Study finds decline in rate of prostate cancer treatment after change in screening recommendations

As some national guidelines now recommend against routine prostate cancer screening, the overall rate of men receiving treatment for the disease declined 42 percent, a new study finds. [More]
New study explores impact of Affordable Care Act on socioeconomic disparities in cancer screening

New study explores impact of Affordable Care Act on socioeconomic disparities in cancer screening

Out-of-pocket expenditures are thought to be a significant barrier to receiving cancer preventive services, especially for individuals of lower socioeconomic status. A new study looks at how the Affordable Care Act (ACA), which eliminated such out-of-pocket expenditures, has affected the use of mammography and colonoscopy. [More]
Landmark Lancet Series highlights areas and extent of overuse and underuse of medical services

Landmark Lancet Series highlights areas and extent of overuse and underuse of medical services

Launched today by The Lancet, the 'Right Care Series' features major commentaries by Vikas Saini (Lown Institute, Boston), Adam Elshaug (University of Sydney), Paul Glasziou (Bond University), Don Berwick (Institute for Healthcare Improvement, Cambridge, MA) and others who examine the areas and extent of overuse and underuse of health and medical services. [More]
Many nursing home residents with renal disease lack advance directives to address end-of-life care

Many nursing home residents with renal disease lack advance directives to address end-of-life care

A new study indicates that many nursing home residents receiving dialysis do not have advance directives that sufficiently address end-of-life treatment decisions. [More]
Yale study highlights treatment burden experienced by older lung cancer patients

Yale study highlights treatment burden experienced by older lung cancer patients

Depending on the type of treatment older lung cancer patients receive, they can spend an average of one in three days interacting with the healthcare system in the first 60 days after surgery or radiation therapy, according to a study by Yale researchers. [More]
Bundled payment models can reduce Medicare, hospital costs without compromising quality of care

Bundled payment models can reduce Medicare, hospital costs without compromising quality of care

Bundled payment models can push Medicare and health system costs down considerably without sacrificing quality of care, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
New Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute reports explore impact of MACRA on radiologists

New Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute reports explore impact of MACRA on radiologists

A new Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute series of reports explores the impact of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA) of 2015, along with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' (CMS) 2016 proposal for its implementation, on radiologists. [More]
Financial penalties can reduce hospital readmissions

Financial penalties can reduce hospital readmissions

Hospitals that were financially penalized for too many readmissions were more likely than non-penalized institutions to subsequently reduce readmissions for all conditions, according to a new study by Yale School of Medicine researchers and colleagues in the Journal of the American Medical Association. [More]

Plastic surgeons question the value of subjective patient satisfaction ratings

Patient satisfaction has become an important quality measure in the US healthcare system. But some plastic surgeons question the value of subjective patient satisfaction ratings--suggesting that they might even lead to lower-quality care in some situations, according to a special topic article in the January issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). [More]
DaVita releases recap of 2016 accomplishments

DaVita releases recap of 2016 accomplishments

DaVita Inc., a leading independent medical group and a leading provider of kidney care services in the United States, today released a recap of major accomplishments for the company in 2016, marking its 16th year bringing quality of life to patients and teammates around the world. [More]
Alere provides update on CMS decision to revoke Medicare billing privileges of Arriva Medical

Alere provides update on CMS decision to revoke Medicare billing privileges of Arriva Medical

Alere Inc., a global leader in rapid diagnostic tests, today provided an update on the decision by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to revoke Arriva Medical's Medicare billing privileges. [More]
Military health system to test U-M-developed V-BID approach

Military health system to test U-M-developed V-BID approach

A health care reform idea originated by University of Michigan faculty will get a major test among members of the nation's military and their families, thanks to a provision in the national defense spending bill signed by President Obama on Friday. [More]
ACA financial penalties lead to reductions in hospital readmission rates for common conditions

ACA financial penalties lead to reductions in hospital readmission rates for common conditions

Financial penalties levied under the Affordable Care Act's Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program lead to the poorest performing hospitals to achieve the greatest reductions in readmission rates for common conditions. [More]
Four-year Johns Hopkins program provides efficient, less expensive care for patients in East Baltimore

Four-year Johns Hopkins program provides efficient, less expensive care for patients in East Baltimore

When people with chronic health problems couldn't get around town to their doctors' appointments, a four-year Johns Hopkins program brought the appointments to them. [More]
FDA approves Dexcom’s G5 Mobile CGM system for diabetes management

FDA approves Dexcom’s G5 Mobile CGM system for diabetes management

Dexcom, Inc., the leader in continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) for patients with diabetes, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved its G5 Mobile CGM system as the first and only continuous glucose monitoring system that can be used to make daily diabetes treatment decisions without finger pricking. [More]
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