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Researchers synthetize molecules to block virus that causes influenza A

Researchers synthetize molecules to block virus that causes influenza A

The influenza A virus is a contagious and severe respiratory infection that affects animals but also humans. Researchers from the University of Barcelona have synthetized some molecules which are able to block the virus that causes influenza A and some of the mutations that make it resistant to common drugs. [More]
Astellas, Dana-Farber to develop K-Ras inhibitors for treatment of lung, pancreatic cancers

Astellas, Dana-Farber to develop K-Ras inhibitors for treatment of lung, pancreatic cancers

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (Dana-Farber) and Astellas Pharma Inc. today announced a three-year collaboration to research and develop small molecule inhibitors of oncogenic K-Ras for the treatment of cancer, including lung cancer. [More]
Research could pave way for more effective drugs to treat inflammation

Research could pave way for more effective drugs to treat inflammation

Six Case Western Reserve scientists are part of an international team that has discovered two compounds that show promise in decreasing inflammation associated with diseases such as ulcerative colitis, arthritis and multiple sclerosis. [More]
FDA grants QIDP and Fast Track designation to Nabriva's lefamulin for treatment of CABP, ABSSSI

FDA grants QIDP and Fast Track designation to Nabriva's lefamulin for treatment of CABP, ABSSSI

Nabriva Therapeutics AG, a biotechnology company focused on developing pleuromutilins, a new class of antibiotics for the treatment of serious infections caused by resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens, announced today that the United States Food and Drug Administration has granted Qualified Infectious Disease Product (QIDP) as well as Fast Track status designation to Nabriva's lead product lefamulin, for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). [More]
Arisaph Pharmaceuticals receives STTR grants to develop cancer drug candidates

Arisaph Pharmaceuticals receives STTR grants to develop cancer drug candidates

Arisaph Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a privately held biopharmaceutical company focused on discovery and development of novel therapies for cardiometabolic diseases and cancer, announced today that it has been awarded a phase II Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grant and a supplemental phase I grant, both from the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Scientists explore chili pepper's effect to develop new drug candidate for pain

Scientists explore chili pepper's effect to develop new drug candidate for pain

Biting into a chili pepper causes a burning spiciness that is irresistible to some, but intolerable to others. Scientists exploring the chili pepper's effect are using their findings to develop a new drug candidate for many kinds of pain, which can be caused by inflammation or other problems. [More]
IUPUI receives $600,000 award from National Science Foundation for drug discoveries

IUPUI receives $600,000 award from National Science Foundation for drug discoveries

Haibo Ge, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology in the School of Science at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI), is the recipient of a 5-year, $600,000 award from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to fund research that may one day contribute to drug discoveries. [More]
TAXIS acquires novel antimicrobial drug candidates from Biota

TAXIS acquires novel antimicrobial drug candidates from Biota

TAXIS Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced the acquisition of a group of novel antimicrobial drug candidates from Biota Pharmaceuticals Inc. of Atlanta, GA. [More]
Compounds developed for cancer treatment show promise as potential oral therapy for Alzheimer's

Compounds developed for cancer treatment show promise as potential oral therapy for Alzheimer's

Currently, no cure exists for Alzheimer's disease, the devastating neurological disease affecting more than 5 million Americans. But scientists are now reporting new progress on a set of compounds, initially developed for cancer treatment, that shows promise as a potential oral therapy for Alzheimer's. Their study appears in ACS' Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. [More]
Brain network measures placebo effects in Parkinson's disease patients

Brain network measures placebo effects in Parkinson's disease patients

Investigators at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research have utilized a new image-based strategy to identify and measure placebo effects in randomized clinical trials for brain disorders. The findings are published in the August issue of The Journal of Clinical Investigation. [More]
ACS Infectious Diseases journal highlights chemistry and collaborative research area

ACS Infectious Diseases journal highlights chemistry and collaborative research area

The American Chemical Society (ACS) announced today that Courtney Aldrich, Ph.D., will head the brand-new, web-only journal ACS Infectious Diseases as editor-in-chief. With the first issue slated for publication in January 2015, the pioneering journal will meet a growing demand for a place to publish top-notch chemistry-focused infectious diseases research. [More]
New chemical compound protects against blindness and diabetes in animals

New chemical compound protects against blindness and diabetes in animals

In a new study led by UC San Francisco scientists, a chemical compound designed to precisely target part of a crucial cellular quality-control network provided significant protection, in rats and mice, against degenerative forms of blindness and diabetes. [More]
Exeter scientists find health benefits in rotten egg gas

Exeter scientists find health benefits in rotten egg gas

It may smell of flatulence and have a reputation for being highly toxic, but when used in the right tiny dosage, hydrogen sulfide is now being being found to offer potential health benefits in a range of issues, from diabetes to stroke, heart attacks and dementia. A new compound (AP39), designed and made at the University of Exeter, could hold the key to future therapies, by targeting delivery of very small amounts of the substance to the right (or key) places inside cells. [More]

Peakdale Molecular reports significant growth in demand for its medicinal chemistry services

Peakdale Molecular, a leading UK provider of medicinal chemistry and chemistry services, is celebrating its most successful year ever for revenues and earnings since the company’s inception in 1992. [More]
Syngene International, Bristol-Myers Squibb extend drug discovery and development collaboration

Syngene International, Bristol-Myers Squibb extend drug discovery and development collaboration

Bristol-Myers Squibb and Syngene International, India's largest contract research organization, today announced a five-year extension of their drug discovery and development collaboration in India. [More]
P2Y12 and blood clotting: an interview with Dr. Jacobson, NIH

P2Y12 and blood clotting: an interview with Dr. Jacobson, NIH

We already understand the many steps involved in blood clotting in great mechanistic detail. The process of blood vessels closing off in response to injury is necessary for preserving life, but blood platelets that are over-active, or activated inappropriately because of unstable plaque, can lead to heart attacks and strokes. [More]
New report raises important questions about transcranial direct current stimulation

New report raises important questions about transcranial direct current stimulation

Over the past several decades, neurostimulation techniques such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have gradually gained favour in the public eye. In a new report, published yesterday in the prestigious scientific journal Neuron, IRCM ethics experts raise important questions about the rising tide of tDCS coverage in the media, while regulatory action is lacking and ethical issues need to be addressed. [More]
NIH award reflects urgency of overcoming infections that resist drug treatment

NIH award reflects urgency of overcoming infections that resist drug treatment

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health has selected infectious disease expert David Perlin, executive director of the Public Health Research Institute at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, to lead a major research effort aimed at developing new forms of antibiotics to regain the upper hand over deadly bacteria that have become resistant to current treatments. [More]
Georgia State researcher receives grant to develop novel therapeutics against RSV infection

Georgia State researcher receives grant to develop novel therapeutics against RSV infection

Dr. Richard Plemper, a professor in the new Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University, has received a five-year, $2.83 million federal grant to develop novel therapeutics against Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) infection. [More]
New insight provides potential to improve treatment for sepsis

New insight provides potential to improve treatment for sepsis

In a review published in the April issue of Immunity, Kevin J. Tracey, MD, president of The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, says it's time to take a fresh look at the medical community's approach to treating sepsis, which kills millions worldwide every year, including more than 200,000 Americans. [More]