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UA professor uses NSF grant to develop 3-D-printed biodegradable polymer scaffolds

UA professor uses NSF grant to develop 3-D-printed biodegradable polymer scaffolds

Laboratory-engineered noses, jaws and ears. The stuff science fiction is made of is coming soon from a University of Akron lab. With a $390,000 NSF grant, Matthew Becker, UA professor of polymer science and biomedical engineering, is developing 3-D-printed biodegradable polymer scaffolds, the frameworks within which bone will grow, with the hope of changing the face of craniofacial reconstruction. [More]
Researchers report role of two gene-regulating molecules in Parkinson's disease

Researchers report role of two gene-regulating molecules in Parkinson's disease

As Parkinson's disease progresses in patients, a puzzling dichotomy plays out in their brains. One set of neurons degenerates, while a similar population nearby is spared the same degree of damage. Why the difference? An answer to this question could clear the way for preventions and treatments for this disease, which impairs movement. [More]
TSRI study explores bacterial enzyme that may help people to quit smoking

TSRI study explores bacterial enzyme that may help people to quit smoking

A new study from scientists at The Scripps Research Institute explores a bacterial enzyme that might be used as a drug candidate to help people quit smoking. [More]
Metformin drug has impact on blood fat levels

Metformin drug has impact on blood fat levels

Besides affecting the blood sugar levels, the substance Metformin, also has an impact on blood fat levels. This was elucidated by an interdisciplinary team of the German Center for Diabetes Research headed by Dr. Rui Wang-Sattler of the Helmholtz Zentrum München. Especially the harmful LDL cholesterol can be reduced. [More]
Researchers explore key factors to improve astronauts’ nutrition needs during space missions

Researchers explore key factors to improve astronauts’ nutrition needs during space missions

Centuries ago, ships often sailed with crews numbering in the hundreds returning with tens. Cause of death: Scurvy - a severe depletion of Vitamin C. [More]
TWi Biotechnology gets notice of patent allowance covering use of AC-201 drug in diabetes treatment

TWi Biotechnology gets notice of patent allowance covering use of AC-201 drug in diabetes treatment

TAIPEI, Aug. 3, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- TWi Biotechnology, Inc., today announced that it has received Notices of Allowance for AC-201, TWi Biotechnology's lead drug candidate, from the European Patent Office and the Patent Office of the Russian Federation for patent applications numbered 11766702.2-1460 and 2012147449, respectively. [More]
Consumption of B-GOS prebiotic has positive effect on gut microbiota, immune systems of elderly people

Consumption of B-GOS prebiotic has positive effect on gut microbiota, immune systems of elderly people

Clasado Biosciences Limited, the producers and suppliers of the second generation prebiotic Bimuno, a unique trans-galactooligosaccharide, and the Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, The University of Reading, UK, today announce the results of human research demonstrating the positive effects of an advanced prebiotic on the immune system of the elderly. [More]

Sphere Medical publishes white paper discussing areas where Proxima mitigates sources of pre-analytical errors

Sphere Medical, innovator in critical care monitoring and diagnostics equipment, has published a white paper focusing on the mitigation of common pre-analytical errors associated with arterial blood gas analysis. [More]
WSU scientists suggest that glyphosate not present in human breast milk

WSU scientists suggest that glyphosate not present in human breast milk

Washington State University scientists have found that glyphosate, the main ingredient in the herbicide Roundup, does not accumulate in mother's breast milk. [More]
UC San Diego researchers identify pivotal player in diabetic kidney disease

UC San Diego researchers identify pivotal player in diabetic kidney disease

Tapping the potential of metabolomics, an emerging field focused on the chemical processes of metabolism, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a new and pivotal player in diabetic kidney disease. [More]
Chemicals used in plastics linked to increased risk of high blood pressure, diabetes in children and adolescents

Chemicals used in plastics linked to increased risk of high blood pressure, diabetes in children and adolescents

According to a new series of studies out of NYU Langone Medical Center, two chemicals increasingly used during manufacturing to strengthen plastic wrap, soap, cosmetics, and processed food containers have been linked to a rise in risk of high blood pressure and diabetes in children and adolescents. [More]
Unique diagnostic test could help detect world's deadliest superbugs, infectious diseases

Unique diagnostic test could help detect world's deadliest superbugs, infectious diseases

Infectious diseases such as hepatitis C and some of the world's deadliest superbugs--C. difficile and MRSA among them--could soon be detected much earlier by a unique diagnostic test, designed to easily and quickly identify dangerous pathogens. [More]
Bacterial ‘fight club’ approach effective for finding new drugs from natural sources

Bacterial ‘fight club’ approach effective for finding new drugs from natural sources

Creating bacterial "fight clubs" is an effective way to find new drugs from natural sources. That is the conclusion of a team of Vanderbilt chemists who have been exploring ways to get bacteria to produce biologically active chemicals that they normally hold in reserve. These compounds are called secondary metabolites. [More]

Inexpensive nickel catalyst triggers decarbonylative cross-coupling between aromatic esters and boronic acids

Esters have been identified to act as a new and clean coupling partner for the carbon-carbon bond forming cross-coupling reaction to make useful compounds for pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and organic materials. [More]
Diet, acidity of urine may influence susceptibility to urinary tract infections

Diet, acidity of urine may influence susceptibility to urinary tract infections

The acidity of urine -- as well as the presence of small molecules related to diet -- may influence how well bacteria can grow in the urinary tract, a new study shows. The research, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, may have implications for treating urinary tract infections, which are among the most common bacterial infections worldwide. [More]
Automated droplet-based surface sampling probe analyzes liver biopsy sample in 10 minutes

Automated droplet-based surface sampling probe analyzes liver biopsy sample in 10 minutes

Surgeons could know while their patients are still on the operating table if a tissue is cancerous, according to researchers from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Brigham and Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School. [More]
La Jolla Institute researchers identify molecular pathway that maintains Treg cells' function

La Jolla Institute researchers identify molecular pathway that maintains Treg cells' function

Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are part of the system of checks and balances that prevents the immune response from going overboard and causing autoimmune disease. Although critically important for shaping the immune response and maintaining self-tolerance, how they hold on to their immune-suppressive powers had remained unclear. [More]
PNP Therapeutics granted FDA orphan drug designation for Gedeptin

PNP Therapeutics granted FDA orphan drug designation for Gedeptin

PNP Therapeutics Inc. announced today the Food and Drug Administration has granted orphan drug status to Gedeptin, the Company's lead product candidate (adenoviral vector expressing E. coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase gene) for the intratumoral treatment of anatomically accessible oral and pharyngeal cancers, including cancers of the lip, tongue, gum, floor of mouth, salivary gland and other oral cavities. [More]
New microfluidic chip could save millions of euros in drug development costs

New microfluidic chip could save millions of euros in drug development costs

Scientists in an EU-supported project have developed a microfluidic chip that simultaneously analyses the reactions of several human organ tissues when they come into contact with candidates for new drugs. [More]
New research shows that low glycemic index diets reduce autism symptoms in mice

New research shows that low glycemic index diets reduce autism symptoms in mice

Bread, cereal and other sugary processed foods cause rapid spikes and subsequent crashes in blood sugar. In contrast, diets made up of vegetables, fruits and whole grains are healthier, in part because they take longer to digest and keep us more even-keeled. [More]
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