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Common antidepressant medications not helpful for people with mood, anxiety disorders

Common antidepressant medications not helpful for people with mood, anxiety disorders

Studies indicate that the majority of people with mood and anxiety disorders who receive the most commonly prescribed class of antidepressant medications, Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors or SSRI's, are not helped by these medications. SSRIs are designed to increase serotonin, a neurotransmitter in the brain that is key to maintenance of mood. [More]
New study shows association between BPA exposure and ASD in children

New study shows association between BPA exposure and ASD in children

A newly published study is the first to report an association between bisphenol-A (BPA), a common plasticizer used in a variety of consumer food and beverage containers, with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in children. [More]
Neuroprotective compounds can limit damage to the brain during ischemic stroke

Neuroprotective compounds can limit damage to the brain during ischemic stroke

In the 1990s, neuroscientists identified a class of drugs that showed promise in the area of stroke. NMDA receptor antagonists could limit damage to the brain in animal models of stroke. But one problem complicated testing the drugs in a clinical setting: the side effects included disorientation and hallucinations. [More]
Hair sample tests reveal underreported exposure to tobacco smoke among preemies with lung disease

Hair sample tests reveal underreported exposure to tobacco smoke among preemies with lung disease

Public health experts have long known that tobacco smoke exposure (TSE) can be harmful for children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia, a lung disease that often accompanies premature birth. [More]
Tobacco smoke exposure common among children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia

Tobacco smoke exposure common among children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia

Public health experts have long known that tobacco smoke exposure (TSE) can be harmful for children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia, a lung disease that often accompanies premature birth. [More]
Nicotine metabolite supports learning, memory by amplifying action of primary chemical messenger

Nicotine metabolite supports learning, memory by amplifying action of primary chemical messenger

Nicotine's primary metabolite supports learning and memory by amplifying the action of a primary chemical messenger involved in both, researchers report. [More]
Gut microbial metabolite of linoleic acid has suppressive effect on intestinal inflammation

Gut microbial metabolite of linoleic acid has suppressive effect on intestinal inflammation

Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), including Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, are hard to completely cure. Globally, IBDs affect more than 4 million people, today. However, Professor Soichi Tanabe (Graduate School of Biosphere Science, Hiroshima University) and his collaborators have demonstrated that 10-hydroxy-cis-12-octadecenoic acid (HYA), a gut microbial metabolite of linoleic acid, has a suppressive effect on intestinal inflammation. [More]
BHB compound produced during dieting blocks part of immune system involved in inflammatory disorders

BHB compound produced during dieting blocks part of immune system involved in inflammatory disorders

Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have found that a compound produced by the body when dieting or fasting can block a part of the immune system involved in several inflammatory disorders such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Children exposed to air pollution are at increased risk for brain inflammation, neurodegenerative changes

Children exposed to air pollution are at increased risk for brain inflammation, neurodegenerative changes

City smog lowers children's IQ. This is among findings from a recent University of Montana study that found children living in cities with significant air pollution are at an increased risk for detrimental impacts to the brain, including short-term memory loss and lower IQ. [More]
New study heightens concerns over the detrimental impact of APOE ε4 in urban children

New study heightens concerns over the detrimental impact of APOE ε4 in urban children

A new study by researchers at the Universities of Montana, Carleton, and North Carolina, and the Centro de Ciencias de la Atmósfera, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, heightens concerns over the detrimental impact of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele -- the most prevalent genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease -- upon cognition, olfaction, and metabolic brain indices in healthy urban children and teens. [More]
Research shows olfactory proxy detection is a phenomenon in both insects and humans

Research shows olfactory proxy detection is a phenomenon in both insects and humans

Antioxidants are natural food ingredients that protect cells from harmful influences. Their main task is to neutralize so-called "free radicals" which are produced in the process of oxidation and which are responsible for cell degeneration. [More]
Walnuts may improve cognitive function

Walnuts may improve cognitive function

Eating walnuts may improve performance on cognitive function tests, including those for memory, concentration and information processing speed according to new research from the David Geffen School of Medicine at The University of California, Los Angeles, led by Dr. Lenore Arab. Cognitive function was consistently greater in adult participants that consumed walnuts, regardless of age, gender or ethnicity. [More]
UCSD nanoengineers develop temporary tattoo to measure glucose levels

UCSD nanoengineers develop temporary tattoo to measure glucose levels

Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego have tested a temporary tattoo that both extracts and measures the level of glucose in the fluid in between skin cells. This first-ever example of the flexible, easy-to-wear device could be a promising step forward in noninvasive glucose testing for patients with diabetes. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers find new potential target for halting tumor growth

UT Southwestern researchers find new potential target for halting tumor growth

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have discovered that brain tumors are capable of burning acetate for fuel, providing a new potential target for halting tumor growth. [More]
Researchers develop new method to track movement of carcinogenic PAHs in the human body

Researchers develop new method to track movement of carcinogenic PAHs in the human body

Researchers for the first time have developed a method to track through the human body the movement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or PAHs, as extraordinarily tiny amounts of these potential carcinogens are biologically processed and eliminated. [More]
Blue light can knock circadian rhythms off-kilter, study finds

Blue light can knock circadian rhythms off-kilter, study finds

A study funded by the National Institutes of Health is unraveling the mystery of how blue light from residential and commercial lighting, electronic devices, outdoor lights and billboards can throw off-kilter the natural body clock of humans, plants and animals, leading to disease. [More]
Study shows how phthalates linked with complications of pregnancy

Study shows how phthalates linked with complications of pregnancy

In recent years, scientists have linked chemicals known as phthalates with complications of pregnancy and fetal development. [More]
Scientists discover ways to detect several toxic flame retardants in people's bodies

Scientists discover ways to detect several toxic flame retardants in people's bodies

A new peer-reviewed study found that people are contaminated with several toxic flame retardants rarely studied in the US, including one that has never before been detected in Americans called TCEP. Scientists tested urine samples of California residents for biomarkers of six chemicals, all of which were present. [More]
Dosing of antiretroviral medication to prevent HIV infection differs by sex

Dosing of antiretroviral medication to prevent HIV infection differs by sex

A mathematical model developed by NIH grantees predicts that women must take the antiretroviral medication Truvada daily to prevent HIV infection via vaginal sex, whereas just two doses per week can protect men from HIV infection via anal sex. [More]
Prenatal exposure to phthalate DiNP associated with shorter AGD in Swedish boys: Study

Prenatal exposure to phthalate DiNP associated with shorter AGD in Swedish boys: Study

The first study to examine prenatal exposure to the phthalate DiNP finds it is associated with a shorter anogenital distance (AGD) in Swedish boys at the age of 21 months. These findings raise concern since animal research has linked DiNP exposure to a shorter AGD, and studies on humans have related shorter AGD to male genital birth defects as well as impaired reproductive function in adult males, and the levels of DiNP metabolites in humans are increasing globally. [More]