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A Microbicide is any substance or process that kills germs (bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms that can cause infection and disease). Also called germicide.
Scientists develop microbicide gel that prevents transmission of multiple STIs in vagina/rectum in animals

Scientists develop microbicide gel that prevents transmission of multiple STIs in vagina/rectum in animals

Population Council scientists and their partners have found that their proprietary microbicide gel is safe, stable, and can prevent the transmission of multiple sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in both the vagina and rectum in animals: HIV, herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2), and human papillomavirus (HPV). [More]

New method of protecting women from transmission of HIV is safe

Findings of an early phase clinical trial at the University of Alabama at Birmingham suggest that a possible new method of protecting women from the transmission of HIV is safe. [More]
Novel HIV prevention products for women demonstrate safety in clinical studies

Novel HIV prevention products for women demonstrate safety in clinical studies

Two early clinical studies of novel HIV prevention products for women - the first combination antiretroviral (ARV) vaginal ring and a vaginal film - show the products to be safe and open the door to product improvements that could expand options for women-initiated prevention tools. The results of both studies were presented today at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. [More]

Women using DMPA injection more likely to acquire HIV than women using NET-EN

Women who used an injectable contraceptive called DMPA were more likely to acquire HIV than women using a similar product called NET-EN, according to a secondary analysis of data from a large HIV prevention trial called VOICE, researchers from the National Institutes of Health-funded Microbicide Trials Network reported today at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Boston. [More]
UNC receives $40M for clinical trials unit devoted to HIV/AIDS treatment, prevention and research

UNC receives $40M for clinical trials unit devoted to HIV/AIDS treatment, prevention and research

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has received a seven-year, more than $40 million award from the National Institutes of Health for a clinical trials unit that will implement the scientific agendas of five NIH networks devoted to HIV/AIDS treatment, prevention, and cure research. [More]
CONRAD receives USAID Pioneers Prize for developing tenofovir gel to reduce HIV infection in women

CONRAD receives USAID Pioneers Prize for developing tenofovir gel to reduce HIV infection in women

CONRAD, a leading reproductive health-research organization based at Eastern Virginia Medical School (EVMS), today announced that they are a winner of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Science and Technology Pioneers Prize for their work in developing tenofovir gel. [More]
Researchers create vaginal cream using silver nanoparticles to control transmition of HIV

Researchers create vaginal cream using silver nanoparticles to control transmition of HIV

The product has proven efficiency in lab tests, although clinical trials are yet to be performed. After discovering that silver nanoparticles are capable of blocking the entry of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) into the organism, a group of researchers from the University of Texas, in collaboration with Humberto Lara Villegas, specialist in nanoparticles and virology from the University of Monterrey, Mexico (UDEM), create a vaginal cream to control the transmition of the virus. [More]
CWRU researchers receive NIAID grant to conduct HIV research and clinical trials

CWRU researchers receive NIAID grant to conduct HIV research and clinical trials

AIDS researchers from Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals Case Medical Center have received a seven-year funding award from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]

Population Council gets USAID cooperative agreement to develop non-ARV microbicides that block HIV, STI

The Population Council today announced it was awarded a cooperative agreement from the US Agency for International Development's (USAID) Office of HIV and AIDS: "Non-ARV Based Combination Microbicide that Blocks HIV and Other STIs." [More]
MTN receives $70M to develop and test products that aim to reduce spread of HIV

MTN receives $70M to develop and test products that aim to reduce spread of HIV

With funding of $70 million to support its effort into 2021, the Microbicide Trials Network (MTN) will continue to develop and test products that aim to reduce the spread of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, federal officials announced yesterday. [More]

Investigators, CTUs chosen to lead five HIV/AIDS clinical trials networks through 2021

Principal investigators and clinical trials units have been chosen to lead and conduct the research of five HIV/AIDS clinical trials networks through 2021. The effort is directed and funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health. Total funding for the networks' leadership and the CTUs is expected to reach $225 million in 2014, the first year of operation. [More]

New microbicide gel formulation shows promise for safe vaginal and rectal administration to prevent HIV

Researchers developed a first-of-its-kind microbicide gel formulation that shows promise for safe vaginal and rectal administration to prevent the sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). [More]

IPM receives US$40M from USAID to advance new HIV prevention tools for women

‚ÄčThe International Partnership for Microbicides (IPM) announced today that it has received two competitive five-year awards with a combined US$40 million ceiling from the US Agency for International Development (USAID). [More]

MTN-017 study launched to test reduced glycerin formulation of tenofovir gel

‚ÄčIRMA applauds the launch of the world's first-ever Phase II rectal microbicide trial. The Microbicide Trial Network's study, called MTN-017, will test a reduced glycerin formulation of tenofovir gel applied rectally. [More]

Researchers launch phase II clinical trial of rectal microbicide to prevent HIV infections

Taking an important step toward the development of a product to prevent HIV infections associated with unprotected anal sex, researchers today announced the launch of a global Phase II clinical trial of a potential rectal microbicide. [More]
Drexel University researchers create molecule that can cause AIDS virus to destroy itself

Drexel University researchers create molecule that can cause AIDS virus to destroy itself

Pinning down an effective way to combat the spread of the human immunodeficiency virus, the viral precursor to AIDS, has long been challenge task for scientists and physicians, because the virus is an elusive one that mutates frequently and, as a result, quickly becomes immune to medication. [More]

New report shows steady progress in research and development for HIV vaccines

Recent breakthroughs in HIV prevention research have confirmed the promise of new options to help end the AIDS epidemic and highlight the urgent need for ongoing research to develop additional prevention options and support rapid rollout of proven ones. [More]

Reformulated version of anti-HIV gel safe for HIV-negative men and women

A reformulated version of an anti-HIV gel developed for vaginal use was found safe and acceptable by HIV-negative men and women who used it rectally, according to a Phase I clinical trial published today in PLOS ONE. [More]
Einstein researchers to develop drug-impregnated intravaginal ring for HIV prevention in women

Einstein researchers to develop drug-impregnated intravaginal ring for HIV prevention in women

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have been awarded a $12 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop a drug-impregnated intravaginal ring to prevent HIV infection in women. [More]

Women's low adherence to daily-dose products in HIV prevention trial suggest different approach needed, researchers say

"Results of a major HIV prevention trial suggest that daily use of a product -- whether a vaginal gel or an oral tablet -- does not appear to be the right approach for preventing HIV in young, unmarried African women," a press release from the Microbicide Trials Network reports. [More]