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New microbial analysis has implications for protecting environment, energy recovery and human health

New microbial analysis has implications for protecting environment, energy recovery and human health

An international team of scientists from the Translational Genomics Research Institute and The Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine have completed a first-of-its-kind microbial analysis of a biological wastewater treatment plant that has broad implications for protecting the environment, energy recovery and human health. [More]
UTSA's Bernard Arulanandam named fellow of AAAS

UTSA's Bernard Arulanandam named fellow of AAAS

Bernard Arulanandam, UTSA Jane and Roland Blumberg Professor in Biology and Assistant Vice President for Research Support, has been named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Arulanandam was elected by his peers for the honor, recognizing his scientific and socially distinguished efforts to advance science and its applications. [More]
New NIH funding to help researchers develop drug delivery system to prevent HIV infection in women

New NIH funding to help researchers develop drug delivery system to prevent HIV infection in women

The University of Texas Medical Branch is part of a collaboration led by the Oak Crest Institute of Science that received a $20 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop a novel intravaginal ring capable of delivering powerful antiretroviral drugs to prevent the spread of sexually transmitted HIV in women. The total award to UTMB is approximately $2.5 million. [More]
Automated biospecimen thawing: an interview with Dr Rolf Ehrhardt, CEO of BioCision

Automated biospecimen thawing: an interview with Dr Rolf Ehrhardt, CEO of BioCision

Surprisingly, even with decades of cryopreservation research, little progress has been made in the way frozen biospecimens are thawed. It’s still very common for researchers and clinicians to thaw cells and other frozen biological samples in a variety of manual ways ... [More]
Six Albert Einstein College of Medicine faculty members selected as AAAS Fellows

Six Albert Einstein College of Medicine faculty members selected as AAAS Fellows

Six faculty members at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Election as an AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. This year, 401 members have been awarded this honor by AAAS because of their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications. [More]
Study finds that starting ART treatment soon after HIV infection improves immune health

Study finds that starting ART treatment soon after HIV infection improves immune health

HIV-1-infected U.S. military members and beneficiaries treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) soon after infection were half as likely to develop AIDS and were more likely to reconstitute their immune-fighting CD4+ T-cells to normal levels, researchers reported Nov. 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
Authors review current progress in developing transgenic pig models for human diseases

Authors review current progress in developing transgenic pig models for human diseases

Genetically engineered pigs, minipigs, and microminipigs are valuable tools for biomedical research, as their lifespan, anatomy, physiology, genetic make-up, and disease mechanisms are more similar to humans than the rodent models typically used in drug discovery research. [More]
Merck, NewLink Genetics sign exclusive worldwide license agreement for Ebola vaccine candidate

Merck, NewLink Genetics sign exclusive worldwide license agreement for Ebola vaccine candidate

Merck, known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, and NewLink Genetics Corporation, announced today that they have entered into an exclusive worldwide license agreement to research, develop, manufacture, and distribute NewLink's investigational rVSV-EBOV (Ebola) vaccine candidate. [More]
Elsevier launches new journal Current Opinion in Food Science

Elsevier launches new journal Current Opinion in Food Science

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, is pleased to announce the launch of the latest title in the Current Opinion journal series : Current Opinion in Food Science. [More]
NUS researchers make breakthrough discovery that could lead to future treatment for multiple sclerosis

NUS researchers make breakthrough discovery that could lead to future treatment for multiple sclerosis

A multi-disciplinary research team from the National University of Singapore has made a breakthrough discovery of a new type of immune cells that may help in the development of a future treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
Scientists develop new method to rapidly identify antibiotic resistance

Scientists develop new method to rapidly identify antibiotic resistance

Scientists from Uppsala University, the Science for Life Laboratory in Stockholm and Uppsala University Hospital have developed a new method of rapidly identifying which bacteria are causing an infection and determining whether they are resistant or sensitive to antibiotics. [More]
Researchers say that promoting healthy gut microbiota can help treat metabolic syndrome

Researchers say that promoting healthy gut microbiota can help treat metabolic syndrome

Promoting healthy gut microbiota, the bacteria that live in the intestine, can help treat or prevent metabolic syndrome, a combination of risk factors that increases a person's risk for heart disease, diabetes and stroke, according to researchers at Georgia State University and Cornell University. [More]
Unique ability helps prolific bacterium to afflict humans, animals and even plants

Unique ability helps prolific bacterium to afflict humans, animals and even plants

New research has found that one of the world's most prolific bacteria manages to afflict humans, animals and even plants by way of a mechanism not before seen in any infectious microorganism -- a sense of touch. This unique ability helps make the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa ubiquitous, but it also might leave these antibiotic-resistant organisms vulnerable to a new form of treatment. [More]
University of Texas student receives Robert D. Watkins Graduate Research Fellowship

University of Texas student receives Robert D. Watkins Graduate Research Fellowship

Veronica Garcia, a student at The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, has been awarded a Robert D. Watkins Graduate Research Fellowship from the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
Targeting bacterial motility to combat chronic respiratory disease

Targeting bacterial motility to combat chronic respiratory disease

Mycoplasma gallisepticum causes chronic respiratory disease in birds. The illness particularly affects domestic chicken and turkey flocks. The bacteria are especially life-threatening for the animals when they occur in combination with other infections. In order to control the spread of the disease, poultry farms in the EU must be proven free from Mycoplasma gallisepticum or face being closed. [More]
Blocking key brain receptor cell could neutralize biological consequences of Alzheimer's

Blocking key brain receptor cell could neutralize biological consequences of Alzheimer's

Blocking a key receptor in brain cells that is used by oxygen free radicals could play a major role in neutralizing the biological consequences of Alzheimer's disease, according to researchers at Temple University. [More]
Great Basin Scientific seeks FDA approval for Group B Strep assay

Great Basin Scientific seeks FDA approval for Group B Strep assay

Great Basin Scientific, Inc., a molecular diagnostics company, today announced it has submitted its Group B Strep assay to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for 510(k) clearance. [More]
'Spillover' of henipaviruses into humans underway, study finds

'Spillover' of henipaviruses into humans underway, study finds

Another family of viruses, deadly in some cases, may have already jumped from fruit bats into humans in Africa, according to a study published today in the journal Nature Communications. The study provides the first, preliminary scientific evidence that "spillover" of henipaviruses into human populations is underway. [More]
New view on how nerve cells die in Parkinson's disease

New view on how nerve cells die in Parkinson's disease

Scientists at Trinity College Dublin have made an important breakthrough in our understanding of Parkin - a protein that regulates the repair and replacement of nerve cells within the brain. [More]
Strains of enterotoxigenic E. coli worldwide have similar toxins and virulence factors

Strains of enterotoxigenic E. coli worldwide have similar toxins and virulence factors

The strains of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) that infect adults and children in Asia, Africa, and the Americas, have notably similar toxins and virulence factors, according to research published ahead of print in the Journal of Bacteriology. [More]