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Researchers introduce the idea of using sewage to study human microbiome

Researchers introduce the idea of using sewage to study human microbiome

A new study demonstrates that sewage is an effective means to sample the fecal bacteria from millions of people. Researchers say the information gleaned from the work provides a unique opportunity to monitor, through gut microbes, the public health of a large population without compromising the privacy of individuals. [More]
Researchers reveal how malaria parasite deploys genetic trickery to escape immune system attack

Researchers reveal how malaria parasite deploys genetic trickery to escape immune system attack

Up to one million people -- mainly pregnant woman and young children -- are killed each year by the Plasmodium falciparum parasite, which causes the most devastating form of human malaria. [More]
Simple paper strip test can rapidly diagnose Ebola

Simple paper strip test can rapidly diagnose Ebola

When diagnosing a case of Ebola, time is of the essence. However, existing diagnostic tests take at least a day or two to yield results, preventing health care workers from quickly determining whether a patient needs immediate treatment and isolation. [More]
Epigenetics and women’s health research: an interview with Professor Steve Conlan, Swansea University

Epigenetics and women’s health research: an interview with Professor Steve Conlan, Swansea University

Our research into gynaecological oncology focuses around understanding mechanisms of how genes are regulated or how they become dysregulated in a disease; and also the effects that has on the surface of the endometrium and also the function of the ovaries... [More]
Study suggests that antibiotics can induce potentially dangerous biofilm formation

Study suggests that antibiotics can induce potentially dangerous biofilm formation

Most people have taken an antibiotic to treat a bacterial infection. Now researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the University of San Diego, La Jolla, reveal that the way we often think about antibiotics - as straightforward killing machines - needs to be revised. [More]
Researchers explore influence of host organisms on bacterial metabolism

Researchers explore influence of host organisms on bacterial metabolism

Monika Ehling-Schulz's group from the Institute of Microbiology, together with Mathias Müller's group at the Institute of Animal Breeding and Genetics studied the influence of host organisms on bacterial metabolism. The researchers infected three different lineages of mice with the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. The mouse strains showed significant differences in their response to the infection and in the severity of the clinical symptoms. [More]
Researchers reveal how C. difficile wreaks havoc on guts, causes life-threatening diseases

Researchers reveal how C. difficile wreaks havoc on guts, causes life-threatening diseases

In a new paper in the journal Infection and Immunity, the researchers lay out for the first time exactly how C. difficile wreaks havoc on the guts of animals in a short time, and causes severe diarrhea and life-threatening disease in humans. [More]
NIAID expands Tuberculosis Research Units program to drive innovation in TB research

NIAID expands Tuberculosis Research Units program to drive innovation in TB research

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, is expanding its Tuberculosis Research Units program in an effort to drive innovation in tuberculosis (TB) research. NIAID is awarding up to $15.2 million in fiscal year 2015 and as much as $105.3 million over seven years to fund four institutions that will act as a collaborative TBRU network. [More]
Weill Cornell receives NIH grant to study TB-causing bacteria

Weill Cornell receives NIH grant to study TB-causing bacteria

In an effort to stop tuberculosis (TB) from becoming progressively less treatable worldwide, the National Institutes of Health has awarded Weill Cornell Medical College more than $6.2 million in first-year funding to support a research collaboration among six institutions in close alliance with voluntary pharmaceutical partners. [More]
First comprehensive maps and analyses of human epigenomes revealed

First comprehensive maps and analyses of human epigenomes revealed

Two dozen scientific papers published online simultaneously on Feb. 18, 2015 present the first comprehensive maps and analyses of the epigenomes of a wide array of human cell and tissue types. Epigenomes are patterns of chemical annotations to the genome that determine whether, how, and when genes are activated. [More]

POCARED Diagnostics announces closure of another $15M in funding

POCARED Diagnostics Ltd. is an Israeli-based Diagnostics and Pre-analytical technology manufacturer with offices in the United States announced they have closed another $15 Million in funding. [More]
Researchers describe new family of bacteria common in malaria mosquitoes

Researchers describe new family of bacteria common in malaria mosquitoes

A new family of bacteria that are common in malaria mosquitoes has been described by researchers at Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) and Uppsala University in Sweden, Justus-Liebig-Universität Giessen, Germany, and the Veterinärmedizinische Universität, Austria. [More]
Discovery offers much needed information about how virulent insect-borne diseases cause infection

Discovery offers much needed information about how virulent insect-borne diseases cause infection

For decades, scientists have thought the bacteria that cause the bubonic plague hijack host cells at the site of a fleabite and are then taken to the lymph nodes, where the bacteria multiply and trigger severe disease. But UNC School of Medicine researchers discovered that this accepted theory is off base. The bacteria do not use host cells; they traffic to lymph nodes on their own and not in great numbers. [More]
Researchers report first evidence of Seoul hantavirus in wild rats in the Netherlands

Researchers report first evidence of Seoul hantavirus in wild rats in the Netherlands

In a paper just published in the peer reviewed journal Infection, Ecology & Epidemiology, researchers report discovering the first evidence of Seoul hantavirus (SEOV) in the wild rat population in the Netherlands. The discovery comes on the heels of similar ones in France, Belgium and the United Kingdom in recent years, and has some researchers concerned about the potential spread of the virus to humans. [More]
Cervarix effective against other common cancer-causing HPVs

Cervarix effective against other common cancer-causing HPVs

According to a multinational clinical trial involving nearly 20,000 young women, the human papilloma virus vaccine, Cervarix, not only has the potential to prevent cervical cancer, but was effective against other common cancer-causing human papillomaviruses, aside from just the two HPV types, 16 and 18, which are responsible for about 70 percent of all cases. [More]
New study indicates that malaria-causing parasite is unlikely to cross from animals to humans

New study indicates that malaria-causing parasite is unlikely to cross from animals to humans

In recent years, public health experts have increasingly explored the idea of eliminating the most dangerous malaria-causing parasite. But they have questioned whether getting rid of this species, called Plasmodium falciparum, would allow other species of the parasite to simply jump into the gap and start infecting humans with malaria. [More]
Experimental Ebola virus medication shows promise in monkeys

Experimental Ebola virus medication shows promise in monkeys

An experimental medication that targets a protein in Ebola virus called VP24 protected 75% of a group of monkeys that were studied from Ebola virus infection, according to new research conducted by the U.S. Army, in collaboration with Sarepta Therapeutics, Inc. [More]
CWRU researcher receives $3.9 million grant for HIV research

CWRU researcher receives $3.9 million grant for HIV research

A researcher at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine has been awarded $3.9 million to determine if the combination of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and drug abuse is a double kick in the gut, leading to organ damage throughout the body. [More]
Study highlights the need for more research on trauma and other body-mind therapies

Study highlights the need for more research on trauma and other body-mind therapies

In a Theory and Hypothesis paper titled "Somatic Experiencing: Using Interoception and Proprioception as Core Elements of Trauma Therapy," published today in Frontiers in Psychology, Dartmouth investigators Peter Payne, SEP, and Mardi Crane-Godreau, PhD, note the lack of hypothesized scientific models for the mechanisms of action responsible for outcomes in Somatic Experiencing® (SE) trauma therapy and other body-mind therapies. [More]
MSU graduate student discovers critical molecule that helps combat lung infections

MSU graduate student discovers critical molecule that helps combat lung infections

A Montana State University graduate student who wants to reduce the number of people dying from lung infections has discovered a molecule that's critical for immunity. [More]