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Novel discovery offers new insight into why women more likely than men to develop MS

Novel discovery offers new insight into why women more likely than men to develop MS

An innocent mistake made by a graduate student in a Northwestern Medicine lab (she accidentally used male mice instead of female mice during an experiment) has led scientists to a novel discovery that offers new insight into why women are more likely than men to develop autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
IDT to host instructive talk on accelerating synthetic biology at ASM General Meeting

IDT to host instructive talk on accelerating synthetic biology at ASM General Meeting

Integrated DNA Technologies will host an instructive talk on accelerating synthetic biology at the American Society for Microbiology General Meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana on Sunday May 31, 2015 at 11am CDT. [More]
Scientists identify molecular 'lock' that enables Ebola virus to gain entry to cells

Scientists identify molecular 'lock' that enables Ebola virus to gain entry to cells

An international team including scientists from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases has identified the molecular "lock" that the deadly Ebola virus must pick to gain entry to cells. [More]
Liverpool scientists complete genomics studies on multidrug resistant Typhoid fever in Africa

Liverpool scientists complete genomics studies on multidrug resistant Typhoid fever in Africa

The team has completed two genomics studies on the tropical disease, a condition that is estimated to cause up to 30 million illnesses and over a quarter of a million deaths globally each year. [More]
Study: Drugs that block NPC1 protein could be used to treat Ebola virus disease

Study: Drugs that block NPC1 protein could be used to treat Ebola virus disease

A new study has demonstrated that a protein called Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) is critical for the Ebola virus to infect a host. The study, published in the May/June issue of mBio, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, suggests that drugs that block NPC1 could be used to treat this deadly disease. [More]
Microfluidic cell-squeezing device could introduce specific antigens inside immune system's B cells

Microfluidic cell-squeezing device could introduce specific antigens inside immune system's B cells

MIT researchers have shown that they can use a microfluidic cell-squeezing device to introduce specific antigens inside the immune system's B cells, providing a new approach to developing and implementing antigen-presenting cell vaccines. [More]
Phages in chicken meat can transfer antimicrobial resistance to bacteria

Phages in chicken meat can transfer antimicrobial resistance to bacteria

Bacteria resistant to antibiotics are on the rise. There are different explanations for how resistances are transferred. Researchers from the Vetmeduni Vienna found phages in chicken meat that are able to transfer antimicrobial resistance to bacteria. Phages are viruses that exclusively infect bacteria. They can contribute to the spread of antimicrobial resistance. [More]
Chemical compound shows promise in treating rheumatoid arthritis

Chemical compound shows promise in treating rheumatoid arthritis

Montana State University researchers and their collaborators have published their findings about a chemical compound that shows potential for treating rheumatoid arthritis. [More]
New study suggests ways to accelerate recovery from dangerous diarrheal disease

New study suggests ways to accelerate recovery from dangerous diarrheal disease

A new study delineates a sequential pattern of changes in the intestinal microbial population of patients recovering from cholera in Bangladesh, findings that may point to ways of speeding recovery from the dangerous diarrheal disease. [More]
Lab M demonstrates quality with compliance to ISO 11133:2014

Lab M demonstrates quality with compliance to ISO 11133:2014

Lab M has been compliant according to ISO 11133:2014 which relates to the microbiology of food, animal feed and water – culture media preparation, production, storage and testing... [More]

New test could identify resistant tuberculosis faster

Tuberculosis (TB) disease rates in some parts of London are as high as in Sub-Saharan Africa, and drug-resistant strains are becoming increasingly common. [More]
HHMI selects two Boston University medical students to conduct full-time biomedical research

HHMI selects two Boston University medical students to conduct full-time biomedical research

Two medical students from Boston University have been selected by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute to conduct full-time biomedical research in its Medical Research Fellows Program. Joseph Park and Jacqueline Estevez are two of the selected 68 top medical and veterinary students from 37 different schools in the United States to receive this honor. [More]

COPAN obtains FDA clearance for new FecalSwab

COPAN, an innovative company focused on bringing breakthrough products to Microbiology preanalytics around the world, announced that it has obtained FDA clearance for its new FecalSwab. [More]
UCL-led team develops new technique to find resistant TB faster

UCL-led team develops new technique to find resistant TB faster

The time needed to genetically sequence the bacteria causing tuberculosis (Mtb) from patient samples has been reduced from weeks to days using a new technique developed by a UCL-led team. This could help health service providers to better treat disease, control transmission of this infection, and monitor outbreaks. [More]
UAB opens third multidisciplinary clinic for transverse myelitis

UAB opens third multidisciplinary clinic for transverse myelitis

Mike Jezdimir knows firsthand how hard it is to get appropriate medical treatment for his condition, a disease of the spinal cord called transverse myelitis. He has had it for 48 years, since he was 17. TM is fairly uncommon, and many physicians rarely encounter it. Treatment options are limited. [More]
Simple blood test could help predict effectiveness of interferon-based therapy in HCV-infected patients

Simple blood test could help predict effectiveness of interferon-based therapy in HCV-infected patients

A simple blood test can be used to predict which chronic hepatitis C patients will respond to interferon-based therapy, according to a report in the May issue of Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the basic science journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Immune system plays surprising role in the progression of Rett syndrome

Immune system plays surprising role in the progression of Rett syndrome

New research by investigators at the University of Massachusetts Medical School suggests the immune system plays an unsuspected and surprising role in the progression of Rett syndrome, a severe neurological disorder affecting children. Immune cells known as macrophages are unable to perform their normal function and are instead amplifying the disease. [More]
Removing bacterial biofilms could help prevent and treat colon cancers, study suggests

Removing bacterial biofilms could help prevent and treat colon cancers, study suggests

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine has uncovered a big clue to how bacteria may promote some colon cancers. [More]
NIH-sponsored Phase 1 clinical trial evaluates novel investigational West Nile virus vaccine

NIH-sponsored Phase 1 clinical trial evaluates novel investigational West Nile virus vaccine

A novel investigational West Nile virus vaccine discovered and developed by scientists at the Oregon National Primate Research Center at Oregon Health & Science University is being evaluated in an NIH-sponsored Phase 1, first-in-human, clinical trial at Duke University. Although several early-stage West Nile virus vaccine clinical trials have been completed to date, no human vaccine has been approved for commercial use. [More]
BD reports revenues of $2.051 billion for second fiscal quarter 2015

BD reports revenues of $2.051 billion for second fiscal quarter 2015

BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company), a leading global medical technology company, today reported quarterly revenues of $2.051 billion for the second fiscal quarter ended March 31, 2015, representing a decrease of 1.0 percent from the prior-year period, or an increase of 4.9 percent on a foreign currency-neutral basis. [More]
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