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Breakthroughs against Plasmodium falciparum pave way for latest advancement

Breakthroughs against Plasmodium falciparum pave way for latest advancement

When the highly-influential European Medicines Agency announced its recommendation to approve what could be the world's first licensed vaccine against malaria in infants and children, there was much celebrating in the research community at NYU Langone Medical Center. [More]
Astellas reports topline results from isavuconazole Phase 3 study in candidemia and other invasive Candida infections

Astellas reports topline results from isavuconazole Phase 3 study in candidemia and other invasive Candida infections

Astellas today announced topline results from the Phase 3 ACTIVE study evaluating the efficacy and safety of intravenous (IV) and oral isavuconazole, commercially known as CRESEMBA (isavuconazonium sulfate), under development for adults with candidemia and other invasive Candida infections. [More]
Cepheid announces international availability of updated Xpert Carba-R test to identify Superbugs

Cepheid announces international availability of updated Xpert Carba-R test to identify Superbugs

Cepheid today announced the international availability of an update to Xpert Carba-R, with the addition of two newly emerging carbapenemase genes, OXA-181 and OXA-232. The on-demand, molecular test also detects and differentiates among the five most prevalent mechanisms of carbapenem resistance, namely KPC, NDM, VIM, IMP-1 and OXA-48. [More]
Consumption of B-GOS prebiotic has positive effect on gut microbiota, immune systems of elderly people

Consumption of B-GOS prebiotic has positive effect on gut microbiota, immune systems of elderly people

Clasado Biosciences Limited, the producers and suppliers of the second generation prebiotic Bimuno, a unique trans-galactooligosaccharide, and the Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, The University of Reading, UK, today announce the results of human research demonstrating the positive effects of an advanced prebiotic on the immune system of the elderly. [More]
Europe has increasing prevalence of fungal resistance, warns ESCMID

Europe has increasing prevalence of fungal resistance, warns ESCMID

The European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Disease – an organization that explores the risks and best practices in infectious disease – is imploring global healthcare professionals and bodies to take a more active role in the growing problem of fungal resistance. [More]
Study findings could lead to new ways to tailor therapies for cancer

Study findings could lead to new ways to tailor therapies for cancer

By studying the yeast used in beer- and bread-making, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have uncovered the mechanism by which ancient proteins repair DNA damage and how their dysfunction could lead to the development of tumors. [More]
Study finds strong link between diabetes and TB in tropical Australia

Study finds strong link between diabetes and TB in tropical Australia

A 20-year study by James Cook University scientists has found a strong link between diabetes and tuberculosis in tropical Australia. [More]
UMass Amherst toxicologist hopes US regulatory agency may acknowledge hormesis hypothesis soon

UMass Amherst toxicologist hopes US regulatory agency may acknowledge hormesis hypothesis soon

When environmental toxicologist Edward Calabrese in the School of Public Health and Health Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst heard recently that the U.S. National Regulatory Commission has opened a new docket on proposed rule changes and standards for radiation protection, he felt it as "a vindication of my 30-year career, in many ways." [More]
Mix of bacteria living in guts may band together to ward off dangerous infections

Mix of bacteria living in guts may band together to ward off dangerous infections

Like a collection of ragtag villagers fighting off an invading army, the mix of bacteria that live in our guts may band together to keep dangerous infections from taking hold, new research suggests. [More]
New UTMB study reveals mechanism central to pollen-induced allergies

New UTMB study reveals mechanism central to pollen-induced allergies

A new study from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has uncovered a mechanism that is central to becoming allergic to ragweed pollen and developing allergic asthma or seasonal nasal allergies. The findings are currently available online in the American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology. [More]
Researchers develop diagnostic test to detect enterovirus D68

Researchers develop diagnostic test to detect enterovirus D68

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a diagnostic test to quickly detect enterovirus D68 (EV-D68), a respiratory virus that caused unusually severe illness in children last year. The outbreak caused infections at an unprecedented rate, with over 1,000 confirmed cases and 14 reported deaths nationwide, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
Infants born with mutation in PLVAP gene develop severe protein losing enteropathy

Infants born with mutation in PLVAP gene develop severe protein losing enteropathy

Newborn children born with a mutation in the Plasmalemma Vesicle Associated Protein (PLVAP) gene develop severe protein losing enteropathy, according to a case study1 published in Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the basic science journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]

Dairy products could make probiotics more effective

The success of probiotics for boosting human health may depend partly upon the food, beverage, or other material carrying the probiotics, according to research published on July 10th in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
Canadian researchers discover how HIV evades the body's antiviral responses

Canadian researchers discover how HIV evades the body's antiviral responses

A Canadian research team at the IRCM in Montreal, led by molecular virologist Eric A. Cohen, PhD, made a significant discovery on how HIV escapes the body's antiviral responses. The team uncovered how an HIV viral protein known as Vpu tricks the immune system by using its own regulatory process to evade the host's first line of defence. [More]
Various freshwater sources in Georgia pose possible risk for salmonella infections

Various freshwater sources in Georgia pose possible risk for salmonella infections

Researchers from the University of Georgia have determined that various freshwater sources in Georgia, such as rivers and lakes, could feature levels of salmonella that pose a risk to humans. [More]
New study reveals highly promising approach to coating tissue engineered constructs

New study reveals highly promising approach to coating tissue engineered constructs

A new study showing the ability to apply a thin coating of viable respiratory epithelial cells to tissue engineered constructs using a commercially available spray device is especially promising for therapeutic approaches in development to repair or replace challenging structures such as trachea or bronchi. [More]
Multidrug-resistant bacteria can naturally relinquish its ability to resist antibiotics

Multidrug-resistant bacteria can naturally relinquish its ability to resist antibiotics

Infections with one of the most troublesome and least understood antibiotic-resistant "superbugs" are increasing at alarming rates, particularly in health-care settings. [More]
Cysticercosis now fully controlled in Mexico

Cysticercosis now fully controlled in Mexico

Dr. Ana Flisser was recognized for 40 years of research regarding this disease. The parasite can not be eradicated; however, it is important to present simple preventive measures. [More]
Potential molecular link identified between excess fat in the blood and blood vessel recovery in ischemia

Potential molecular link identified between excess fat in the blood and blood vessel recovery in ischemia

The buildup of fat in the blood makes a bad situation worse - it not only raises a person's risk for heart attack or stroke but also impairs the growth of new blood vessels. How excess fat in the blood - a condition known as hyperlipidemia - blocks vessel growth was unclear, but new work by researchers at Temple University School of Medicine shows that a molecule known as caspase-1 plays a central role and that preventing its activity could be the key to building new blood vessels and restoring blood supply to oxygen-starved tissues. [More]
Starting anti-HIV treatment early improves survival among patients with newly diagnosed TB

Starting anti-HIV treatment early improves survival among patients with newly diagnosed TB

Starting anti-HIV treatment within two weeks of the diagnosis of tuberculosis, or TB, improved survival among patients with both infections who had very low immune-cell counts, according to an analysis by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Health. [More]
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