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MRSA correlated to eczema? An interview with Dr Bjorn Herpers

MRSA correlated to eczema? An interview with Dr Bjorn Herpers

There is a lot of evidence that Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is involved in eczema. Eczema is now thought to be caused by a barrier dysfunction of the skin that allows external triggers to cause an overshoot of inflammation. [More]
Investigational biomarker surpasses current gold standard test for identifying brain shunt infections

Investigational biomarker surpasses current gold standard test for identifying brain shunt infections

In a study of children with brain shunts at Children's of Alabama, a University of Alabama at Birmingham investigational biomarker outperformed the current "gold standard" test for detecting bacterial infections in the shunts. [More]
New study shows variation in junk DNA can affect health

New study shows variation in junk DNA can affect health

All humans are 99.9 percent identical, genetically speaking. But that tiny 0.1 percent variation has big consequences, influencing the color of your eyes, the span of your hips, your risk of getting sick and in some ways even your earning potential. [More]
New discovery could lead to effective treatment methods for cystitis

New discovery could lead to effective treatment methods for cystitis

Every year, millions of people are treated for cystitis, but despite its prevalence, the disease is still a scientific mystery. [More]
Researcher receives NIH grant to detect increasing Mtb activity in people with HIV

Researcher receives NIH grant to detect increasing Mtb activity in people with HIV

Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death worldwide among people infected with HIV. [More]
New research may explain why people with blood group O get more severely ill from cholera

New research may explain why people with blood group O get more severely ill from cholera

People with blood type O often get more severely ill from cholera than people of other blood types. New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis may explain why. [More]
The rise of disease ecology and its implications for parasitology

The rise of disease ecology and its implications for parasitology

The Journal of Parasitology – With a shared focus on host–pathogen relationships, parasitology and disease ecology seem to have a lot in common. But parasitology lacks the eye-catching—and wallet-opening—emphasis on known diseases. By working more closely with disease ecologists, could parasitologists gain more support for work crucial to predicting and controlling infectious diseases? [More]
Sanford-NDSU Collaborative Seed Grant Program provides funding for three health research projects

Sanford-NDSU Collaborative Seed Grant Program provides funding for three health research projects

Three research projects have received $250,000 in seed funding from the Sanford Health NDSU Collaborative Seed Grant program. NDSU researchers will have opportunities to collaborate with investigators from Sanford Research. [More]
Scientists grow noroviruses in laboratory cultures of human intestinal epithelial cells

Scientists grow noroviruses in laboratory cultures of human intestinal epithelial cells

Human noroviruses - the leading viral cause of acute diarrhea around the world - have been difficult to study because scientists had not found a way to grow them in the lab. [More]
Bacteria in smokeless tobacco products linked to opportunistic infections

Bacteria in smokeless tobacco products linked to opportunistic infections

Several species of bacteria found in smokeless tobacco products have been associated with opportunistic infections, according to a paper published August 26 in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
ESCMID releases new guidelines on best practices to detect C. difficile infections

ESCMID releases new guidelines on best practices to detect C. difficile infections

The European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases has just released new guidelines on best practice methods to diagnose Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). [More]
Researchers develop new method to culture norovirus in intestinal cells

Researchers develop new method to culture norovirus in intestinal cells

Researchers have succeeded in culturing norovirus in human intestinal cells, a breakthrough that could help scientists develop novel therapeutics and vaccines against the debilitating effects of the virus. [More]
Majority of cancers can be caused by infectious agents in sub-Saharan Africa, reveals study

Majority of cancers can be caused by infectious agents in sub-Saharan Africa, reveals study

In 1963, Irish surgeon Denis Parson Burkitt airmailed samples of an unusual jaw tumor found in Ugandan children to his colleague, Anthony Epstein, at Middlesex Hospital in London. [More]
New study may offer vital clues to understanding how Zika virus affects the developing brain

New study may offer vital clues to understanding how Zika virus affects the developing brain

In a very severe, genetic form of microcephaly, stem cells in the brain fail to divide, according to a new Columbia University Medical Center study that may provide important clues to understanding how the Zika virus affects the developing brain. [More]
Portable Lab-on-a-Stick test helps in rapid detection of bacterial resistance to antibiotics

Portable Lab-on-a-Stick test helps in rapid detection of bacterial resistance to antibiotics

A portable power-free test for the rapid detection of bacterial resistance to antibiotics has been developed by academics at Loughborough University and the University of Reading. [More]
U-M study casts doubt on possible link between obesity and imbalance of microbes

U-M study casts doubt on possible link between obesity and imbalance of microbes

For people with weight problems, news headlines in recent years may have brought relief, as researchers studying the microscopic creatures inside our bodies reported possible links between obesity and an out-of-whack balance of microbes. [More]
Cloned Zika virus could be used for development of attenuated vaccine

Cloned Zika virus could be used for development of attenuated vaccine

Stopping the explosive spread of Zika virus - which can lead to birth defects in babies born to infected mothers - depends on genetic insights gleaned through new tools and models. [More]
NYIT researcher aims to study link between wound healing problems and methamphetamine use

NYIT researcher aims to study link between wound healing problems and methamphetamine use

A chance observation in a Southern California fast food restaurant led Luis Martinez, Ph.D., to wonder about the connections behind wound healing problems and methamphetamine use. [More]
Researchers identify tantalizing target in fight against aggressive form of lung cancer

Researchers identify tantalizing target in fight against aggressive form of lung cancer

Researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have discovered a flaw in the armor of the most aggressive form of lung cancer, a weakness that doctors may be able to exploit to slow or even stop the disease. [More]
Research opens door to new class of treatments for gum disease

Research opens door to new class of treatments for gum disease

If you hate going to the dentist, here's some good news. New research published online in The FASEB Journal, shows that melanocortin agonism may effectively control the inflammation that often occurs in gum tissue, which when unchecked, ultimately accelerates tooth and bone loss. [More]
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