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Research breakthroughs may pave way for new drugs to fight against parasitic worm infections

Research breakthroughs may pave way for new drugs to fight against parasitic worm infections

Recent breakthroughs may pave the way for vaccines and new drugs for those infected by parasitic helminths. These flatworms, including tapeworms that cause hydatid diseases and neurocysticercosis, liver flukes, and blood flukes (schistosomes), infect more than 300 million people and cause approximately four million disability-adjusted life years lost due to chronic illness and death each year. [More]
New NIH award aims to help increase diversity in biomedicine

New NIH award aims to help increase diversity in biomedicine

The University of Alaska Fairbanks received a $23.8 million, five-year award from the National Institutes of Health to launch a new undergraduate program that will engage students from diverse backgrounds, especially those from rural Alaska, in biomedical research as a way to foster their interest and success in biomedical and health careers. [More]
New test could help physicians predict people who are at early stages of sepsis

New test could help physicians predict people who are at early stages of sepsis

A new test, developed by University of British Columbia researchers, could help physicians predict within an hour if a patient will develop severe sepsis so they can begin treatment immediately. [More]
Human trial of second investigational Ebola vaccine candidate under way

Human trial of second investigational Ebola vaccine candidate under way

Human testing of a second investigational Ebola vaccine candidate is under way at the National Institutes of Health's Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. [More]
Novel approach may help detect invasive aspergillosis

Novel approach may help detect invasive aspergillosis

Many different microbes can cause pneumonia, and treatment may be delayed or off target if doctors cannot tell which bug is the culprit. A novel approach—analyzing a patient's breath for key chemical compounds made by the infecting microbe—may help detect invasive aspergillosis, a fungal infection that is a leading cause of mortality in patients with compromised immune systems, according to a proof-of-concept study now online in Clinical Infectious Diseases. [More]
Lactobacillus-containing probiotics can improve lupus symptoms

Lactobacillus-containing probiotics can improve lupus symptoms

Lactobacillus species, commonly seen in yogurt cultures, correlate, in the guts of mouse models, with mitigation of lupus symptoms, while Lachnospiraceae, a type of Clostridia, correlate with worsening, according to research published ahead of print in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. [More]
Antibiotic-resistant bacteria share resources to cause chronic infections, show studies

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria share resources to cause chronic infections, show studies

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria can share resources to cause chronic infections, Vanderbilt University investigators have discovered. [More]
Ebola Virus and Public Health: A special feature by Disaster Medicine and Public Health

Ebola Virus and Public Health: A special feature by Disaster Medicine and Public Health

Accurate knowledge regarding Ebola is critical and pertinent for practicing physicians and clinicians given the current risk of hazardous global outbreak and epidemic. [More]
New oral biologic medication successfully treats precancerous intestinal inflammation

New oral biologic medication successfully treats precancerous intestinal inflammation

An oral biologic medication has successfully treated chronic, precancerous inflammation in the intestine, according to results of an animal study authored by an MD/PhD student in the University at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. [More]
Research initiative focuses on microbial characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus

Research initiative focuses on microbial characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus

Staphylococcus aureus (Sa) and methicillin-resistant staph aureus (MRSA) continue to be among the most common pathogens that overwhelm the immune system, causing serious skin, soft tissue and life-threatening blood-borne infections. [More]
Four UCLA researchers receive NIH Director's New Innovator Award

Four UCLA researchers receive NIH Director's New Innovator Award

Four scientists from the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have received a National Institutes of Health Director's New Innovator Award that will forward revolutionary stem cell and neuro-science in medicine. [More]
Vancomycin drug still effective in treating Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections

Vancomycin drug still effective in treating Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections

A University of Nebraska Medical Center research team has determined that a longtime antibiotic, vancomycin, is still effective in treating Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections and that physicians should continue to use the drug even though several newer antibiotics are now available in the marketplace. [More]
NanoBio to highlight prophylactic NE HSV-2 vaccine candidate at The Keystone Symposia Conference

NanoBio to highlight prophylactic NE HSV-2 vaccine candidate at The Keystone Symposia Conference

NanoBio Corporation today announced that the company will present data at The Keystone Symposia Conference, The Modes of Action of Vaccine Adjuvants, in Seattle on October 12, 2014. [More]
NIH announces high-risk, high-reward grants for UCSF researchers

NIH announces high-risk, high-reward grants for UCSF researchers

UC San Francisco researchers received five awards announced this week by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for high-risk, high-reward scientific research projects. Their work will focus on novel approaches for diagnosing and treating diseases ranging from autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases, to cancer, diabetes and neurological disorders. [More]
UCSF researchers receive five NIH awards for high-risk scientific research projects

UCSF researchers receive five NIH awards for high-risk scientific research projects

UC San Francisco researchers received five awards announced this week by the National Institutes of Health for high-risk, high-reward scientific research projects. Their work will focus on novel approaches for diagnosing and treating diseases ranging from autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases, to cancer, diabetes and neurological disorders. [More]
Probiotic yogurt protects children, pregnant women against heavy metal exposure

Probiotic yogurt protects children, pregnant women against heavy metal exposure

Yogurt containing probiotic bacteria successfully protected children and pregnant women against heavy metal exposure in a recent study. [More]
Penn Medicine to explore therapeutic strategies for HIV positive women at risk of cervical cancer

Penn Medicine to explore therapeutic strategies for HIV positive women at risk of cervical cancer

The introduction of antiretroviral drugs in Botswana over the last two decades has increased the life expectancies of people living with HIV—many of whom are women co-infected with the human papillomavirus virus (HPV)—considerably: from 39 years to the low 60s. As a result, this co-infected group of women is at a much higher risk of developing HPV-associated cervical cancer. [More]
Scientists shed new light on how LAMR1 and Gal-3 proteins can cause meningitis, septicaemia

Scientists shed new light on how LAMR1 and Gal-3 proteins can cause meningitis, septicaemia

Previously undiscovered secrets of how human cells interact with a bacterium which causes a serious human disease have been revealed in new research by microbiologists at The University of Nottingham. [More]
Luminex gets FDA approval to add three new targets to xTAG Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel

Luminex gets FDA approval to add three new targets to xTAG Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel

Luminex Corporation today announced it has received U.S. FDA clearance to add three new targets to its xTAG Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel (GPP). The targets include Adenovirus 40/41, Entamoeba histolytica and Vibrio cholerae. [More]
Research: Gut bacteria may cause animals to gain weight

Research: Gut bacteria may cause animals to gain weight

A species of gut bacteria called Clostridium ramosum, coupled with a high-fat diet, may cause animals to gain weight. The work is published this week in mBio-, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. [More]