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Novel chemical virus can cross double lipid layer surrounding cells to release drugs

Novel chemical virus can cross double lipid layer surrounding cells to release drugs

Viruses are able to redirect the functioning of cells in order to infect them. Inspired by their mode of action, scientists from the CNRS and Université de Strasbourg have designed a "chemical virus" that can cross the double lipid layer that surrounds cells, and then disintegrate in the intracellular medium in order to release active compounds. [More]
Researchers uncover important cellular functions that help regulate inflammation

Researchers uncover important cellular functions that help regulate inflammation

Researchers at the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute at Virginia Tech have uncovered key cellular functions that help regulate inflammation -- a discovery that could have important implications for the treatment of allergies, heart disease, and certain forms of cancer. [More]

Brainbow technique reveals surprising data about brain's visual circuitry

Neuroscientists know that some connections in the brain are pruned through neural development. Function gives rise to structure, according to the textbooks. But scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have discovered that the textbooks might be wrong. [More]
Health providers still prescribing expensive malaria drugs in Nigeria to patients who do not have malaria

Health providers still prescribing expensive malaria drugs in Nigeria to patients who do not have malaria

Health providers trained to perform malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) are still prescribing valuable malaria medicines to patients who do not have malaria, according to new research published in PLOS ONE. [More]
Cosmetic and cleaning products contain millions of plastic particles

Cosmetic and cleaning products contain millions of plastic particles

Everyday cosmetic and cleaning products contain huge quantities of plastic particles, which are released to the environment and could be harmful to marine life, according to a new study. [More]
Researchers report new optical method for quickly and accurately diagnosing breast cancer

Researchers report new optical method for quickly and accurately diagnosing breast cancer

A new optical method for more quickly and accurately determining whether breast tissue lesions are cancerous is described by University of Illinois researchers in the Journal of Biomedical Optics, published by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics. [More]
Long lasting flu vaccine using antibodies advance from TSRI and Janssen

Long lasting flu vaccine using antibodies advance from TSRI and Janssen

Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson (Janssen) have found a way to induce antibodies to fight a wide range of influenza subtypes—work that could one day eliminate the need for repeated seasonal flu shots. [More]
TSRI, Janssen collaborate to find universal flu vaccine

TSRI, Janssen collaborate to find universal flu vaccine

Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute and the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson have found a way to induce antibodies to fight a wide range of influenza subtypes—work that could one day eliminate the need for repeated seasonal flu shots. [More]
Tiny nanocrystals could be used in advanced medical imaging technologies to light up cancer cells

Tiny nanocrystals could be used in advanced medical imaging technologies to light up cancer cells

Researchers in China have developed tiny nanocrystals that could be used in the next generation of medical imaging technologies to light up cancer cells. [More]
Researchers capture images of immune cell interactions rallying to destroy herpes simplex virus

Researchers capture images of immune cell interactions rallying to destroy herpes simplex virus

Doctor Scott Mueller and colleagues from the University of Melbourne's Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the Doherty Institute used state-of-the-art microscopy to painstakingly capture images of the interactions of three crucial types of immune cells rallying to destroy herpes simplex virus. [More]

High pressure freezer with integrated light stimulation launched by Leica Microsystems

Leica Microsystems launches the Leica EM ICE, a new generation High-Pressure Freezer with fully integrated light stimulation option at the precision of a millisecond. [More]
Reducing amyloid fibril levels in semen may help reduce transmission of HIV

Reducing amyloid fibril levels in semen may help reduce transmission of HIV

There may be two new ways to fight AIDS -- using a heat shock protein or a small molecule - to attack fibrils in semen associated with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) during the initial phases of infection, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Determining the dynein-dynactin complex structure: an interview with Dr Gabriel C. Lander

Determining the dynein-dynactin complex structure: an interview with Dr Gabriel C. Lander

This is a macromolecular assembly is made up of two components, dynein and dynactin, that works to move molecular cargo (organelles, RNA, vesicles, proteins, viruses) along microtubule highways within our cells. [More]
USC kidney researcher named recipient of ASN-AHA Young Investigator Award

USC kidney researcher named recipient of ASN-AHA Young Investigator Award

Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California kidney researcher Janos Peti-Peterdi is the 2015 recipient of the ASN-AHA Young Investigator Award. [More]
Researchers describe new Lab-on-a-Disc device for fast and reliable diagnostics of urinary tract infections

Researchers describe new Lab-on-a-Disc device for fast and reliable diagnostics of urinary tract infections

Urinary tract infections can quickly move from being a merely miserable experience to a life-threatening condition. Untreated cases may trigger sepsis, which occurs when the immune system, in an attempt to fight off the infection, inadvertently activates body-wide inflammation that can cause blood clots and leaky blood vessels. [More]
Next generation quantitative live-cell microscope released by Bruker

Next generation quantitative live-cell microscope released by Bruker

Bruker today announced the release of the Opterra II™ Multipoint Scanning Confocal Microscope, which represents the next generation of quantitative live-cell microscopes. [More]

EPFL scientists reveal that the brain is not as compact as we thought

Using an innovative method, EPFL scientists show that the brain is not as compact as we have thought all along. To study the fine structure of the brain, including its connections between neurons, the synapses, scientists must use electron microscopes. However, the tissue must first be fixed to prepare it for this high magnification imaging method. [More]
Researchers create new cell screening method for immunotherapy cancer treatments

Researchers create new cell screening method for immunotherapy cancer treatments

Researchers have created a new method for screening cells used in immunotherapy cancer treatments, allowing high-performing immune system cells to be studied in isolation and potentially expanding the number of patients for whom the breakthrough treatment proves successful. [More]
Pitt researchers figure out how to quantify beating action of cilia

Pitt researchers figure out how to quantify beating action of cilia

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have figured out how to objectively quantify the beating action of cilia, the tiny, hair-like projections on cells that line nasal passages, the lungs and almost every other body tissue, according to a study published online today in Science Translational Medicine. [More]
Sleeping in lateral position may effectively remove brain waste, say Stony Brook researchers

Sleeping in lateral position may effectively remove brain waste, say Stony Brook researchers

Sleeping in the lateral, or side position, as compared to sleeping on one's back or stomach, may more effectively remove brain waste and prove to be an important practice to help reduce the chances of developing Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other neurological diseases, according to researchers at Stony Brook University. [More]
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