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New technique can help identify aggressive forms of DCIS

New technique can help identify aggressive forms of DCIS

When a woman is diagnosed with the earliest stage of breast cancer, how aggressive should her treatment be? Will the non-invasive cancer become invasive? Or is it a slow-growing variety that will likely never be harmful? [More]
Novel therapeutic approach may be effective for disrupting bacterial biofilms

Novel therapeutic approach may be effective for disrupting bacterial biofilms

Biofilms are communities of bacteria that adhere to a surface and are nearly impossible to eradicate when they are pathogenic, or disease-causing. [More]
Scientists gain new insights into how cancer cells may squeeze through narrow blood vessels

Scientists gain new insights into how cancer cells may squeeze through narrow blood vessels

The spread of cancer from a tumor's original location to other parts of the body can play a major role in whether the disease turns deadly. Many steps in this process, called metastasis, remain murky. [More]
New research identifies flaws in LM-method for Lyme disease

New research identifies flaws in LM-method for Lyme disease

A new microscopy technique (LM-method) developed to detect Lyme disease is unable to distinguish infected patients from healthy controls, yielding false-positive results that could lead doctors to over-diagnose a patient, according to new research published in the journal Infectious Diseases. [More]
Prior Scientific details extensive range of products for neuroscience, electrophysiological applications in new brochure

Prior Scientific details extensive range of products for neuroscience, electrophysiological applications in new brochure

Prior Scientific, a leader in advanced high precision microscopy products, details its extensive range of automated systems, motorised stages and accessories for neuroscience and electrophysiological applications in a new brochure. [More]
Therapeutic stem cells exit bloodstream in different way than previously thought

Therapeutic stem cells exit bloodstream in different way than previously thought

Researchers at North Carolina State University have discovered that therapeutic stem cells exit the bloodstream in a different manner than was previously thought. This process, dubbed angiopellosis by the researchers, has implications for improving our understanding of not only intravenous stem cell therapies, but also metastatic cancers. [More]
Researchers develop new technology to capture images of the brain

Researchers develop new technology to capture images of the brain

In a partnership melding neuroscience and electrical engineering, researchers from UNC-Chapel Hill and NC State University have developed a new technology that will allow neuroscientists to capture images of the brain almost 10 times larger than previously possible - helping them better understand the behavior of neurons in the brain. [More]
New research shows Fukushima radioactive fallout on Tokyo enclosed in glassy microparticles

New research shows Fukushima radioactive fallout on Tokyo enclosed in glassy microparticles

New research shows that most of the radioactive fallout which landed on downtown Tokyo a few days after the Fukushima accident was concentrated and deposited in non-soluble glass microparticles, as a type of 'glassy soot'. [More]
Major review highlights lack of genetic understanding of Zika virus

Major review highlights lack of genetic understanding of Zika virus

A major review of the Zika virus has concluded that further research to understand the nature of the virus is critical to developing antiviral treatments and vaccines.The paper, published in the journal Veterinary Quarterly, considers the breadth of current research and highlights a lack of understanding of the nature of the virus. [More]
New CAR-based therapy using combined cancer target could be effective for solid tumors

New CAR-based therapy using combined cancer target could be effective for solid tumors

Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), engineered from a patient's own immune cells, have been successful for treating blood cancers, but using CARs for solid tumors has been limited by side effects to normal tissues containing the protein targeted by the engineered cells. [More]
Salk Institute researchers use super-resolution microscope to image vital receptors in lymph nodes

Salk Institute researchers use super-resolution microscope to image vital receptors in lymph nodes

When the body is fighting an invading pathogen, white blood cells--including T cells--must respond. Now, Salk Institute researchers have imaged how vital receptors on the surface of T cells bundle together when activated. [More]
Using spectral imaging to study brain tumors in 3D: an interview Dr Cyril Petibois

Using spectral imaging to study brain tumors in 3D: an interview Dr Cyril Petibois

I’m a biophysicist at the University of Bordeaux and I mainly work on bio-imaging methods in the cancer laboratory research facility, mostly for brain cancers. [More]
Controlling corneal blindness by 2030: an interview with Dr Pravin Vaddavalli

Controlling corneal blindness by 2030: an interview with Dr Pravin Vaddavalli

Corneal blindness is estimated to be the second most prevalent cause of blindness in many less developed countries. Globally, bilateral corneal blindness is estimated to afflict 4.9 million persons and accounts for 12% of 39 million blind, utilizing WHO 2010 global blindness data. [More]
New qPAINT technology helps develop more precise, less expensive microscopes

New qPAINT technology helps develop more precise, less expensive microscopes

Knowing the exact number of molecules located at specific junctures in cells can be a critical measure of health as well as disease. For example, abnormally high numbers of growth factor receptors on cells can be an indication of cancerous and precancerous states; specific proteins located at the junction where neurons connect in the brain may affect brain function as they accumulate or disperse. [More]
Study captures interactions of HIV-infected immune cells in living animal

Study captures interactions of HIV-infected immune cells in living animal

By watching brightly glowing HIV-infected immune cells move within mice, researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have shown how infected immune cells latch onto an uninfected sister cell to directly transmit newly minted viral particles. [More]
Tackling healthcare challenges in a changing world: an interview with Professor Jeremy Nicholson

Tackling healthcare challenges in a changing world: an interview with Professor Jeremy Nicholson

As individuals and as populations our risks of getting diseases are determined partly genetically and partly from the environment that we live in. An important part of that environment that mediates between the outside world and the inside world of our bodies is the microbiome. [More]
New drug-capture device can soak up chemotherapy drugs to limit toxicity

New drug-capture device can soak up chemotherapy drugs to limit toxicity

Doctors have a powerful arsenal of cancer-fighting chemotherapy drugs to choose from, though a key challenge is to better target these drugs to kill tumors while limiting their potentially harmful side effects. [More]
Researchers detect vascular matrix stiffening during early stages of pulmonary hypertension

Researchers detect vascular matrix stiffening during early stages of pulmonary hypertension

Pulmonary hypertension is an abnormal elevation of pressure in the pulmonary circulation that results in stress on the heart and remodeling of blood vessels in the lung. [More]
RSI-MRI imaging technology can effectively differentiate aggressive prostate cancer

RSI-MRI imaging technology can effectively differentiate aggressive prostate cancer

Physicians have long used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect cancer but results of a University of California San Diego School of Medicine study describe the potential use of restriction spectrum imaging (RSI) as an imaging biomarker that enhances the ability of MRI to differentiate aggressive prostate cancer from low-grade or benign tumors and guide treatment and biopsy. [More]
Using proteomic mass spectrometry imaging to detect malignant melanoma: an interview with Stephen Turner

Using proteomic mass spectrometry imaging to detect malignant melanoma: an interview with Stephen Turner

Today, using anatomic pathology, the differences in appearance of a normal or a malignant lesion can be difficult to tell when just using light microscopy. [More]
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