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New method could help doctors better understand how drug abuse affects the brain

New method could help doctors better understand how drug abuse affects the brain

A new method for measuring and imaging how quickly blood flows in the brain could help doctors and researchers better understand how drug abuse affects the brain, which may aid in improving brain-cancer surgery and tissue engineering, and lead to better treatment options for recovering drug addicts. [More]
Pixcelldata, eX-Path announce major new deal in advance of ECP 2014

Pixcelldata, eX-Path announce major new deal in advance of ECP 2014

Pixcelldata, the innovative Irish developer of digital pathology management and collaboration software has announced a major new deal with Dutch based eX-Path, global providers of tele-pathology services, founded by renowned pathology expert, Dr. Marius Nap. [More]
Novel "man and machine" decision support system for diagnosing malaria infection

Novel "man and machine" decision support system for diagnosing malaria infection

A Finnish-Swedish research group at the Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, and Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, has developed a novel "man and machine" decision support system for diagnosing malaria infection. [More]
Live cell imaging solution launched by QImaging

Live cell imaging solution launched by QImaging

QImaging™ today launched a new, all-in-one camera package that supports demanding live cell fluorescence imaging requirements. The Live Cell Imaging Package provides researchers with the sensitivity of EMCCD and the versatility of sCMOS camera technologies by combining QImaging’s Rolera™ Thunder EMCCD and optiMOS™ sCMOScameras. Now, researchers can address their unique imaging needs for a broader, more diverse set of scientific applications. [More]
Study: Brain tumors hijack the brain's existing blood supply during progression

Study: Brain tumors hijack the brain's existing blood supply during progression

Dangerous brain tumors hijack the brain's existing blood supply throughout their progression, by growing only within narrow potential spaces between and along the brain's thousands of small blood vessels, new research shows for the first time. [More]
CAP awards accreditation to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Pathology & Laboratory Medicine

CAP awards accreditation to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Pathology & Laboratory Medicine

The Accreditation Committee of the College of American Pathologists (CAP) has awarded accreditation to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania based on results of a recent on-site inspection as part of the CAP's Accreditation Programs. [More]
Bee, snake, scorpion venom could form basis of new generation of cancer-fighting drugs

Bee, snake, scorpion venom could form basis of new generation of cancer-fighting drugs

Bee, snake or scorpion venom could form the basis of a new generation of cancer-fighting drugs, scientists will report here today. [More]
Hand-held photoacoustic microscopy may change the way doctors treat, diagnose melanoma

Hand-held photoacoustic microscopy may change the way doctors treat, diagnose melanoma

A new hand-held device that uses lasers and sound waves may change the way doctors treat and diagnose melanoma, according to a team of researchers from Washington University in St. Louis. [More]
7.0T NMR spectroscopy detects lesions in hippocampal neurons of Alzheimer's disease

7.0T NMR spectroscopy detects lesions in hippocampal neurons of Alzheimer's disease

Magnetic resonance spectroscopy can quantitatively analyze in vivo abnormalities of biochemical metabolism within brain tissue in a noninvasive and non-radioactive manner. [More]
Kids are at risk of biological damage results from microwave radiation emitted by wireless devices

Kids are at risk of biological damage results from microwave radiation emitted by wireless devices

A scholarly article on wireless safety, published online in the Journal of Microscopy and Ultrastructure, reports that children and fetuses are the most at risk from neurological and biological damage that results from microwave radiation emitted by wireless devices, due to the higher rate of absorption of microwave radiation by children than by adults. [More]
New techniques offer insight into cell-by-cell makeup of organisms

New techniques offer insight into cell-by-cell makeup of organisms

In general, our knowledge of biology-and much of science in general-is limited by our ability to actually see things. Researchers who study developmental problems and disease, in particular, are often limited by their inability to look inside an organism to figure out exactly what went wrong and when. [More]
Laboratories at TSRI investigate antibodies to fight Ebola virus

Laboratories at TSRI investigate antibodies to fight Ebola virus

Laboratories at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) are investigating antibodies to fight Ebola virus, including the three antibodies recently used to treat two American health care workers infected with the Ebola virus. [More]
Researchers at NIH-FEI Living Lab for Structural Biology achieve breakthrough biological results using FEI’s Titan Krios™ transmission electron microscope

Researchers at NIH-FEI Living Lab for Structural Biology achieve breakthrough biological results using FEI’s Titan Krios™ transmission electron microscope

FEI is pleased to announce that researchers at the NIH-FEI Living Lab for Structural Biology have achieved breakthrough biological results, using FEI’s Titan Krios™ transmission electron microscope (TEM), to elucidate the structural mechanism by which glutamate receptors participate in the transmission of signals between neurons in the brain. Their work is described in Nature, “Structural Mechanism of Glutamate Receptor Activation and Desensitization,” by Meyerson, et al., (DOI: 10.1038/nature13603), http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nature13603.html . [More]
Study reveals intricate mechanisms involved in enzyme that governs DNA duplication

Study reveals intricate mechanisms involved in enzyme that governs DNA duplication

In a study published today in Genes & Development, Dr Christian Speck from the MRC Clinical Sciences Centre's DNA Replication group, in collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), New York, reveal the intricate mechanisms involved in the enzyme that governs DNA duplication during cell division. [More]
Medical education in sub-Saharan Africa is being revitalized through U.S. funded effort

Medical education in sub-Saharan Africa is being revitalized through U.S. funded effort

Medical education in sub-Saharan Africa is being revitalized and expanded through a U.S.-funded effort that is dramatically increasing enrollment, broadening curricula, upgrading Internet access and providing cutting-edge skills labs and other technologies. [More]
Identification of new molecular mechanism indicates new ways to block uncontrolled cell division

Identification of new molecular mechanism indicates new ways to block uncontrolled cell division

In a study published today in Genes & Development, Dr Christian Speck from the MRC Clinical Sciences Centre's DNA Replication group, in collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), New York, reveal the intricate mechanisms involved in the enzyme that governs DNA duplication during cell division. [More]
Marine pest may pave way for novel anti-fouling coatings for maritime industry, biomedicine

Marine pest may pave way for novel anti-fouling coatings for maritime industry, biomedicine

A team of biologists, led by Clemson University associate professor Andrew S. Mount, performed cutting-edge research on a marine pest that will pave the way for novel anti-fouling paint for ships and boats and also improve bio-adhesives for medical and industrial applications. [More]
U.S.-funded effort revitalizes, expands medical education in sub-Saharan Africa

U.S.-funded effort revitalizes, expands medical education in sub-Saharan Africa

Medical education in sub-Saharan Africa is being revitalized and expanded through a U.S.-funded effort that is dramatically increasing enrollment, broadening curricula, upgrading Internet access and providing cutting-edge skills labs and other technologies. [More]
Robert E. Marc named recipient of 2014 Paul Kayser International Award in Retina Research

Robert E. Marc named recipient of 2014 Paul Kayser International Award in Retina Research

Robert E. Marc, Ph.D., director of research at the University of Utah's John A. Moran Eye Center, has been named by the International Society of Eye Research as the recipient of the Houston, Texas-based Retina Research Foundation's 2014 Paul Kayser International Award in Retina Research. [More]
Study finds microglia increase neuronal firing and enhance brain cell survival after injury

Study finds microglia increase neuronal firing and enhance brain cell survival after injury

A type of immune cell widely believed to exacerbate chronic adult brain diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis (MS), can actually protect the brain from traumatic brain injury (TBI) and may slow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, according to Cleveland Clinic research published today in the online journal Nature Communications. [More]