Molecular Biology News and Research RSS Feed - Molecular Biology News and Research

Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. The field overlaps with other areas of biology and chemistry, particularly genetics and biochemistry. Molecular biology chiefly concerns itself with understanding the interactions between the various systems of a cell, including the interactions between DNA, RNA and protein biosynthesis as well as learning how these interactions are regulated.
New discovery could lead to effective treatment methods for cystitis

New discovery could lead to effective treatment methods for cystitis

Every year, millions of people are treated for cystitis, but despite its prevalence, the disease is still a scientific mystery. [More]
European scientists invent new microscope for rapid detection of deadly infections

European scientists invent new microscope for rapid detection of deadly infections

A group of European scientists have invented a microscope that will allow the fastest ever detection of life-threatening infections caused by bacteria, such as E. coli or Staphylococcus, and conditions such as Meningitis, saving millions of lives every year. [More]
New ATA recommendations offer guidance for managing all forms of thyrotoxicosis

New ATA recommendations offer guidance for managing all forms of thyrotoxicosis

New evidence-based recommendations from the American Thyroid Association provide guidance to clinicians in the management of patients with all forms of thyrotoxicosis (excessively high thyroid hormone activity), including hyperthyroidism. [More]
MGH investigators discover key molecules essential for sensing proteasome dysfunction

MGH investigators discover key molecules essential for sensing proteasome dysfunction

Maintaining appropriate levels of proteins within cells largely relies on a cellular component called the proteasome, which degrades unneeded or defective proteins to recycle the components for the eventual assembly of new proteins. [More]
NIH researchers design new set of assays for initial screening of patients with Fragile X syndrome

NIH researchers design new set of assays for initial screening of patients with Fragile X syndrome

Fragile X syndrome, the most common heritable cause of intellectual disability and a frequent cause of autism, is characterized by abnormalities of the FMR1 gene that are difficult to analyze. [More]
Cutting off fuel to cancer cells may be potential therapeutic strategy for Kras-driven lung cancers

Cutting off fuel to cancer cells may be potential therapeutic strategy for Kras-driven lung cancers

Research from investigators at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Princeton University has identified a new approach to cancer therapy in cutting off a cancer cell's 'fuel supply' by targeting a cellular survival mechanism known as autophagy. [More]
Scientist receives $1.7 million grant to study how early life toxic exposures predispose to diabetes

Scientist receives $1.7 million grant to study how early life toxic exposures predispose to diabetes

Some studies indicate that early life exposure to pollutants such as PCBs and phthalates can predispose people to disease. Now environmental scientist Alicia Timme-Laragy at the University of Massachusetts Amherst has received a five-year, $1.7 million grant from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences for a multi-level study of early life exposure to environmental contaminants and aberrant pancreas development, which may predispose one to diabetes. [More]
Wiley's Zika page offers free access to published content to coincide with events in Brazil

Wiley's Zika page offers free access to published content to coincide with events in Brazil

Wiley has made available all of its published Zika content on one site http://www.wiley.com/go/zika to coincide with events in Brazil, a territory that has seen increased cases of Zika Virus recently. [More]
Study uses computer-based approaches to characterize Zika virus genome

Study uses computer-based approaches to characterize Zika virus genome

The sudden emergence of the Zika virus epidemic in Latin America in 2015-16 has caught the scientific world unawares. [More]
New tool helps researchers make connections between proteins, genes, drugs and diseases

New tool helps researchers make connections between proteins, genes, drugs and diseases

Every day, more than 3,000 new abstracts are uploaded to PubMed, the main biomedical literature reference database. Even in a researcher's narrowly-defined field, it is impossible to stay on top of the ever-evolving webs of interconnections between these papers. [More]
Scientists engineer therapeutic system with two arms to get better hold on cancer target

Scientists engineer therapeutic system with two arms to get better hold on cancer target

Scientists have engineered a sort of biological barbell that can get inside cancer cells and do damage to two proteins that work independently and together to enable cancer's survival and spread. [More]
UCI molecular biologists find new way to combat skin cancer

UCI molecular biologists find new way to combat skin cancer

Using new and innovative immune-therapeutic approaches to silence "don't eat me" signaling proteins recognized by specialized cells of the immune system, University of California, Irvine molecular biologists and their colleagues have identified an effective way to combat metastatic melanoma. [More]
Abingdon Health appoints JoyingBio as distributor of PCRD lateral flow immunoassays in China

Abingdon Health appoints JoyingBio as distributor of PCRD lateral flow immunoassays in China

Abingdon Health Ltd is pleased to announce the appointment of JoyingBio as distributor in China for PCRD nucleic acid lateral flow immunoassays (NALFIA). [More]
Study clarifies role of KLF12 in CRC tumor growth

Study clarifies role of KLF12 in CRC tumor growth

Results of preclinical studies by MUSC investigators reported in the July 2016 issue of PLOS One, demonstrate for the first time that the transcription factor KLF12 promotes CRC cell growth, in part, by activating EGR1. Furthermore, data demonstrate that KLF12 and EGR1 levels synergistically correlate with poor CRC prognoses. [More]
Scientists develop photosensitive mimics of class of signaling molecules

Scientists develop photosensitive mimics of class of signaling molecules

Teams at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich and EMBL have created photosensitive mimics of a class of signaling molecules, thus enabling their actions to be regulated by light, and affording new insights into the communications networks that control cellular metabolism. [More]
CD4/CD8 ratio biomarker could help identify HIV-infected individuals at risk for heart disease

CD4/CD8 ratio biomarker could help identify HIV-infected individuals at risk for heart disease

The ratio of CD4 to CD8 T cells in the blood-a marker of immune system health and associated with mortality risk in the general population-is an independent predictor of coronary heart disease in HIV-infected patients, according to a new study published in AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
New book details role of astrocytes in epileptic brain tissue

New book details role of astrocytes in epileptic brain tissue

Present throughout human history, epilepsy is a devastating group of neurological disorders characterized by periodic and unpredictable seizure activity in the brain. [More]
Novel community-produced biological network models hold potential in drug discovery and toxicology

Novel community-produced biological network models hold potential in drug discovery and toxicology

A new set of community-produced biological network models has been shown to allow a deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying a range of diseases. [More]
Scientists unveil structure of Zika NS1 protein

Scientists unveil structure of Zika NS1 protein

Researchers have revealed the molecular structure of a protein produced by the Zika virus that is thought to be involved in the virus's reproduction and its interaction with a host's immune system. [More]
Texas Biomed scientists receive $23 million NIH grant to develop AIDS vaccine

Texas Biomed scientists receive $23 million NIH grant to develop AIDS vaccine

To support a coordinated, innovative approach to the development of an AIDS vaccine, Texas Biomedical Research Institute scientists, together with a multi-institutional coalition of experts from the United States and Europe, have received a grant for $23 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
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