Molecular Biology News and Research RSS Feed - Molecular Biology News and Research

Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. The field overlaps with other areas of biology and chemistry, particularly genetics and biochemistry. Molecular biology chiefly concerns itself with understanding the interactions between the various systems of a cell, including the interactions between DNA, RNA and protein biosynthesis as well as learning how these interactions are regulated.
Existing cancer drugs may be able to help people with enlarged heart cells

Existing cancer drugs may be able to help people with enlarged heart cells

UT Southwestern Medical Center cardiology researchers have identified molecular ties between the growth of cancer cells and heart cells that suggest existing cancer drugs may be able to help those with enlarged heart cells -- a condition that can lead to heart attacks and stroke. [More]
MicroRNAs circulating in blood could lead to first diagnostic test for asthma

MicroRNAs circulating in blood could lead to first diagnostic test for asthma

People with asthma have telltale molecules circulating in their blood, say researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. The discovery could lead to the first diagnostic blood test for asthma, as well as more targeted treatments for the condition. [More]
FOXO proteins affect dozens of genes common to worms, flies, mice and humans

FOXO proteins affect dozens of genes common to worms, flies, mice and humans

Whether a creature is a worm, a fly, a mouse, or a human, death inevitably awaits. And not only do these organisms share a common fate, but also, according to a new study, they may share some of the specific mechanisms of mortality. The researchers found that in all four species, there are 46 genes regulated by the same family of "FOXO" proteins known to be central in aging and longevity. [More]
Improving body clock could protect against metabolic syndrome

Improving body clock could protect against metabolic syndrome

Essential biological processes are managed by an internal timer or body clock. When the body clock gets out of whack, conditions such as metabolic syndrome can occur. [More]
Bacteroidia pilins prevalent in human gut and mouth form new type of pili to cling to hosts

Bacteroidia pilins prevalent in human gut and mouth form new type of pili to cling to hosts

Many bacteria interact with their environment through hair-like structures known as pili, which attach to and help mediate infection of host organisms, among other things. Now a U.S.-Japanese research team, including scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, has discovered that certain bacteria prevalent in the human gut and mouth assemble their pili in a previously unknown way - information that could potentially open up new ways of fighting infection. [More]
Abnormally active Rab5 protein leads to early development of neurodegenerative disease

Abnormally active Rab5 protein leads to early development of neurodegenerative disease

Writing in the April 11 issue of The Journal of Clinical Investigation, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine say abnormalities in a protein that helps transport and sort materials inside cells are linked to axonal dysfunction and degeneration of neurons in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Down syndrome (DS). [More]
New GHz-class NMR magnet and probe technologies introduced by Bruker at ENC 2016

New GHz-class NMR magnet and probe technologies introduced by Bruker at ENC 2016

At the 57th Experimental Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Conference (www.enc-conference.org), Bruker announced new GHz-class NMR magnet and probe technologies to enable expanding frontiers in structural biology, membrane protein and intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) research. [More]
Study reveals new activation mechanism for protein kinases

Study reveals new activation mechanism for protein kinases

Protein kinases, most scientists would agree, regulate nearly every aspect of cell life. It is no surprise, then, that having faulty protein kinases may lead to a number of human conditions, including cardiovascular diseases, cancer and diabetes. [More]
AstraZeneca, MedImmune to present new clinical trial and scientific data on lung cancer treatments at ELCC 2016

AstraZeneca, MedImmune to present new clinical trial and scientific data on lung cancer treatments at ELCC 2016

AstraZeneca and its global biologics research and development arm, MedImmune, will report new clinical trial and scientific data from their industry-leading lung cancer franchise of marketed and pipeline medicines at the European Lung Cancer Conference in Geneva, Switzerland, 13 -16 April 2016. [More]
Study finds evidence of lung function abnormalities in light-use hookah smokers

Study finds evidence of lung function abnormalities in light-use hookah smokers

A study of light-use hookah or waterpipe smokers found evidence of lung function abnormalities, including marked changes in cells lining the airways. The study, "Pulmonary Abnormalities in Young, Light-use Waterpipe (Hookah) Smokers," was published recently in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
Immune-boosting formulation in Chinese herbal remedies comes from bacteria growing on Angelica roots

Immune-boosting formulation in Chinese herbal remedies comes from bacteria growing on Angelica roots

Juzen-taiho-to, also known as shi quan da bu tang, is one of the most popular herbal formulas in China and Japan and is used in the West by practitioners of traditional Asian medicine. New research suggests the remedy's immune-boosting effects are due, at least in part, to bacteria that grow on the roots of one of the formula's component herbs. [More]
Blocking blood supply of small cell lung cancer tumors may help delay cancer relapse

Blocking blood supply of small cell lung cancer tumors may help delay cancer relapse

A study by researchers at Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine has found that blocking the blood supply of small cell lung cancer tumors may help reduce their growth and delay the regrowth process after treatment. Small cell lung cancer is considered the most lethal of all lung cancers. [More]

Cambridge Pharmaceutical Cryo-EM Consortium formed by FEI, five pharmaceutical companies, the Medical Research Council and the University of Cambridge

FEI (NASDAQ: FEIC) has partnered with five pharmaceutical companies: Astex Pharmaceuticals, AstraZeneca, GlaxoSmithKline, Heptares Therapeutics, and UCB; the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology (MRC-LMB); and the University of Cambridge’s Nanoscience Centre, to form the “Cambridge Pharmaceutical Cryo-EM Consortium,” which is the first of its kind worldwide. [More]
UT Southwestern scientists discover mutation that causes X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder

UT Southwestern scientists discover mutation that causes X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have discovered a mutation that causes a rare systemic disorder known as X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder (XLPDR) and, significantly, the unexpected cellular mechanism by which the mutation causes the disease. [More]
SLU scientist describes several tactics that can help cells overcome lesions

SLU scientist describes several tactics that can help cells overcome lesions

In a recent review paper published in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, SLU scientist Alessandro Vindigni, Ph.D., describes the strategies cells use when their DNA faces replication stress, challenges that may derail a cell's ability to reproduce. [More]
Structure of fibril protein could lead to specific targets for diagnosis, treatment of Parkinson's disease

Structure of fibril protein could lead to specific targets for diagnosis, treatment of Parkinson's disease

Chemists have identified the complex chemical structure of the protein that stacks together to form fibrils in the brains of Parkinson's disease patients. Armed with this knowledge, researchers can identify specific targets for diagnosis and treatment. [More]
Research shows tumor suppressor protein regulates polarity genes

Research shows tumor suppressor protein regulates polarity genes

What does Brad Pitt have in common with a fruit fly? His Hollywood hairstyles cover a prominent cowlick - the swirl of hair that that is caused by a patterning mechanism also active in our two-winged friends -- that similarly feature "polarized" hair patterns. [More]
Extracellular vesicle isolation and characterization: an interview with Dr Carley Ross

Extracellular vesicle isolation and characterization: an interview with Dr Carley Ross

Extracellular vesicles are membrane surrounded structures released by cells in an evolutionally conserved manner. There are three main types of EVs, Exosomes (50-100 nm), Microparticles (200 nm-1 um) and Apoptotic bodies. [More]
Study provides better picture of molecular basis for antibiotic resistance

Study provides better picture of molecular basis for antibiotic resistance

Scientists from the University of Leeds have solved a 25-year-old question about how a family of proteins allow bacteria to resist the effects of certain antibiotics. [More]
Shigella dysenteriae pathogen probably originated in Europe, genetic study reveals

Shigella dysenteriae pathogen probably originated in Europe, genetic study reveals

The largest genetic study on the bacterium responsible for epidemic dysentery has revealed that the Shigella dysenteriae pathogen, which remains a real scourge in Africa and Asia, probably originated in Europe. [More]
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