Molecular Biology News and Research RSS Feed - Molecular Biology News and Research

Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. The field overlaps with other areas of biology and chemistry, particularly genetics and biochemistry. Molecular biology chiefly concerns itself with understanding the interactions between the various systems of a cell, including the interactions between DNA, RNA and protein biosynthesis as well as learning how these interactions are regulated.
Researchers at NIH-FEI Living Lab for Structural Biology achieve breakthrough biological results using FEI’s Titan Krios™ transmission electron microscope

Researchers at NIH-FEI Living Lab for Structural Biology achieve breakthrough biological results using FEI’s Titan Krios™ transmission electron microscope

FEI is pleased to announce that researchers at the NIH-FEI Living Lab for Structural Biology have achieved breakthrough biological results, using FEI’s Titan Krios™ transmission electron microscope (TEM), to elucidate the structural mechanism by which glutamate receptors participate in the transmission of signals between neurons in the brain. Their work is described in Nature, “Structural Mechanism of Glutamate Receptor Activation and Desensitization,” by Meyerson, et al., (DOI: 10.1038/nature13603), http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nature13603.html . [More]
Study: Spicy capsaicin can reduce risk of colorectal tumors

Study: Spicy capsaicin can reduce risk of colorectal tumors

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that dietary capsaicin - the active ingredient in chili peppers - produces chronic activation of a receptor on cells lining the intestines of mice, triggering a reaction that ultimately reduces the risk of colorectal tumors. [More]
Researchers describe how PAI-1 protein behaves in its short life

Researchers describe how PAI-1 protein behaves in its short life

The human body contains a unique protein that has the unusual property of destroying itself after a few hours of existence - it must therefore be continually recreated and is no stable protein. [More]
Modulation of B cells may effectively treat symptoms of type 2 diabetes and periodontitis

Modulation of B cells may effectively treat symptoms of type 2 diabetes and periodontitis

Going to the dentist isn't fun for anyone, but for those with periodontal disease related to type 2 diabetes, a new research discovery may have them smiling. [More]
Rice, Baylor scientists analyze how influenza-related proteins help infect cells

Rice, Baylor scientists analyze how influenza-related proteins help infect cells

A flu virus acts like a Trojan horse as it attacks and infects host cells. Scientists at Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine have acquired a clearer view of the well-hidden mechanism involved. [More]
Researchers discover new function of body's most important tumor-suppressing protein

Researchers discover new function of body's most important tumor-suppressing protein

Researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have discovered a new function of the body's most important tumor-suppressing protein. Called p53, this protein has been called "the guardian of the genome." [More]
Researchers receive inaugural funding from AHA to prevent heart disease and stroke

Researchers receive inaugural funding from AHA to prevent heart disease and stroke

Researchers and clinicians at UT Southwestern Medical Center are among a small, select group at U.S. universities to receive inaugural funding from the American Heart Association (AHA) for work that takes aim at heart disease and stroke. [More]
Tackling hepatitis C: an interview with Gaston Picchio, Global Hepatitis Disease Area Leader at Janssen

Tackling hepatitis C: an interview with Gaston Picchio, Global Hepatitis Disease Area Leader at Janssen

Gaston Picchio outlines the major findings of the recent report published by The Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU): ‘Tackling hepatitis C: Moving towards an integrated policy approach’ [More]
New research reveals how expectations about odors can influence symptoms of asthma

New research reveals how expectations about odors can influence symptoms of asthma

New research from the Monell Center reveals that simply believing that an odor is potentially harmful can increase airway inflammation in asthmatics for at least 24 hours following exposure. The findings highlight the role that expectations can play in health-related outcomes. [More]
Study finds microglia increase neuronal firing and enhance brain cell survival after injury

Study finds microglia increase neuronal firing and enhance brain cell survival after injury

A type of immune cell widely believed to exacerbate chronic adult brain diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis (MS), can actually protect the brain from traumatic brain injury (TBI) and may slow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, according to Cleveland Clinic research published today in the online journal Nature Communications. [More]
Unnatural DNA bases: an interview with Professor Floyd E. Romesberg, The Scripps Research Institute

Unnatural DNA bases: an interview with Professor Floyd E. Romesberg, The Scripps Research Institute

The natural DNA bases that form the letters of DNA are usually referred to as G, C, A, and T. Those are only the first letters of the chemical names. They’re often called nucleotides by their scientific name and all of them have in common a phosphate part, a sugar part and a nucleobase part. [More]
Scientists reveal structure of protein involved in life and development of cancer

Scientists reveal structure of protein involved in life and development of cancer

Scientists reveal the structure of one of the most important and complicated proteins in cell division - a fundamental process in life and the development of cancer - in research published in Nature today (Sunday). [More]
Three leading universities join forces to find better solutions for patients with craniofacial defects

Three leading universities join forces to find better solutions for patients with craniofacial defects

One in every 2,000 babies is born with a skull that can't grow normally. Various sections of these babies' skulls are fused together at joints called sutures, constricting the developing brain and disrupting vision, sleep, eating and IQ. For these young patients, risky skull-expanding surgeries become an almost annual event. [More]
Scientists make seminal breakthrough in understanding molecular basis of fibroadenoma

Scientists make seminal breakthrough in understanding molecular basis of fibroadenoma

A multi-disciplinary team of scientists from the National Cancer Centre Singapore, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore, and Singapore General Hospital have made a seminal breakthrough in understanding the molecular basis of fibroadenoma, one of the most common breast tumours diagnosed in women. [More]
UT Southwestern researcher named recipient of ASBMB Merck Award for research on molecular biology

UT Southwestern researcher named recipient of ASBMB Merck Award for research on molecular biology

Dr. Zhijian "James" Chen, Professor of Molecular Biology and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator at UT Southwestern Medical Center, has been named the 2015 recipient of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Merck Award, which recognizes outstanding contributions to research in biochemistry and molecular biology. [More]
Research reveals structural differences of protein involved in Huntington's disease

Research reveals structural differences of protein involved in Huntington's disease

Neutron scattering research at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has revealed clear structural differences in the normal and pathological forms of a protein involved in Huntington's disease. [More]
Research shows promise to speed up drug discovery for deadly diseases

Research shows promise to speed up drug discovery for deadly diseases

Antibiotic resistance is depleting our arsenal against deadly diseases and infections, such as tuberculosis and Staph infections, but recent research shows promise to speed up the drug discovery process. [More]
New software-based method identifies patients with newly diagnosed HIV using EMRs

New software-based method identifies patients with newly diagnosed HIV using EMRs

A new, validated software-based method for identifying patients with newly diagnosed HIV using electronic medical records (EMRs) is described in AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]

New method for identifying patients with newly diagnosed HIV using electronic medical records

A new, validated software-based method for identifying patients with newly diagnosed HIV using electronic medical records (EMRs) is described in AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Advanced Cell Diagnostics’ in situ hybridization technology reaches two major milestones

Advanced Cell Diagnostics’ in situ hybridization technology reaches two major milestones

Advanced Cell Diagnostics Inc. (ACD), a leader in the field of molecular pathology and developer of cell and tissue-based analysis tools, has announced that its RNAscope® RNA in situ hybridization technology has reached two major milestones. In just three years, over 100 peer-reviewed papers featuring the technology have been published, and with the significant increase in use of RNAscope, ACD has now built a library of over 4000 target probes for numerous species. Probes are designed to order in under two weeks, and in just six months the library has grown by over 1500, reflecting the wide interest in ACD’s breakthrough technology. [More]