Molecular Biology News and Research RSS Feed - Molecular Biology News and Research

Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. The field overlaps with other areas of biology and chemistry, particularly genetics and biochemistry. Molecular biology chiefly concerns itself with understanding the interactions between the various systems of a cell, including the interactions between DNA, RNA and protein biosynthesis as well as learning how these interactions are regulated.
Monell Center to promote Anosmia Awareness Day with new educational outreach initiatives

Monell Center to promote Anosmia Awareness Day with new educational outreach initiatives

The Monell Center announces three new educational outreach initiatives to promote Anosmia Awareness Day, which takes place on February 27. Each was designed to increase awareness and increase the limited information currently available about anosmia, the loss of our sense of smell, which affects over six million Americans and many millions more worldwide. [More]
New TAU study may offer hope to people diagnosed with Glioblastoma multiforme

New TAU study may offer hope to people diagnosed with Glioblastoma multiforme

There are no effective available treatments for sufferers of Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most aggressive and devastating form of brain tumor. The disease, always fatal, has a survival rate of only 6-18 months. [More]
Epigenetics and women’s health research: an interview with Professor Steve Conlan, Swansea University

Epigenetics and women’s health research: an interview with Professor Steve Conlan, Swansea University

Our research into gynaecological oncology focuses around understanding mechanisms of how genes are regulated or how they become dysregulated in a disease; and also the effects that has on the surface of the endometrium and also the function of the ovaries... [More]
NYU Langone's Michael M. Halassa selected as winner of 2015 Sloan Research Fellowship

NYU Langone's Michael M. Halassa selected as winner of 2015 Sloan Research Fellowship

Michael M. Halassa, MD, PhD, assistant professor, Departments of Psychiatry and Neuroscience and Physiology at NYU Langone Medical Center's Neuroscience Institute, has been selected as a winner of the 2015 Sloan Research Fellowship. [More]
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation announces recipients of 2015 Sloan Research Fellowships

Alfred P. Sloan Foundation announces recipients of 2015 Sloan Research Fellowships

The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation is pleased to announce the selection of 126 outstanding U.S. and Canadian researchers as recipients of the 2015 Sloan Research Fellowships. Awarded annually since 1955, the fellowships honor early-career scientists and scholars whose achievements and potential identify them as rising stars, the next generation of scientific leaders. [More]
Study: Growth hormone can improve social impairment in patients with Phelan-McDermid syndrome

Study: Growth hormone can improve social impairment in patients with Phelan-McDermid syndrome

A growth hormone can significantly improve the social impairment associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in patients with a related genetic syndrome, according to a pilot study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published yesterday on Pub Med, a public database of biomedical topics maintained by the National Institutes of Health (study originally published in the December 12 issue of the journal Molecular Autism). [More]
Researchers report development of first 3D tissue-engineered system

Researchers report development of first 3D tissue-engineered system

A team led by researchers at Tufts University School of Engineering and the University of Pavia has reported development of the first three-dimensional tissue system that reproduces the complex structure and physiology of human bone marrow and successfully generates functional human platelets. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers find that acetate speeds up growth and metastasis of tumors

UT Southwestern researchers find that acetate speeds up growth and metastasis of tumors

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers seeking novel ways to combat cancer found that giving acetate, a major compound produced in the gut by host bacteria, to mice sped up the growth and metastasis of tumors. [More]
Researchers identify molecule that can block progression of Alzheimer's disease

Researchers identify molecule that can block progression of Alzheimer's disease

A molecule that can block the progress of Alzheimer's disease at a crucial stage in its development has been identified by researchers in a new study, raising the prospect that more such molecules may now be found. [More]
Applying NMR to biological problems: an interview with Professor Arthur Palmer

Applying NMR to biological problems: an interview with Professor Arthur Palmer

Our current focus is on areas in protein folding, molecular recognition by proteins and also enzyme catalysis. NMR spin relaxation is one of the very powerful techniques in NMR for studying conformational dynamics in proteins or chemical kinetic processes. [More]
NTU Singapore setting up new institute to find cures for human diseases

NTU Singapore setting up new institute to find cures for human diseases

Nanyang Technological University is setting up a new institute to advance research in the life sciences, with a focus on ramping up Singapore's efforts in finding cures for human diseases. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers identify common signaling mechanism that controls immune system

UT Southwestern researchers identify common signaling mechanism that controls immune system

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a common signaling mechanism to produce interferon - one of the main proteins used to signal the immune system when the body needs to defend itself against a virus, tumor, or other diseases. [More]
New study indicates that malaria-causing parasite is unlikely to cross from animals to humans

New study indicates that malaria-causing parasite is unlikely to cross from animals to humans

In recent years, public health experts have increasingly explored the idea of eliminating the most dangerous malaria-causing parasite. But they have questioned whether getting rid of this species, called Plasmodium falciparum, would allow other species of the parasite to simply jump into the gap and start infecting humans with malaria. [More]
Common protein may play strategic role in tumor growth

Common protein may play strategic role in tumor growth

A common, yet previously undistinguished protein, which is elevated in many late-stage cancers, may play a strategic role in tumor growth through a non-conventional pathway, researchers at the Indiana University School of Medicine report in the Feb. 10 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [More]
Magnetizing biomolecules: an interview with Dr. Fred Whipple, AMSBIO

Magnetizing biomolecules: an interview with Dr. Fred Whipple, AMSBIO

Nanoparticle technology was originally developed in the 1980s and 1990s. As the technology evolved, it soon became possible to produce uniform nanoscopic beads that are magnetic, and that also have a variety of specific surface chemistries. It was immediately evident that such beads could be used to great advantage for biochemical separations. [More]
Scientists sequence genetic code of roundworm that causes disease in humans, animals

Scientists sequence genetic code of roundworm that causes disease in humans, animals

For the first time, scientists have sequenced the genetic code of Toxocara canis, a roundworm that causes disease in humans and animals, which paves the way for new drugs, vaccines and diagnostic tests. [More]
CWRU researcher receives $3.9 million grant for HIV research

CWRU researcher receives $3.9 million grant for HIV research

A researcher at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine has been awarded $3.9 million to determine if the combination of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and drug abuse is a double kick in the gut, leading to organ damage throughout the body. [More]
New studies show that treating infertility with stem cells may not be realised

New studies show that treating infertility with stem cells may not be realised

Whether or not infertility can be treated with stem cells has been a matter of debate for many years. [More]
Three Keck Medicine scientists of USC receive $4.3 million from CIRM for stem cell research

Three Keck Medicine scientists of USC receive $4.3 million from CIRM for stem cell research

Three scientists from Keck Medicine of the University of Southern California have won grants exceeding $4.3 million from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine for research that includes creating a temporary liver for transplant patients, finding novel ways to treat immune disorders and blood diseases and developing a new animal model for exploring diseases like heart failure, diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases. [More]
UNM professors create education pipeline to help students excel in STEM careers

UNM professors create education pipeline to help students excel in STEM careers

For Angela Wandinger-Ness, PhD, giving back to society and investing in the future are the same thing. "That was the hook," she says. "If you're going to be in academics, you're there to do research and teaching and education." [More]
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