Molecular Biology News and Research RSS Feed - Molecular Biology News and Research

Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. The field overlaps with other areas of biology and chemistry, particularly genetics and biochemistry. Molecular biology chiefly concerns itself with understanding the interactions between the various systems of a cell, including the interactions between DNA, RNA and protein biosynthesis as well as learning how these interactions are regulated.
UNM professors create education pipeline to help students excel in STEM careers

UNM professors create education pipeline to help students excel in STEM careers

For Angela Wandinger-Ness, PhD, giving back to society and investing in the future are the same thing. "That was the hook," she says. "If you're going to be in academics, you're there to do research and teaching and education." [More]
Scientists create largest ever catalogue of biological chimeras

Scientists create largest ever catalogue of biological chimeras

Scientists from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre's Structural Computational Biology Group, led by Alfonso Valencia, are making the largest ever catalogue of biological chimeras available to the public domain. [More]
NEB announces introduction of one-step cloning and multiple DNA fragment assembly

NEB announces introduction of one-step cloning and multiple DNA fragment assembly

New England Biolabs announces the introduction of the NEBuilder HiFi DNA Assembly Cloning Kit and Master Mix for one-step cloning and multiple DNA fragment assembly in as little as 15 minutes. [More]
Some genetic features associated with modern diseases are ancient

Some genetic features associated with modern diseases are ancient

Psoriasis, a chronic skin condition, can cause rashes that itch and sting. So why would a genetic susceptibility to this and other ailments persist for hundreds of thousands of years, afflicting our ancient ancestors, and us? [More]
TAU researchers identify novel proteins capable of stymieing growth in antibiotic-resistant bacteria

TAU researchers identify novel proteins capable of stymieing growth in antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Antibiotic-resistant infections are on the rise, foiling efforts to reduce death rates in developing countries where uncontrolled use of antibiotics and poor sanitation run amok. The epidemic of "superbugs," bacteria resistant to antibiotics, knows no borders -- presenting a clear and present danger around the globe. [More]
Synthetic compound shows antibiotic action against MRSA

Synthetic compound shows antibiotic action against MRSA

Microbiologists and chemists at the University of South Florida have developed and patented a synthetic compound that has shown antibiotic action against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, also known as MRSA, which can cause many serious infections and deaths. [More]
Research reveals key protein structure, paves way for better anti-anxiety drugs

Research reveals key protein structure, paves way for better anti-anxiety drugs

When new medicines are invented, the drug may hit the intended target and nullify the symptoms, but nailing a bull's eye - one that produces zero side effects - can be quite elusive. [More]
Case Western researchers awarded NSF grant to develop new method to reduce risk of Ebola virus

Case Western researchers awarded NSF grant to develop new method to reduce risk of Ebola virus

Health care workers must diagnose and isolate Ebola victims at an early stage to have a chance to save them and prevent the virus from spreading. But the most sensitive and quickest diagnostic test produces a small percentage of false negative results that undermine efforts to control the deadly agent. [More]
BRCA1/2 analysis: an interview with Jurgi Camblong, CEO of Sophia Genetics

BRCA1/2 analysis: an interview with Jurgi Camblong, CEO of Sophia Genetics

BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are two of the most well studied genes in the cancer field. They are tumor suppressors - mutations in these genes can lead to breast and/or ovarian cancer. Predispositions can be detected in women before they develop cancer. [More]
NMR in cancer research: an interview with Andy Byrd

NMR in cancer research: an interview with Andy Byrd

My research these days is generally classified as structural biology, although as I trained in chemistry. I specialize in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applied to biological problems. Our lab is very interested in studying mammalian proteins, particularly systems involved in cancer, in order to try to understand mechanisms to provide that information for our collaborators, and for the general knowledge of the community as well. [More]
SLU researcher discovers new information about how antibiotics stop staph infections

SLU researcher discovers new information about how antibiotics stop staph infections

In research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, assistant professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Saint Louis University Mee-Ngan F. Yap, Ph.D., discovered new information about how antibiotics like azithromycin stop staph infections, and why staph sometimes becomes resistant to drugs. [More]
Monell Center receives NIH grant to develop clinical tool that can predict anosmia

Monell Center receives NIH grant to develop clinical tool that can predict anosmia

Monell Center scientist Kai Zhao, PhD, is principal investigator on a $1.5M 4-year grant from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, part of the National Institutes of Health, to further develop clinical methodology that can predict the path of air flow through a person's nasal passages. [More]
Researchers find CREB-activated genes in long-term memory-trained worms

Researchers find CREB-activated genes in long-term memory-trained worms

A new study has identified genes involved in long-term memory in the worm as part of research aimed at finding ways to retain cognitive abilities during aging. [More]
ASCB honors UTSA adjunct professor with E. B. Wilson Medal

ASCB honors UTSA adjunct professor with E. B. Wilson Medal

William Brinkley, adjunct professor of biology in the UTSA College of Sciences, was recently honored with the E. B. Wilson Medal from the American Society for Cell Biology. The medal, the organization's highest honor for far-reaching contributions to cell biology over a lifetime in science, was presented to Brinkley at the 54th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia. [More]
Researchers reveal key factor in understanding elevated cancer risk linked to gene therapy

Researchers reveal key factor in understanding elevated cancer risk linked to gene therapy

National Institutes of Health researchers have uncovered a key factor in understanding the elevated cancer risk associated with gene therapy. They conducted research on mice with a rare disease similar to one in humans, hoping their findings may eventually help improve gene therapy for humans. Researchers at the National Human Genome Research Institute, part of NIH, published their research in the Jan. 20, 2015, online issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation. [More]
CUMC researcher develops new 3D microscope that can help view living things at very high speeds

CUMC researcher develops new 3D microscope that can help view living things at very high speeds

Opening new doors for biomedical and neuroscience research, Elizabeth Hillman, associate professor of biomedical engineering at Columbia Engineering and of radiology at Columbia University Medical Center, has developed a new microscope that can image living things in 3D at very high speeds. [More]
Tiny lumps of calcium phosphate may trigger age-related macular degeneration

Tiny lumps of calcium phosphate may trigger age-related macular degeneration

New research from scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine has found that tiny lumps of calcium phosphate may be an important triggering factor for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a degenerative eye disease that can cause severe vision loss and blindness. [More]
Modelling the biological mesoscale: an interview with Professor Art Olson

Modelling the biological mesoscale: an interview with Professor Art Olson

The biological mesoscale range includes biological structures that range from 10 to 100 nanometers (billionths of a meter). Structures in this size range include viruses, cellular organelles, large molecular complexes, and any other internal cellular environments within that range. [More]
Johns Hopkins-led study offers strategy to eradicate HIV

Johns Hopkins-led study offers strategy to eradicate HIV

Luring dormant HIV out of hiding and destroying its last cure-defying holdouts has become the holy grail of HIV eradication, but several recent attempts to do so have failed. Now the findings of a Johns Hopkins-led study reveal why that is and offer a strategy that could form a blueprint for a therapeutic vaccine to eradicate lingering virus from the body. [More]
Endogenous retroviruses play critical role in body's immune defense against bacterial, viral pathogens

Endogenous retroviruses play critical role in body's immune defense against bacterial, viral pathogens

Retroviruses are best known for causing contagious scourges such as AIDS, or more sporadically, cancer. [More]