Molecular Biology News and Research RSS Feed - Molecular Biology News and Research

Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. The field overlaps with other areas of biology and chemistry, particularly genetics and biochemistry. Molecular biology chiefly concerns itself with understanding the interactions between the various systems of a cell, including the interactions between DNA, RNA and protein biosynthesis as well as learning how these interactions are regulated.
TSRI scientist receives Outstanding Investigator Grant to focus on memory formation research

TSRI scientist receives Outstanding Investigator Grant to focus on memory formation research

Ron Davis, chair of the Department of Neuroscience on the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute has been awarded a $5 million Outstanding Investigator Grant, one of the first of its kind, by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
New research shows how children integrate different sensory information to direct social behavior

New research shows how children integrate different sensory information to direct social behavior

New research from the Monell Center reveals that children begin using olfactory information to help guide their responses to emotionally-expressive faces at about five years of age. [More]
Turning off 'fat-specific protein 27' improves blood sugar levels, reduces body fat in animal model

Turning off 'fat-specific protein 27' improves blood sugar levels, reduces body fat in animal model

In a study published in the Journal of Lipid Research, Saint Louis University scientist Angel Baldan, Ph.D., reports that turning off a protein found in liver and adipose tissue significantly improves blood sugar levels, as well as reduces body fat in an animal model. [More]
Good-tasting food does not lead to weight gain, new research suggests

Good-tasting food does not lead to weight gain, new research suggests

Does eating good-tasting food make you gain weight? Despite the common perception that good-tasting food is unhealthy and causes obesity, new research from the Monell Center using a mouse model suggests that desirable taste in and of itself does not lead to weight gain. [More]
Environmentally-friendly pipette system launched by Mettler Toledo

Environmentally-friendly pipette system launched by Mettler Toledo

METTLER TOLEDO’S Rainin TerraRacks™ have enabled the European Institute of Oncology in Milan, Italy, to adopt a more environmentally-friendly approach to manual pipetting. Dr Bronislava Matoskova, Molecular Medicine Program Manager, explained: “As well as regular biochemistry and molecular biology studies, we analyze human tissue, blood and serum as part of a molecular medicine research program. [More]
RNA modifications play significant role in function of nervous system

RNA modifications play significant role in function of nervous system

Researchers at the Institute of Molecular Biology and Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz have shown that a new way of regulating genes is vital for the activity of the nervous system. [More]
German Research Foundation to extend financial support for neuronal homeostasis research

German Research Foundation to extend financial support for neuronal homeostasis research

The German Research Foundation will be providing financial support to the Collaborative Research Center 1080 on "Molecular and cellular mechanisms of neuronal homeostasis" for four more years. [More]
Disturbances in the body’s carbon monoxide metabolism linked to circadian disruption

Disturbances in the body’s carbon monoxide metabolism linked to circadian disruption

Chronobiologists from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have shown that the body's carbon monoxide metabolism is closely linked to the body's circadian (internal) clock. [More]
UCLA researchers discover how chronic inflammation increases prostate cancer risk

UCLA researchers discover how chronic inflammation increases prostate cancer risk

UCLA researchers have discovered a previously unrecognized type of progenitor cell that, though rare in most regions of the human prostate, is found in uncommonly high numbers in inflamed areas of the gland. [More]
Tufts scientists discover reason for incidence of genetic error that causes many disorders

Tufts scientists discover reason for incidence of genetic error that causes many disorders

Tufts University researchers have discovered a possible explanation for the occurrence of a genetic error that causes over a dozen neuromuscular and neurodegenerative disorders, including Huntington's disease, myotonic dystrophy and forms of spinocerebellar ataxia. [More]
Menopausal women may experience accelerated decline in lung function, research shows

Menopausal women may experience accelerated decline in lung function, research shows

Menopausal women appear to experience an accelerated decline in lung function, according to new research published online ahead of print in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
Scientists discover molecular link between rare childhood genetic disease and major cancer gene

Scientists discover molecular link between rare childhood genetic disease and major cancer gene

A team of researchers led by a University of Rhode Island scientist has discovered an important molecular link between a rare childhood genetic disease, Fanconi anemia, and a major cancer gene called PTEN. [More]
Monell Center receives Gates Foundation grant to support innovative global health research project

Monell Center receives Gates Foundation grant to support innovative global health research project

The Monell Center announced today that it has received a $345,000 grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The grant supports an innovative global health research project titled, "Developing Novel Pediatric Formulation Technologies for Global Health: Human Taste Assays." [More]
Study suggests new approach to treat white blood cells of sepsis patients

Study suggests new approach to treat white blood cells of sepsis patients

New research findings published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, suggest that treating the white blood cells of sepsis patients with antibodies that block programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) and programmed cell death ligand (PD-L1) molecules may restore their function and ultimately their ability to eradicate deadly bacteria. [More]
NSF awards grant to advance new diagnostic test for fatal gastrointestinal disease in pre-term infants

NSF awards grant to advance new diagnostic test for fatal gastrointestinal disease in pre-term infants

The National Science Foundation has chosen an LSU Health New Orleans team that developed a test for the early detection of a potentially life-threatening gastrointestinal disease affecting pre-term, low birthweight babies to receive expert guidance to move the technology forward. [More]
Experts explore if DXA-derived measurements could predict fracture risk in diabetic patients

Experts explore if DXA-derived measurements could predict fracture risk in diabetic patients

Increased risk of fracture has been shown to be one of the complications arising from longstanding diabetes. With the worldwide increase in Type 2 Diabetes (T2D), in part due to aging populations, there is also increasing concern about how to identify and manage patients with diabetes who are at high risk of osteoporotic fracture. [More]
Scientists develop safe, highly efficient method to improve searching of new germicides

Scientists develop safe, highly efficient method to improve searching of new germicides

Scientists from the Lomonosov Moscow State University in cooperation with colleagues have worked out a safe, not that expensive and highly efficient method, which allows to speed up and improve searching of new germicides. [More]
New study finds link between memory mechanisms and resistance to epilepsy

New study finds link between memory mechanisms and resistance to epilepsy

A new study undertaken jointly by researchers from the Sagol Department of Neurobiology at the University of Haifa and European researchers, published in the journal Cerebral Cortex, exposes a new biological mechanism that, on the one hand, damages a very specific type of memory, but at the same time provides resistance to epilepsy. [More]
Scientists develop new technology that sheds light on HIV infection

Scientists develop new technology that sheds light on HIV infection

A group of researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation and the Pompeu Fabra University in Barcelona, Spain, have developed a new technology that sheds light on the HIV infection and offers a first glance at the expression landscape of the HIV in the human genome. [More]
Omega-3 fatty acids can stimulate activation of brown and beige adipose tissues, study finds

Omega-3 fatty acids can stimulate activation of brown and beige adipose tissues, study finds

Omega-3 fatty acids are able to stimulate the activation of brown and beige adipose tissues, a discovery that would promote the development of new therapies for obesity and other metabolism diseases, according to a research study published in the journal Nature Communications under the supervision of Professor Francesc Villarroya, from the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biomedicine and the Biomedical Research Center Red-Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBEROBN) of the Institute of Health Carlos III. [More]
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