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Researchers use gelation chips to develop strong muscle fibers

Researchers use gelation chips to develop strong muscle fibers

USC researcher Megan L. McCain and colleagues have devised a way to develop bigger, stronger muscle fibers. But instead of popping up on the bicep of a bodybuilder, these muscles grow on a tiny scaffold or "chip" molded from a type of water-logged gel made from gelatin. [More]
Breakthrough research could lead to new drugs to improve heart attack outcomes

Breakthrough research could lead to new drugs to improve heart attack outcomes

A research advance from the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute and Stanford University could lead to new drugs that minimize the damage caused by heart attacks. [More]
Study highlights continuing problem of MSI in Gulf War veterans

Study highlights continuing problem of MSI in Gulf War veterans

Veterans of the Gulf War are more than twice as likely to have medically unexplained symptoms known as "multisymptom illness" (MSI), compared to Iraq/Afghanistan War veterans, according to an updated research review in the July Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, official publication of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. [More]
Stem cell procedure may be safe for ALS patients

Stem cell procedure may be safe for ALS patients

A phase II clinical trial in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig's disease, suggests that transplanting human stem cells into the spinal cord may be done safely. [More]
New electric mesh device wraps around the heart to deliver electrical impulses

New electric mesh device wraps around the heart to deliver electrical impulses

A research team led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Seoul National University has developed a new electric mesh device that can be wrapped around the heart to deliver electrical impulses and thereby improve cardiac function in experimental models of heart failure, a major public health concern and leading cause of mortality and disability. [More]
Scientists develop novel bionic cardiac patch to treat heart problems

Scientists develop novel bionic cardiac patch to treat heart problems

Scientists and doctors in recent decades have made vast leaps in the treatment of cardiac problems - particularly with the development in recent years of so-called "cardiac patches," swaths of engineered heart tissue that can replace heart muscle damaged during a heart attack. [More]
LIF-treated muscle stem cells show promise in treatment of muscular dystrophy

LIF-treated muscle stem cells show promise in treatment of muscular dystrophy

Satellite cells are stem cells found in skeletal muscles. While transplantation of such muscle stem cells can be a potent therapy for degenerative muscle diseases such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy, these cells tend to lose their transplantation efficiency when cultured in vitro. [More]
Jefferson researchers discover alternate pathway that helps heart keep pumping

Jefferson researchers discover alternate pathway that helps heart keep pumping

About 5.7 million Americans have heart failure, half of whom will die from the disease within 5 years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
Why does appetite loss occur during illness? An interview with Prof. Conti and Prof. Francesconi

Why does appetite loss occur during illness? An interview with Prof. Conti and Prof. Francesconi

Appetite, as a word, come from the Latin appetitus, meaning "desire for.” Therefore, appetite can be defined as a pleasurable sensation or the desire to eat. This sensation is coordinated by several brain areas associated with reward processing such amygdala, hippocampus, ventral pallidum, nucleus accumbens and striatum, and others. [More]
Researchers receive grant to improve quality of donor limb, tissue for transplant

Researchers receive grant to improve quality of donor limb, tissue for transplant

A Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine faculty member has received $998,500 from the U.S. Department of Defense to develop a new approach to improve the quality and quantity of limbs and tissues obtained from brain dead organ donors. [More]
Blood mannose levels could help predict type 2 diabetes risk

Blood mannose levels could help predict type 2 diabetes risk

Even if you are not overweight, your mannose levels may indicate whether you're at risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D) or insulin resistance (IR), a Swedish study shows. [More]
Study shows one in five individuals from U.S. military sample have obesity

Study shows one in five individuals from U.S. military sample have obesity

Despite being held to stringent weight and body fat standards, newly published research shows that one in five individuals from a sample of U.S. military personnel from 2001 - 2008 have obesity. [More]
Re-engineering cardiac scarring process could improve clinical outcomes for heart disease patients

Re-engineering cardiac scarring process could improve clinical outcomes for heart disease patients

Literal heartbreak, from illness or injury, triggers the body's natural healing mechanisms. [More]
The future of simulated teaching methods: an interview with Dr Robert Amyot

The future of simulated teaching methods: an interview with Dr Robert Amyot

In healthcare, we have physicians, nurses and paramedics who know the textbook by heart and know exactly what they need to do, but have never experienced the procedure first-hand, or they have no experience responding to adverse events that may occur. [More]
Scientists provide new insights into role of star-shaped brain cells in memory, learning

Scientists provide new insights into role of star-shaped brain cells in memory, learning

A molecule that enables strong communication between our brain and muscles appears to also aid essential communication between our neurons, scientists report. [More]
New light-based technology facilitates deeper look into human body

New light-based technology facilitates deeper look into human body

New light-based technologies that facilitate a look inside the human body using light -- and without cutting into the tissue -- promise to enable both compact, wearable devices for point-of-care diagnostics as well as powerful new systems that provide even more information and from even deeper under the skin. [More]
Study shows skill-related memory persists in amnesia patients

Study shows skill-related memory persists in amnesia patients

She no longer recognizes a Van Gogh, but can tell you how to prepare a watercolor palette. [More]
Two gene variants provide clue to why some patients with PD respond well to rasagiline drug

Two gene variants provide clue to why some patients with PD respond well to rasagiline drug

Researchers have identified a gene variant which explains why some patients with Parkinson's Disease respond well to drug treatment and other do not. [More]
Novel adaptive mechanisms in hibernating animals may provide clues to mitigate cardiac injury

Novel adaptive mechanisms in hibernating animals may provide clues to mitigate cardiac injury

Novel adaptations discovered in hibernating animals may reveal ways to mitigate injuries associated with strokes, heart attacks and organ transplants, according to researchers at the University of Alaska Fairbanks and Duke University. [More]
New study identifies 40 genes susceptible to migraine

New study identifies 40 genes susceptible to migraine

Migraine is one of the most common neurological disorders and it affects 1 out of 7 people in the world. Painful and incapacitating, it has multi-factor origins, with the participation of environmental triggering factors and several altered genes in each individual. [More]
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