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Angela W. Rowe honored with American Osteopathic Academy of Orthopedics' Award of Fellow

Angela W. Rowe honored with American Osteopathic Academy of Orthopedics' Award of Fellow

Angela W. Rowe, D.O., orthopedic surgeon at Blair Orthopedics, has received the American Osteopathic Academy of Orthopedics' Award of Fellow. [More]
Aging astrocytes lose ability to protect motor neurons, reveal Cedars-Sinai ALS researchers

Aging astrocytes lose ability to protect motor neurons, reveal Cedars-Sinai ALS researchers

Lou Gehrig's disease, also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, attacks muscle-controlling nerve cells – motor neurons – in the brain, brainstem and spinal cord, leading to progressive weakness and eventual paralysis of muscles throughout the body. Patients typically survive only three to five years after diagnosis. [More]
Researchers describe new progress in treatment of brain cancer, other neurological diseases

Researchers describe new progress in treatment of brain cancer, other neurological diseases

A new technology that may assist in the treatment of brain cancer and other neurological diseases is the subject of an article in a recent issue of the journal Technology, published by World Scientific Publishing Company. [More]
UCSD researchers develop novel ultrasound technology to diagnose two heart conditions

UCSD researchers develop novel ultrasound technology to diagnose two heart conditions

Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have determined for the first time the impact of a ring-shaped vortex on transporting blood flow in normal and abnormal ventricles within the human heart. They worked with cardiologists at the Non-Invasive Cardiology Laboratory at Gregorio Marañon Hospital, in Madrid, Spain. [More]
Sleep apnea may affect peoples' ability to form new spatial memories

Sleep apnea may affect peoples' ability to form new spatial memories

Sleep apnea may affect your ability to form new spatial memories, such as remembering where you parked your car, new research led by NYU Langone Medical Center sleep specialists suggests. [More]
Women delay seeking medical care for heart symptoms, put health at risk

Women delay seeking medical care for heart symptoms, put health at risk

When heart symptoms strike, men and women go through similar stages of pain but women are more likely to delay seeking care and can put their health at risk, according to a study presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress. [More]
Robotically assisted CABG surgery reduces complications, cuts recovery times

Robotically assisted CABG surgery reduces complications, cuts recovery times

Robotically assisted coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery is a rapidly evolving technology that shortens hospital stays and reduces the need for blood products, while decreasing recovery times, making the procedure safer and less risky, says a study presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress. [More]
Interrupting blood supply to limb before cardiac surgery protects the heart during operation

Interrupting blood supply to limb before cardiac surgery protects the heart during operation

In a study just published in the International Journal of Cardiology, researchers from the K.G. Jebsen Center for Exercise in Medicine – Cardiac Exercise Research Group (CERG) at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) and the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the St. Olavs Hospital in Trondheim, Norway have shown that shutting off the blood supply to an arm or leg before cardiac surgery protects the heart during the operation. [More]
Women with bad backs have renewed hope for better sex lives

Women with bad backs have renewed hope for better sex lives

Newly published findings from the University of Waterloo are giving women with bad backs renewed hope for better sex lives. The findings—part of the first-ever study to document how the spine moves during sex—outline which sex positions are best for women suffering from different types of low-back pain. The new recommendations follow on the heels of comparable guidelines for men released last month. [More]
MIT researchers develop new way to model effects of cancer-causing genetic mutations

MIT researchers develop new way to model effects of cancer-causing genetic mutations

Sequencing the genomes of tumor cells has revealed thousands of genetic mutations linked with cancer. However, sifting through this deluge of information to figure out which of these mutations actually drive cancer growth has proven to be a tedious, time-consuming process. [More]
Study finds that beetroot can improve athletic performance, benefit heart failure patients

Study finds that beetroot can improve athletic performance, benefit heart failure patients

Football teams are claiming it improves their athletic performance, and according to new research from Kansas State University, it also benefits heart failure patients. The special ingredient: beetroot. [More]
Passengers from West Africa to start 3-week Ebola screening

Passengers from West Africa to start 3-week Ebola screening

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has announced that any person flying into the USA from Liberia, Sierra Leone or Guinea will soon have to undergo daily Ebola monitoring for several weeks after their arrival. [More]
Scientists use innovative exome sequencing strategy to identify new gene associated with ALS

Scientists use innovative exome sequencing strategy to identify new gene associated with ALS

Using an innovative exome sequencing strategy, a team of international scientists led by John Landers, PhD, at the University of Massachusetts Medical School has shown that TUBA4A, the gene encoding the Tubulin Alpha 4A protein, is associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurological disorder also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease. [More]
Levodopa dose linked to malnutrition risk in Parkinson’s disease

Levodopa dose linked to malnutrition risk in Parkinson’s disease

The malnutrition often seen in patients with Parkinson’s disease could be partly an effect of levodopa medication, research suggests. [More]
Vascular receptor autoantibodies implicated in SSc-PAH

Vascular receptor autoantibodies implicated in SSc-PAH

medwireNews: Autoantibodies to endothelin receptor type A and angiotensin receptor type-1 predict the development of, and mortality from, systemic sclerosis-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension, research suggests. [More]
Analgesics, anti-inflammatory drugs have beneficial effect on treatment of depression

Analgesics, anti-inflammatory drugs have beneficial effect on treatment of depression

Ordinary over the counter painkillers and anti-inflammatory drugs purchased from pharmacies may also be effective in the treatment of people suffering of depression. [More]
IOF data shows 93% of US adults are unaware of men’s susceptibility to osteoporosis

IOF data shows 93% of US adults are unaware of men’s susceptibility to osteoporosis

New survey findings released by the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) for World Osteoporosis Day show that on average, 93 percent of nearly 1,200 adults surveyed are unaware how common osteoporotic fractures are in men. [More]
Qualified massage therapist can play key role in improving cardiovascular health

Qualified massage therapist can play key role in improving cardiovascular health

Many already view massage as an important approach to relieving muscle pain or as a means to relax. However, working with a qualified massage therapist can also play a significant role in improving cardiovascular health as evidenced by a growing body of research, according to the American Massage Therapy Association. [More]
Researchers uncover surprising way to reduce brain damage caused by head injuries

Researchers uncover surprising way to reduce brain damage caused by head injuries

Scientists have uncovered a surprising way to reduce the brain damage caused by head injuries - stopping the body's immune system from killing brain cells. The study, published in the open access journal Acta Neuropathologica Communications, showed that in experiments on mice, an immune-based treatment reduced the size of brain lesions. [More]
Esophageal tissue can be grown in vivo from human and mouse cells, say researchers

Esophageal tissue can be grown in vivo from human and mouse cells, say researchers

In a first step toward future human therapies, researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles have shown that esophageal tissue can be grown in vivo from both human and mouse cells. The study has been published online in the journal Tissue Engineering, Part A. [More]