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Two studies highlight important new discovery around most common genetic defect linked to ALS

Two studies highlight important new discovery around most common genetic defect linked to ALS

In today's issue of Nature, two new studies funded in part by The ALS Association both highlight an important new discovery around the C9orf72 mutation, the most common genetic defect associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). [More]
UCSF study reveals molecular timing mechanism of stem cells

UCSF study reveals molecular timing mechanism of stem cells

UC San Francisco researchers have for the first time developed a method to precisely control embryonic stem cell differentiation with beams of light, enabling them to be transformed into neurons in response to a precise external cue. [More]
Individuals having high blood levels of two closely related proteins experience few adverse health events

Individuals having high blood levels of two closely related proteins experience few adverse health events

Individuals previously diagnosed with heart disease may be less likely to experience heart failure, heart attacks, or stroke, or to die from these events, if they have higher blood levels of two very closely related proteins, according to a new study led by a UC San Francisco research team. [More]
Symic receives $1.5M NIH Phase II SBIR grant to develop AVF therapeutic candidate

Symic receives $1.5M NIH Phase II SBIR grant to develop AVF therapeutic candidate

Platform therapeutic company Symic Biomedical, Inc. announced today that it has received a $1.5M Phase II SBIR grant from the National Institutes of Health to further develop its therapeutic agent to reduce arteriovenous fistula (AVF) failures, a significant unmet clinical need in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients undergoing hemodialysis. [More]
Scientists reveal how a common gene mutation in ALS and FTD disrupts normal cell function

Scientists reveal how a common gene mutation in ALS and FTD disrupts normal cell function

Researchers have determined how the most common gene mutation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) disrupts normal cell function, providing insight likely to advance efforts to develop targeted therapies for these brain diseases. [More]
Commonly used heart attack blood test may identify people at risk for hypertension

Commonly used heart attack blood test may identify people at risk for hypertension

Analysis of blood samples from more than 5,000 people suggests that a more sensitive version of a blood test long used to verify heart muscle damage from heart attacks could also identify people on their way to developing hypertension well before the so-called silent killer shows up on a blood pressure machine. [More]
Optimal aerobic exercise training may benefit patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension

Optimal aerobic exercise training may benefit patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension

A physical therapy researcher with the IU School of Health and Rehabilitation Services at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis has been awarded a $465,000 National Institutes of Health grant to optimize aerobic exercise training for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, a goal data suggests could reduce morbidity and mortality among those with the disease. [More]
Elite CBD Remedy Tincture now available through Mary's Nutritionals

Elite CBD Remedy Tincture now available through Mary's Nutritionals

Elite Botanicals, the leading cultivator of CBD-rich hemp in Colorado, today announced that it's Elite CBD Remedy Tincture is now available through medical and recreational dispensaries in Colorado, as well as online through Mary's Nutritionals. [More]
Gerard E. Francisco to be honored with AAPM&R Distinguished Member Award

Gerard E. Francisco to be honored with AAPM&R Distinguished Member Award

Gerard E. Francisco, M.D., chairman of physical medicine and rehabilitation at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School and chief medical officer at TIRR Memorial Hermann, will be recognized at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Oct. 1 - 4 in Boston. [More]
Beta-blockers improve overall survival among epithelial ovarian cancer patients

Beta-blockers improve overall survival among epithelial ovarian cancer patients

In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers demonstrate a benefit in overall survival among epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients receiving generic heart medications known as beta-blockers. Survival was shown to be greatest among those prescribed first-generation nonselective beta-blockers. [More]
Researchers report new breakthrough in countering deadly effects of radiation exposure

Researchers report new breakthrough in countering deadly effects of radiation exposure

An interdisciplinary research team led by The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston reports a new breakthrough in countering the deadly effects of radiation exposure. A single injection of a regenerative peptide was shown to significantly increase survival in mice when given 24 hours after nuclear radiation exposure. [More]
Alpha lipoic acid can stimulate telomerase with positive effects in mouse model of atherosclerosis

Alpha lipoic acid can stimulate telomerase with positive effects in mouse model of atherosclerosis

In human cells, shortened telomeres, the protective caps at the ends of chromosomes, are both a sign of aging and contribute to it. Scientists at Emory University School of Medicine have found that the dietary supplement alpha lipoic acid (ALA) can stimulate telomerase, the enzyme that lengthens telomeres, with positive effects in a mouse model of atherosclerosis. [More]
Three projects that focus on improving global health win DEBUT Challenge

Three projects that focus on improving global health win DEBUT Challenge

Three unique projects focused on improving global health won the National Institutes of Health's Design by Biomedical Undergraduate Teams (DEBUT) Challenge. The winners showed exemplary initiative in designing tools for a less expensive, portable device to monitor HIV treatment, a new surgical clamp to treat drooping eyelids, and a low-cost patient monitor. [More]
Researchers evaluate use of human fetal progenitor tenocyte to repair tendon injuries

Researchers evaluate use of human fetal progenitor tenocyte to repair tendon injuries

Tendon injuries, especially those acquired while engaging in sports, are not easily healed due to the fibrous nature of tendon tissues which transmit forces from muscle to bone and protect surrounding tissues against tension and compression. Tendon injuries to wrists, knees, elbows and rotator cuffs, often from over use when playing golf or tennis, are increasingly common for both professional and amateur athletes ("weekend warriors") alike. [More]
Novel wound closure technique may reduce complication rates for patients with scoliosis

Novel wound closure technique may reduce complication rates for patients with scoliosis

Patients with scoliosis who undergo surgery may be less likely to develop an infection or other complications after the procedure when a novel wound closure technique pioneered at NYU Langone Medical Center is utilized, according to new research. [More]
Loyola University Medical Center first in Illinois to offer new, noninvasive test for heart disease

Loyola University Medical Center first in Illinois to offer new, noninvasive test for heart disease

Loyola University Medical Center is the first and only hospital in Illinois to offer a new, noninvasive technology to test for coronary artery disease. [More]
FDA accepts Allergan's resubmission of BOTOX sBLA for treatment of adults with upper limb spasticity

FDA accepts Allergan's resubmission of BOTOX sBLA for treatment of adults with upper limb spasticity

Allergan plc, a leading global pharmaceutical company today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has accepted the company's resubmission of its Supplemental Biologics License Application (sBLA) for BOTOX (onabotulinumtoxinA) for the treatment of adults with lower limb (involving ankle and toe muscles) spasticity in adults. [More]
IUPUI researcher receives NIH grant to study role of collagen in bone fracture resistance

IUPUI researcher receives NIH grant to study role of collagen in bone fracture resistance

A biomedical engineer researcher at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis has received a $419,000 National Institutes of Health grant to uncover why mechanical loading of bones increases their resistance to fractures. [More]

Study shows how single-cell organisms can somersault or bend their bodies

In a paper appearing in Scientific Reports today, the motion of micro-organisms as they swim through various types of fluid channels show "quite strange and new" responses for single cell organisms, including the performance of somersaults, meandering wanderings, and even a ballistic type of behavior, wrote Sunghwan "Sunny" Jung, a member of the Virginia Tech Department of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics. [More]
Simple exercises, stretches can help eliminate postural stressors

Simple exercises, stretches can help eliminate postural stressors

Modern lifestyle factors, such as texting, reaching for your keyboard or wearing high heels, can create postural stressors that often cause muscle imbalances and injury. Having good posture is essential for good health; however, understanding what good posture is and maintaining it are hard. [More]
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