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Scientists devise new route to synthesize insecticide in 15 steps

Scientists devise new route to synthesize insecticide in 15 steps

For chemists like Sarah Reisman, professor of chemistry at Caltech, synthesizing molecules is like designing your own jigsaw puzzle. You know what the solved puzzle looks like--the molecule--and your job is to figure out the best pieces to use to put it together. [More]
PinnacleHealth replaces aortic valve in two patients using minimally invasive surgery

PinnacleHealth replaces aortic valve in two patients using minimally invasive surgery

This week, PinnacleHealth became the first hospital in the country to implant the EDWARDS INTUITY Elite valve, a rapid deployment device for surgical aortic valve replacement, after U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval. [More]
Study finds age-dependent differences in expression of allergy to dust mites

Study finds age-dependent differences in expression of allergy to dust mites

In adults with a house dust mite allergy, a cascade of inflammatory signals on the surface of the airways leads to airway remodeling. [More]
Liver cancer time-bomb as up to 70% people with Hep C miss out on follow-up testing

Liver cancer time-bomb as up to 70% people with Hep C miss out on follow-up testing

Up to 70 per cent of Victorians with suspected hepatitis C may not have received follow-up testing, putting them at risk of chronic liver disease and even cancer, University of Melbourne researchers say. [More]
New study uses evolutionary theory to predict cancer risk in patients with Barrett's esophagus

New study uses evolutionary theory to predict cancer risk in patients with Barrett's esophagus

A disorder known as Barrett's esophagus (BE) affects some 200,000 Americans each year. The condition, which is caused by stomach acid damaging the lining of the esophagus, can lead to the development of a serious, potentially fatal cancer of epithelial tissue, known as esophageal adenocarcinoma. [More]
Surgical repair of mitral valve may provide greater benefit in patients with no symptoms

Surgical repair of mitral valve may provide greater benefit in patients with no symptoms

A new study recently published in the Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery questions whether patients with isolated moderate to severe mitral valve regurgitation should receive treatment in earlier stages instead of waiting until symptoms appear. [More]
Atomic level analysis reveals how two classes of calcium channel blockers produce different effects

Atomic level analysis reveals how two classes of calcium channel blockers produce different effects

An atomic level analysis has revealed how two classes of calcium channel blockers, widely prescribed for heart disease patients, produce separate therapeutic effects through their actions at different sites on the calcium channel molecule. [More]
HMS study reveals key instigator of nerve cell damage in ALS patients

HMS study reveals key instigator of nerve cell damage in ALS patients

Scientists from Harvard Medical School have identified a key instigator of nerve cell damage in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, a progressive and incurable neurodegenerative disorder. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers discover protein that can promote healthful breakdown of fat

UT Southwestern researchers discover protein that can promote healthful breakdown of fat

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found that a protein often located on the surface of fat droplets within cells - and especially abundant in the muscles of endurance athletes - can kick-start the more efficient and healthful breakdown of fat. [More]
Tendon transfer for quadriplegics greatly underused, article reveals

Tendon transfer for quadriplegics greatly underused, article reveals

A surgery for quadriplegics called tendon transfer can significantly improve hand and elbow function, but the procedure is greatly underused, according to an article in the journal Hand Clinics by Loyola Medicine hand surgeon Michael S. Bednar, MD, FAAOS. [More]
MDI Biological Laboratory researchers receive patent for novel heart disease drug

MDI Biological Laboratory researchers receive patent for novel heart disease drug

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has announced that it will grant a patent to MDI Biological Laboratory scientists Voot P. Yin, Ph.D., and Kevin Strange, Ph.D., and their collaborator Michael Zasloff, M.D., Ph.D., for use of the small molecule MSI-1436 to stimulate the repair and regeneration of heart tissue damaged by injuries such as a heart attack. [More]
Aquatic treadmill exercise may maximize functional recovery after subacute stroke

Aquatic treadmill exercise may maximize functional recovery after subacute stroke

For patients in rehabilitation after a stroke, walking on an underwater treadmill produces better measures of exercise performance compared to conventional treadmill walking, reports a study in the American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, the official journal of the Association of Academic Physiatrists. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Novel innovation could help scientists study new treatments for mitochondrial diseases

Novel innovation could help scientists study new treatments for mitochondrial diseases

A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences from the University of Missouri has succeeded in creating embryos with "heteroplasmy," or the presence of both maternal and paternal mitochondrial DNA. [More]
Researchers discover new role of cellular signaling molecule involved in release of hunger hormone

Researchers discover new role of cellular signaling molecule involved in release of hunger hormone

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified a previously unknown role of a cellular signaling molecule involved in release of the "hunger hormone" ghrelin, a finding that could have implications for optimal treatment of children taking beta blockers. [More]
Morbidly obese individuals more likely to experience heart failure, say researchers

Morbidly obese individuals more likely to experience heart failure, say researchers

A study by Johns Hopkins researchers of more than 13,000 people has found that even after accounting for such risk factors as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes, so-called morbid obesity appears to stand alone as a standout risk for heart failure, but not for other major types of heart disease. [More]
Study challenges widely-held assumption that larger athletes need more protein

Study challenges widely-held assumption that larger athletes need more protein

Sports nutrition recommendations may undergo a significant shift after research from the University of Stirling has found individuals with more muscle mass do not need more protein after resistance exercise. [More]
Tulane professor receives three-year grant to improve survival of mesenchymal stem cells

Tulane professor receives three-year grant to improve survival of mesenchymal stem cells

Kim O'Connor, a professor in Tulane University's Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, received a three-year $599,638 grant from the National Science Foundation to study ways to improve the survival of mesenchymal stem cells once they are implanted in patients. [More]
Research shows ketone esters increase exercise endurance, cognitive function in rats

Research shows ketone esters increase exercise endurance, cognitive function in rats

New research published online in The FASEB Journal shows that in rats, a substance called a ketone ester significantly increase exercise endurance, cognitive function and energy levels in the heart at high workloads. [More]
Children living in poor communities less likely to receive diagnosis for strabismus, study shows

Children living in poor communities less likely to receive diagnosis for strabismus, study shows

Children are less likely to be diagnosed with crossed eyes, a condition known as strabismus, if they live in poor communities, according to an analysis led by researchers at the University of Michigan's Kellogg Eye Center. [More]
Social support, nutrition and exercise intervention can prevent malnutrition and frailty

Social support, nutrition and exercise intervention can prevent malnutrition and frailty

A training program for the reactivation of older and frail people established by MedUni Vienna has achieved remarkable success. [More]
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