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New player in calcium signalling pathways acts as molecular brake to Orai activation

New player in calcium signalling pathways acts as molecular brake to Orai activation

Information flow in cells relies on calcium as a key agent in several signalling pathways. Calcium dependent signalling is crucial in nearly every aspect of life - muscle movement, immune reactions, nerve function, light sensing and many such processes. [More]
Combining VCA with organ transplants improves patient outcomes

Combining VCA with organ transplants improves patient outcomes

Simultaneous transplantation of a "composite" skull and scalp flap plus a kidney and pancreas—all from the same donor—provided excellent outcomes for a patient with a non-healing scalp defect and declining organ kidney and pancreas function, according to a report in the June issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. [More]
Older runners consume similar rate of metabolic energy as young runners, study finds

Older runners consume similar rate of metabolic energy as young runners, study finds

If you're an avid runner, logging dozens of miles every week and you happen to be over 65, odds are you're burning oxygen at nearly the same rate as a runner in her 20s. [More]
Research sheds light on how subtle genetic differences in DMD patients produce variation in symptoms

Research sheds light on how subtle genetic differences in DMD patients produce variation in symptoms

Johns Hopkins researchers report they have inadvertently found a way to make human muscle cells bearing genetic mutations from people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). [More]
Bereaved parents feel that pediatric end-of-life care needs improvement

Bereaved parents feel that pediatric end-of-life care needs improvement

Many pediatricians and pediatric subspecialists believe that their clinical care extends from treating ill children through end-of-life care. However, are pediatricians actually meeting the needs of families and their dying child? In a new study scheduled for publication in The Journal of Pediatrics, researchers surveyed bereaved parents and found that pediatric end-of-life care needs improvement. [More]
Adolescents and young adults have lower cancer survival rates compared to children

Adolescents and young adults have lower cancer survival rates compared to children

More young people of all ages are surviving cancer than ever before, but new research published today in The Lancet Oncology journal shows that adolescents and young adults have a lower chance of surviving eight relatively common types of cancer than children, according to the latest data from a long-running study of cancer survival across Europe. [More]
RBFOX2 dysregulation may cause heart damage in diabetic patients

RBFOX2 dysregulation may cause heart damage in diabetic patients

Cardiac complications are the number one cause of death among diabetics. Now a team of scientists has uncovered a molecular mechanism involved in a common form of heart damage found in people with diabetes. [More]
Researchers find potential link between pulmonary function and vocal fatigue symptoms in women

Researchers find potential link between pulmonary function and vocal fatigue symptoms in women

Teaching is an occupation with a high risk of developing vocal problems -- teachers have more than twice the voice problems than people in other professions, as the voice is the major tool in classroom instruction and is often used for long periods of time and in noisy environments. [More]
Shoulder, arm pain could stem from thoracic outlet syndrome

Shoulder, arm pain could stem from thoracic outlet syndrome

Shoulder and arm pain come with the territory for some athletes and certain occupations like hair stylists, mechanics, even office workers. [More]
Nutrition, safety tips for grilling season

Nutrition, safety tips for grilling season

Cooking meat, including beef, pork, fish, or poultry, with high-temperature methods such as pan frying or grilling directly over an open flame can increase exposure to chemicals that can cause changes in DNA that may increase the risk of cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute. [More]
WPI receives patent for novel method of reprogramming human skin cells

WPI receives patent for novel method of reprogramming human skin cells

Cell therapies for a range of serious conditions, including heart attacks, diabetes, and traumatic injuries, will be accelerated by research at Worcester Polytechnic Institute that yielded a newly patented method of converting human skin cells into engines of wound healing and tissue regeneration. [More]
New technique to grow blood vessels could accelerate growth of regenerative medicine

New technique to grow blood vessels could accelerate growth of regenerative medicine

In addition the technique to grow the blood vessels in a 3D scaffold cuts down on the risk of transplant rejection because it uses cells from the patient. It was developed by researchers from the University of Bath's Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, working with colleagues at Bristol Heart Institute. [More]
Physical exercise may be as effective as drugs for treating prostate cancer patients

Physical exercise may be as effective as drugs for treating prostate cancer patients

At age 70, Alfred Roberts plays hockey twice a week. Nothing special, right? Except that for three years he has had advanced prostate cancer, which has spread to his bones. "I've always been active. Hockey keeps me in shape and keeps my mind off things. I've got friends that have played until age 80, and my goal is to beat them!" said the veteran stick handler. [More]
Tips for improving cardiovascular health

Tips for improving cardiovascular health

New research by UT Southwestern heart specialists shows that sedentary behavior such as sitting for long periods of time at a desk or on the couch is associated with increased amounts of calcium in the arteries, which in turn can lead to higher risk of heart attack. [More]
New experimental model may predict eventual cardiac phenotype in pediatric patients

New experimental model may predict eventual cardiac phenotype in pediatric patients

An experimental model uses genetics-guided biomechanics and patient-derived stem cells to predict what type of inherited heart defect a child will develop, according to authors of a new study in the journal Cell. [More]
Simple sarcopenia screening method could easily diagnose severity of heart disease

Simple sarcopenia screening method could easily diagnose severity of heart disease

Researchers from Kumamoto University in Japan have shown that a simple screening method could quickly and easily diagnose the severity of heart disease. The method was originally developed to diagnose sarcopenia, a disease that causes a loss of muscle mass and strength. [More]
New research defies earlier belief that calcium channels function independently

New research defies earlier belief that calcium channels function independently

Voltage-gated calcium channels open in unison, rather than independently, to allow calcium ions into and activate excitable cells such as neurons and muscle cells, researchers with UC Davis Health System and the University of Washington have found. [More]
Easy, immediate access to effective antidotes could help reduce deaths from opioid overdose

Easy, immediate access to effective antidotes could help reduce deaths from opioid overdose

Over the past 15 years, deaths caused by heroin and prescription opioid overdoses have quadrupled despite the existence of a highly effective antidote. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society, explores what it might take to turn the tide. [More]
Basic mechanisms behind memory are more dynamic, research finds

Basic mechanisms behind memory are more dynamic, research finds

We tend to think our memory works like a filing cabinet. We experience an event, generate a memory and then file it away for later use. However, according to medical research, the basic mechanisms behind memory are much more dynamic. [More]
Oct4 gene may play significant role in preventing underlying cause of heart attacks, strokes

Oct4 gene may play significant role in preventing underlying cause of heart attacks, strokes

A gene that scientific dogma insists is inactive in adults actually plays a vital role in preventing the underlying cause of most heart attacks and strokes, researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have determined. [More]
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