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XBiotech announces results from Phase I/II oncology study

XBiotech is announcing that results from its Phase I/II oncology study conducted at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, TX were published today in Lancet Oncology. The featured article describes the outcome in 52 advanced cancer patients treated with Xilonix™, XBiotech's novel, non-cytotoxic, anti-tumor therapy. [More]

Study shows massage therapy improves blood flow, alleviates muscle soreness after exercise

Massage therapy improves general blood flow and alleviates muscle soreness after exercise, according to a study by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago. [More]

Scientist receives $1.8M defense grant from Kessler Foundation for spinal cord injury research

Kessler Foundation has been named awardee of a three-year grant for $1.8 million from the Department of Defense Spinal Cord Injury Research Program. Gail Forrest, PT, PhD, is principal investigator for the randomized, double-blinded, controlled, multi-site clinical trial, which will test strategies to improve bone and muscle strength after spinal cord injury. Dr. Forrest is assistant director of Human Performance & Engineering Research at Kessler Foundation. [More]
B1/Cdk1 protein which plays key role in cell division also boosts power of mitochondrial activity

B1/Cdk1 protein which plays key role in cell division also boosts power of mitochondrial activity

​An international team led by researchers at UC Davis has shown that the cyclin B1/Cdk1 protein complex, which plays a key role in cell division, also boosts the mitochondrial activity to power that process. [More]

Research provides fresh insight into structure of sodium channels

Sodium channels are implicated in many serious conditions such as heart disease, epilepsy and pain, making them an important potential target for drug therapies. Unfortunately, there is still much scientists do not know about the molecules. [More]

Docs who treat patients with severe LAM face agonizing treatment decision

​Doctors who treat patients with a severe and progressive respiratory disease called lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) can face an agonizing treatment decision. [More]
FDA grants clearance for Breathe Technologies’ Non-Invasive Open Ventilation System

FDA grants clearance for Breathe Technologies’ Non-Invasive Open Ventilation System

Breathe Technologies, Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted the fifth 510(k) clearance for its Non-Invasive Open Ventilation System, allowing its use with compressed air supply for non-oxygen dependent patients. [More]

Study reveals factors that contribute to eye mobility disorder

Imagine you cannot move your eyes up, and you cannot lift your upper eyelid. You walk through life with your head tilted upward so that your eyes look straight when they are rolled down in the eye socket. [More]

Massage therapy alleviates muscle soreness and improves general blood flow

Massage therapy improves general blood flow and alleviates muscle soreness after exercise, according to a study by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago. [More]
New syndrome osteosarcopenic obesity links deterioration of bone density and muscle mass with obesity

New syndrome osteosarcopenic obesity links deterioration of bone density and muscle mass with obesity

Florida State University researchers have identified a new syndrome called "osteosarcopenic obesity" that links the deterioration of bone density and muscle mass with obesity. [More]
New mouse study indicates that mutant protein in muscle cells is responsible for SBMA

New mouse study indicates that mutant protein in muscle cells is responsible for SBMA

Sometimes known as Kennedy's disease, spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a rare inherited neuromuscular disorder characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. [More]
Researchers coax human embryonic stem cells to turn into working spinal cord cells

Researchers coax human embryonic stem cells to turn into working spinal cord cells

The sponginess of the environment where human embryonic stem cells are growing affects the type of specialized cells they eventually become, a University of Michigan study shows. [More]

Harvard successfully transplants regenerated esophagus into rat using bioreactor

Harvard Apparatus Regenerative Technology, Inc., a clinical stage biotechnology company developing regenerated organs for transplant, initially focused on the trachea, announces that a research team led by Paolo Macchiarini, MD, PhD at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden has successfully transplanted a regenerated esophagus into a rat using a bioreactor developed by HART. [More]

New set of criteria for diagnosing sarcopenia in older adults

Sarcopenia - the age-related loss of muscle mass and strength - may put up to 50 percent of seniors at greater risk for disability, yet there is no consensus within the medical community for how this condition should be measured. [More]
WHI study shows no significant link between vitamin D levels and menopause symptoms

WHI study shows no significant link between vitamin D levels and menopause symptoms

A new study from the Women's Health Initiative shows no significant connection between vitamin D levels and menopause symptoms. The study was published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
Whey protein consumption may lead to significant decrease in body weight

Whey protein consumption may lead to significant decrease in body weight

New research published in the March/April 2014 issue of the Journal of the American College of Nutrition shows whey protein, either as a supplement combined with resistance exercise or as part of a weight-loss or weight-maintenance diet, may provide men and women benefits related to body composition. [More]

FDA approves Boston Scientific's latest generation of defibrillators and heart failure devices

Boston Scientific Corporation has received FDA approval for its latest generation of defibrillators and heart failure devices designed to advance patient care. The newly approved devices include the DYNAGEN MINI and INOGEN MINI ICDs, as well as the DYNAGEN X4 and INOGEN X4 CRT-Ds. [More]
Drugs used to treat osteoporosis appear to prevent cell membrane repair

Drugs used to treat osteoporosis appear to prevent cell membrane repair

A class of drugs widely used to treat osteoporosis appears to impede a cell's ability to repair a protective outer membrane that helps determine what enters and exits, researchers report. [More]

Study: Chemotherapy before surgery improves survival in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer

Contrary to treatment guidelines for high-risk bladder cancer, chemotherapy before or after surgery is not commonly used in routine clinical practice. The findings are published early online in Cancer, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. [More]

Tissue reconstruction using autologous engineered implants has been successfully achieved in humans

Reconstruction of damaged/absent tissue using engineered autologous (from the patients’ own cells) implants has been successfully achieved in humans for the first time. [More]