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Rigel Pharmaceuticals reports net loss of $22.3 million for fourth quarter 2014

Rigel Pharmaceuticals reports net loss of $22.3 million for fourth quarter 2014

Rigel Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today reported financial results for the fourth quarter and year ended December 31, 2014. For the fourth quarter of 2014, Rigel reported a net loss of $22.3 million, or $0.25 per share, compared to a net loss of $16.9 million, or $0.19 per share, in the fourth quarter of 2013. [More]
Existing drug could help treat MS, other neurological diseases

Existing drug could help treat MS, other neurological diseases

Damage to myelin, the fatty insulator that enables communication between nerve cells, characterizes multiple sclerosis (MS) and other devastating neurological diseases. [More]
New insights into the use, outcomes of gluteoplasty and vaginal labiaplasty procedures

New insights into the use, outcomes of gluteoplasty and vaginal labiaplasty procedures

Two of the fastest-growing plastic surgery procedures are gluteoplasty or "butt augmentation," to improve the appearance of the buttocks; and labiaplasty to address cosmetic and functional concerns with the vagina. [More]
Feast-or-famine diet may extend lifespan, improve age-related diseases

Feast-or-famine diet may extend lifespan, improve age-related diseases

University of Florida Health researchers have found that putting people on a feast-or-famine diet may mimic some of the benefits of fasting, and that adding antioxidant supplements may counteract those benefits. [More]
Researchers reveal role of abdominal muscles in muscular dystrophy process

Researchers reveal role of abdominal muscles in muscular dystrophy process

The muscular dystrophies are known to target various muscle groups differentially. In addition to making limb muscles weak, muscular dystrophy (MD) can also lead to decreased function of specific muscles involved in respiration causing breathing difficulties as well as leading to cardiac problems. [More]
Chiasma closes $70 million Series E financing round

Chiasma closes $70 million Series E financing round

Chiasma, Inc., a U.S. privately-held biopharma company developing octreotide capsules, its lead product for the orphan condition acromegaly, today announced the closing of a $70 million Series E financing round. [More]
Study shows efficacy of YONDELIS (trabectedin) in patients with soft-tissue sarcoma

Study shows efficacy of YONDELIS (trabectedin) in patients with soft-tissue sarcoma

PharmaMar announced that the European Journal of Cancer published online data from a large retrospective study with soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) patients carried out at 25 French centers confirming that in routine practice YONDELIS (trabectedin) shows comparable or better clinical outcomes than those observed in clinical trials. [More]
Study: Levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel improves quality of life in advanced PD patients

Study: Levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel improves quality of life in advanced PD patients

Although levodopa remains the "gold standard" to effectively control motor deficits in the treatment of early stage Parkinson's disease (PD), it loses effectiveness as the disease progresses. After four to six years of treatment with oral medications for Parkinson's disease, about 40% of patients experience lack of muscle control (dyskinesias), end-of-dose wearing off, and fluctuations in "On/Off" states. [More]

Unique research consortium focuses on musculoskeletal disorders and diseases

The Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences, the University of Missouri – Kansas City and the University of Kansas Medical Center proudly announce a research consortium among the three Kansas City-area institutions. The consortium brings together scientists and resources focused on the research of musculoskeletal disorders and diseases. [More]

Three Austrian men undergo bionic hand reconstruction

Three Austrian men have become the first in the world to undergo a new technique called “bionic reconstruction”, enabling them to use a robotic prosthetic hand controlled by their mind, according to new research published in The Lancet. [More]
Researchers generate mature, functional skeletal muscles using new approach

Researchers generate mature, functional skeletal muscles using new approach

A team of researchers from Italy, Israel and the United Kingdom has succeeded in generating mature, functional skeletal muscles in mice using a new approach for tissue engineering. The scientists grew a leg muscle starting from engineered cells cultured in a dish to produce a graft. [More]
Sotera Wireless announces acquisition of Reflectance Medical

Sotera Wireless announces acquisition of Reflectance Medical

Sotera Wireless, Inc. today announced its acquisition of Reflectance Medical Inc., a privately held company that has developed first-of-its kind technology aimed at detecting potentially life threatening conditions in critically ill patients, including those who have suffered trauma injuries. [More]
Discovery demonstrates effect of exercise to prevent chronic health conditions

Discovery demonstrates effect of exercise to prevent chronic health conditions

A researcher at the University of Virginia School of Medicine has magnified a benefit of exercise in mice to provide a "profound" protection from diabetic cardiomyopathy, a potentially deadly heart condition that affects many people with diabetes. The discovery demonstrates the power of exercise to prevent chronic health conditions and suggests that one day some benefits of exercise may come in a pill or bottle. [More]
Indiana University study reveals connection between mussels and muscles

Indiana University study reveals connection between mussels and muscles

An Indiana University study has revealed that there may be a greater connection between mussels and muscles than previously thought. [More]
Epigenome plays significant part in embryonic development

Epigenome plays significant part in embryonic development

The early stages of embryonic development shape our cells and tissues for life. It is during this time that our newly formed cells are transformed into heart, skin, nerve or other cell types. Scientists are finding that this process is largely controlled not by the genome, but by the epigenome, chemical markers on DNA that tell cells when to turn genes on and off. [More]
Rigel, Bristol-Myers Squibb partner to develop, commercialize TGF beta receptor kinase inhibitors

Rigel, Bristol-Myers Squibb partner to develop, commercialize TGF beta receptor kinase inhibitors

Rigel Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Bristol-Myers Squibb Company today announced that they have entered into a collaboration agreement for the discovery, development and commercialization of cancer immunotherapies based on Rigel's extensive portfolio of small molecule TGF beta receptor kinase inhibitors. [More]

Hiroshima University develops Sensorimotor Enhancing Suit to support human motion

A prototype for wearable equipment to support human motion has been developed at Hiroshima University, Japan. This wearable equipment, called the Sensorimotor Enhancing Suit (SEnS), enhances sensorimotor functions by reducing the muscle load of the upper limbs. [More]
Researchers develop targeted approach that allows muscle to burn more energy

Researchers develop targeted approach that allows muscle to burn more energy

What started as an evolutionary protection against starvation has become a biological "bad joke" for people who need to lose weight. The human body doesn't distinguish between dieting and possible starvation, so when there is a decrease in calories consumed, human metabolism increases its energy efficiency and weight loss is resisted. [More]
Smartphones, tablets can do damage to overall health in unexpected ways

Smartphones, tablets can do damage to overall health in unexpected ways

Despite the many benefits of having information at your fingertips, smartphones and tablets can do damage to your body and overall health in unexpected ways. [More]
Discovery could help scientists treat heart problems

Discovery could help scientists treat heart problems

The average heart beats 35 million times a year - 2.5 billion times over a lifetime. Those beats must be precisely calibrated; even a small divergence from the metronomic rhythm can cause sudden death. For decades, scientists have wondered exactly how the heart stays so precisely on rhythm even though it contains so many moving parts. [More]