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Tiny 'submarines' could help treat stomach diseases with acid-sensitive drugs

Tiny 'submarines' could help treat stomach diseases with acid-sensitive drugs

Tiny “submarines” that speed independently through the stomach, use gastric acid for fuel (while rapidly neutralizing it), and release their cargo precisely at the desired pH: Though it may sound like science fiction, this is a new method for treating stomach diseases with acid-sensitive drugs introduced by scientists in the journal Angewandte Chemie. [More]
Better dietary resilience and nutrition can promote healthy aging, review finds

Better dietary resilience and nutrition can promote healthy aging, review finds

Improving dietary resilience and better integration of nutrition in the health care system can promote healthy aging and may significantly reduce the financial and societal burden of the "silver tsunami." [More]
Landmark clinical trial testing new ablation procedure to treat life-threatening heart rhythm disorder

Landmark clinical trial testing new ablation procedure to treat life-threatening heart rhythm disorder

Loyola Medicine is the only center in the Midwest enrolling patients in a landmark clinical trial of a new procedure to treat a life-threatening heart rhythm disorder called ventricular tachycardia. [More]
New Iowa State study shows that people with gym membership exercise more

New Iowa State study shows that people with gym membership exercise more

If your New Year's resolution was to exercise more in 2017, chances are you've already given up or you're on the verge of doing so. To reach your goal, you may want to consider joining a gym, based on the results of a new study from a team of Iowa State University researchers. [More]
Study investigates use of glucose to shorten induced labor in nulliparous woman

Study investigates use of glucose to shorten induced labor in nulliparous woman

In a study to be presented Thursday, Jan. 26, in the oral concurrent session at 1:15 p.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting, researchers with the Université de Sherbrooke in Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada will present their findings in a study titled, Reduction of total labor length through the addition of parenteral dextrose solution in induction of labor in nulliparous: results of DEXTRONS prospective randomized controlled trial. [More]
NYU Langone scientists discover mechanism behind many disease-related genetic deletions

NYU Langone scientists discover mechanism behind many disease-related genetic deletions

Scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center have discovered the mechanisms behind a genetic change known to cause a set of related diseases. [More]
Better eye discipline may help reduce concussion in female soccer players

Better eye discipline may help reduce concussion in female soccer players

With the ever-growing popularity of women's soccer, attention to sports-related concussions is also a growing concern, as the act of heading the ball is thought to contribute to increased incidence of concussion. [More]
First symptoms of meningitis

First symptoms of meningitis

Thankfully, meningitis is a rare condition. Although it can occur in anyone, it's more prevalent in babies and young children, with young people and students being the next most at risk group. In the early stages, it can be very difficult to tell meningitis apart from milder diseases, as it often resembles other common viral illnesses. Symptoms of the disease can develop very quickly. [More]
Soft robotic sleeve that mimics healthy cardiac muscles could aid failing hearts

Soft robotic sleeve that mimics healthy cardiac muscles could aid failing hearts

Every year about 2,100 people receive heart transplants in the United States, while 5.7 million suffer from heart failure. Given the scarcity of available donor hearts, clinicians and biomedical engineers from Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard University have spent several years developing a mechanical alternative. [More]
BetterYou magnesium can raise cellular mineral levels faster than traditional tablets

BetterYou magnesium can raise cellular mineral levels faster than traditional tablets

Low magnesium levels are leading to a worrying level of undissolved calcium and increased heavy metal toxicity which can severely impact on our health and wellbeing, say mineral analysis experts. [More]
Blocking molecular signaling pathway could prevent or reverse peripheral neuropathy

Blocking molecular signaling pathway could prevent or reverse peripheral neuropathy

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, the University of Manitoba and St. Boniface Hospital Albrechtsen Research Centre in Canada, have identified a molecular signaling pathway that, when blocked, promotes sensory neuron growth and prevents or reverses peripheral neuropathy in cell and rodent models of type 1 and 2 diabetes, chemotherapy-induced neuropathy and HIV. [More]
Bionic hand reconstruction offers hope for patients with global brachial plexopathies

Bionic hand reconstruction offers hope for patients with global brachial plexopathies

​Bionic hand? No longer only an image conjured by science fiction, bionic hands return functionality in cases of traumatic nerve and muscle loss. [More]
Metabolomics and NMR

Metabolomics and NMR

Bruker has been involved in the Phenome Center network since its beginning. Several years ago, the whole visionary concept of a global phenome network was actually born with Professor Jeremy Nicholson and Bruker BioSpin has been part of it since the early stages. [More]
Synthesized steroid prevents lethal protein buildup in animal model of Parkinson's disease

Synthesized steroid prevents lethal protein buildup in animal model of Parkinson's disease

A synthesized steroid mirroring one naturally made by the dogfish shark prevents the buildup of a lethal protein implicated in some neurodegenerative diseases, reports an international research team studying an animal model of Parkinson's disease. [More]
Yale researchers discover how tick-borne bacteria cause infection

Yale researchers discover how tick-borne bacteria cause infection

Before infecting humans, tick-borne bacteria or viruses first have to get past a tick's defenses to colonize it. [More]
Naturally-occurring compound can inhibit early formation of toxins linked to Parkinson's Disease

Naturally-occurring compound can inhibit early formation of toxins linked to Parkinson's Disease

A naturally-occurring compound has been found to block a molecular process thought to underlie Parkinson's Disease, and to suppress its toxic products, scientists have reported. [More]
New research defines impact of cannabis on health

New research defines impact of cannabis on health

A report published this week consolidated all evidence published since 1999 regarding the therapeutic benefits and health risks associated with cannabis and cannabis-derived products, such as marijuana. [More]
Diet and exercise can help lessen damage caused by malaria, UTA study suggests

Diet and exercise can help lessen damage caused by malaria, UTA study suggests

The right amount of diet and exercise can help lessen damage to the heart and skeletal muscles brought on by malaria, according to a new UTA study. [More]
Researchers move one step closer to regenerating heart wall using stem cells

Researchers move one step closer to regenerating heart wall using stem cells

A process using human stem cells can generate the cells that cover the external surface of a human heart -- epicardium cells -- according to a multidisciplinary team of researchers. [More]
Experts suggest new five-stage system of classifying patients at risk for heart attack

Experts suggest new five-stage system of classifying patients at risk for heart attack

Experts at Johns Hopkins and New York's Mount Sinai Health System have published a suggested new plan for a five-stage system of classifying the risk of heart attack in those with heart disease, one they say puts much-needed and long-absent focus on the risks faced by millions of Americans who pass so-called stress tests or have less obvious or earlier-stage danger signs. [More]
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