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People who use anabolic steroids to improve sporting performance experience memory issues

People using anabolic steroids to improve muscle growth and sporting performance are far more likely to experience issues with their memory, according to new research from Northumbria University. [More]
Scientists find way to create therapeutic heat to treat people suffering from chronic muscle pain

Scientists find way to create therapeutic heat to treat people suffering from chronic muscle pain

If you suffer from chronic muscle pain a doctor will likely recommend for you to apply heat to the injury. But how do you effectively wrap that heat around a joint? Korean Scientists at the Center for Nanoparticle Research, Institute for Basic Science in Seoul, along with an international team, have come up with an ingenious way of creating therapeutic heat in a light, flexible design. [More]
Vitamin B12 supplements offer no benefits for neurological or cognitive function in older people

Vitamin B12 supplements offer no benefits for neurological or cognitive function in older people

Vitamin B12 supplements offer no benefits for neurological or cognitive function in older people with moderate vitamin B12 deficiency, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. [More]
Combination of exercise and artificial gravity may reduce effects of extended weightlessness in space

Combination of exercise and artificial gravity may reduce effects of extended weightlessness in space

Astronauts on the International Space Station have a number of exercise options, including a mechanical bicycle bolted to the floor, a weightlifting machine strapped to the wall, and a strap-down treadmill. They spend a significant portion of each day working out to ward off the long-term effects of weightlessness, but many still suffer bone loss, muscle atrophy, and issues with balance and their cardiovascular systems. [More]

University of Salzburg researchers develop new method for calculating exact time of death

A new method for calculating the exact time of death, even after as much as 10 days, has been developed by a group of researchers at the University of Salzburg. [More]
UCLA patient successfully receives smaller Total Artificial Heart

UCLA patient successfully receives smaller Total Artificial Heart

A petite 44-year-old woman has received a successful heart transplant at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, thanks to an experimental Total Artificial Heart designed for smaller patients. [More]
UCLA patient first in California to receive smaller Total Artificial Heart

UCLA patient first in California to receive smaller Total Artificial Heart

A petite 44-year-old woman has received a successful heart transplant at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, thanks to an experimental Total Artificial Heart designed for smaller patients. [More]
New study shows negative effects of using high heels

New study shows negative effects of using high heels

A new study showing the negative effects of prolonged high heel use confirms expert consensus on the footwear, according to a UNC Charlotte expert. [More]
UCLA cardiologists use less invasive approach to replace heart valve

UCLA cardiologists use less invasive approach to replace heart valve

Last summer, after a long career as a successful entrepreneur and a brief retirement, Richard Whitaker was helping to start another new company. Unfortunately, a serious health concern caused a couple of interruptions in his work on the new venture. One of Whitaker's heart valves wasn't working properly, which caused congestive heart failure and led to two hospitalizations within several months. [More]
Special issue provides comprehensive overview of latest findings in the area of skeletal research

Special issue provides comprehensive overview of latest findings in the area of skeletal research

While there is good understanding of how bone mass, and more recently bone architecture, affects fracture risk, far less is known about the material properties of bone, or how these can impart resilience or fragility to the skeleton. [More]
Study: Peripheral nerve stimulation therapy can reverse SCI-associated nerve deterioration

Study: Peripheral nerve stimulation therapy can reverse SCI-associated nerve deterioration

Approximately 12,000 spinal cord injuries (SCI) happen every year in the U.S., the majority caused by car accidents, falls, sporting accidents and gunshot wounds. [More]
ALS ACT initiative to speed discovery of new ALS treatments

ALS ACT initiative to speed discovery of new ALS treatments

The ALS Association and the ALS Finding a Cure Foundation are pleased to announce $3 million in funding for two new Phase II clinical studies through the ALS Accelerated Therapeutics (ALS ACT) initiative. [More]
Study offers potential ways to preserve muscle mass and strength for people in low-resistance environments

Study offers potential ways to preserve muscle mass and strength for people in low-resistance environments

It is well known that muscles need resistance (gravity) to maintain optimal health, and when they do not have this resistance, they deteriorate. A new report published in the July 2015 issue of The FASEB Journal, however, suggests that this might not be true for all muscles, offering hope that there may be ways to preserve muscle mass and strength for individuals in low-resistance environments, whether it be the microgravity of space, extended periods in a hospital bed, or a 9-5 job behind a desk. [More]
Study: Around 6% survive cardiac arrest outside of hospital setting

Study: Around 6% survive cardiac arrest outside of hospital setting

Cardiac arrest strikes almost 600,000 people each year, killing the vast majority of those individuals, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. Every year in the U.S., approximately 395,000 cases of cardiac arrest occur outside of a hospital setting, in which less than 6 percent survive. Approximately 200,000 cardiac arrests occur each year in hospitals, and 24 percent of those patients survive. Estimates suggest that cardiac arrest is the third leading cause of death in the U.S. behind cancer and heart disease. [More]
New review may help women with stress urinary incontinence make more informed choices about treatment

New review may help women with stress urinary incontinence make more informed choices about treatment

A new Cochrane systematic review published today of surgery for stress urinary incontinence makes an important contribution to an ongoing debate and will help women to make more informed choices about treatment. [More]
Pinaverium offers quick relief from IBS symptoms

Pinaverium offers quick relief from IBS symptoms

Pinaverium offers quick and effective relief of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms, according to clinical trial results published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Telesta submits Biologics License Application for MCNA to FDA

Telesta submits Biologics License Application for MCNA to FDA

Telesta Therapeutics Inc. announced today that it has submitted electronically, through its U.S. agent, a Biologics License Application (BLA) to the United States Food and Drug Administration for MCNA. MCNA is Telesta's novel biologic immunotherapeutic for the treatment of high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer patients who have failed first-line BCG therapy. [More]
STIOLTO RESPIMAT Inhalation Spray now available for treatment of COPD across the U.S.

STIOLTO RESPIMAT Inhalation Spray now available for treatment of COPD across the U.S.

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced today that STIOLTO RESPIMAT (tiotropium bromide and olodaterol) Inhalation Spray is now available by prescription at pharmacies across the United States. [More]
Kay E. Davies named recipient of ASHG's 2015 William Allan Award

Kay E. Davies named recipient of ASHG's 2015 William Allan Award

The American Society of Human Genetics has named Kay E. Davies, DPhil, Dr. Lee's professor of anatomy, associate head of the medical sciences division; and director of the Medical Research Council Functional Genomics Unit in the department of physiology, anatomy and genetics at the University of Oxford, the 2015 recipient of the annual William Allan Award. [More]
Inactivity affects muscular strength in young and older people

Inactivity affects muscular strength in young and older people

New research reveals that it only takes two weeks of not using their legs for young people to lose a third of their muscular strength, leaving them on par with a person who is 40-50 years their senior. The Center for Healthy Aging and the Department of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Copenhagen conducted the research. [More]
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