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Janssen submits YONDELIS NDA for treatment of advanced soft tissue sarcoma

Janssen submits YONDELIS NDA for treatment of advanced soft tissue sarcoma

PharmaMar announces that Janssen Research & Development, LLC has submitted a New Drug Application (NDA) for YONDELIS (trabectedin) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma (STS), including liposarcoma and leiomyosarcoma subtypes, who have received prior chemotherapy including an anthracycline. [More]
PPMD, Santhera Pharmaceuticals collaborate to study Duchenne muscular dystrophy

PPMD, Santhera Pharmaceuticals collaborate to study Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy, the leading advocacy organization working to end Duchenne muscular dystrophy (Duchenne) and Santhera Pharmaceuticals, a Swiss specialty pharmaceutical company focusing on the development and marketing of innovative pharmaceutical products for the treatment of mitochondrial and neuromuscular diseases, will collaborate on a benefit/risk study in Duchenne. [More]
Isis Pharmaceuticals announces initiation of ISIS-SMN Rx Phase 3 study in children with SMA

Isis Pharmaceuticals announces initiation of ISIS-SMN Rx Phase 3 study in children with SMA

Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced today the initiation of a pivotal Phase 3 study evaluating ISIS-SMNRx in approximately 120 non-ambulatory children with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). [More]
VeraVia releases information to help men achieve better weight loss strategy

VeraVia releases information to help men achieve better weight loss strategy

A recent study published in the British Journal of General Practice found that physicians have difficulty visually diagnosing obesity in men. San Diego fitness retreat VeraVia has released information for men to help them understand how their own weight loss differs from women. VeraVia founder and CEO Wyatt Chapman says, "Achieving the best weight loss strategy for your body and lifestyle can be complicated. [More]
TSRI scientists find simple method to convert human skin cells into sensory neurons

TSRI scientists find simple method to convert human skin cells into sensory neurons

A team led by scientists from The Scripps Research Institute has found a simple method to convert human skin cells into the specialized neurons that detect pain, itch, touch and other bodily sensations. These neurons are also affected by spinal cord injury and involved in Friedreich's ataxia, a devastating and currently incurable neurodegenerative disease that largely strikes children. [More]
Dantrolene drug may be effective treatment for rare form of diabetes

Dantrolene drug may be effective treatment for rare form of diabetes

A commonly prescribed muscle relaxant may be an effective treatment for a rare but devastating form of diabetes, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report. [More]
People with sleep apnea have lower peak oxygen uptake during aerobic activity

People with sleep apnea have lower peak oxygen uptake during aerobic activity

People with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea may have an intrinsic inability to burn high amounts of oxygen during strenuous aerobic exercise, according to a new study led by researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine. [More]
Two medical research bodies announce new research centre to tackle musculoskeletal disorders

Two medical research bodies announce new research centre to tackle musculoskeletal disorders

A major new research centre to tackle the impact of musculoskeletal disorders on people's ability to work has been announced by two leading medical research bodies. [More]
Tips to reduce risk of Turkey Bowl injuries

Tips to reduce risk of Turkey Bowl injuries

Every year around this time, Loyola University Medical Center sports medicine surgeon Dr. Pietro Tonino sees a spike in sprains, contusions, broken bones and other injuries suffered in Thanksgiving pick-up football games. [More]
Research paves way for improving efficacy of ALS treatement

Research paves way for improving efficacy of ALS treatement

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is a neurodegenerative disease that primarily kills motor neurons, leading to paralysis and death 2 to 5 years from diagnosis. Currently ALS has no cure. Despite promising early-stage research, the majority of drugs in development for ALS have failed. Now researchers have uncovered a possible explanation. [More]
Study sheds light on how HIV medications cause significant damage to fetal hearts

Study sheds light on how HIV medications cause significant damage to fetal hearts

A study by a Wayne State University and Children's Hospital of Michigan, Detroit Medical Center research team is shedding new light on the troubling question of whether the drugs often given to HIV-positive pregnant women can cause significant long-term heart problems for the non-HIV-infected babies they carry. [More]
MGH investigators develop system to accurately track the process of falling asleep

MGH investigators develop system to accurately track the process of falling asleep

Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have developed a system to accurately track the dynamic process of falling asleep, something has not been possible with existing techniques. In their report in the October issue of the open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology, the research team describes how combining key physiologic measurements with a behavioral task that does not interfere with sleep onset gives a better picture of the gradual process of falling asleep. [More]
Obese people experience silent cardiac damage that fuels risk for heart failure

Obese people experience silent cardiac damage that fuels risk for heart failure

Using an ultrasensitive blood test to detect the presence of a protein that heralds heart muscle injury, researchers from Johns Hopkins and elsewhere have found that obese people without overt heart disease experience silent cardiac damage that fuels their risk for heart failure down the road. [More]
Snus consumption in Norway is highest among young people

Snus consumption in Norway is highest among young people

The increase in Scandinavian snus consumption in Norway is highest among young people, according to a new report from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. [More]
Study shows how stem cells can help regenerate damaged muscle after heart attack

Study shows how stem cells can help regenerate damaged muscle after heart attack

Delivering stem cell factor directly into damaged heart muscle after a heart attack may help repair and regenerate injured tissue, according to a study led by researchers from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai presented November 18 at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2014 in Chicago, IL. [More]
Scientists discover second wave of heart muscle inflammation within a week after heart attack

Scientists discover second wave of heart muscle inflammation within a week after heart attack

Results of a new study challenge the current consensus in cardiology that peak myocardial edema, or heart muscle swelling, only occurs just after a myocardial infarction, or heart attack. In the study, presented as a Late-Breaking Clinical Trial at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2014 and published simultaneously in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, scientists discovered a second wave of swelling and inflammation occurs within a week of a heart attack. [More]
Janssen announces submission of NDA for three-month paliperidone palmitate

Janssen announces submission of NDA for three-month paliperidone palmitate

Janssen Research & Development, LLC today announced the submission of a New Drug Application (NDA) for three-month atypical antipsychotic paliperidone palmitate to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The NDA seeks approval for the medication as a treatment for schizophrenia in adults. [More]
Research breakthrough offers hope for patients with severe spinal cord injuries

Research breakthrough offers hope for patients with severe spinal cord injuries

Case Western Reserve researchers have developed a procedure that restores function to muscles involved in the control of breathing - even when they have been paralyzed for more than a year. The breakthrough offers hope that one day patients with severe spinal cord injuries will be able to breathe again without the assistance of a ventilator. [More]
Cardiac stem cell treatment restores heart function damaged by Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Cardiac stem cell treatment restores heart function damaged by Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Researchers at the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute have found that injections of cardiac stem cells might help reverse heart damage caused by Duchenne muscular dystrophy, potentially resulting in a longer life expectancy for patients with the chronic muscle-wasting disease. [More]
Study identifies new gene for progressive form of epilepsy

Study identifies new gene for progressive form of epilepsy

A study led by researchers at University of Helsinki, Finland and Universities of Melbourne and South Australia has identified a new gene for a progressive form of epilepsy. The findings of this international collaborative effort have been published today, 17 November 2014, in Nature Genetics. [More]