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New IMA device could improve diagnosis, treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain

More than 100 million people across Europe suffer from chronic musculoskeletal pain, with an estimated 40 per cent undiagnosed. Ageing populations throughout Europe means that this only going to increase in the coming years. [More]
Interactive Autism Network to join National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network

Interactive Autism Network to join National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network

The Interactive Autism Network, a project of the Kennedy Krieger Institute supported by the Simons Foundation, was approved today for a three-year $1.6 million funding award by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute to be part of PCORnet, the National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network. [More]
Zimmer Biomet announces financial results for Q2 2015

Zimmer Biomet announces financial results for Q2 2015

Zimmer Biomet Holdings, Inc. today reported financial results for the quarter ended June 30, 2015. The Company reported second quarter net sales of $1.17 billion, a decrease of 1.3% reported and an increase of 5.7% constant currency compared to the second quarter of 2014. [More]
MiMedx Group reports record revenues and earnings for Q2 2015

MiMedx Group reports record revenues and earnings for Q2 2015

MiMedx Group, Inc., the leading regenerative medicine company utilizing human amniotic tissue and patent-protected processes to develop and market advanced products and therapies for the Wound Care, Surgical, Orthopedic, Spine, Sports Medicine, Ophthalmic and Dental sectors of healthcare, announced today its record results for the second quarter of 2015. [More]
IOF, EOS to jointly hold Middle East & Africa Osteoporosis Meeting in Abu Dhabi

IOF, EOS to jointly hold Middle East & Africa Osteoporosis Meeting in Abu Dhabi

With a growing senior population and an increase in unhealthy lifestyles, the prevalence of osteoporosis and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus is soaring in the Middle East and North African region. In response to the dramatic increase in these diseases within the region the International Osteoporosis Foundation, in cooperation with the Emirates Osteoporosis Society, will be holding the 3rd Middle East & Africa Osteoporosis Meeting from December 5-7, 2015 in Abu Dhabi. [More]
Novartis announces FDA approval of Odomzo (sonidegib) 200 mg capsules for treatment of laBCC patients

Novartis announces FDA approval of Odomzo (sonidegib) 200 mg capsules for treatment of laBCC patients

Novartis today announced the US Food and Drug Administration has approved Odomzo (sonidegib, formerly LDE225) 200 mg capsules for the treatment of adult patients with locally advanced basal cell carcinoma (laBCC) that has recurred following surgery or radiation therapy, or those who are not candidates for surgery or radiation therapy. [More]
Study looks at impact of amyloid imaging on diagnosis, management of patients with cognitive impairment

Study looks at impact of amyloid imaging on diagnosis, management of patients with cognitive impairment

Eli Lilly and Company and Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lilly, today announced new data showing that knowledge of amyloid status as determined by Florbetapir F 18 Injection imaging altered diagnosis and management in the majority of patients being studied. [More]
Early antiretroviral treatment prevents AIDS- and non-AIDS-related diseases in HIV-infected people

Early antiretroviral treatment prevents AIDS- and non-AIDS-related diseases in HIV-infected people

Starting antiretroviral therapy early not only prevents serious AIDS-related diseases, but also prevents the onset of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and other non-AIDS-related diseases in HIV-infected people, according to a new analysis of data from the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) study, the first large-scale randomized clinical trial to establish that earlier antiretroviral treatment benefits all HIV-infected individuals. [More]
Hospital for Special Surgery named top hospital in nation for orthopedics for sixth consecutive year

Hospital for Special Surgery named top hospital in nation for orthopedics for sixth consecutive year

For the sixth consecutive year, Hospital for Special Surgery has been ranked the top hospital in the country for orthopedics by U.S. News & World Report in its 2015 "Best Hospitals" survey. The hospital was also nationally recognized as a leader in rheumatology, ranking No. 3 in association with NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. [More]
Rivanna’s handheld ultrasound device Accuro receives FDA clearance

Rivanna’s handheld ultrasound device Accuro receives FDA clearance

Rivanna Medical announced today that it has received FDA 510(k) clearance to market Accuro, a handheld and untethered smart phone-sized ultrasound device that is designed to guide spinal anesthesia with automated 3D navigation technology in addition to ultrasound imaging of abdominal, musculoskeletal, cardiac and peripheral vascular anatomies. [More]
Hyperbaric oxygen treatment effective for fibromyalgia

Hyperbaric oxygen treatment effective for fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia is almost impossible to diagnose. The chronic pain syndrome strikes an estimated 1 in 70 Americans, most of them women. The disorder is often triggered by head trauma, a neurological infection, or severe emotional stress, and is characterized by symptoms such as musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, memory loss and mood swings. Fibromyalgia is often mistaken for other culprits and most patients suffer months, even years, of unrelenting pain before being properly diagnosed. And once diagnosed, patients enjoy little respite because few therapies have been found to be effective in assuaging its symptoms. [More]
Prolonged standing in workplace may lead to serious health consequences

Prolonged standing in workplace may lead to serious health consequences

Recent research has warned of the health detriments associated with sitting for long stretches of time at the office, but what about the nearly half of all employees worldwide who are required to stand for more than 75% of their workdays? Prolonged standing is associated with short-term adverse health issues, including reports of fatigue, leg cramps, and backaches, which can affect job performance and cause significant discomfort. [More]
New understanding of keratin 17 protein could lead to development of better ways to prevent cancer

New understanding of keratin 17 protein could lead to development of better ways to prevent cancer

New research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests that the protein keratin 17 - the presence of which is used in the lab to detect and stage various types of cancers - is not just a biomarker for the disease, but may play a critical role in tumor growth. [More]
BioMed Central launches new open access journal Archives of Physiotherapy

BioMed Central launches new open access journal Archives of Physiotherapy

In partnership with the Italian Society of Physiotherapy and the University of Applied Sciences and Arts of Southern Switzerland, BioMed Central has launched Archives of Physiotherapy. It is one of the few open access journals specializing solely in the subject of physiotherapy. The article-processing charges (APCs) will be covered on behalf of authors by both organizations for the first four years of publication. [More]
Canadian researchers launch world's first viral therapy clinical trial to attack and kill cancer cells

Canadian researchers launch world's first viral therapy clinical trial to attack and kill cancer cells

Canadian researchers have launched the world's first clinical trial of a novel investigational therapy that uses a combination of two viruses to attack and kill cancer cells, and stimulate an anti-cancer immune response. Previous research by this team and others worldwide suggests that this approach could be very powerful, and could have fewer side effects than conventional chemotherapy and radiation, although it will take years to rigorously test through this trial and others. [More]
IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) approved in Europe for treatment of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia

IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) approved in Europe for treatment of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia

Today AbbVie announced the European Commission granted marketing authorization for IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) as the first treatment option available in all 28 member states of the European Union for the treatment of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM), a rare, slow growing blood cancer, in adult patients who have received at least one prior therapy, or in first line treatment for patients unsuitable for chemo-immunotherapy. [More]
AOFAS, Consumer Reports Health partner to release handout explaining best treatment approach for plantar fasciitis

AOFAS, Consumer Reports Health partner to release handout explaining best treatment approach for plantar fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis is pain in the heel or arch of the foot. It is caused by irritation of the plantar fascia, the band of tissue that goes from the heel to the ball of the foot. This common condition takes time to heal, and non-surgical treatments should always be considered first. [More]
UC Davis scientists identify significant driver of neuropathic pain

UC Davis scientists identify significant driver of neuropathic pain

Scientists at the University of California, Davis, have identified a key mechanism in neuropathic pain. The discovery could eventually benefit millions of patients with chronic pain from trauma, diabetes, shingles, multiple sclerosis or other conditions that cause nerve damage. [More]
Bacterial biofilms play role in development of systemic lupus erythematosus

Bacterial biofilms play role in development of systemic lupus erythematosus

Lupus, multiple sclerosis, and type-1 diabetes are among more than a score of diseases in which the immune system attacks the body it was designed to defend. But just why the immune system begins its misdirected assault has remained a mystery. [More]
Study: New test may help predict effectiveness of biologic drugs in RA patients

Study: New test may help predict effectiveness of biologic drugs in RA patients

A study of 311 patients by The University of Manchester has found that it may be possible to predict early which rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients will fail to respond to the biologic drugs given to treat them. [More]
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