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Study finds older adults who sustain wrist fractures more likely to have poor balance

Study finds older adults who sustain wrist fractures more likely to have poor balance

Elderly patients suffering a low energy wrist (distal radius) fracture are more likely to have difficulties with balance, placing them at risk for future injuries, according to a new study appearing in the July 20, 2016 issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. [More]
HSS researchers launch new study to find if stem cell treatment could help people with knee arthritis

HSS researchers launch new study to find if stem cell treatment could help people with knee arthritis

Researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery have launched a study to determine if a treatment using stem cells could help people with painful knee arthritis. [More]

DePuy Synthes Trauma launches new system to treat hand fractures and correct deformities

Today DePuy Synthes Trauma announced the launch of the Variable Angle Locking Hand System, a comprehensive and versatile system of anatomically contoured and low-profile plates to treat hand fractures and correct deformities. The system features the company’s proprietary Variable Angle Locking technology. [More]
New SACN guidelines recommend daily 10 micrograms intake of Vitamin D

New SACN guidelines recommend daily 10 micrograms intake of Vitamin D

The Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) has published a report advising that anybody aged over one year should have a vitamin D intake of 10 micrograms a day throughout the year. [More]
Researchers identify how sensory nerve receptors work together to transmit itch signals

Researchers identify how sensory nerve receptors work together to transmit itch signals

Researchers have found how sensory nerve cells work together to transmit itch signals from the skin to the spinal cord, where neurons then carry those signals to the brain. Their discovery may help scientists find more effective ways to make itching stop. [More]
Study provides more insight into effects of DBS in treatment of Alzheimer's disease

Study provides more insight into effects of DBS in treatment of Alzheimer's disease

New findings published today by a team of researchers led by Dr. Andres Lozano at the Krembil Neuroscience Centre of Toronto Western Hospital have provided further insight into the effects of Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Scientists develop new way to resurface arthritic hip joint

Scientists develop new way to resurface arthritic hip joint

With a goal of treating worn, arthritic hips without extensive surgery to replace them, scientists have programmed stem cells to grow new cartilage on a 3-D template shaped like the ball of a hip joint. [More]
Combination approach could be more effective to treat fibromyalgia pain

Combination approach could be more effective to treat fibromyalgia pain

Queen's University researcher Ian Gilron has uncovered a more effective way of treating fibromyalgia, a medical condition characterized by chronic widespread pain typically accompanied by fatigue, as well as sleep, mood and memory problems. [More]
Scientists discover new, unexpected features of collagen

Scientists discover new, unexpected features of collagen

Scientists at the National Institutes of Health are reporting new, unexpected details about the fundamental structure of collagen, the most abundant protein in the human body. [More]
Study shows twice daily exercise intervention improves bone strength in VLBW pre-term infants

Study shows twice daily exercise intervention improves bone strength in VLBW pre-term infants

Because of their low weight and premature birth, very low birth weight (VLBW) pre-term infants have lower bone mineral mass and a greater need for bone nutrients compared to most new-born infants. [More]

Researchers show how barefoot running can reduce injury risk

Scientists from the Universities of Granada and Jaén have demonstrated how barefoot running, when done properly, can considerably decrease the risk of injury as it produces significant changes to foot strike patterns, regardless of the speed of the runner. [More]
World’s most intelligent prosthetic limb? An interview with Professor Saeed Zahedi

World’s most intelligent prosthetic limb? An interview with Professor Saeed Zahedi

The main challenges for lower limb amputees are safety and pain. Lack of sensory feedback leading to an increased risk of falling, compensatory movements due to instability causing lower back pain and discomfort between the residual limb and prosthesis all contribute to a significant reduction in confidence and an inability to live a full life. [More]
New strategy treats fatal autoimmune disease without outward off-target effects

New strategy treats fatal autoimmune disease without outward off-target effects

In a study with potentially major implications for the future treatment of autoimmunity and related conditions, scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have found a way to remove the subset of antibody-making cells that cause an autoimmune disease, without harming the rest of the immune system. [More]
Communication training for orthopedic surgery residents seeks to enhance interactions with older adults

Communication training for orthopedic surgery residents seeks to enhance interactions with older adults

A program to improve orthopedic surgery residents' communication skills with older adults is having a positive impact, according to a new study. [More]
Virus-like elements within human genome linked to development of lupus and Sjogren's syndrome

Virus-like elements within human genome linked to development of lupus and Sjogren's syndrome

Researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery have uncovered a potential genetic trigger of systemic autoimmune disease. [More]
Research finds significant increase in use of chiropractic services among veterans

Research finds significant increase in use of chiropractic services among veterans

The use of chiropractic services in the Department of Veterans Affairs health care system has seen a steep rise over more than a decade, according to research published in the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, the official scientific journal of the American Chiropractic Association. [More]
Taking ipilimumab, nivolumab drugs may increase risk of developing rheumatologic diseases

Taking ipilimumab, nivolumab drugs may increase risk of developing rheumatologic diseases

Case reports on 13 cancer patients suggest that a small number of cancer patients taking the immunotherapy drugs ipilimumab and nivolumab may be at some higher-than-normal risk of developing autoimmune joint and tissue diseases, including inflammatory arthritis, according to a preliminary study by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers. [More]
Metal ions released by implant wear can damage progenitors of bone-forming cells

Metal ions released by implant wear can damage progenitors of bone-forming cells

In metal-on-metal pairings, both the shell and head of an implant consist of a cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy. The release of metal ions into the body has been reported as a result of implant wear. Bone loss (osteolysis) was observed in many cases. [More]
Apixaban effective in polypharmacy setting

Apixaban effective in polypharmacy setting

The superiority of apixaban over warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation is maintained in those taking multiple medications, shows further analysis of the ARISTOTLE trial. [More]
IOF urges clinicians in Asia to prepare for escalating crisis of osteoporosis among elderly people

IOF urges clinicians in Asia to prepare for escalating crisis of osteoporosis among elderly people

The International Osteoporosis Foundation is calling on doctors in the Asia-Pacific region to prepare for an immense rise in the number of elderly people suffering broken bones as a result of osteoporosis. [More]
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