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MIT researchers develop new nanodevice that can help overcome drug resistance

MIT researchers develop new nanodevice that can help overcome drug resistance

Chemotherapy often shrinks tumors at first, but as cancer cells become resistant to drug treatment, tumors can grow back. A new nanodevice developed by MIT researchers can help overcome that by first blocking the gene that confers drug resistance, then launching a new chemotherapy attack against the disarmed tumors. [More]
New medical device could revolutionise kidney disease care in the UK

New medical device could revolutionise kidney disease care in the UK

A new medical device which combines nanotechnology with a pregnancy tester could help diagnose and treat the 1 million people in the UK who don’t know they have kidney disease, a new report by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers reveals today. [More]
New TAU study may offer hope to people diagnosed with Glioblastoma multiforme

New TAU study may offer hope to people diagnosed with Glioblastoma multiforme

There are no effective available treatments for sufferers of Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most aggressive and devastating form of brain tumor. The disease, always fatal, has a survival rate of only 6-18 months. [More]
Simple paper strip test can rapidly diagnose Ebola

Simple paper strip test can rapidly diagnose Ebola

When diagnosing a case of Ebola, time is of the essence. However, existing diagnostic tests take at least a day or two to yield results, preventing health care workers from quickly determining whether a patient needs immediate treatment and isolation. [More]
Researchers develop durable antibacterial coatings of nanocomposites

Researchers develop durable antibacterial coatings of nanocomposites

Ruthless with bacteria, harmless to human cells. New, durable antibacterial coatings of nanocomposites, developed at the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw, will in future help to improve the hygiene of sportswear, and used in medicine, will reduce the rate of infections and shorten the times of in-patient hospital admissions. [More]
MIT chemical engineers develop new type of self-healing hydrogel

MIT chemical engineers develop new type of self-healing hydrogel

Scientists are interested in using gels to deliver drugs because they can be molded into specific shapes and designed to release their payload over a specified time period. However, current versions aren't always practical because must be implanted surgically. [More]
Korean scientists produce flexible, stable monolayers of protein-bound gold nanoparticles

Korean scientists produce flexible, stable monolayers of protein-bound gold nanoparticles

Free-standing nanoparticle films are of great interest for technical applications, such as the development of nanoelectronic devices. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, Korean scientists have introduced very flexible and stable monolayers of gold nanoparticles made by a self-assembly process based on protein aggregation. The films were used to coat wafers up to 10 cm in diameter. [More]
Targeted nanomedicines could help prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis

Targeted nanomedicines could help prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis

Nanometer-sized "drones" that deliver a special type of healing molecule to fat deposits in arteries could become a new way to prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis, according to a study in pre-clinical models by scientists at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Columbia University Medical Center. [More]

Particle sciences manufactures clinical supplies for Kinex’s glioblastom therapeutic

Particle Sciences, Inc (PSI), has completed the manufacturing of clinical supplies for the first in human studies of KX2-361 (KX02), Kinex Pharmaceuticals’ small molecule Src/pre-tublin inhibitor. [More]
INRS researchers explore cellular and molecular mechanisms that affect AgNP particles

INRS researchers explore cellular and molecular mechanisms that affect AgNP particles

Whereas resistance to antibiotics complicates certain treatments, antimicrobial silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are gaining popularity for medical use. These particles are toxic for certain bacteria, but what about for humans? Researchers at INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier Research Centre have taken a step toward understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that affect these particles. [More]
Biomedical use of gold nanotubes demonstrated in mouse model of human cancer

Biomedical use of gold nanotubes demonstrated in mouse model of human cancer

Scientists have shown that gold nanotubes have many applications in fighting cancer: internal nanoprobes for high-resolution imaging; drug delivery vehicles; and agents for destroying cancer cells. [More]
Magnetizing biomolecules: an interview with Dr. Fred Whipple, AMSBIO

Magnetizing biomolecules: an interview with Dr. Fred Whipple, AMSBIO

Nanoparticle technology was originally developed in the 1980s and 1990s. As the technology evolved, it soon became possible to produce uniform nanoscopic beads that are magnetic, and that also have a variety of specific surface chemistries. It was immediately evident that such beads could be used to great advantage for biochemical separations. [More]
Lintec to commercialize carbon nanotubes developed at UTD

Lintec to commercialize carbon nanotubes developed at UTD

Lintec of America recently announced an exclusive license to commercialize novel fabrication methods for carbon nanotube (CNT) macrostructures, including sheets, yarns and ribbons, developed at the University of Texas at Dallas. [More]
New study suggests that e-cigarette vapors can damage lungs

New study suggests that e-cigarette vapors can damage lungs

Do electronic cigarettes help people quit smoking? As the debate continues on that point, a new University of Rochester study suggests that e-cigarettes are likely a toxic replacement for tobacco products. [More]

Microscopic hand-like gripper could help doctors perform remotely guided surgical procedures

Many people imagine robots today as clunky, metal versions of humans, but scientists are forging new territory in the field of 'soft robotics.' One of the latest advances is a flexible, microscopic hand-like gripper. The development could help doctors perform remotely guided surgical procedures or perform biopsies. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers successfully deliver new nanoparticle gene therapy to treat glioma in rats

Johns Hopkins researchers successfully deliver new nanoparticle gene therapy to treat glioma in rats

Despite improvements in the past few decades with surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy, a predictably curative treatment for glioma does not yet exist. New insights into specific gene mutations that arise in this often deadly form of brain cancer have pointed to the potential of gene therapy, but it's very difficult to effectively deliver toxic or missing genes to cancer cells in the brain. [More]

Micromotor fueled by stomach acid effectively delivers gold nanoparticles

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have shown that a micromotor fueled by stomach acid can take a bubble-powered ride inside a mouse. These tiny motors, each about one-fifth the width of a human hair, may someday offer a safer and more efficient way to deliver drugs or diagnose tumors. [More]
Cell-penetrating nanoparticles can efficiently transport oligonucleotide drugs into cells

Cell-penetrating nanoparticles can efficiently transport oligonucleotide drugs into cells

Therapeutic oligonucleotide analogs represent a new and promising family of drugs that act on nucleic acid targets such as RNA or DNA; however, their effectiveness has been limited due to difficulty crossing the cell membrane. [More]
Researchers create customized soap bubbles that promote drug and vaccine delivery

Researchers create customized soap bubbles that promote drug and vaccine delivery

When University of Maryland Professors Philip DeShong and Daniel Stein began tagging soap bubbles with biomolecules, they had no idea this technology would one day be poised to change the way drugs and vaccines fight against bacteria, viruses and cancer. [More]
UB researchers design nanoparticle that may open door for new 'hypermodal' imaging systems

UB researchers design nanoparticle that may open door for new 'hypermodal' imaging systems

Using two biocompatible parts, University at Buffalo researchers and their colleagues have designed a nanoparticle that can be detected by six medical imaging techniques. [More]