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Experimental nanoparticle therapy speeds healing of all sorts of wounds

Experimental nanoparticle therapy speeds healing of all sorts of wounds

An experimental therapy developed by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University cut in half the time it takes to heal wounds compared to no treatment at all. Details of the therapy, which was successfully tested in mice, were published online in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology. [More]
Iron oxide nanoparticles selectively target cell surface markers in tumor microenvironments

Iron oxide nanoparticles selectively target cell surface markers in tumor microenvironments

Nanoparticles hold great promise for cancer diagnostics and therapies, but only to the extent that they can be selectively guided to tumors and cancer cells. [More]
DFG Senate approves establishment of one Clinical Research Unit, five Research Units

DFG Senate approves establishment of one Clinical Research Unit, five Research Units

At its spring meeting in Bonn, the Senate of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) approved the establishment of one new Clinical Research Unit and five new Research Units. [More]
Wyatt Technology’s CG-MALS system enables characterization of complex protein-protein interactions

Wyatt Technology’s CG-MALS system enables characterization of complex protein-protein interactions

Study published in Nature outlines use of Wyatt’s Calypso II system to confirm the stoichiometry of αSNAP-SNARE complex [More]
GenVec collaborates with TheraBiologics to develop NSC-mediated cancer therapeutics

GenVec collaborates with TheraBiologics to develop NSC-mediated cancer therapeutics

GenVec, Inc. today announced that it has formed a collaboration with TheraBiologics to develop cancer therapeutics leveraging both GenVec's proprietary gene delivery platform and TheraBiologics' proprietary neural stem cell (NSC) technology. [More]
Scientists use optical radiation to treat cancer at the cellular level

Scientists use optical radiation to treat cancer at the cellular level

Wanting to achieve early cancer detection, a group of scientists from the Center for Research in Optics (CIO) of Guadalajara, in Mexico, seeks to address the problem from the cell with optical radiation. [More]
Sandia biosciences technologies could soon find their way into doctors' offices

Sandia biosciences technologies could soon find their way into doctors' offices

Technologies developed in Sandia National Laboratories' biosciences program could soon find their way into doctors' offices -- devices like wearable microneedles that continuously analyze electrolyte levels and a lab-on-a-disk that can test a drop of blood for 64 different diseases in minutes. [More]
Antibiotic nanoparticles can help treat lung infection, prevent drug resistance

Antibiotic nanoparticles can help treat lung infection, prevent drug resistance

Treating respiratory disease is often difficult because drugs have to cross biological barriers such as respiratory tissue and mucosa, and must therefore be given in large quantities in order for an effective amount to reach the target. [More]
Glyconanoparticles may help reduce cell damage and inflammation after stroke

Glyconanoparticles may help reduce cell damage and inflammation after stroke

Materials resulting from chemical bonding of glucosamine, a type of sugar, with fullerenes, kind of nanoparticles known as buckyballs, might help to reduce cell damage and inflammation occurring after stroke. [More]
Medicine-loaded nanoparticles could help patients achieve corneal transplant success

Medicine-loaded nanoparticles could help patients achieve corneal transplant success

There are about 48,000 corneal transplants done each year in the U.S., compared to approximately 16,000 kidney transplants and 2,100 heart transplants. Out of the 48,000 corneal transplants done, 10 percent of them end up in rejection, largely due to poor medication compliance. This costs the health care system and puts undue strain on clinicians, patients and their families. [More]
Washington University researchers develop way to apply light-based therapy to reach deep tumors

Washington University researchers develop way to apply light-based therapy to reach deep tumors

Light long has been used to treat cancer. But phototherapy is only effective where light easily can reach, limiting its use to cancers of the skin and in areas accessible with an endoscope, such as the gastrointestinal tract. [More]
More research needed to explore toxicity of cellulose nanocrystals, says Virginia Tech scientist

More research needed to explore toxicity of cellulose nanocrystals, says Virginia Tech scientist

Are cellulose nanocrystals harmful to human health? The answer might depend on the route of exposure, according to a review of the literature by a Virginia Tech scientist, but there have been few studies and many questions remain. [More]
Scientists develop nanocarriers for lung cancer treatment

Scientists develop nanocarriers for lung cancer treatment

Nanoparticles can function as carriers for medicines to combat lung cancer: Working in a joint project at the NIM (Nanosystems Initiative Munich) Excellence Cluster, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität in Munich have developed nanocarriers that site-selectively release medicines/drugs at the tumor site in human and mouse lungs. [More]
MIT researchers develop new nanodevice that can help overcome drug resistance

MIT researchers develop new nanodevice that can help overcome drug resistance

Chemotherapy often shrinks tumors at first, but as cancer cells become resistant to drug treatment, tumors can grow back. A new nanodevice developed by MIT researchers can help overcome that by first blocking the gene that confers drug resistance, then launching a new chemotherapy attack against the disarmed tumors. [More]
New medical device could revolutionise kidney disease care in the UK

New medical device could revolutionise kidney disease care in the UK

A new medical device which combines nanotechnology with a pregnancy tester could help diagnose and treat the 1 million people in the UK who don’t know they have kidney disease, a new report by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers reveals today. [More]
New TAU study may offer hope to people diagnosed with Glioblastoma multiforme

New TAU study may offer hope to people diagnosed with Glioblastoma multiforme

There are no effective available treatments for sufferers of Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most aggressive and devastating form of brain tumor. The disease, always fatal, has a survival rate of only 6-18 months. [More]
Simple paper strip test can rapidly diagnose Ebola

Simple paper strip test can rapidly diagnose Ebola

When diagnosing a case of Ebola, time is of the essence. However, existing diagnostic tests take at least a day or two to yield results, preventing health care workers from quickly determining whether a patient needs immediate treatment and isolation. [More]
Researchers develop durable antibacterial coatings of nanocomposites

Researchers develop durable antibacterial coatings of nanocomposites

Ruthless with bacteria, harmless to human cells. New, durable antibacterial coatings of nanocomposites, developed at the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw, will in future help to improve the hygiene of sportswear, and used in medicine, will reduce the rate of infections and shorten the times of in-patient hospital admissions. [More]
MIT chemical engineers develop new type of self-healing hydrogel

MIT chemical engineers develop new type of self-healing hydrogel

Scientists are interested in using gels to deliver drugs because they can be molded into specific shapes and designed to release their payload over a specified time period. However, current versions aren't always practical because must be implanted surgically. [More]
Korean scientists produce flexible, stable monolayers of protein-bound gold nanoparticles

Korean scientists produce flexible, stable monolayers of protein-bound gold nanoparticles

Free-standing nanoparticle films are of great interest for technical applications, such as the development of nanoelectronic devices. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, Korean scientists have introduced very flexible and stable monolayers of gold nanoparticles made by a self-assembly process based on protein aggregation. The films were used to coat wafers up to 10 cm in diameter. [More]
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