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Nanoparticles packed with chemotherapy drug and coated with chitosan target cancer stem-like cells

Nanoparticles packed with chemotherapy drug and coated with chitosan target cancer stem-like cells

Nanoparticles packed with a clinically used chemotherapy drug and coated with an oligosaccharide derived from the carapace of crustaceans might effectively target and kill cancer stem-like cells, according to a recent study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. [More]
UNSW Australia to co-host sixth International Nanomedicine Conference in Sydney

UNSW Australia to co-host sixth International Nanomedicine Conference in Sydney

Advances in nanotechnology and nano-fabrication are fundamentally changing the future of medicine, enabling more effective diagnostics and targeted drugs, and new bioactive materials that can help repair our bodies. [More]
Angiography and MPI: an interview with Professor Mauro Magnani University of Urbino

Angiography and MPI: an interview with Professor Mauro Magnani University of Urbino

I am Mauro Magnani, Professor of Biochemistry at the University of Urbino, Italy. My background is essentially the transition of activity from the lab to application. I am also the founder of a spin-off company called EryDel, which uses technology to load materials or drugs inside cells. [More]
Researchers develop protective vaccine against chlamydia infections

Researchers develop protective vaccine against chlamydia infections

Chlamydiae are the most common, sexually transmitted, bacterial pathogens in the world. Every year around 100 million people contract Chlamydia infections, which are one of the main causes of female infertility and ectopic pregnancies and can also lead to blindness - especially in developing countries. [More]
Preclinical Magnetic Particle Imaging: an interview with Professor Jeff Bulte, Johns Hopkins

Preclinical Magnetic Particle Imaging: an interview with Professor Jeff Bulte, Johns Hopkins

I'm Jeff Bulte, professor of Radiology and Director of Cellular Imaging at the Institute for Cell Engineering at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland in the United States. I lead a group of about 20 to 25 people who focus their research on imaging cells. [More]
Johns Hopkins scientists use experimental therapy to reverse progression of atherosclerosis in rodents

Johns Hopkins scientists use experimental therapy to reverse progression of atherosclerosis in rodents

In what may be a major leap forward in the quest for new treatments of the most common form of cardiovascular disease, scientists at Johns Hopkins report they have found a way to halt and reverse the progression of atherosclerosis in rodents by loading microscopic nanoparticles with a chemical that restores the animals’ ability to properly handle cholesterol. [More]
New 'smart insulin patch' could help patients suffering from diabetes

New 'smart insulin patch' could help patients suffering from diabetes

Painful insulin injections could become a thing of the past for the millions of Americans who suffer from diabetes, thanks to a new invention from researchers at the University of North Carolina and NC State, who have created the first "smart insulin patch" that can detect increases in blood sugar levels and secrete doses of insulin into the bloodstream whenever needed. [More]
Benitec, ReNeuron collaborate to launch new exploratory cellular therapy program

Benitec, ReNeuron collaborate to launch new exploratory cellular therapy program

Benitec Biopharma is pleased to announce the launch of a new exploratory cellular therapy program including exosome-based delivery utilising the Company's proprietary ddRNAi technology. Entry into these areas have been facilitated by the commencement of a collaboration with UK-based stem cell therapeutics company, ReNeuron. [More]
Researchers use different approaches to test ways to manipulate nanoparticles in medicine

Researchers use different approaches to test ways to manipulate nanoparticles in medicine

Nanoparticles are the smallest particles capable of reaching virtually all parts of the body. Researchers use various approaches to test ways in which nanoparticles could be used in medicine - for instance, to deliver substances to a specific site in the body such as a tumor. [More]
Researchers find easy way to produce carbon nanoparticles that can carry drugs to targeted tissues

Researchers find easy way to produce carbon nanoparticles that can carry drugs to targeted tissues

Researchers have found an easy way to produce carbon nanoparticles that are small enough to evade the body's immune system, reflect light in the near-infrared range for easy detection, and carry payloads of pharmaceutical drugs to targeted tissues. [More]
Scientists explain the existence of intrinsic chirality in ordinary nanocrystals

Scientists explain the existence of intrinsic chirality in ordinary nanocrystals

A team of scientists from ITMO University and Trinity College Dublin published first experimental results showing that ordinary nanocrystals possess intrinsic chirality and can be produced under normal conditions as a half-and-half mixture of mirror images of each other. [More]
Breakthrough discovery on element transformation could lead to new way for treating cancer with radiation

Breakthrough discovery on element transformation could lead to new way for treating cancer with radiation

Chemists at Tufts University's School of Arts and Sciences, collaborating with PerkinElmer and UCL (University College London), have witnessed atoms of one chemical element morph into another for the first time ever -- a feat that produced an unexpected outcome that could lead to a new way to safely treat cancer with radiation. [More]
Nanoplatform technology that detects early stages of cancer receives U.S. patent

Nanoplatform technology that detects early stages of cancer receives U.S. patent

A U.S. patent has been awarded to a Kansas State University technology that quickly detects the early stages of cancer before physical symptoms ever appear. [More]
Cancer cases among athletes playing on synthetic turf fields continue to grow

Cancer cases among athletes playing on synthetic turf fields continue to grow

Cancer cases among athletes who have played on synthetic turf fields are being gathered in a ever lengthening list, reports Environment and Human Health, Inc., an organization of physicians and public health professionals. [More]
Weill Cornell scientists reveal how XBP1 gene can trigger immune responses against ovarian tumors

Weill Cornell scientists reveal how XBP1 gene can trigger immune responses against ovarian tumors

Ovarian cancer shuts down immune system cells that would otherwise act as a first line of defense against the deadly tumor, Weill Cornell Medical College scientists report today. But a therapy that restores the cells' disease-fighting abilities could provide a powerful new strategy to attack the cancer, which kills more than 14,000 women each year. [More]
Catalan researchers first to use liposomes to fight against diabetes

Catalan researchers first to use liposomes to fight against diabetes

For the first time liposomes that imitate cells in the process of natural death have been used to treat Diabetes. Researchers at Germans Trias Research Institute (at UAB-Campus of International Excellence Sphere) generated liposomes in collaboration with professionals from the ICN2. PLOS ONE Journal publishes the work. [More]
Researchers investigate how ingested nanoparticles may influence metabolic processes

Researchers investigate how ingested nanoparticles may influence metabolic processes

Researchers at Binghamton University believe understanding nano particles' ability to influence our metabolic processing may be integral to mediating metabolic disorders and obesity, both of which are on the rise and have been linked to processed foods. [More]
Gold nanoparticles with functional surfaces regulate osteogenic differentiation of stem cells

Gold nanoparticles with functional surfaces regulate osteogenic differentiation of stem cells

Tissue Regeneration Materials Unit (Guoping Chen, Unit Director) at the International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA) (Masakazu Aono, Director General, MANA), NIMS (Sukekatsu Ushioda, President) successfully developed gold nanoparticles that have functional surfaces and act on osteogenic differentiation of stem cells. [More]
Study: Intravenous nutrition source may significantly reduce toxicity of platinum-based cancer drugs

Study: Intravenous nutrition source may significantly reduce toxicity of platinum-based cancer drugs

A single dose of an FDA-approved intravenous nutrition source may be able to significantly reduce the toxicity and increase the bioavailability of platinum-based cancer drugs, according to a study by Carnegie Mellon University biologists published in Scientific Reports. [More]
Nanoparticle-based therapy effective in treating mice with multiple myeloma

Nanoparticle-based therapy effective in treating mice with multiple myeloma

Researchers have designed a nanoparticle-based therapy that is effective in treating mice with multiple myeloma, a cancer of immune cells in the bone marrow. [More]
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