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UTHealth researchers demonstrate new way to reduce preterm birth

UTHealth researchers demonstrate new way to reduce preterm birth

Using nanoparticles to engineer a special drug, a team of researchers from McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston has demonstrated in pre-clinical trials a new way to both reduce preterm birth and avoid the risks of medication in pregnancy to unborn babies. [More]
Molecular imaging and radiochemistry: the importance of instrumentation. An interview with Professor Björn Wängler

Molecular imaging and radiochemistry: the importance of instrumentation. An interview with Professor Björn Wängler

I’m Björn Wängler, Professor for Molecular Imaging and Radiochemistry at the medical faculty Mannheim of Heidelberg University. I’m a radiopharmaceutical chemist by background and completed my PhD in 2004 at the University of Mainz. [More]
New biosensor test system developed for accurate measurements of protein molecule concentration in blood

New biosensor test system developed for accurate measurements of protein molecule concentration in blood

Researchers from the General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences and Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have developed a new biosensor test system based on magnetic nanoparticles. [More]
Researchers demonstrate new way to reduce preterm birth using nanoparticles

Researchers demonstrate new way to reduce preterm birth using nanoparticles

Using nanoparticles to engineer a special drug, a team of researchers has demonstrated in mice a new way to both reduce preterm birth and avoid the risks of medication in pregnancy to unborn babies. [More]
New humidity sensors could help combat proliferation of bacteria

New humidity sensors could help combat proliferation of bacteria

The Telecommunications Engineer Aitor Urrutia-Azcona has designed some humidity sensors with anti-bacterial properties that combat the proliferation of micro-organisms in environments where the humidity level is very high, such as hospitals and industrial premises for foodstuffs or pharmaceutical products. [More]
Amorphous iron nanoparticles have potential to kill tumor cells

Amorphous iron nanoparticles have potential to kill tumor cells

Amorphous iron nanoparticles have a specific toxicity in tumor cells. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, Chinese scientists describe their design and synthesis of a special amorphous state of nanoparticulate iron, which can locally release reactive iron species in the acidic and hydrogen peroxide rich environment of cancer cells, providing new possibilities for theranostics and chemodynamic therapies. [More]
Combining nanomedicine with two anticancer treatments could improve outcomes for pancreatic cancer patients

Combining nanomedicine with two anticancer treatments could improve outcomes for pancreatic cancer patients

A nanoparticle drug-delivery system that combines two complementary types of anticancer treatment could improve outcomes for patients with pancreatic cancer and other highly treatment-resistant tumors while decreasing toxicity. [More]
New technique may accelerate development of novel vaccines

New technique may accelerate development of novel vaccines

An interdisciplinary team of Oxford University researchers has devised a new technique to speed up the development of novel vaccines. [More]
Adaptive, light-activated nanotherapy effective against drug-resistant bacteria

Adaptive, light-activated nanotherapy effective against drug-resistant bacteria

In the ever-escalating evolutionary battle with drug-resistant bacteria, humans may soon have a leg up thanks to adaptive, light-activated nanotherapy developed by researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder. [More]
Anti-cancer drug uses 50 times less chemo to effectively destroy drug-resistant lung cancer

Anti-cancer drug uses 50 times less chemo to effectively destroy drug-resistant lung cancer

The cancer drug paclitaxel just got more effective. For the first time, researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have packaged it in containers derived from a patient's own immune system, protecting the drug from being destroyed by the body's own defenses and bringing the entire payload to the tumor. [More]
Malaysian scientists join forces with Harvard experts to help revolutionize lung disease treatment

Malaysian scientists join forces with Harvard experts to help revolutionize lung disease treatment

Malaysian scientists are joining forces with Harvard University experts to help revolutionize the treatment of lung diseases -- the delivery of nanomedicine deep into places otherwise impossible to reach. [More]
Scientists develop a method for cell replacement in diseased vessels

Scientists develop a method for cell replacement in diseased vessels

In industrialized countries, a particularly high number of people suffer from arteriosclerosis -- with fatal consequences: Deposits in the arteries lead to strokes and heart attacks. A team of researchers under the leadership of the University of Bonn has now developed a method for guiding replacement cells to diseased vascular segments using nanoparticles. [More]
New TAU study offers tangible hope of curing Mantle Cell Lymphoma

New TAU study offers tangible hope of curing Mantle Cell Lymphoma

With a median survival rate of just five to seven years, Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL) is considered the most aggressive known blood cancer -- and available therapies are scarce. Three thousand Americans are diagnosed with MCL every year, and despite progress in personalized therapies to treat metastases elsewhere in the body, systemic therapeutic drug delivery to cancerous blood cells continues to challenge the world of cancer research. [More]
Lipoprotein nanoplatelets important for imaging biological molecules and cells

Lipoprotein nanoplatelets important for imaging biological molecules and cells

An interdisciplinary research team from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has developed a new material composite derived from quantum dots. These lipoprotein nanoplatelets are rapidly taken up by cells and retain their fluorescence, making them particularly well-suited for imaging cells and understanding disease mechanisms. [More]
Shells of plant virus trigger immune system to wipe out tumors, provide protection against metastases

Shells of plant virus trigger immune system to wipe out tumors, provide protection against metastases

The shells of a common plant virus, inhaled into a lung tumor or injected into ovarian, colon or breast tumors, not only triggered the immune system in mice to wipe out the tumors, but provided systemic protection against metastases, researchers from Case Western Reserve University and Dartmouth University report. [More]
Australian researchers develop new technique to combat chronic bacterial infections in hospitals

Australian researchers develop new technique to combat chronic bacterial infections in hospitals

One of the scourges of infections in hospitals – biofilms formed by bacteria that stick to each other on living tissue and medical instruments, making them harder to remove – can be tricked into dispersing with the targeted application of nanoparticles and heat, researchers have found. [More]

Research project explores use of nanoparticles as a way to disinfect wounds

Infections contracted during surgical operations are a serious healthcare problem, leading to death in some cases. Now, a research project at the University of Huddersfield is investigating the use of nanoparticles as a way to disinfect wounds. It could prove to be much more effective than existing techniques because the particles would be tiny enough to enter the skin via hair follicles, ensuring much better penetration of the area affected by surgery. [More]
Researchers identify dazzling new method for visualizing neurons

Researchers identify dazzling new method for visualizing neurons

Researchers have discovered a dazzling new method of visualizing neurons that promises to benefit neuroscientists and cell biologists alike: by using spectral confocal microscopy to image tissues impregnated with silver or gold. [More]
Four UC Santa Barbara engineers named 2015 NAI fellows

Four UC Santa Barbara engineers named 2015 NAI fellows

Four UC Santa Barbara engineers have been elected to the National Academy of Inventors for 2015. Recognized for their "highly prolific spirit of invention," professors John Bowers, Craig Hawker, Umesh Mishra and Galen Stucky are among the newest fellows elected by the organization. [More]
Study: Brain cell death may trigger multiple sclerosis

Study: Brain cell death may trigger multiple sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis (MS) may be triggered by the death of brain cells that make myelin, the insulation around nerve fibers, according to research on a novel mouse model developed by scientists from the University of Chicago and Northwestern Medicine. The death of these cells initiates an autoimmune response against myelin, the main characteristic of the disease, which leads to MS-like symptoms in mice. [More]
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