Nausea News and Research RSS Feed - Nausea News and Research

Nausea is the sensation of unease and discomfort in the upper stomach and head with an urge to vomit. An attack of nausea is known as a qualm.
Searing temperatures can be inherently dangerous to vulnerable children, older adults

Searing temperatures can be inherently dangerous to vulnerable children, older adults

The searing, record-setting temperatures in the West and Southwest United States flared a warning that extreme heat could be commonplace across much of the country this summer. [More]
New study identifies 40 genes susceptible to migraine

New study identifies 40 genes susceptible to migraine

Migraine is one of the most common neurological disorders and it affects 1 out of 7 people in the world. Painful and incapacitating, it has multi-factor origins, with the participation of environmental triggering factors and several altered genes in each individual. [More]
Researchers play crucial role in crafting diagnostic criteria for functional GI disorders

Researchers play crucial role in crafting diagnostic criteria for functional GI disorders

With no laboratory test available to diagnose functional gastrointestinal disorders, proper diagnostic criteria are critical for clinicians to make an accurate determination of what ails their patients. [More]
FDA approves novel stomach-draining device to treat obesity

FDA approves novel stomach-draining device to treat obesity

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved a new obesity treatment device that uses a surgically-placed tube to drain a portion of the stomach contents after every meal. [More]
FDA approves Vaxchora for prevention of cholera

FDA approves Vaxchora for prevention of cholera

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Vaxchora, a vaccine for the prevention of cholera caused by serogroup O1 in adults 18 through 64 years of age traveling to cholera-affected areas. Vaxchora is the only FDA-approved vaccine for the prevention of cholera. [More]
Utah researchers find way to use power of protease to destroy budding AIDS virus

Utah researchers find way to use power of protease to destroy budding AIDS virus

When new AIDS virus particles bud from an infected cell, an enzyme named protease activates to help the viruses mature and infect more cells. That's why modern AIDS drugs control the disease by inhibiting protease. [More]
Advanced imaging technique helps predict recovery in concussion patients

Advanced imaging technique helps predict recovery in concussion patients

Using an advanced imaging technique, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System were able to predict which patients who'd recently suffered concussions were likely to fully recover. [More]
Pre-procedure medication regimen could lower incidence of hospital readmission in lung caner patients

Pre-procedure medication regimen could lower incidence of hospital readmission in lung caner patients

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine have found that putting liver cancer patients on a medication regimen prior to undergoing a certain treatment could lead to shorter hospital stays and less chance for readmission due to complications. [More]
PD surgery improves quality of life in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

PD surgery improves quality of life in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

Although surgery can prolong the lives of patients with an aggressive type of cancer called malignant pleural mesothelioma, many patients avoid the operation for fear it will degrade their quality of life. [More]
Scientists explore effects of physiological fluid shear on dangerous type of Salmonella

Scientists explore effects of physiological fluid shear on dangerous type of Salmonella

Once inside the human body, infectious microbes like Salmonella face a fluid situation. They live in a watery world, surrounded by liquid continually flowing over and abrading their cell surfaces--a property known as fluid shear. [More]
Metabolite of oral DMF drug for multiple sclerosis appears to slow onset of Parkinson's disease

Metabolite of oral DMF drug for multiple sclerosis appears to slow onset of Parkinson's disease

The metabolite of a drug that is helping patients battle multiple sclerosis appears to significantly slow the onset of Parkinson's disease, researchers say. [More]
Cabozantinib drug can extend lives of patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma

Cabozantinib drug can extend lives of patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma

Data presented today at the American Society of Clinical Oncology congress showed that cabozantinib, a next generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) can extend the lives of patients by nearly two years following failure of one or more anti-angiogenic therapies almost five months longer than everolimus, a current standard of care therapy. [More]
Human stem cells restore motor function in chronic stroke patients

Human stem cells restore motor function in chronic stroke patients

Injecting modified, human, adult stem cells directly into the brains of chronic stroke patients proved not only safe but effective in restoring motor function, according to the findings of a small clinical trial led by Stanford University School of Medicine investigators. [More]
Metformin along with chemotherapy/radiation improves outcomes in head and neck cancer patients

Metformin along with chemotherapy/radiation improves outcomes in head and neck cancer patients

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine have found that adding increasing doses of an approved Type 2 diabetes drug, metformin, to a chemotherapy and radiation treatment regimen in head and neck cancer patients is not well tolerated if escalated too quickly, but allowing slower escalation could be beneficial. [More]
Targeted therapy rucaparib shows promise in treating pancreatic cancer patients with BRCA mutation

Targeted therapy rucaparib shows promise in treating pancreatic cancer patients with BRCA mutation

The targeted therapy rucaparib, which has demonstrated robust clinical activity in ovarian cancer patients with a BRCA mutation, also showed promise in previously treated pancreatic cancer patients with the mutation, according to results from a phase II clinical study presented by Susan M. Domchek, MD, executive director of the Basser Center for BRCA at the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania, at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting. [More]
Nivolumab drug shows better response rate in metastatic bladder cancer patients

Nivolumab drug shows better response rate in metastatic bladder cancer patients

The immune checkpoint blockade drug nivolumab reduced tumor burden in 24.4 percent of patients with metastatic bladder cancer, regardless of whether their tumors had a biomarker related to the drug's target, according to clinical trial results from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Scientists use new technique to repair fibrotic liver cells within the organ

Scientists use new technique to repair fibrotic liver cells within the organ

Advances in stem cell research have made it possible to convert patients' skin cells into heart cells, kidney cells, liver cells and more in the lab dish, giving researchers hope that one day such cells could replace organ transplantation for patients with organ failure. [More]
New research explores women’s perspective about medication use during pregnancy

New research explores women’s perspective about medication use during pregnancy

Pregnant women overestimate the risks of taking over the counter and prescribed medication - according to new research from the University of East Anglia. [More]
FDA approves blood-based cobas EGFR Mutation Test v2 for NSCLC patients

FDA approves blood-based cobas EGFR Mutation Test v2 for NSCLC patients

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the cobas EGFR Mutation Test v2, a blood-based companion diagnostic for the cancer drug Tarceva (erlotinib). This is the first FDA-approved, blood-based genetic test that can detect epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations in non-small cell lung cancer patients. [More]
Interventions for breast cancer patients show benefits based on women’s stress levels

Interventions for breast cancer patients show benefits based on women’s stress levels

Is a couples' support group or an enhanced couples' group therapy intervention with skill instruction more effective for helping women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer? According to research from an investigator at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and colleagues from other facilities across the country, neither intervention is more dominant, but each has its own benefits depending on the stress level of the patient. [More]
Advertisement