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Neurodegeneration is the umbrella term for the progressive loss of structure or function of neurons, including death of neurons.
Researchers uncover surprising way to reduce brain damage caused by head injuries

Researchers uncover surprising way to reduce brain damage caused by head injuries

Scientists have uncovered a surprising way to reduce the brain damage caused by head injuries - stopping the body's immune system from killing brain cells. The study, published in the open access journal Acta Neuropathologica Communications, showed that in experiments on mice, an immune-based treatment reduced the size of brain lesions. [More]
Researchers propose new milestones to augment National Alzheimer's Plan

Researchers propose new milestones to augment National Alzheimer's Plan

The U.S. Government has initiated a major effort to prevent and effectively treat Alzheimer's disease by 2025. However, a workgroup of nearly 40 Alzheimer's researchers and scientists says the research milestones in the U.S. Government's National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease must be broadened in scope, increased in scale, and adequately funded in order to successfully achieve this goal. [More]
Scientists identify two microRNA molecules that control chronic inflammation

Scientists identify two microRNA molecules that control chronic inflammation

University of Utah scientists have identified two microRNA molecules that control chronic inflammation, a discovery that one day may help researchers prevent certain fatal or debilitating conditions before they start. [More]
Researchers identify two microRNA molecules that control chronic inflammation

Researchers identify two microRNA molecules that control chronic inflammation

University of Utah scientists have identified two microRNA molecules that control chronic inflammation, a discovery that one day may help researchers prevent certain fatal or debilitating conditions before they start. [More]
Researchers define the process of Parkinson's disease using genetic mouse model

Researchers define the process of Parkinson's disease using genetic mouse model

Parkinson's Disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. In Germany alone, almost half a million people are affected. The focus of the disease is the progressive degeneration of dopamine-producing nerve cells in a certain region of the midbrain, the substantia nigra. Misfolded proteins are the cause. Until recently, it was unclear why damage is confined to specific nerve cells. [More]
New class of compounds protect brain cells from traumatic brain injury

New class of compounds protect brain cells from traumatic brain injury

A new class of compounds has now been shown to protect brain cells from the type of damage caused by blast-mediated traumatic brain injury (TBI). [More]
Pollution in many cities threatens brain development in children

Pollution in many cities threatens brain development in children

Pollution in many cities threatens the brain development in children. Findings by University of Montana Professor Dr. Lilian Calder-n-Garcidue-as, MA, MD, Ph.D., and her team of researchers reveal that children living in megacities are at increased risk for brain inflammation and neurodegenerative changes, including Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease. [More]
Sanofi contributes $2.5 million to CCNA for dementia research

Sanofi contributes $2.5 million to CCNA for dementia research

Sanofi announced today its $2.5 million contribution to co-fund the Canadian Consortium on Neurodegeneration in Aging, a partnership officially launched in Montreal today in the presence of The Honourable Rona Ambrose, Minister of Health. [More]
Researchers develop novel technique to promote tissue repair in damaged muscles

Researchers develop novel technique to promote tissue repair in damaged muscles

Researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (Sanford-Burnham) have developed a novel technique to promote tissue repair in damaged muscles. [More]
Findings may help develop biomarkers to identify HIV patients at risk of dementia

Findings may help develop biomarkers to identify HIV patients at risk of dementia

Since the introduction of the combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) in the mid-90s, the life expectancy of HIV patients has significantly improved. As a result, long-term complications are becoming more relevant: almost every second HIV patient is affected by neurocognitive disorders, which can lead to dementia. [More]
BioLegend acquires shares of Covance Antibody Services

BioLegend acquires shares of Covance Antibody Services

BioLegend, Inc. (BioLegend) acquired the shares of Covance Antibody Services Inc., a business unit of Covance, located in Dedham, Massachusetts, on August 29, 2014. [More]
Finding suggests that retina acts as type of window to the brain

Finding suggests that retina acts as type of window to the brain

Researchers at the Gladstone Institutes and University of California, San Francisco have shown that a loss of cells in the retina is one of the earliest signs of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in people with a genetic risk for the disorder-even before any changes appear in their behavior. [More]
Understanding neuron development: an interview with Dr. Brock Grill, The Scripps Research Institute

Understanding neuron development: an interview with Dr. Brock Grill, The Scripps Research Institute

There’s a big difference between understanding coordination and actually building connectivity. In terms of building connectivity, several molecules have been identified that control this process and a lot has been learned from both genetic and biochemical research in a variety of different systems, particularly studies in the nematode C. elegans, the fruit fly Drosophila and mice. [More]
Researchers uncover role of epigenetic changes in Alzheimer's disease

Researchers uncover role of epigenetic changes in Alzheimer's disease

A team led by researchers at the University of Exeter Medical School and King's College London has uncovered some of the strongest evidence yet that epigenetic changes in the brain play a role in Alzheimer's disease. [More]
New therapeutic strategy to combat common genetic risk factor for ALS, FTD

New therapeutic strategy to combat common genetic risk factor for ALS, FTD

A team of researchers at Mayo Clinic and The Scripps Research Institute in Florida have developed a new therapeutic strategy to combat the most common genetic risk factor for the neurodegenerative disorders amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). [More]
Study identifies novel gene that controls nerve conduction velocity linked with MS

Study identifies novel gene that controls nerve conduction velocity linked with MS

A new study published in The American Journal of Pathology identifies a novel gene that controls nerve conduction velocity. [More]
Novogen receives funding support to commence studies in muscular dystrophy

Novogen receives funding support to commence studies in muscular dystrophy

The Australian biotechnology company, Novogen Limited today announced receipt of funding from the FSHD Global Research Foundation as part of the Company’s efforts to find effective treatments for a range of musculo-degenerative diseases including facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD). [More]
Nigral neuronal loss and α-synuclein pathology scrutinised in PD

Nigral neuronal loss and α-synuclein pathology scrutinised in PD

The severity of neurodegeneration and local burden of α-synuclein are closely coupled during disease progression in Parkinson’s disease, a post-mortem study has found. [More]
Penn physiologist receives Javits Neuroscience Investigator Award from NIH

Penn physiologist receives Javits Neuroscience Investigator Award from NIH

Erika Holzbaur, PhD, a professor of Physiology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has received the Javits Neuroscience Investigator Award from the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Small molecule may be able to convince damaged nerves to effectively rewire circuits

Small molecule may be able to convince damaged nerves to effectively rewire circuits

Frogs, dogs, whales, snails can all do it, but humans and primates can't. Regrow nerves after an injury, that is—while many animals have this ability, humans don't. [More]