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Neurodegeneration is the umbrella term for the progressive loss of structure or function of neurons, including death of neurons.
Breakthrough research could lead to new drugs to improve heart attack outcomes

Breakthrough research could lead to new drugs to improve heart attack outcomes

A research advance from the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute and Stanford University could lead to new drugs that minimize the damage caused by heart attacks. [More]
New technology could help deliver treatments for brain injuries

New technology could help deliver treatments for brain injuries

A new study led by scientists at the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute describes a technology that could lead to new therapeutics for traumatic brain injuries. The discovery, published today in Nature Communications, provides a means of homing drugs or nanoparticles to injured areas of the brain. [More]
Scientists discover link between two genes involved in PD and autoimmune diseases

Scientists discover link between two genes involved in PD and autoimmune diseases

A study publish in the journal CELL indicates that two genes associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) are key regulators of the immune system, providing direct evidence linking Parkinson's to autoimmune disease. [More]
Mutant fruit flies provide insight into origins of Parkinson's disease

Mutant fruit flies provide insight into origins of Parkinson's disease

The neurodegeneration that occurs in Parkinson’s disease is a result of stress on the endoplasmic reticulum in the cell rather than failure of the mitochondria as previously thought, according to a study in fruit flies. [More]
New study suggests how rod photoreceptors may have originated to give rise to nocturnal mammals

New study suggests how rod photoreceptors may have originated to give rise to nocturnal mammals

Retinas from our earliest vertebrate ancestors had cone-like photoreceptors, presumably allowing them to see in daylight, but little ability to see at night. Then, millions of years ago in the Mesozoic era, and in relatively short order, mammals emerged that had retinas with predominantly rod photoreceptors, allowing for them to see at night perhaps to hunt for food while their dinosaur predators were dozing. [More]
Complex 36-point therapeutic personalized program can help reverse memory loss in early AD patients

Complex 36-point therapeutic personalized program can help reverse memory loss in early AD patients

Results from quantitative MRI and neuropsychological testing show unprecedented improvements in ten patients with early Alzheimer's disease (AD) or its precursors following treatment with a programmatic and personalized therapy. Results from an approach dubbed metabolic enhancement for neurodegeneration are now available online in the journal Aging. [More]
Researchers find new method to replicate one of earliest changes in Alzheimer’s disease

Researchers find new method to replicate one of earliest changes in Alzheimer’s disease

Researchers at the Babraham Institute have found a way to replicate one of the earliest changes in Alzheimer's disease in a dish. This means that it should now be possible to find out a lot more about why it happens - and how to stop it. The new findings are published in the journal Molecular Neurodegeneration and supported by the charity Alzheimer's Research UK. [More]
New imaging study links tau proteins to neurodegenerative pathology of Alzheimer's disease

New imaging study links tau proteins to neurodegenerative pathology of Alzheimer's disease

Alzheimer's is a devastating and incurable disease marked by beta-amyloid and tau protein aggregations in the brain, yet the direct relationship between these proteins and neurodegeneration has remained a mystery. [More]
Measuring specific proteins in blood samples may help track progression of dementias

Measuring specific proteins in blood samples may help track progression of dementias

Reliable information can be obtained on the progression of dementias by measuring specific proteins in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid. A test of this kind is especially significant to the development of new therapies, as reported in the journal Neuron by scientists from the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel, along with international colleagues. [More]
NMNAT2 enzyme may help protect against debilitating effects of neurodegenerative disorders

NMNAT2 enzyme may help protect against debilitating effects of neurodegenerative disorders

A study led by biomedical researchers at Indiana University has found evidence that an enzyme known as NMNAT2 may help protect against the debilitating effects of certain degenerative brain diseases, including Alzheimer's. [More]
New dietary supplement can prevent, reverse massive brain cell loss

New dietary supplement can prevent, reverse massive brain cell loss

A dietary supplement containing a blend of thirty vitamins and minerals--all natural ingredients widely available in health food stores--has shown remarkable anti-aging properties that can prevent and even reverse massive brain cell loss, according to new research from McMaster University. [More]
New player in calcium signalling pathways acts as molecular brake to Orai activation

New player in calcium signalling pathways acts as molecular brake to Orai activation

Information flow in cells relies on calcium as a key agent in several signalling pathways. Calcium dependent signalling is crucial in nearly every aspect of life - muscle movement, immune reactions, nerve function, light sensing and many such processes. [More]
Research sheds new light on biological processes underlying neurodegeneration in AD

Research sheds new light on biological processes underlying neurodegeneration in AD

Progranulin is a central protein in both neuronal survival and neurodegenerative diseases. It is thus not surprising that altered progranulin levels represent a universal theme shared across several common neurodegenerative diseases. [More]
SBP scientists discover new regulator of immune responses

SBP scientists discover new regulator of immune responses

Research led by scientists at the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute has identified a new regulator of immune responses. The study, published recently in Immunity, sheds new light on why T cells fail to clear chronic infections and eliminate tumors. [More]
PET imaging with PiB may help in early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

PET imaging with PiB may help in early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

The effort to find ways to detect and diagnose preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD) has taken a big step forward with the use of positron emission tomography (PET), a "nuclear medicine" for imaging processes in the body, when PET is used with a special 'tracer' that binds to the amyloid plaques in the brain that are a characteristic cause of AD. [More]
New Spherical Brain Mapping for dementia diagnosis

New Spherical Brain Mapping for dementia diagnosis

Diagnosis, treatment and care of dementia is one of the major concerns in neurology research and associated healthcare programs. Dementia affects older age groups with a greater frequency, and as our population ages, the burden of dementia on public health is rapidly increasing. [More]
Malicious form of ATF2 protein drives formation of melanoma

Malicious form of ATF2 protein drives formation of melanoma

An international collaborative study led by scientists at the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute has identified a malicious form of a protein that drives the formation of melanoma. [More]
Coprophagia linked to neurodegenerative dementia

Coprophagia linked to neurodegenerative dementia

Coprophagia, eating one's feces, is common in animals but rarely seen in humans. Mayo Clinic researchers reviewed the cases of a dozen adult patients diagnosed with coprophagia over the past 20 years and found that the behavior is associated with a wide range of neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly neurodegenerative dementias. [More]
Exercise may help reduce toxicity caused by glutamate build-up in the brain

Exercise may help reduce toxicity caused by glutamate build-up in the brain

In a new study published today in Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, scientists from the University of Guelph have found that exercise has the potential to decrease toxic build-up in the brain, reducing the severity of brain disorders such as Huntington's disease. [More]
New way of understanding neurodegeneration may lead to novel treatments

New way of understanding neurodegeneration may lead to novel treatments

University of Adelaide researchers have developed a new theory for the causes of dementia and other neurodegenerative diseases, involving an out-of-control immune system. [More]
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