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Biomedical researcher wins 2016 Gutenberg Research Award for work on programmed cell death

Biomedical researcher wins 2016 Gutenberg Research Award for work on programmed cell death

The Gutenberg Research College of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz has chosen to give the 2016 Gutenberg Research Award to American biomedical researcher Dr. Vishva Dixit for his groundbreaking work in the field of programmed cell death. [More]
Study shows cannabinoid type 2 receptor plays vital role in signal processing of the brain

Study shows cannabinoid type 2 receptor plays vital role in signal processing of the brain

The cannabinoid type 2 receptor - also called "CB2 receptor" - is a special membrane protein. Its function is to receive chemical signals that control cellular activity. "Until now, this receptor was considered part of the immune system without function in nerve cells. [More]
New miniaturized microscope offers unprecedented insight into nervous system function

New miniaturized microscope offers unprecedented insight into nervous system function

A microscope about the size of a penny is giving scientists a new window into the everyday activity of cells within the spinal cord. The innovative technology revealed that astrocytes--cells in the nervous system that do not conduct electrical signals and were traditionally viewed as merely supportive--unexpectedly react to intense sensation. [More]
Rapamycin drug could target neural damage linked to Leigh syndrome

Rapamycin drug could target neural damage linked to Leigh syndrome

Salk Institute scientists showed how an FDA-approved drug boosts the health of brain cells by limiting their energy use. Like removing unnecessary lighting from a financially strapped household to save on electricity bills, the drug--called rapamycin--prolongs the survival of diseased neurons by forcing them to reduce protein production to conserve cellular energy. [More]
Study reveals new function for CACNA1C gene in psychiatric diseases

Study reveals new function for CACNA1C gene in psychiatric diseases

A new study shows the death of newborn brain cells may be linked to a genetic risk factor for five major psychiatric diseases, and at the same time shows a compound currently being developed for use in humans may have therapeutic value for these diseases by preventing the cells from dying. [More]
Innovative strategy can reverse symptoms in neurodegenerative diseases

Innovative strategy can reverse symptoms in neurodegenerative diseases

Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease are the two most common neurodegenerative disorders worldwide and cause untold suffering to millions of patients and their families. Treatments for these diseases are limited, and no cures exist. Now, a new study describes an innovative strategy that reverses symptoms in these neurodegenerative diseases - at least in fruit flies which had been genetically altered to model the diseases. [More]
University of Leicester-led study finds way to reverse symptoms of Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s

University of Leicester-led study finds way to reverse symptoms of Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s

A five-year study by an international team led from the University of Leicester has found a way of ‘reversing’ symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s – using fruit flies as test subjects. [More]
FAU's clinical trial to evaluate efficacy of RVT-101 tablet for Lewy body dementia

FAU's clinical trial to evaluate efficacy of RVT-101 tablet for Lewy body dementia

Florida Atlantic University's Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine is spearheading the South Florida site for the first U.S. clinical trial for Lewy body dementia (LBD), the second-most common dementia after Alzheimer's disease. The HEADWAY-DLB is a phase 2b multi-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to evaluate an investigational medicine, RVT-101, for dementia with Lewy bodies. [More]
New diagnostic approach may help physicians more efficiently screen for dementia

New diagnostic approach may help physicians more efficiently screen for dementia

A tiered diagnostic approach that incorporates clinical, imaging and laboratory data may help physicians more efficiently screen for neurodegenerative disorders such as dementia, according to the consensus of a multi-disciplinary panel of experts. [More]
Researchers devise method to stably internalize chemotherapy loaded microparticles into prostate cells

Researchers devise method to stably internalize chemotherapy loaded microparticles into prostate cells

A collaborative Brigham and Women's Hospital and Johns Hopkins University co-led team has found proof-of-concept evidence for a potential cancer treatment that leverages microparticles and mesenchymal stem cells. [More]
Scientists identify unique memory suppressor gene that could provide clues for new Alzheimer’s disease treatments

Scientists identify unique memory suppressor gene that could provide clues for new Alzheimer’s disease treatments

While research has identified hundreds of genes required for normal memory formation, genes that suppress memory are of special interest because they offer insights into how the brain prioritizes and manages all of the information, including memories, that it takes in every day. [More]
Intestinal bacteria can be used to reduce cancer risk, reveals UCLA study

Intestinal bacteria can be used to reduce cancer risk, reveals UCLA study

Researchers have shown that various types of intestinal bacteria might be factors in both causing and preventing obesity, and in other conditions and diseases. Now, a UCLA study suggests that it could also potentially be used to reduce the risk for some types of cancer. [More]
PITRM1 protein may be involved in development of Alzheimer's disease

PITRM1 protein may be involved in development of Alzheimer's disease

University of Bergen researchers have found a protein that could hold the key to understanding how Alzheimer's disease develops. [More]
The Weizmann Institute of Science purchases novel Aeon™ 1GHz NMR system from Bruker

The Weizmann Institute of Science purchases novel Aeon™ 1GHz NMR system from Bruker

The Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel today announced major scientific instrument purchases from Bruker (NASDAQ: BRKR), including a novel Aeon™ 1GHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system for expanding frontiers in structural biology and intrinsically disordered protein (IDPs) research. Furthermore, the Weizmann Institute is adding an Aeon 600 MHz NMR, a 263 GHz dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-NMR system, and a Biospec® 15 Tesla system for preclinical ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Various NMR and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) instrument upgrades round out this major acquisition, instantly propelling the Weizmann Institute to the frontiers of modern magnetic resonance research infrastructure. [More]
New Rutgers study links protein that helps fight infection to heart and liver disease

New Rutgers study links protein that helps fight infection to heart and liver disease

A protein that should help fight infection and keep us healthy may be targeted for treating devastating illnesses like heart and liver disease, according to a new Rutgers study. [More]
Versatile automated microplate sample screening applications: an interview with Tobias Pusterla

Versatile automated microplate sample screening applications: an interview with Tobias Pusterla

Microplate readers are divided into single-mode and multi-mode readers. A single mode reader is mainly a reader dedicated to the detection of absorbance, luminescence or fluorescence. [More]
UW-Madison neuroscientist discover genetic machinery that causes maturation in young nerve cells

UW-Madison neuroscientist discover genetic machinery that causes maturation in young nerve cells

In one of the first studies to 'read' the genetic activity inside individual brain cells, University of Wisconsin-Madison neuroscientist Xinyu Zhao has identified the genetic machinery that causes maturation in a young nerve cell. The cells under study came from the hippocampus, a memory-related structure that is the only place in a mammal's brain where new neurons can form throughout life. [More]
USF receives $9 million NIH grant to study unique treatment for age-related hearing loss

USF receives $9 million NIH grant to study unique treatment for age-related hearing loss

Researchers in the University of South Florida's Global Center for Hearing and Speech Research, recognized as the world's top research center for age-related hearing loss, have received a five-year, $9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study two unique ways to treat age-related hearing loss (ARHL). [More]
Omega-3 fatty acids improve cognitive function in older adults

Omega-3 fatty acids improve cognitive function in older adults

Changes in cognitive function and memory decline form a normal part of aging. However, in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease or mild cognitive impairment (the pre-dementia phase of Alzheimer's disease), these changes occur more quickly. There are currently no effective treatments for these diseases. [More]
Real maple syrup shows promise in protecting brain health

Real maple syrup shows promise in protecting brain health

As part of a two-day symposium at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society, a group of international scientists shared promising results of 24 studies exploring the beneficial effects of natural products on the prevention of neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Alzheimer's disease. [More]
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