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High quality exosome research products

High quality exosome research products

AMSBIO has introduced a wide selection of new high quality products for exosome research. Formulated to be quick, affordable and easy to use, AMSBIO's new expanded suite of quantification kits, isolation tools, standards, DNA & RNA extraction kits, antibodies and cell culture reagents will facilitate your understanding of exosomes using a wide variety of samples. [More]
Research sheds new light on biological processes underlying neurodegeneration in AD

Research sheds new light on biological processes underlying neurodegeneration in AD

Progranulin is a central protein in both neuronal survival and neurodegenerative diseases. It is thus not surprising that altered progranulin levels represent a universal theme shared across several common neurodegenerative diseases. [More]
Technical advances in neuroimaging offer new promise to clinicians

Technical advances in neuroimaging offer new promise to clinicians

The current special issue of Technology and Innovation, Journal of the National Academy of Inventors, Volume 18, Number 1 (all open access), is devoted to the evolution of neuroimaging technology, with seven articles chronicling the latest advances in this critical area. [More]
ULK1, ULK2 enzymes play key role in maintaining cellular homeostasis

ULK1, ULK2 enzymes play key role in maintaining cellular homeostasis

Researchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have uncovered how two enzymes, ULK1 and ULK2, which are best known for their role in the degradation and recycling of proteins, control the trafficking of specific proteins. [More]
Biosensor can detect molecules linked to neurodegenerative diseases, cancer

Biosensor can detect molecules linked to neurodegenerative diseases, cancer

A biosensor developed by researchers at the National Nanotechnology Laboratory in Campinas, São Paulo State, Brazil, has been proven capable of detecting molecules associated with neurodegenerative diseases and some types of cancer. [More]
New research may increase understanding of link between olfactory decline and brain-related diseases

New research may increase understanding of link between olfactory decline and brain-related diseases

Deterioration in a person's ability to smell can sometimes be an early sign of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's or Alzheimer's. [More]
Exercise may help reduce toxicity caused by glutamate build-up in the brain

Exercise may help reduce toxicity caused by glutamate build-up in the brain

In a new study published today in Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, scientists from the University of Guelph have found that exercise has the potential to decrease toxic build-up in the brain, reducing the severity of brain disorders such as Huntington's disease. [More]
Unlocking the dark proteome: an interview with Dr Kriwacki

Unlocking the dark proteome: an interview with Dr Kriwacki

The term dark proteome refers to proteins whose structural features and thus functions are not well understood. Many proteins within the dark proteome do not fold into stable three-dimensional structures. These proteins are called intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and feature highly flexible, disordered confirmations. [More]
Researchers identify out of control immune system linked to neurodegenerative diseases

Researchers identify out of control immune system linked to neurodegenerative diseases

AN out of control immune system has been identified as a possible cause of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s. [More]
New way of understanding neurodegeneration may lead to novel treatments

New way of understanding neurodegeneration may lead to novel treatments

University of Adelaide researchers have developed a new theory for the causes of dementia and other neurodegenerative diseases, involving an out-of-control immune system. [More]
Human gut model HuMiX represents actual conditions, processes that occur within intestines

Human gut model HuMiX represents actual conditions, processes that occur within intestines

One of the most complex human organs is the digestive tract: Here, the body comes into contact with all manner of diet-derived compounds and with countless bacteria. [More]
Scientists visualize apoptosis in live zebrafish using FLIM OPT method

Scientists visualize apoptosis in live zebrafish using FLIM OPT method

A promising approach for watching cell signaling processes in their physiological context: Scientists visualize apoptosis in live zebrafish using fluorescence lifetime imaging with optical projection tomography to map FRET biosensor activity in space and time. [More]
Biomedical researcher wins 2016 Gutenberg Research Award for work on programmed cell death

Biomedical researcher wins 2016 Gutenberg Research Award for work on programmed cell death

The Gutenberg Research College of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz has chosen to give the 2016 Gutenberg Research Award to American biomedical researcher Dr. Vishva Dixit for his groundbreaking work in the field of programmed cell death. [More]
Study shows cannabinoid type 2 receptor plays vital role in signal processing of the brain

Study shows cannabinoid type 2 receptor plays vital role in signal processing of the brain

The cannabinoid type 2 receptor - also called "CB2 receptor" - is a special membrane protein. Its function is to receive chemical signals that control cellular activity. "Until now, this receptor was considered part of the immune system without function in nerve cells. [More]
New miniaturized microscope offers unprecedented insight into nervous system function

New miniaturized microscope offers unprecedented insight into nervous system function

A microscope about the size of a penny is giving scientists a new window into the everyday activity of cells within the spinal cord. The innovative technology revealed that astrocytes--cells in the nervous system that do not conduct electrical signals and were traditionally viewed as merely supportive--unexpectedly react to intense sensation. [More]
Rapamycin drug could target neural damage linked to Leigh syndrome

Rapamycin drug could target neural damage linked to Leigh syndrome

Salk Institute scientists showed how an FDA-approved drug boosts the health of brain cells by limiting their energy use. Like removing unnecessary lighting from a financially strapped household to save on electricity bills, the drug--called rapamycin--prolongs the survival of diseased neurons by forcing them to reduce protein production to conserve cellular energy. [More]
Study reveals new function for CACNA1C gene in psychiatric diseases

Study reveals new function for CACNA1C gene in psychiatric diseases

A new study shows the death of newborn brain cells may be linked to a genetic risk factor for five major psychiatric diseases, and at the same time shows a compound currently being developed for use in humans may have therapeutic value for these diseases by preventing the cells from dying. [More]
Innovative strategy can reverse symptoms in neurodegenerative diseases

Innovative strategy can reverse symptoms in neurodegenerative diseases

Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease are the two most common neurodegenerative disorders worldwide and cause untold suffering to millions of patients and their families. Treatments for these diseases are limited, and no cures exist. Now, a new study describes an innovative strategy that reverses symptoms in these neurodegenerative diseases - at least in fruit flies which had been genetically altered to model the diseases. [More]
University of Leicester-led study finds way to reverse symptoms of Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s

University of Leicester-led study finds way to reverse symptoms of Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s

A five-year study by an international team led from the University of Leicester has found a way of ‘reversing’ symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s – using fruit flies as test subjects. [More]
FAU's clinical trial to evaluate efficacy of RVT-101 tablet for Lewy body dementia

FAU's clinical trial to evaluate efficacy of RVT-101 tablet for Lewy body dementia

Florida Atlantic University's Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine is spearheading the South Florida site for the first U.S. clinical trial for Lewy body dementia (LBD), the second-most common dementia after Alzheimer's disease. The HEADWAY-DLB is a phase 2b multi-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to evaluate an investigational medicine, RVT-101, for dementia with Lewy bodies. [More]
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