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Research provides insights for why some epilepsy patients continue to experience postoperative seizures

Research provides insights for why some epilepsy patients continue to experience postoperative seizures

New research from the University of Liverpool, published in the journal Brain, has highlighted the potential reasons why many patients with severe epilepsy still continue to experience seizures even after surgery. [More]
Research sheds new light on how humans learn to behave under uncertainty

Research sheds new light on how humans learn to behave under uncertainty

New research has revealed how three important brain signaling chemicals affect the way that we handle uncertainty. [More]
Experts to examine impact of live music on health and morbidity in children with learning disabilities

Experts to examine impact of live music on health and morbidity in children with learning disabilities

Experts in the fields of music, education, neurology, psychiatry and psychology will gather at a conference at the Royal Society of Medicine in London on Monday 28 November to examine the current evidence for the value and impact of music interventions, especially live music, on health and morbidity in children with learning disabilities. [More]
TSRI scientists discover sub-region in the brain that works to form contextual fear memory

TSRI scientists discover sub-region in the brain that works to form contextual fear memory

While the romantic poets' idea of memories being akin to spirits may have poetic merit, the scientists' perspective is that memories are concrete, physical entities that can be visualized within various regions of the brain. [More]
Neuroimaging markers may help predict psychotherapy response in patients with depression, anxiety

Neuroimaging markers may help predict psychotherapy response in patients with depression, anxiety

Brain imaging scans may one day provide useful information on the response to psychotherapy in patients with depression or anxiety, according to a review of current research in the November/December issue of the Harvard Review of Psychiatry, published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Brain surgery helps remove scar tissue causing seizures in epilepsy patients

Brain surgery helps remove scar tissue causing seizures in epilepsy patients

By the time epilepsy patient Erika Fleck came to Loyola Medicine for a second opinion, she was having three or four seizures a week and hadn't been able to drive her two young children for five years. [More]
Scanning people's brains with fMRI more effective at spotting lies than traditional polygraph test

Scanning people's brains with fMRI more effective at spotting lies than traditional polygraph test

When it comes to lying, our brains are much more likely to give us away than sweaty palms or spikes in heart rate, new evidence from researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania suggests. [More]
Brain plasticity after injury: an interview with Dr Swathi Kiran

Brain plasticity after injury: an interview with Dr Swathi Kiran

Brain plasticity is the phenomenon by which the brain can rewire and reorganize itself in response to changing stimulus input. Brain plasticity is at play when one is learning new information (at school) or learning a new language... [More]
New study to explore therapeutic pill for treatment of concussion

New study to explore therapeutic pill for treatment of concussion

The goal of finding a treatment for concussion may be one step closer due to a new study being launched by University of Miami researchers. [More]
Researchers find differences in the brain regions of children with Tourette's syndrome

Researchers find differences in the brain regions of children with Tourette's syndrome

Using MRIs, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified areas in the brains of children with Tourette's syndrome that appear markedly different from the same areas in the brains of children who don't have the neuropsychiatric disorder. [More]
Novel approach to analyzing brain structures may help predict progression of Alzheimer's disease

Novel approach to analyzing brain structures may help predict progression of Alzheimer's disease

Use of a novel approach to analyzing brain structure that focuses on the shape rather than the size of particular features may allow identification of individuals in early presymptomatic stages of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
New research finds brain changes in pedophilic hands-on offenders

New research finds brain changes in pedophilic hands-on offenders

New research reveals that certain alterations in the brain may be present in pedophiles, with differences between hands-on offenders and those who have not sexually offended against children. [More]
UA neuroscientists receive $10.3 million grant to find cause for heightened risk of Alzheimer's in women

UA neuroscientists receive $10.3 million grant to find cause for heightened risk of Alzheimer's in women

Why do more women than men get Alzheimer's disease? In their quest to find the answer, neuroscientist Roberta Diaz Brinton, PhD, and her collegues in the Center for Innovation in Brain Science at the University of Arizona Health Sciences, have been awarded a $10.3 million five-year Program Project Grant from the National Institute on Aging at the National Institutes of Health. [More]
U-M investigators awarded $7.5 million NIH grant to expand chronic pain research

U-M investigators awarded $7.5 million NIH grant to expand chronic pain research

In order to better understand the disparity between identifiable damage and chronic pain, the National Institutes of Health has awarded $7.5 million over five years to physician-scientists at the University of Michigan Health System. [More]
Researchers discover brain signature that may help identify fibromyalgia patients

Researchers discover brain signature that may help identify fibromyalgia patients

University of Colorado Boulder researchers have discovered a brain signature that identifies fibromyalgia sufferers with 93 percent accuracy, a potential breakthrough for future clinical diagnosis and treatment of the highly prevalent condition. [More]
Does music improve child brain development?

Does music improve child brain development?

We are a research group at the Brain and Creativity Institute at University of Southern California. In 2012, we began a five-year longitudinal study in collaboration with the Los Angeles Philharmonic and their Youth Orchestra program at the Heart of Los Angeles (YOLA at HOLA). [More]
Brain atrophy patterns linked to loss of specific cognitive abilities in patients with Alzheimer's disease

Brain atrophy patterns linked to loss of specific cognitive abilities in patients with Alzheimer's disease

Mathematical modeling of the brain scans of patients with Alzheimer's disease and others at risk for the devastating neurodegenerative disorder has identified specific patterns of brain atrophy that appear to be related to the loss of particular cognitive abilities. [More]
Women may have better verbal memory skills than men during early stages of Alzheimer's disease

Women may have better verbal memory skills than men during early stages of Alzheimer's disease

Women may have better verbal memory skills than men even when their brains show the same level of problems metabolizing glucose, which occurs in people with Alzheimer's disease, according to research published in the October 5, 2016, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Researchers suggest effective diagnostic tool for identifying post-concussion syndrome

Researchers suggest effective diagnostic tool for identifying post-concussion syndrome

Repeated concussions or other mild traumatic brain injuries can lead to prolonged symptoms and impaired quality of life. [More]
SINAPSE network enhances strengths to develop world-class future in medical imaging for Scotland

SINAPSE network enhances strengths to develop world-class future in medical imaging for Scotland

Scotland has a strong legacy as one of the pioneers of medical imaging. In the late 70s, Aberdeen University became the first institution to develop a full body MRI scanner; the system named the Mark I prototype was an enormous step forward for healthcare. [More]
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