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Automated speech analysis program correctly identifies young people at risk for psychosis

Automated speech analysis program correctly identifies young people at risk for psychosis

An automated speech analysis program correctly differentiated between at-risk young people who developed psychosis over a two-and-a-half year period and those who did not. In a proof-of-principle study, researchers at Columbia University Medical Center, New York State Psychiatric Institute, and the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center found that the computerized analysis provided a more accurate classification than clinical ratings. [More]
Cognitive factors associated with activity, participation in everyday life among people with MS

Cognitive factors associated with activity, participation in everyday life among people with MS

Kessler Foundation researchers found that processing speed is the primary limiting factor associated with activity and participation in everyday life among people with multiple sclerosis (MS). "Factors that moderate activity limitation and participation restriction in people with multiple sclerosis" was published in the American Journal of Occupational Therapy. [More]
Temporary postnatal visual deprivation induces permanent auditory responses in the brain's visual area

Temporary postnatal visual deprivation induces permanent auditory responses in the brain's visual area

A brief period of postnatal visual deprivation, when early in life, drives a rewiring of the brain areas involved in visual processing, even if the visual restoration is completed well before the baby reaches one year of age, researchers at the University of Trento, McMaster University, and the University of Montreal revealed today in Current Biology. [More]
Researchers find effectiveness of ramelteon for treatment of sleep disturbances after TBI

Researchers find effectiveness of ramelteon for treatment of sleep disturbances after TBI

Kessler researchers found preliminary evidence for the effectiveness of ramelteon for the treatment of sleep disturbances after traumatic brain injury (TBI). The article, "Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation on May 28, 2015. Authors are Anthony Lequerica, PhD, and Nancy Chiaravalloti, PhD, of Kessler Foundation, Neil Jasey, MD, of Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation, and Jaclyn Portelli Tremont, MA, of Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University. [More]
New study offers first clinical recommendations for headache diagnosis in pregnant women

New study offers first clinical recommendations for headache diagnosis in pregnant women

If a pregnant woman with high blood pressure and no history of headache suddenly develops a headache that quickly gets worse, she could be at risk for pregnancy complications, including preeclampsia, which put both the mother and fetus at risk. [More]
CMU BrainHub scientists use non-invasive brain-imaging tool to detect basal ganglia pathways

CMU BrainHub scientists use non-invasive brain-imaging tool to detect basal ganglia pathways

Certain diseases, like Parkinson's and Huntingdon's disease, are associated with damage to the pathways between the brain's basal ganglia regions. The basal ganglia sits at the base of the brain and is responsible for, among other things, coordinating movement. It is made up of four interconnected, deep brain structures that imaging techniques have previously been unable to visualize. [More]
Kessler Foundation researcher confirms link between sleep disturbances and MS-related fatigue

Kessler Foundation researcher confirms link between sleep disturbances and MS-related fatigue

Kessler Foundation's Lauren Strober, PhD, explores the association of secondary fatigue and sleep disturbances in multiple sclerosis (MS). "Fatigue in multiple sclerosis: a look at the role of poor sleep" was published in Frontiers in Neurology. [More]
Researchers identify novel brain network that plays wide role in memory and learning processes

Researchers identify novel brain network that plays wide role in memory and learning processes

One of the more heartbreaking realities of Alzheimer's is the moment when a loved one struggling with the disease no longer fully recognizes a family member or close friend who is caring for them. [More]

Dartmouth researcher finds way to predict human emotions

A Dartmouth researcher and his colleagues have discovered a way to predict human emotions based on brain activity. [More]

Study sheds light on what motivates people to trust

Trust matters whether it's love, money or another part of our everyday lives that requires risk, and a new study by a Dartmouth brain researcher and his collaborators sheds light on what motivates people to make that leap of faith. [More]
Early exposure to repetitive head impacts linked to later life structural brain changes among former NFL players

Early exposure to repetitive head impacts linked to later life structural brain changes among former NFL players

Former National Football League (NFL) players who started playing tackle football before the age of 12 were found to have a higher risk of altered brain development compared to those who started playing at a later age. The study is the first to demonstrate a link between early exposure to repetitive head impacts and later life structural brain changes. [More]
Structural brain changes found in chemoradiation-treated glioblastoma patients

Structural brain changes found in chemoradiation-treated glioblastoma patients

US researchers find evidence of marked and progressive brain atrophy during standard chemoradiation therapy in patients with glioblastoma. [More]
Trauma may cause long-lasting effects even in people without PTSD

Trauma may cause long-lasting effects even in people without PTSD

Trauma may cause distinct and long-lasting effects even in people who do not develop PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder), according to research by scientists working at the University of Oxford's Department of Psychiatry. It is already known that stress affects brain function and may lead to PTSD, but until now the underlying brain networks have proven elusive. [More]
New study estimates link between coffee consumption habits and incidence of mild cognitive impairment

New study estimates link between coffee consumption habits and incidence of mild cognitive impairment

A new study by researchers at the University of Bari Aldo Moro, Bari, Italy, Geriatric Unit & Laboratory of Gerontology and Geriatrics, IRCCS "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Foggia, Italy, and Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Roma, Italy, estimates the association between change or constant habits in coffee consumption and the incidence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), evaluating 1,445 individuals recruited from 5,632 subjects, aged 65-84 year old, from the Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging (ILSA), a population-based sample from eight Italian municipalities with a 3.5-year median follow-up. [More]
Kessler Foundation, University of Bordeaux team up to study emotional processing deficits in MS people

Kessler Foundation, University of Bordeaux team up to study emotional processing deficits in MS people

Kessler Foundation received $65,500 as part of a two-year $140,000 grant from the ARSEP Foundation of France to the University of Bordeaux, to launch a collaborative study of emotional processing deficits in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Helen Genova, Ph.D., and Jean Lengenfelder, Ph.D., of Kessler Foundation and Bruno Brochet, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of Bordeaux are the principal investigators. [More]
Gene therapy used for sight restoration also strengthens visual pathways in the brain

Gene therapy used for sight restoration also strengthens visual pathways in the brain

Since 2007, clinical trials using gene therapy have resulted in often-dramatic sight restoration for dozens of children and adults who were otherwise doomed to blindness. Now, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, have found evidence that this sight restoration leads to strengthening of visual pathways in the brain, published this week in Science Translational Medicine. [More]
Alzheimer's disease may be 'at work' years ahead of actual symptoms, say IU researchers

Alzheimer's disease may be 'at work' years ahead of actual symptoms, say IU researchers

The best-known genetic variant linked to Alzheimer's disease may be "at work" promoting deposits of plaque in the brain long before any symptoms of the disease can be measured on tests, according to a national research study led by Indiana University School of Medicine investigators. [More]
Shape of the cerebral cortex strongly correlates with genetic ancestry

Shape of the cerebral cortex strongly correlates with genetic ancestry

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego and the School of Medicine have found that the three-dimensional shape of the cerebral cortex - the wrinkled outer layer of the brain controlling many functions of thinking and sensation - strongly correlates with ancestral background. [More]
Study: Brain activity changes after memory retraining in TBI patients

Study: Brain activity changes after memory retraining in TBI patients

Kessler Foundation researchers published results of their TBI-MEM trial, the first study to demonstrate significant changes in cerebral activation after memory retraining in individuals with traumatic brain injury. [More]
People who survive stroke may experience accelerated and persistent decline in cognitive function

People who survive stroke may experience accelerated and persistent decline in cognitive function

In a study that included nearly 24,000 participants, those who experienced a stroke had an acute decline in cognitive function and also accelerated and persistent cognitive decline over 6 years, according to an article in the July 7 issue of JAMA. [More]
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