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Scientists find interaction between amyloid and tau proteins that cause brain damage linked with AD

Scientists find interaction between amyloid and tau proteins that cause brain damage linked with AD

For years, neuroscientists have puzzled over how two abnormal proteins, called amyloid and tau, accumulate in the brain and damage it to cause Alzheimer's disease (AD). Which one is the driving force behind dementia? The answer: both of them, according to a new study by researchers at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute. [More]
New diagnostic approach may help physicians more efficiently screen for dementia

New diagnostic approach may help physicians more efficiently screen for dementia

A tiered diagnostic approach that incorporates clinical, imaging and laboratory data may help physicians more efficiently screen for neurodegenerative disorders such as dementia, according to the consensus of a multi-disciplinary panel of experts. [More]
Rush awarded $14.5 million NIA grant to study effects of MIND diet on Alzheimer's disease

Rush awarded $14.5 million NIA grant to study effects of MIND diet on Alzheimer's disease

Can a particular diet prevent Alzheimer's disease? The National Institute of Aging has invested heavily in Rush University Medical Center to try to find out. [More]
QuietKit unveils new platform to educate users on basics of meditation, mindfulness

QuietKit unveils new platform to educate users on basics of meditation, mindfulness

QuietKit today announced the launch of its new platform, a website that educates users on the basics of meditation and mindfulness. The website features step-by-step guided meditations to help users develop a habitual practice. [More]
Clinical scores unreliable in minor stroke and TIA

Clinical scores unreliable in minor stroke and TIA

Research shows that imaging findings, rather than clinical scores, are the best means of predicting recurrent events in patients with minor stroke or transient ischaemic attack. [More]
MGH study finds that the brains of young marijuana users react differently to social exclusion

MGH study finds that the brains of young marijuana users react differently to social exclusion

A study from Massachusetts General Hospital researchers finds that the brains of young adult marijuana users react differently to social exclusion than do those of non-users. In a report published in the March issue of Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, the team reports that activation of the insula, a region of the brain that is usually active during social rejection, was reduced in young marijuana users when they were being excluded from participation in virtual game of catch. [More]
Study demonstrates possibility of simultaneous improvement in all mental, physical functions

Study demonstrates possibility of simultaneous improvement in all mental, physical functions

Let's say you've decided to make some changes in your life. You're out of shape, your mind wanders, your self-esteem is wavering, and you have no idea what you just read. So you decide to focus on one thing -- losing weight, maybe -- and tackle the other issues later. You don't want to take on too much at once, right? [More]
Women's verbal memory advantage may mask cognitive decline

Women's verbal memory advantage may mask cognitive decline

Women with amnestic mild cognitive impairment have better verbal memory skills than their male counterparts during the early stages of hippocampal decline. [More]
People who burn more calories have larger gray matter volume in key brain areas linked to memory, cognition

People who burn more calories have larger gray matter volume in key brain areas linked to memory, cognition

Whether they jog, swim, garden or dance, physically active older persons have larger gray matter volume in key brain areas responsible for memory and cognition, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and UCLA. [More]
Kessler Foundation's Silvana L. Costa awarded Switzer Research Fellowship for research on MS

Kessler Foundation's Silvana L. Costa awarded Switzer Research Fellowship for research on MS

Silvana L. Costa, PhD, of Kessler Foundation has been awarded a Switzer Research Fellowship by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living and Rehabilitation Research. The $70,000 Merit Award funds her research on "Processing Speed Deficits in Multiple Sclerosis: Exploring the Complex Sensorial Cognitive Motor Interaction." [More]
Brains have different traits that affect anatomical and cognitive factors

Brains have different traits that affect anatomical and cognitive factors

Everyone has a different mixture of personality traits: some are outgoing, some are tough and some are anxious. A new study suggests that brains also have different traits that affect both anatomical and cognitive factors, such as intelligence and memory. [More]
Frontotemporal dementia often misdiagnosed as Alzheimer’s disease in many patients

Frontotemporal dementia often misdiagnosed as Alzheimer’s disease in many patients

Many patients showing signs of dementia are quickly diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease when they might actually suffer from frontotemporal dementia, delaying the appropriate treatment for them. [More]
Understanding the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder

Understanding the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder

Advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition and analyses over the last two decades have enabled the identification of neuroanatomical abnormalities in a range of mental disorders, however one question which has consistently surfaced is the extent to which the medications used to treat such disorders may accentuate or ameliorate these abnormalities. [More]
Electronic health records could help identify people who have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes

Electronic health records could help identify people who have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes

In 2012, a group of UCLA researchers set out to mine thousands of electronic health records for a more accurate and less expensive way to identify people who have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. The researchers got much more than they bargained for. [More]
TAU research highlights neuroprotective potential of protein-protectant drug candidate SKIP

TAU research highlights neuroprotective potential of protein-protectant drug candidate SKIP

Activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP), essential for brain formation, is frequently mutated in children on the autism spectrum. In older men and women, ADNP expression in the blood is correlated with cognition and further altered in Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Novel non-invasive method of vagus nerve stimulation reduces depressive symptoms

Novel non-invasive method of vagus nerve stimulation reduces depressive symptoms

Researchers of a new study published in the current issue of Biological Psychiatry report successful reduction of depressive symptoms in patients using a novel non-invasive method of vagus nerve stimulation, or VNS. [More]
Noninvasive FMRI may help evaluate effectiveness of new pain medications

Noninvasive FMRI may help evaluate effectiveness of new pain medications

New research may allow new, more effective and safer pain medications to reach patients who suffer from chronic pain sooner. According to a recent study published in Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI), to measure the brain's neural response to pain, may be a viable tool for evaluating the effectiveness of new pain medications during the early stages of human drug development - providing the needed objective evidence to prevent the premature discarding of potentially beneficial therapies. [More]
Study finds no evidence of genetic overlap between schizophrenia risk and subcortical brain volumes

Study finds no evidence of genetic overlap between schizophrenia risk and subcortical brain volumes

Over the last decade, important contributions to our understanding of schizophrenia have come from two different types of studies. Neuroimaging studies have found that certain parts of the brain, such as the hippocampus and amygdala, are smaller in people with schizophrenia - a devastating psychiatric illness with high heritability. [More]
Men with ASD have differences in brain connections

Men with ASD have differences in brain connections

Research at King's College London has revealed subtle brain differences in adult males with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which may go some way towards explaining why symptoms persist into adulthood in some people with the disorder. [More]
Children with sensory processing disorder have altered pathways for brain connectivity

Children with sensory processing disorder have altered pathways for brain connectivity

Researchers at UC San Francisco have found that boys and girls with sensory processing disorder (SPD) have altered pathways for brain connectivity when compared to typically developing children, and the difference predicts challenges with auditory and tactile processing. [More]
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