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Butler neuropsychologist studies OCD patients undergoing gamma knife radiosurgery

Butler neuropsychologist studies OCD patients undergoing gamma knife radiosurgery

Supported by a $750,000 K23 Career Development Award from the National Institutes of Health, Butler Hospital neuropsychologist Nicole McLaughlin, PhD, is conducting a first-of-its-kind study of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) undergoing gamma knife radiosurgery. [More]
Study: Engaging brain areas linked to 'off-task' mental activities can boost performance

Study: Engaging brain areas linked to 'off-task' mental activities can boost performance

To solve a mental puzzle, the brain's executive control network for externally focused, goal-oriented thinking must activate, while the network for internally directed thinking like daydreaming must be turned down to avoid interference – or so we thought. [More]
Early brain imaging studies may help prevent vascular diseases

Early brain imaging studies may help prevent vascular diseases

Future prevention and treatment strategies for vascular diseases may lie in the evaluation of early brain imaging tests long before heart attacks or strokes occur, according to a systematic review conducted by a team of cardiologists, neuroscientists, and psychiatrists from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published in the October issue of JACC Cardiovascular Imaging. [More]
Internal calorie counter evaluates food based on its caloric density, shows neuroimaging study

Internal calorie counter evaluates food based on its caloric density, shows neuroimaging study

As you glance over a menu or peruse the shelves in a supermarket, you may be thinking about how each food will taste and whether it's nutritious, or you may be trying to decide what you're in the mood for. [More]

Study: People appreciate fairness in the same way as they appreciate money for themselves

Ever wondered how people figure out what is fair? Look to the brain for the answer. According to a new Norwegian brain study, people appreciate fairness in much the same way as they appreciate money for themselves, and also that fairness is not necessarily that everybody gets the same income. [More]
Mediso launches MultiScan LFER 150 PET/CT for research applications

Mediso launches MultiScan LFER 150 PET/CT for research applications

Mediso announces the MultiScan LFER 150 PET/CT, the first member of the MultiScan product line dedicated to research applications for both clinical and pre-clinical imaging. The LFER 150 (Large Field of view Extreme Resolution) with 20 cm axial and 15 cm transaxial field of view (FOV), sub-mm PET resolution and 5% sensitivity is aimed at pre-clinical brain research. [More]
Caregivers more aware of SUDEP than patients

Caregivers more aware of SUDEP than patients

Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is concerning and many—even those with seizure disorders—may not be aware of this condition. New research published in Epilepsia, a journal published by Wiley on behalf of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE), reports that 76% of caregivers are more likely to have heard of SUDEP compared with 65% of patients with epilepsy. [More]
NeuroSigma, VA partner to evaluate eTNS system for TBI patients in Phase I clinical trial

NeuroSigma, VA partner to evaluate eTNS system for TBI patients in Phase I clinical trial

NeuroSigma, Inc., a California-based life sciences company focused on commercialization of its non-invasive Monarch eTNS System for the treatment of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, today announced that it has entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the U.S. Veterans Affairs for a clinical trial to evaluate the benefits of non-invasive, external Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation (eTNS) for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in a Phase I clinical trial. [More]
USC to become a hub for exploring the human brain

USC to become a hub for exploring the human brain

In a rare distinction for one university, neuroimaging world leaders and USC Professors Arthur Toga and Paul Thompson will receive two major research center awards to advance their exploration of the human brain. [More]
Kessler Foundation's Guang Yue to study impact of high-effort training on muscle weakness

Kessler Foundation's Guang Yue to study impact of high-effort training on muscle weakness

Guang Yue, PhD, of Kessler Foundation has been awarded an NIH grant for$1,962,767 to study the impact of high-effort training on the muscle weakness that impairs quality life among many individuals with cancer. [More]
Researchers launch landmark new program to explore potential impact of medical marijuana

Researchers launch landmark new program to explore potential impact of medical marijuana

Thanks to a $500,000 gift from international best-selling author and mental health advocate Patricia Cornwell, McLean Hospital and Harvard Medical School researchers will launch a landmark new program that will more fully explore the potential impact of medical marijuana on cognition, brain structure and function. [More]
Care lags for people who have stroke in hospital, study finds

Care lags for people who have stroke in hospital, study finds

At the first sign of a stroke, time is of the essence. For every minute of delay in treatment, people typically lose almost two million brain cells. Yet a new study presented at the Canadian Stroke Congress reveals that those delays - in getting the right tests and the right drugs - can be longer when people experience a stroke in a hospital. [More]
Depression contributes to abnormal pain processes in IBS patients

Depression contributes to abnormal pain processes in IBS patients

High rates of anxiety and depression amongst patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have led many researchers to believe there could be a causal relationship between psychological factors and IBS symptoms. Now, scientists in Germany have found clear evidence that patients with IBS process pain signals from the gut abnormally, and that disturbed brain responses to pain are particularly pronounced in patients with more depression symptoms. [More]
Brain & Behavior Research Foundation to honor 8 scientists for achievements in psychiatric research

Brain & Behavior Research Foundation to honor 8 scientists for achievements in psychiatric research

The Brain & Behavior Research Foundation will honor eight scientists with its 2014 Outstanding Achievement Prizes for work delving into psychiatric disorders that affect one in four people. The awards, which celebrate the transformative power of neuroscience and psychiatric research to improve the lives of people with mental illness, will be presented at the Foundation's National Awards Dinner at the Pierre Hotel. [More]
Increasing prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea threatens public health and safety

Increasing prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea threatens public health and safety

Public health and safety are threatened by the increasing prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea, which now afflicts at least 25 million adults in the U.S., according to the National Healthy Sleep Awareness Project. Several new studies highlight the destructive nature of obstructive sleep apnea, a chronic disease that increases the risk of high blood pressure, heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, stroke and depression. [More]
Virginia Tech participates in NCAA initiative to limit concussions among college athletes, military personnel

Virginia Tech participates in NCAA initiative to limit concussions among college athletes, military personnel

Virginia Tech is participating in a new, landmark $30 million national effort sponsored by the National Collegiate Athletic Association and the U.S. Department of Defense to combat concussions among college athletes and active service military personnel. [More]
Virginia Tech participates in national effort to combat concussions

Virginia Tech participates in national effort to combat concussions

Virginia Tech is participating in a new, landmark $30 million national effort sponsored by the National Collegiate Athletic Association and the U.S. Department of Defense to combat concussions among college athletes and active service military personnel. [More]
Study links slowed processing speed with executive deficits in individuals with multiple sclerosis

Study links slowed processing speed with executive deficits in individuals with multiple sclerosis

Kessler Foundation researchers have published a study supporting the role of slowed processing speed in the executive deficits found in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
Working memory may be underlying mechanism of cognitive reserve in MS

Working memory may be underlying mechanism of cognitive reserve in MS

Kessler Foundation scientists have shown that working memory may be an underlying mechanism of cognitive reserve in multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
One year of CPAP therapy restores white matter, improves cognition and mood

One year of CPAP therapy restores white matter, improves cognition and mood

A neuroimaging study is the first to show that white matter damage caused by severe obstructive sleep apnea can be reversed by continuous positive airway pressure therapy. [More]