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Study: Growth hormone can improve social impairment in patients with Phelan-McDermid syndrome

Study: Growth hormone can improve social impairment in patients with Phelan-McDermid syndrome

A growth hormone can significantly improve the social impairment associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in patients with a related genetic syndrome, according to a pilot study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published yesterday on Pub Med, a public database of biomedical topics maintained by the National Institutes of Health (study originally published in the December 12 issue of the journal Molecular Autism). [More]
Scientists identify role of tau-associated MAPT gene in development of Alzheimer's disease

Scientists identify role of tau-associated MAPT gene in development of Alzheimer's disease

An international team of scientists, led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, has identified the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) gene as increasing the risk for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). [More]
New Penn Medicine study reveals how sleep deprivation increases intake of fat

New Penn Medicine study reveals how sleep deprivation increases intake of fat

Experts have warned for years that insufficient sleep can lead to weight gain. A new Penn Medicine study found that not only do we consume more food following a night of total sleep deprivation, but we also we consume more fat and less carbohydrates and a region of the brain known as the salience network is what may lead us to eat more fat. [More]
Endogenous cannabinoids linked to weight gain in people with schizophrenia

Endogenous cannabinoids linked to weight gain in people with schizophrenia

Cannabinoids may be involved in the weight gain that occurs in people with schizophrenia who are treated with the antipsychotic olanzapine, according to a pilot study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology by researchers at the Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Montréal and Université de Montréal. [More]
Brain scans can predict therapeutic responses to talk therapy

Brain scans can predict therapeutic responses to talk therapy

UNC School of Medicine researchers have shown that brain scans can predict which patients with clinical depression are most likely to benefit from a specific kind of talk therapy. [More]
Researchers identify a common pattern across different psychiatric disorders

Researchers identify a common pattern across different psychiatric disorders

In a study analyzing whole-brain images from nearly 16,000 people, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine identified a common pattern across a spectrum of psychiatric disorders that are widely perceived to be quite distinct. [More]

Finding could improve treatment, diagnosis of common reading disorders

A neuroimaging study by a University at Buffalo psychologist suggests that phonics, a method of learning to read using knowledge of word sounds, shouldn't be overlooked in favor of a whole-language technique that focuses on visually memorizing word patterns, a finding that could help improve treatment and diagnosis of common reading disorders such as dyslexia. [More]
Researchers advance generalized concept for future studies of mental resilience

Researchers advance generalized concept for future studies of mental resilience

Researchers at the Research Center Translational Neurosciences of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz in Germany have advanced a generalized concept as the basis for future studies of mental resilience. Their new approach is based on a mechanistic theory which takes as its starting point the appraisals made by the brain in response to exposure to stressful or threatening situations. [More]
New article provides insight into cognitive fatigue in people with multiple sclerosis

New article provides insight into cognitive fatigue in people with multiple sclerosis

Kessler Foundation researchers have authored a new article that provides insight into the factors that contribute to cognitive fatigue in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). The article, "Subjective cognitive fatigue in MS depends on task length," was epublished ahead of print on October 27 in Frontiers in Neurology. [More]
Personal gender identity of every human being is reflected in the structure of brain networks

Personal gender identity of every human being is reflected in the structure of brain networks

Our sense of belonging to the male or female gender is an inherent component of the human identity perception. As a general rule, gender identity and physical sex coincide. If this is not the case, one refers to trans-identity or transsexuality. In a current study, brain researcher Georg S. Kanz of the University Clinic for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy of the MedUni Vienna was able to demonstrate that the very personal gender identity of every human being is reflected and verifiable in the cross-links between brain regions. [More]
American Migraine Foundation plans to create Migraine Patient Registry and Biorepository

American Migraine Foundation plans to create Migraine Patient Registry and Biorepository

Migraine affects 36 million Americans, can have a major impact on patients' quality of life, and even on their relationships. The World Health Organization estimates that migraine is the third most prevalent medical disorder in the world, the 4th most disabling among women and the 7th most disabling overall. [More]
Transcranial direct current stimulation can help modify attention to threat

Transcranial direct current stimulation can help modify attention to threat

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a painless treatment strategy that uses weak electrical currents to deliver targeted stimulation to the brain via electrodes placed on the scalp. tDCS has shown promise in treating mood, anxiety, cognition, and some symptoms of Parkinson's disease. [More]
SPECT scan measures brain activity during seizures

SPECT scan measures brain activity during seizures

Loyola University Medical Center is offering epileptic patients an imaging scan that records brain activity during seizures. [More]
Researchers use functional MRI to understand how the brain functions

Researchers use functional MRI to understand how the brain functions

University of Nevada, Reno neuroscientists are working with Renown Health to bring new research capabilities to northern Nevada. The research group, led by University Professor of Psychology Michael Webster, has purchased equipment that augments the existing 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology at Renown Health for studies of human brain function. [More]
Abstinence-induced changes in the brain could help predict relapse in smokers

Abstinence-induced changes in the brain could help predict relapse in smokers

Quitting smoking sets off a series of changes in the brain that Penn Medicine researchers say may better identify smokers who will start smoking again—a prediction that goes above and beyond today's clinical or behavioral tools for assessing relapse risk. [More]
UC Berkeley scientists reveal how humans have excelled at 'relational reasoning'

UC Berkeley scientists reveal how humans have excelled at 'relational reasoning'

When it comes to getting out of a tricky situation, we humans have an evolutionary edge over other primates. Take, as a dramatic example, the Apollo 13 voyage in which engineers, against all odds, improvised a chemical filter on a lunar module to prevent carbon dioxide buildup from killing the crew. [More]
Experts report three key topics that may make difference in the battle against Alzheimer's disease

Experts report three key topics that may make difference in the battle against Alzheimer's disease

Detection, prevention, and preclinical treatment are three key areas that may make a difference in the battle to reduce the rapid rise of new Alzheimer's disease (AD) cases every year. These three topics are the focus of an important new supplement to the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. [More]
Frontal lesions predict better improvement in people with spatial neglect after prism therapy

Frontal lesions predict better improvement in people with spatial neglect after prism therapy

Stroke researchers have found that the presence of frontal lesions predicts better functional improvement in individuals with spatial neglect who received prism adaptation therapy. "Integrity of medial temporal structures may predict better improvement of spatial neglect with prism adaptation treatment" was published in September in the Neuroimaging and Rehabilitation Special Issue of Brain Imaging & Behavior. [More]
Neuroimaging markers have synergistic effect on cognitive decline

Neuroimaging markers have synergistic effect on cognitive decline

The Alzheimer disease neuroimaging markers β-amyloid and neurodegeneration have synergistic effects on the rate of cognitive decline in clinically normal people, research shows. [More]
Variants of ASIC1a gene appear to be associated with panic disorder

Variants of ASIC1a gene appear to be associated with panic disorder

Panic disorder is a severe form of anxiety in which the affected individual feels an abrupt onset of fear, often accompanied by profound physical symptoms of discomfort. Scientists have known from studying twins that genes contribute to the risk of panic disorder, but very little is known about which specific genes are involved. [More]