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Kessler Foundation receives $3 million to improve cognition and mobility of people with TBI

Kessler Foundation receives $3 million to improve cognition and mobility of people with TBI

The New Jersey Commission on Brain Injury Research awarded $3 million in grants to Kessler Foundation, half of its total grant distribution in 2015, to improve cognition and mobility of individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). [More]
People with specific gene variant at greater risk of developing depressions

People with specific gene variant at greater risk of developing depressions

People born with a particular gene variant have a greater risk of developing depressions, a recent study from the Department of Psychology at The University of Oslo shows. [More]
Different neurobiological pathways lead to expression of Alzheimer's disease

Different neurobiological pathways lead to expression of Alzheimer's disease

The amyloid cascade hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) posits that sticky aggregations or plaques of amyloid-beta peptides accumulate over time in the brain, triggering a series of events that ultimately result in the full-blown neurodegenerative disorder. The hypothesis has been a major driver of AD research for more than 20 years. [More]
10-week reading intervention improves brain activity in autistic children

10-week reading intervention improves brain activity in autistic children

Ten weeks of intensive reading intervention for children with autism spectrum disorder was enough to strengthen the activity of loosely connected areas of their brains that work together to comprehend reading, University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have found. [More]
NTCELL Phase I/IIa clinical study meets primary endpoint in patients with Parkinson’s disease

NTCELL Phase I/IIa clinical study meets primary endpoint in patients with Parkinson’s disease

Living Cell Technologies Limited today announced results from a Phase I/IIa clinical study of NTCELL, an experimental regenerative cell therapy being studied as a disease-modifying agent in Parkinson’s disease. The study, conducted in four patients in New Zealand, met its primary endpoint of safety, showing NTCELL implantation was well tolerated, with no adverse events considered to be related to NTCELL. [More]
Research: Interaction between cortical and subcortical brain regions highlights role of hypersensitivity in ASD

Research: Interaction between cortical and subcortical brain regions highlights role of hypersensitivity in ASD

The increased interaction between cortical and subcortical brain regions highlights the central role of hypersensitivity and other sensory symptoms in defining Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). [More]
Diagnosing brain lesions in children can be challenging, report Loyola physicians

Diagnosing brain lesions in children can be challenging, report Loyola physicians

Brain lesions in children can be especially challenging to diagnose, according to a report in the journal Frontiers in Neurology by a multidisciplinary team of Loyola University Medical Center physicians.' [More]
Study can help spur beneficial lifestyle changes in patients to reduce Alzheimer's risk

Study can help spur beneficial lifestyle changes in patients to reduce Alzheimer's risk

Armed with new knowledge about how neurodegenerative diseases alter brain structures, increasing numbers of neurologists, psychiatrists and other clinicians are adopting quantitative brain imaging as a tool to measure and help manage cognitive declines in patients. These imaging findings can help spur beneficial lifestyle changes in patients to reduce risk for Alzheimer's disease. [More]
People with high moral reasoning skills show increased gray matter in brain

People with high moral reasoning skills show increased gray matter in brain

Individuals with a higher level of moral reasoning skills showed increased gray matter in the areas of the brain implicated in complex social behavior, decision making, and conflict processing as compared to subjects at a lower level of moral reasoning, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine and the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in collaboration with a researcher from Charité Universitätsmediz in Berlin, Germany. [More]
Researchers examine neuroimaging findings in children with sports-related concussions

Researchers examine neuroimaging findings in children with sports-related concussions

Researchers from the Canada North Concussion Network in Manitoba examined neuroimaging studies obtained in children and adolescents with sports-related concussions and found that the images appeared normal in 78% of cases. [More]
Iron may underlie effect of Alzheimer’s risk allele

Iron may underlie effect of Alzheimer’s risk allele

Ferritin in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Alzheimer’s disease is associated with the APOE ε4 risk allele and predicts cognitive outcomes, a study shows. [More]

SDSU researchers awarded NIH grant to understand how autism plays out across the lifespan

In the public consciousness, autism spectrum disorder only affects children. In truth, ASD is a lifelong condition. But how it affects older adults is a gaping unknown in autism research. Now, a new and significant grant from the National Institutes of Health will help researchers at San Diego State University understand how the disorder plays out across the lifespan. [More]
Strategy-based cognitive training improves cognitive, psychological health after traumatic brain injury

Strategy-based cognitive training improves cognitive, psychological health after traumatic brain injury

In the first study of its kind, veterans and civilians with traumatic brain injury showed improved cognitive performance and psychological and neural health following strategy-based cognitive training. The Department of Defense-funded study, published this week in Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, was conducted by an interdisciplinary team of cognitive neuroscientists, rehabilitation specialists, and neuroimaging experts from the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas. [More]
Study shows how people's expectation of pain affects the experience of pain

Study shows how people's expectation of pain affects the experience of pain

Picture yourself in a medical office, anxiously awaiting your annual flu shot. The nurse casually states, "This won't hurt a bit." But when the needle pierces your skin it hurts, and it hurts a lot. Your expectations have been violated, and not in a good way. [More]

Researchers investigate development of face perception in Japanese children

Face perception plays an important role in social communication. There have been many studies of face perception in human using non-invasive neuroimaging and electrophysiological methods, but studies of face perception in children were quite limited. [More]
Certain proteins may slow cognitive decline in people with Alzheimer's disease

Certain proteins may slow cognitive decline in people with Alzheimer's disease

Certain proteins may slow the devastating memory loss caused by Alzheimer's disease, according to a groundbreaking Iowa State University study. [More]
Parents share arduous, circuitous journey to get referrals for childhood epilepsy surgery

Parents share arduous, circuitous journey to get referrals for childhood epilepsy surgery

Having a child diagnosed with epilepsy can be a frightening and confusing time. Now, parents share their arduous and "circuitous" journey to get referrals for pediatric epilepsy surgery once their child's disease stops responding to anti-seizure medications. The UCLA study sheds light on the difficulties parents face obtaining specialty and sub-specialty care for their children during an already stressful time. [More]
Night shift workers classified as alert insomniacs have highest level of impairment in work productivity

Night shift workers classified as alert insomniacs have highest level of impairment in work productivity

A new study of night shift workers suggests that overnight occupational and cognitive impairment is more strongly correlated to insomnia than it is to sleepiness. [More]
Study: Cannabis consumers more prone to experiencing false memories

Study: Cannabis consumers more prone to experiencing false memories

​A new study published in the American journal with the highest impact factor in worldwide, Molecular Psychiatry, reveals that consumers of cannabis are more prone to experiencing false memories. [More]
Clinical trials show benefits of endovascular therapy for acute ischemic strokes

Clinical trials show benefits of endovascular therapy for acute ischemic strokes

Anthony J. Furlan, MD, Chairman of Neurology and Co-Director of the Neurological Institute at University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, who writes an accompanying editorial for five studies about endovascular stroke therapy published simultaneously in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM.org">NEJM.org April 17), says these randomized clinical trials represent a breakthrough in showing the benefits of endovascular therapy for acute ischemic strokes. [More]
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