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SINAPSE network enhances strengths to develop world-class future in medical imaging for Scotland

SINAPSE network enhances strengths to develop world-class future in medical imaging for Scotland

Scotland has a strong legacy as one of the pioneers of medical imaging. In the late 70s, Aberdeen University became the first institution to develop a full body MRI scanner; the system named the Mark I prototype was an enormous step forward for healthcare. [More]
Belief about nicotine in cigarette may influence brain signals linked to cravings

Belief about nicotine in cigarette may influence brain signals linked to cravings

Craving relief may depend more on the belief of satisfaction than actual relief, according to scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute and the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas. [More]
Building blocks improve spatial abilities in children to greater level than board games

Building blocks improve spatial abilities in children to greater level than board games

Research from Indiana University has found that structured block-building games improve spatial abilities in children to a greater degree than board games. [More]
Limited use of video games may provide benefits to children

Limited use of video games may provide benefits to children

A new study indicates that playing video games for a limited amount of time each week may provide benefits to children, but too much can be detrimental. The findings are published in the Annals of Neurology. [More]
Neuroimaging: an insight into psychiatric causes? An interview with Dr Craig Buckley

Neuroimaging: an insight into psychiatric causes? An interview with Dr Craig Buckley

CUBRIC is one of the top neuroimaging research centres in the UK and has grown rapidly since it opened in 2006. CUBRIC is expected to become an international hub for neuroimaging, unique in Europe. [More]
Scientists discover neural factors that can help identify adolescents at risk for alcohol consumption

Scientists discover neural factors that can help identify adolescents at risk for alcohol consumption

Researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine have identified 34 neural factors that predict adolescent alcohol consumption. [More]
Advances in brain research since patient HM: an interview with Dr Jacopo Annese

Advances in brain research since patient HM: an interview with Dr Jacopo Annese

Jacopo Annese, President and CEO of the Institute for Brain and Society, a non-profit organization dedicated to democratizing neuroscience and making neuroscience tools and knowledge about the brain more available to the public, discusses his work on the Human Brain Library. [More]
ISU researchers discover protein that appears to predict memory loss, brain atrophy in Alzheimer's patients

ISU researchers discover protein that appears to predict memory loss, brain atrophy in Alzheimer's patients

Iowa State University researchers have identified a protein essential for building memories that appears to predict the progression of memory loss and brain atrophy in Alzheimer's patients. [More]
Study reveals evidence of categorical and dimensional models of ASD in the brain

Study reveals evidence of categorical and dimensional models of ASD in the brain

A study in Biological Psychiatry provides a new understanding of brain alterations in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) that may help researchers and clinicians better define the disorder. [More]
Study shows motor cortices encode error signals that drive adaptation in reaching

Study shows motor cortices encode error signals that drive adaptation in reaching

Adaptation in reaching -- gradual improvement of motor control in response to a perturbation -- is a central issue in motor neuroscience.However, even the cortical origin of errors that drive adaptation has remained elusive. [More]
Neuroimaging study identifies four mental stages during math problem solving

Neuroimaging study identifies four mental stages during math problem solving

A new Carnegie Mellon University neuroimaging study reveals the mental stages people go through as they are solving challenging math problems. [More]
New brain map reveals landscape of the cerebral cortex

New brain map reveals landscape of the cerebral cortex

The age of exploration has long passed, but there is at least one area still largely uncharted: the human brain. [More]
Researchers publish comprehensive molecular atlas of primate brain development in Nature

Researchers publish comprehensive molecular atlas of primate brain development in Nature

Researchers at the Allen Institute for Brain Science have published an in-depth analysis of a comprehensive molecular atlas of brain development in the non-human primate. [More]
JAD announces recipient of 2016 Alzheimer Award

JAD announces recipient of 2016 Alzheimer Award

The Journal of Alzheimer's Disease is pleased to announce that Mark W. Bondi, PhD, ABPP/CN, Professor of Psychiatry at UC San Diego and Director of the Neuropsychological Assessment Unit at the VA San Diego Healthcare System, has been chosen as the recipient of the 2016 Alzheimer Award presented by the journal in recognition of his outstanding work on the development of a novel and promising method of staging preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD) based on number of abnormal biomarkers that is predictive of progression to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and AD. [More]
Researcher receives $1.9 million grant to study development of memory networks in children

Researcher receives $1.9 million grant to study development of memory networks in children

Noa Ofen, Ph.D., a Wayne State University researcher in lifespan cognitive neuroscience, received a five-year, $1.9 million grant from the National Institute of Mental Health of the National Institutes of Health to study the development of memory networks in children. [More]
Tiny micro-vesicle structures may help predict probability of developing Alzheimer's dementia

Tiny micro-vesicle structures may help predict probability of developing Alzheimer's dementia

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine say tiny micro-vesicle structures used by neurons and other cells to transport materials internally or dispose of them externally carry tell-tale proteins that may help to predict the likelihood of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) developing into full-blown Alzheimer's disease (AD). [More]
Researchers identify potential biomarker for Parkinson's disease in biobanked urine samples

Researchers identify potential biomarker for Parkinson's disease in biobanked urine samples

For more than five years, urine and cerebral-spinal fluid samples from patients with Parkinson's disease have been locked in freezers in the NINDS National Repository, stored with the expectation they might someday help unravel the still-hidden course of this slow-acting neurodegenerative disease. [More]
Changes in neural circuit involved in emotional resilience may help youngsters adapt to childhood adversity

Changes in neural circuit involved in emotional resilience may help youngsters adapt to childhood adversity

A new study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging reports a neural signature of emotional adaptation that could help researchers understand how the brain adapts to childhood adversity and predict which kids may be vulnerable to developing later psychopathology. [More]
New software tool could help routinely measure brain atrophy in MS patients

New software tool could help routinely measure brain atrophy in MS patients

The loss of brain tissue, called brain atrophy, is a normal part of aging, but multiple sclerosis (MS) accelerates the process. [More]
Cerebral microbleeds linked to increased risk of physical, cognitive disability in MS patients

Cerebral microbleeds linked to increased risk of physical, cognitive disability in MS patients

Leaky blood vessels in the brain called cerebral microbleeds are associated with an increased risk of physical and cognitive disability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a new study by researchers in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo. [More]
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