Neuropathy News and Research RSS Feed - Neuropathy News and Research

Inflammation plays causal role in neurologic changes associated with Lyme disease

Inflammation plays causal role in neurologic changes associated with Lyme disease

About 15% of patients with Lyme disease develop peripheral and central nervous system involvement, often accompanied by debilitating and painful symptoms. New research indicates that inflammation plays a causal role in the array of neurologic changes associated with Lyme disease, according to a study published in The American Journal of Pathology. [More]
Depomed acquires U.S. rights to NUCYNTA franchise from Janssen Pharmaceuticals

Depomed acquires U.S. rights to NUCYNTA franchise from Janssen Pharmaceuticals

Depomed, Inc. today announced that it has closed the acquisition of the U.S. rights to the NUCYNTA franchise from Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. for $1.05 billion. The NUCYNTA franchise includes: NUCYNTA ER (tapentadol) extended release tablets indicated for the management of pain, including neuropathic pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), severe enough to require daily, around-the-clock, long-term opioid treatment; NUCYNTA (tapentadol), an immediate release version of tapentadol, for management of moderate to severe acute pain in adults; and NUCYNTA (tapentadol) oral solution, an approved oral form of tapentadol that has not been launched. [More]
Clonidine Topical Gel fails to meet primary endpoint in Phase 3 study for treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy

Clonidine Topical Gel fails to meet primary endpoint in Phase 3 study for treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy

BioDelivery Sciences International, Inc. announced that the primary efficacy endpoint in the Phase 3 clinical study of Clonidine Topical Gel compared to placebo for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy did not meet statistical significance, although certain secondary endpoints showed statistically significant improvement over placebo. In addition, a strong safety profile for the product was observed. [More]
Patients with carpal tunnel syndrome twice as likely to have migraine headaches, shows study

Patients with carpal tunnel syndrome twice as likely to have migraine headaches, shows study

Patients with carpal tunnel syndrome are more than twice as likely to have migraine headaches, reports a study in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery--Global Open, the official open-access medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). [More]
Targeted drug doubles progression free survival in Hodgkin lymphoma

Targeted drug doubles progression free survival in Hodgkin lymphoma

A phase 3 trial of brentuximab vedotin (BV), the first new drug for Hodgkin lymphoma in over 30 years, shows that adults with hard-to-treat Hodgkin lymphoma given BV immediately after stem cell transplant survived without the disease progressing for twice as long as those given placebo (43 months vs 24 months). [More]
FDA approves CHOLBAM (cholic acid) for treatment of bile acid synthesis disorders

FDA approves CHOLBAM (cholic acid) for treatment of bile acid synthesis disorders

Asklepion Pharmaceuticals, LLC. today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved CHOLBAM (cholic acid) as a once-daily treatment for cholic acid deficiency in bile acid synthesis disorders due to single enzyme defects. [More]
Sildenafil drug may effectively relieve nerve damage in men with long-term diabetes

Sildenafil drug may effectively relieve nerve damage in men with long-term diabetes

New animal studies at Henry Ford Hospital found that sildenafil, a drug commonly used to treat erectile dysfunction, may be effective in relieving painful and potentially life-threatening nerve damage in men with long-term diabetes. [More]
TCC-EZ Casting System dramatically increases healing process of diabetic foot ulcers

TCC-EZ Casting System dramatically increases healing process of diabetic foot ulcers

Diabetics once facing the prospect of amputation to their lower limbs due to the effects of foot ulcers are now back on their feet thanks to a new technology. [More]
OSU engineers use 'additive manufacturing' to create glucose sensor for patients with diabetes

OSU engineers use 'additive manufacturing' to create glucose sensor for patients with diabetes

Engineers at Oregon State University have used "additive manufacturing" to create an improved type of glucose sensor for patients with Type 1diabetes, part of a system that should work better, cost less and be more comfortable for the patient. [More]
United Therapeutics announces FDA approval of dinutuximab for treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma

United Therapeutics announces FDA approval of dinutuximab for treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma

United Therapeutics Corporation announced today that the United States Food and Drug Administration has approved Unituxin (dinutuximab) Injection (formerly called ch14.18), in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin-2 (IL-2), and 13-cis-retinoic acid (RA), for the treatment of pediatric patients with high-risk neuroblastoma who achieve at least a partial response to prior first-line multiagent, multimodality therapy. [More]
Non-viral gene therapy provides relief for diabetics with constant foot pain

Non-viral gene therapy provides relief for diabetics with constant foot pain

Walking barefoot on sand "felt like walking on glass" for Keith Wenckowski, who has lived with type-one diabetes for more than two decades. [More]
Henry Ford researchers propose new treatment strategy for stroke, other neurological disorders

Henry Ford researchers propose new treatment strategy for stroke, other neurological disorders

Medicine should reconsider how it treats stroke and other neurological disorders, focusing on the intrinsic abilities of the brain and nervous system to heal themselves rather than the "modest" benefits of clot-busting drugs and other neuroprotective treatments. [More]
Kyprolis demonstrates superiority over velcade in patients with relapsed multiple myeloma in head-to-head endeavor trial

Kyprolis demonstrates superiority over velcade in patients with relapsed multiple myeloma in head-to-head endeavor trial

Patients Receiving Kyprolis Lived Twice as Long without Disease Progression [More]
Novel technology could improve diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease

Novel technology could improve diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease

Approximately 8 to 12 million people in the United States alone are suffering from peripheral arterial disease (PAD), a common vascular problem that is caused by narrowing of the arteries as a result of plaque buildup. The plaque accumulation leads to an insufficient blood flow to the body's extremities and increases a person's risk for heart attack and stroke by up to six times. PAD is also one of the most serious complications of diabetes. [More]
Study: Gene variant linked to increased risk of vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy in children

Study: Gene variant linked to increased risk of vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy in children

Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who had a certain gene variant experienced a higher incidence and severity of peripheral neuropathy after receiving treatment with the cancer drug vincristine, according to a study in the February 24 issue of JAMA. [More]
Researchers identify first genetic variation linked to increased risk of peripheral neuropathy

Researchers identify first genetic variation linked to increased risk of peripheral neuropathy

Researchers have identified the first genetic variation that is associated with increased risk and severity of peripheral neuropathy following treatment with a widely used anti-cancer drug. Investigators also found evidence of how it may be possible to protect young leukemia patients without jeopardizing cures. [More]
Researchers develop targeted approach that allows muscle to burn more energy

Researchers develop targeted approach that allows muscle to burn more energy

What started as an evolutionary protection against starvation has become a biological "bad joke" for people who need to lose weight. The human body doesn't distinguish between dieting and possible starvation, so when there is a decrease in calories consumed, human metabolism increases its energy efficiency and weight loss is resisted. [More]
Natalizumab drug helps scientists confirm how 'viral reservoirs' form in HIV patients

Natalizumab drug helps scientists confirm how 'viral reservoirs' form in HIV patients

A drug used to treat patients with Crohn's disease and multiple sclerosis has helped scientists confirm how "viral reservoirs" form in patients living with HIV and also proven effective in animal trials at blocking the pathways to those reservoirs in the brain and gut, a team of researchers reported recently in the journal PLOS Pathogens. [More]
Advances in stem cell therapy can improve outcomes for patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers

Advances in stem cell therapy can improve outcomes for patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers

According to data presented at the 73rd Annual Scientific Conference of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons, advances in stem cell therapy can significantly improve outcomes for patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers. Use of stem cells to treat foot problems like diabetic ulcers may speed up the healing process, preventing infection and hospitalization during recovery. [More]
Research findings may point to new treatment for patients with Mitofusin 2 deficiency

Research findings may point to new treatment for patients with Mitofusin 2 deficiency

Researchers have discovered a novel role for Mitofusin 2, and the findings may point to a new treatment for patients with diseases caused by loss of the mitochondrial protein. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement