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Immunomic Therapeutics, Astellas Pharma sign license deal to develop LAMP-vax DNA vaccines

Immunomic Therapeutics, Astellas Pharma sign license deal to develop LAMP-vax DNA vaccines

Immunomic Therapeutics, Inc. ("Immunomic Therapeutics"), a company developing next-generation vaccines based on the LAMP-vax platform, and Astellas Pharma Inc. ("Astellas") today announced they have entered into an exclusive license agreement for Japan to develop and commercialize JRC2-LAMP-vax, Immunomic Therapeutics' vaccine designed to treat allergies induced by Japanese red cedar pollen. [More]
Neuroscientists propose new strategy for brain evolution

Neuroscientists propose new strategy for brain evolution

Little animations trying to master a computer game are teaching neuroscience researchers how the brain evolves when faced with difficult tasks. [More]
Gradual smoking cessation may be key for quitting

Gradual smoking cessation may be key for quitting

Smoking is harmful in almost every respect. Cancer, stroke, and other cardiovascular diseases are just a small part of a well-documented portfolio of serious consequences of smoking. [More]
New eye-tracking device measures severity of concussion and brain injury

New eye-tracking device measures severity of concussion and brain injury

New research out of NYU Langone Medical Center could move the medical community one step closer toward effectively detecting concussion and quantifying its severity. [More]
Researchers discover novel compound that helps curtail progression of temporal lobe epilepsy

Researchers discover novel compound that helps curtail progression of temporal lobe epilepsy

Researchers at the LSU Health New Orleans Neuroscience Center of Excellence have found that a novel compound they discovered helps curtail the onset and progression of temporal lobe epilepsy. [More]
Reducing A2A adenosine receptor levels prevents memory impairments in Alzheimer's mouse model

Reducing A2A adenosine receptor levels prevents memory impairments in Alzheimer's mouse model

A study by scientists from the Gladstone Institutes shows that decreasing the number of A2A adenosine receptors in a particular type of brain cells called astrocytes improved memory in healthy mice. What's more, reducing receptor levels also prevented memory impairments in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Improving prefrontal cortex activity could help autistic people regulate emotions

Improving prefrontal cortex activity could help autistic people regulate emotions

Tantrums, irritability, self-injury, depression, anxiety. These symptoms are associated with autism, but they're not considered core symptoms of the disorder. Researchers from the UNC School of Medicine are challenging this assertion. They have used functional MRI to show that - when it comes to the ability to regulate emotions - brain activity in autistic people is significantly different than brain activity in people without autism. [More]
Sanford-Burnham researchers use human pluripotent stem cells to grow new hair

Sanford-Burnham researchers use human pluripotent stem cells to grow new hair

In a new study from Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, researchers have used human pluripotent stem cells to generate new hair. The study represents the first step toward the development of a cell-based treatment for people with hair loss. In the United States alone, more than 40 million men and 21 million women are affected by hair loss. [More]
Study shows differences in play behavior, brain activation patterns and stress levels in autistic children

Study shows differences in play behavior, brain activation patterns and stress levels in autistic children

Brain scans confirm significant differences in play behavior, brain activation patterns and stress levels in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) as compared with typically developing children. [More]
Increased levels of stress hormones in mother can affect foetal development

Increased levels of stress hormones in mother can affect foetal development

Increased levels of stress hormones can lead pregnant mice to overeat, but affect growth of the foetus and, potentially, the long term health of her offspring, according to a study published today. [More]
Research findings may accelerate work to safely control diabetes

Research findings may accelerate work to safely control diabetes

For those with diabetes, managing blood sugar is a balancing act -- if blood sugar is too high it raises the risk for nerve damage, blindness, kidney failure, and heart trouble, and if too low it can lead to a seizure or unconsciousness. [More]
New discovery may help doctors develop better treatments for brain, spinal cord injuries

New discovery may help doctors develop better treatments for brain, spinal cord injuries

In a discovery that could dramatically affect the treatment of brain and spinal cord injuries, researchers have identified a previously unknown, beneficial immune response that occurs after injury to the central nervous system. [More]
Monell Center receives NIH grant to develop clinical tool that can predict anosmia

Monell Center receives NIH grant to develop clinical tool that can predict anosmia

Monell Center scientist Kai Zhao, PhD, is principal investigator on a $1.5M 4-year grant from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, part of the National Institutes of Health, to further develop clinical methodology that can predict the path of air flow through a person's nasal passages. [More]
UCLA researchers find new treatment that restores normal social behavior in autism mice model

UCLA researchers find new treatment that restores normal social behavior in autism mice model

Among the problems people with Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) struggle with are difficulties with social behavior and communication. That can translate to an inability to make friends, engage in routine conversations, or pick up on the social cues that are second nature to most people. Similarly, in a mouse model of ASD, the animals, like humans, show little interest in interacting or socializing with other mice. [More]
Improving sleep early in life may delay age-related changes in memory

Improving sleep early in life may delay age-related changes in memory

Sound sleep in young and middle-aged people helps memory and learning, but as they hit their seventh, eighth and ninth decades, they don't sleep as much or as well -- and sleep is no longer linked so much to memory, a Baylor researcher says. [More]
Researchers uncover mechanism by which anti-inflammatory processes may cause Alzheimer's

Researchers uncover mechanism by which anti-inflammatory processes may cause Alzheimer's

Inflammation has long been studied in Alzheimer's, but in a counterintuitive finding reported in a new paper, University of Florida researchers have uncovered the mechanism by which anti-inflammatory processes may trigger the disease. [More]
New article provides insight into cognitive fatigue in people with multiple sclerosis

New article provides insight into cognitive fatigue in people with multiple sclerosis

Kessler Foundation researchers have authored a new article that provides insight into the factors that contribute to cognitive fatigue in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). The article, "Subjective cognitive fatigue in MS depends on task length," was epublished ahead of print on October 27 in Frontiers in Neurology. [More]
Scientists take a huge step forward in identifying root causes of psoriasis

Scientists take a huge step forward in identifying root causes of psoriasis

Case Western Reserve scientists have taken a huge leap toward identifying root causes of psoriasis, an inflammatory skin condition affecting 125 million people around the world. Of the roughly 50,000 proteins in the human body, researchers have zeroed in on four that appear most likely to contribute this chronic disease. [More]
Study offers possible explanation for differences between synchronization patterns in autism

Study offers possible explanation for differences between synchronization patterns in autism

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been studied for many years, but there are still more questions than answers. For example, some research into the brain functions of individuals on the autism spectrum have found a lack of synchronization between different parts of the brain that normally work in tandem. But other studies have found the exact opposite - over-synchronization in the brains of those with ASD. [More]
Walnuts may improve cognitive function

Walnuts may improve cognitive function

Eating walnuts may improve performance on cognitive function tests, including those for memory, concentration and information processing speed according to new research from the David Geffen School of Medicine at The University of California, Los Angeles, led by Dr. Lenore Arab. Cognitive function was consistently greater in adult participants that consumed walnuts, regardless of age, gender or ethnicity. [More]