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Sheffield researchers identify novel function of C9orf72 protein linked to ALS and FTD

Sheffield researchers identify novel function of C9orf72 protein linked to ALS and FTD

Scientists from the University of Sheffield have discovered a novel function of the C9orf72 protein which is linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) - giving a new insight into the most common genetic cause of the degenerative diseases. [More]
Researchers uncover how dysfunction of brain circuit may contribute to memory loss

Researchers uncover how dysfunction of brain circuit may contribute to memory loss

Two interconnected brain areas - the hippocampus and the entorhinal cortex - help us to know where we are and to remember it later. [More]
Inhibition behavior may help predict binge drinking habits among young adults

Inhibition behavior may help predict binge drinking habits among young adults

While there are a number of studies on alcohol misuse, most of the research has been focused on the adult population. Alcohol is the most widely used drug among young adults between the ages of 18 to 25. [More]
Researchers examine effect of GluD2 receptor on parallel fibre regeneration

Researchers examine effect of GluD2 receptor on parallel fibre regeneration

Nerves in the central nervous system of adult mammals do not usually regenerate when injured. The granule cell, a nerve cell located in the cerebellum, is different. [More]
Transorbital ACS can improve vision in patients with glaucoma, optic nerve damage

Transorbital ACS can improve vision in patients with glaucoma, optic nerve damage

Vision loss due to glaucoma or optic nerve damage is generally considered irreversible. Now a new prospective, randomized, multi-center clinical trial demonstrates significant vision improvement in partially blind patients after 10 days of noninvasive, transorbital alternating current stimulation. [More]
Study links dopamine D2 receptor to long-term episodic memory

Study links dopamine D2 receptor to long-term episodic memory

A European study led by Umea University Professor Lars Nyberg, has shown that the dopamine D2 receptor is linked to the long-term episodic memory, which function often reduces with age and due to dementia. [More]
Prior Scientific details extensive range of products for neuroscience, electrophysiological applications in new brochure

Prior Scientific details extensive range of products for neuroscience, electrophysiological applications in new brochure

Prior Scientific, a leader in advanced high precision microscopy products, details its extensive range of automated systems, motorised stages and accessories for neuroscience and electrophysiological applications in a new brochure. [More]
Mice studies reveal new insights into neurons that cause symptoms of Rett syndrome

Mice studies reveal new insights into neurons that cause symptoms of Rett syndrome

Two studies in mice from Baylor College of Medicine, Texas, reveal new insights into neurons that mediate symptoms typical of the postnatal neurological disorder Rett syndrome. [More]
Researchers develop new technology to capture images of the brain

Researchers develop new technology to capture images of the brain

In a partnership melding neuroscience and electrical engineering, researchers from UNC-Chapel Hill and NC State University have developed a new technology that will allow neuroscientists to capture images of the brain almost 10 times larger than previously possible - helping them better understand the behavior of neurons in the brain. [More]
LIF-treated muscle stem cells show promise in treatment of muscular dystrophy

LIF-treated muscle stem cells show promise in treatment of muscular dystrophy

Satellite cells are stem cells found in skeletal muscles. While transplantation of such muscle stem cells can be a potent therapy for degenerative muscle diseases such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy, these cells tend to lose their transplantation efficiency when cultured in vitro. [More]
Jefferson researchers discover alternate pathway that helps heart keep pumping

Jefferson researchers discover alternate pathway that helps heart keep pumping

About 5.7 million Americans have heart failure, half of whom will die from the disease within 5 years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
Why does appetite loss occur during illness? An interview with Prof. Conti and Prof. Francesconi

Why does appetite loss occur during illness? An interview with Prof. Conti and Prof. Francesconi

Appetite, as a word, come from the Latin appetitus, meaning "desire for.” Therefore, appetite can be defined as a pleasurable sensation or the desire to eat. This sensation is coordinated by several brain areas associated with reward processing such amygdala, hippocampus, ventral pallidum, nucleus accumbens and striatum, and others. [More]
HDAC inhibitors may help regulate alcoholism-induced anxiety

HDAC inhibitors may help regulate alcoholism-induced anxiety

Epigenetics is the study of changes in organisms caused by modifying gene expression - by alcohol, for example - rather than alteration of the genetic code itself. Recent evidence suggests that alcohol can inhibit activity of an enzyme called histone deacetylase (HDAC) in the amygdala, a brain region that is crucial for storing memories and regulating fear, anxiety, and other emotions. [More]
Photodynamic therapy effective in treating porphyrias but can be severely painful, cause inflammation

Photodynamic therapy effective in treating porphyrias but can be severely painful, cause inflammation

Severe paleness and photosensitivity are two symptoms of a rare group of hereditary diseases that affect haem, a substance in the blood. While these metabolic disorders - known as the porphyrias - are extremely rare, a similar effect is often deliberately triggered by dermatologists in localised areas during the treatment of pre-cancerous skin lesions and skin cancers. [More]
Scientists provide new insights into role of star-shaped brain cells in memory, learning

Scientists provide new insights into role of star-shaped brain cells in memory, learning

A molecule that enables strong communication between our brain and muscles appears to also aid essential communication between our neurons, scientists report. [More]
Scientists discover RNA methylation could strengthen memory formation

Scientists discover RNA methylation could strengthen memory formation

New insight into the process that converts experiences into stable long-term memories has been uncovered by neurobiologists from the University of California, Irvine and the University of Queensland. [More]
Study shows many people may have potential to develop Huntington's disease

Study shows many people may have potential to develop Huntington's disease

More people may have the potential to develop Huntington's disease than previously thought, according to a study published in the June 22, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Scientists detect new genetic candidate for testing treatments that could influence fear learning in PTSD patients

Scientists detect new genetic candidate for testing treatments that could influence fear learning in PTSD patients

Researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles have identified a new genetic candidate for testing therapies that might affect fear learning in people with PTSD or other conditions. Results of the study have been published in the Journal of Neuroscience. [More]
Study links brain chemistry and fluid intelligence in living humans

Study links brain chemistry and fluid intelligence in living humans

A new study begins to clarify how brain structure and chemistry give rise to specific aspects of "fluid intelligence," the ability to adapt to new situations and solve problems one has never encountered before. [More]
Kidney transplant recipients with inflammation prior to surgery more likely to develop diabetes

Kidney transplant recipients with inflammation prior to surgery more likely to develop diabetes

Up to 30 percent of people who receive organ transplants will develop diabetes, but researchers are unsure why. Although doctors typically blame immunosuppressive drugs that transplant recipients take to prevent organ rejection, it's unclear why some people develop the lifelong disorder, while others do not. [More]
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