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Dental pulp stem cell transplants can contribute to peripheral nerve regeneration

Dental pulp stem cell transplants can contribute to peripheral nerve regeneration

Peripheral nerve injuries often are caused by trauma or surgical complications and can result in considerable disabilities. Regeneration of peripheral nerves can be accomplished effectively using autologous (self-donated) nerve grafts, but that procedure may sacrifice a functional nerve and cause loss of sensation in another part of the patient's body. [More]
Sialic acid attached to brain cells may affect brain structure, cause neurological problems

Sialic acid attached to brain cells may affect brain structure, cause neurological problems

New research from The Johns Hopkins University suggests that a molecule commonly found “decorating” brain cells in higher animals, including humans, may affect brain structure. [More]
New treatment option available for CLL patients in Manitoba and Saskatchewan

New treatment option available for CLL patients in Manitoba and Saskatchewan

People in Manitoba and Saskatchewan living with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) will now be able to access a new treatment option through the prescription drug insurance plans in both provinces. Earlier this week, GAZYVA (obinutuzumab) in combination with chlorambucil chemotherapy was added to benefits formularies of the Provincial Oncology Drug Programs at CancerCare Manitoba and the Saskatchewan Cancer Agency. [More]
Study: Genes may not trigger heart disease in people suffering from migraine with aura

Study: Genes may not trigger heart disease in people suffering from migraine with aura

A new study suggests that genes may not be to blame for the increased risk of heart disease some studies have shown in people with migraine, especially those with migraine with aura. The research is published during Headache/Migraine Awareness Month in the inaugural issue of the journal Neurology Genetics, an open access, or free to the public, online-only, peer-reviewed journal from the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
SAGE, SingHealth partner to publish Proceedings of Singapore Healthcare journal

SAGE, SingHealth partner to publish Proceedings of Singapore Healthcare journal

SAGE and SingHealth have today announced a new partnership to publish SingHealth's flagship journal, Proceedings of Singapore Healthcare, as of September 2015. The journal will remain owned by SingHealth but will be published by SAGE. [More]
HKUST scientists find way to stimulate growth of corticospinal tract axons

HKUST scientists find way to stimulate growth of corticospinal tract axons

Researchers at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology have found a way to stimulate the growth of axons, which may spell the dawn of a new beginning on chronic SCI treatments. [More]
New UCL research reveals how past events are reconstructed in the brain

New UCL research reveals how past events are reconstructed in the brain

When remembering something from our past, we often vividly re-experience the whole episode in which it occurred. New UCL research funded by the Medical Research Council and Wellcome Trust has now revealed how this might happen in the brain. [More]
Cortisol study may explain persistence of emotional memories occurring in anxiety, PTSD

Cortisol study may explain persistence of emotional memories occurring in anxiety, PTSD

The stress hormone cortisol strengthens memories of scary experiences. However, it is effective not only while the memory is being formed for the first time, but also later when people look back at an experience while the memory reconsolidates. This has been published by cognition psychologists from the Ruhr-Universität Bochum in the journal "Neuropsychopharmacology". [More]
Study sheds new light on how the brain forms memories

Study sheds new light on how the brain forms memories

In the first study of its kind, UCLA and United Kingdom researchers found that neurons in a specific brain region play a key role in rapidly forming memories about every day events, a finding that may result in a better understanding of memory loss and new methods to fight it in Alzheimer's and other neurological diseases. [More]

Computer model could help develop better strategies for treating early-childhood visual disorders

When newborn babies open their eyes for the first time, they already possess nerve cells specialized in particular stimuli in the visual cortex of their brains - but these nerve cells are not systematically linked with each other. [More]
Brain-imaging studies may help predict promiscuity, problem drinking in young adults

Brain-imaging studies may help predict promiscuity, problem drinking in young adults

A pair of brain-imaging studies suggest researchers may be able to predict how likely young adults are to develop problem drinking or engage in risky sexual behavior in response to stress. [More]
Dietary fat intake could potentially ease mitochondrial disease, shows research

Dietary fat intake could potentially ease mitochondrial disease, shows research

Mice that have a genetic version of mitochondrial disease can easily be mistaken for much older animals by the time they are nine months old: they have thinning grey hair, osteoporosis, poor hearing, infertility, heart problems and have lost weight. Despite having this disease at birth, these mice have a "secret weapon" in their youth that staves off signs of aging for a time. [More]
Sialic acid may play significant role in certain brain disorders

Sialic acid may play significant role in certain brain disorders

A new report published in the July 2015 issue of The FASEB Journal suggests that a common molecule found in higher animals, including humans, affects brain structure. This molecule may play a significant role in how brain cells communicate, possibly shedding light on the underlying causes of certain brain disorders. [More]
New study suggests causal link between job strain and sleep disturbances

New study suggests causal link between job strain and sleep disturbances

A new study suggests that there may be a reciprocal, causal pathway between job strain and disturbed sleep, implying that interventions to treat sleep problems may improve work satisfaction. [More]
FAU awarded $2.1 million to examine effectiveness of antipsychotic medication for schizophrenia

FAU awarded $2.1 million to examine effectiveness of antipsychotic medication for schizophrenia

Florida Atlantic University's Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine was recently awarded a $2.1 million, two-year contract by Otsuka America Pharmaceutical Inc. to conduct a study to examine the effectiveness of an injectable long-acting antipsychotic medication for schizophrenia and its impact on 30-day hospital readmission rates. [More]
Pharma Two B reports positive results from P2B001 Phase IIb study for treatment of early stage PD

Pharma Two B reports positive results from P2B001 Phase IIb study for treatment of early stage PD

Pharma Two B Ltd., a privately held company developing innovative therapeutics based on previously approved drugs, announced today the successful results of the company's Phase IIb pivotal study of P2B001 for the treatment of early stage Parkinson's Disease (PD). [More]
FDA grants first cervical multilevel indication to Centinel Spine’s STALIF C integrated interbody device

FDA grants first cervical multilevel indication to Centinel Spine’s STALIF C integrated interbody device

Centinel Spine, Inc., the pioneer of Stand-Alone, No-Profile, Integrated Interbody fusion devices was granted the first cervical multilevel indication for a Stand-Alone interbody device by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). [More]
TSRI scientists find five different miRNAs involved in memory formation

TSRI scientists find five different miRNAs involved in memory formation

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found that a type of genetic material called “microRNA” plays surprisingly different roles in the formation of memory in animal models. In some cases, these RNAs increase memory, while others decrease it. [More]
EnteroMedics announces pricing of previously announced public offering of common stock

EnteroMedics announces pricing of previously announced public offering of common stock

EnteroMedics Inc., a developer and manufacturer of devices that use neuroblocking technology to treat obesity, metabolic diseases, and other gastrointestinal disorders, announced the pricing of its previously announced public offering of 40,229,886 units. [More]
Three National Laureates selected for 2015 Blavatnik National Awards for Young Scientists

Three National Laureates selected for 2015 Blavatnik National Awards for Young Scientists

A chemist who has made important discoveries in both the human brain and sustainable energy, a neurosurgeon who has done pioneering work mapping the "blueprint" of how humans speak and hear, and a computer scientist who has changed our understanding of the capacity of wireless networks are the three winners of the 2015 Blavatnik National Awards for Young Scientists. [More]
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