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Deleting enzyme favorably impacts behaviors associated with autistic behaviors

Deleting enzyme favorably impacts behaviors associated with autistic behaviors

Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a genetic disorder that causes obsessive-compulsive and repetitive behaviors, and other behaviors on the autistic spectrum, as well as cognitive deficits. It is the most common inherited cause of mental impairment and the most common cause of autism. [More]
Treating obesity with therapies aimed at areas of brain

Treating obesity with therapies aimed at areas of brain

Unlocking the secrets to better treating the pernicious disorders of obesity and dementia reside in the brain, according to a paper from American University's Center for Behavioral Neuroscience. [More]
Compounds developed for cancer treatment show promise as potential oral therapy for Alzheimer's

Compounds developed for cancer treatment show promise as potential oral therapy for Alzheimer's

Currently, no cure exists for Alzheimer's disease, the devastating neurological disease affecting more than 5 million Americans. But scientists are now reporting new progress on a set of compounds, initially developed for cancer treatment, that shows promise as a potential oral therapy for Alzheimer's. Their study appears in ACS' Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. [More]
Monitoring pulse regularly after stroke helps prevent next stroke

Monitoring pulse regularly after stroke helps prevent next stroke

New research suggests that regularly monitoring your pulse after a stroke or the pulse of a loved one who has experienced a stroke may be a simple and effective first step in detecting irregular heartbeat, a major cause of having a second stroke. [More]
Shire, ArmaGen partner to develop AGT-182 drug for treatment of Hunter syndrome

Shire, ArmaGen partner to develop AGT-182 drug for treatment of Hunter syndrome

Shire plc, the global specialty biopharmaceutical company, and ArmaGen, a US privately held biotechnology company, today announced a worldwide licensing and collaboration agreement for AGT-182, an investigational enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for the potential treatment of both the central nervous system (CNS) and somatic manifestations in patients with Hunter syndrome (MPS II). [More]
Robert E. Marc named recipient of 2014 Paul Kayser International Award in Retina Research

Robert E. Marc named recipient of 2014 Paul Kayser International Award in Retina Research

Robert E. Marc, Ph.D., director of research at the University of Utah's John A. Moran Eye Center, has been named by the International Society of Eye Research as the recipient of the Houston, Texas-based Retina Research Foundation's 2014 Paul Kayser International Award in Retina Research. [More]
New research reveals how expectations about odors can influence symptoms of asthma

New research reveals how expectations about odors can influence symptoms of asthma

New research from the Monell Center reveals that simply believing that an odor is potentially harmful can increase airway inflammation in asthmatics for at least 24 hours following exposure. The findings highlight the role that expectations can play in health-related outcomes. [More]
Study reveals novel epilepsy pathway linked to neurodegenerative diseases

Study reveals novel epilepsy pathway linked to neurodegenerative diseases

A recent scientific discovery showed that mutations in prickle genes cause epilepsy, which in humans is a brain disorder characterized by repeated seizures over time. However, the mechanism responsible for generating prickle-associated seizures was unknown. [More]
Researchers demonstrate solid link between bad diet and loss of smell

Researchers demonstrate solid link between bad diet and loss of smell

Could stuffing yourself full of high-fat foods cause you to lose your sense of smell? A new study from Florida State University neuroscientists says so, and it has researchers taking a closer look at how our diets could impact a whole range of human functions that were not traditionally considered when examining the impact of obesity. [More]
Study: Genetics plays major role in development of autism

Study: Genetics plays major role in development of autism

Using new statistical tools, Carnegie Mellon University's Kathryn Roeder has led an international team of researchers to discover that most of the genetic risk for autism comes from versions of genes that are common in the population rather than from rare variants or spontaneous glitches. [More]
Study confirms link between antipsychotic medication and slight decrease in brain volume

Study confirms link between antipsychotic medication and slight decrease in brain volume

A study published today has confirmed a link between antipsychotic medication and a slight, but measureable, decrease in brain volume in patients with schizophrenia. [More]
Research leads to better understanding of neurodegenerative, neurodevelopmental diseases

Research leads to better understanding of neurodegenerative, neurodevelopmental diseases

Throughout our lives, our brains adapt to what we learn and memorise. The brain is indeed made up of complex networks of neurons and synapses that are constantly re-configured. [More]
Hour-long educational coaching session reduces re-admission odds, cost for Medicare patients

Hour-long educational coaching session reduces re-admission odds, cost for Medicare patients

A new study in Journal of General Internal Medicine reports that an hour-long educational coaching session and two or three follow-up phone calls after a hospital stay reduced re-admission odds by 39 percent among Medicare patients. [More]
Salk scientists identify gene that fights metastasis of common lung cancer

Salk scientists identify gene that fights metastasis of common lung cancer

Scientists at the Salk Institute have identified a gene responsible for stopping the movement of cancer from the lungs to other parts of the body, indicating a new way to fight one of the world's deadliest cancers. [More]
Difference between love and lust might be in eyes, say researchers

Difference between love and lust might be in eyes, say researchers

Soul singer Betty Everett once proclaimed, "If you want to know if he loves you so, it's in his kiss." But a new study by University of Chicago researchers suggests the difference between love and lust might be in the eyes after all. [More]
UH Case Medical Center signs agreement with ARUP to offer DEEPGEN-HIV test

UH Case Medical Center signs agreement with ARUP to offer DEEPGEN-HIV test

University Hospitals (UH) Case Medical Center has signed an agreement with ARUP Laboratories, a major national clinical reference laboratory that offers an extensive menu of highly complex and unique medical tests to hospitals, medical schools, and other nonprofit and commercial organizations throughout the United States. [More]
Findings fuel idea that processes of active movement and sensory processing are connected

Findings fuel idea that processes of active movement and sensory processing are connected

A new study by researchers at the University of Oregon published today in the journal Neuron describes a brainstem circuit in mice that may help explain how active movement impacts the way the brain processes sensory information. [More]
People with mild traumatic brain injury may have brain damage and memory problems

People with mild traumatic brain injury may have brain damage and memory problems

Even mild traumatic brain injury may cause brain damage and thinking and memory problems, according to a study published in the July 16, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Single injection of protein FGF1 enough to restore blood sugar levels

Single injection of protein FGF1 enough to restore blood sugar levels

In mice with diet-induced diabetes—the equivalent of type 2 diabetes in humans—a single injection of the protein FGF1 is enough to restore blood sugar levels to a healthy range for more than two days. [More]
Study reveals way to alleviate memory deficits for Alzheimer's disease patients

Study reveals way to alleviate memory deficits for Alzheimer's disease patients

A new study from the Gladstone Institutes has revealed a way to alleviate the learning and memory deficits caused by apoE4, the most important genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, improving cognition to normal levels in aged mice. [More]