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Hallucinogenic drug offers relief for people with cancer-related anxiety or depression

Hallucinogenic drug offers relief for people with cancer-related anxiety or depression

In a small double-blind study, Johns Hopkins researchers report that a substantial majority of people suffering cancer-related anxiety or depression found considerable relief for up to six months from a single large dose of psilocybin -- the active compound in hallucinogenic "magic mushrooms." [More]
Monell Center receives Gates Foundation grant to support innovative global health research project

Monell Center receives Gates Foundation grant to support innovative global health research project

The Monell Center announced today that it has received a $345,000 grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The grant supports an innovative global health research project titled, "Developing Novel Pediatric Formulation Technologies for Global Health: Human Taste Assays." [More]
Transcranial magnetic stimulation could bring back abandoned memories

Transcranial magnetic stimulation could bring back abandoned memories

It's clear that your working memory -- which holds attention on small things of short-term importance -- works, or you wouldn't be able to remember a new phone number long enough to dial it. [More]
Bone density could be one of early indicators of brain degeneration in Alzheimer's disease

Bone density could be one of early indicators of brain degeneration in Alzheimer's disease

Researchers at NEOMED have just identified a major connection between areas of the brainstem - the ancient area that controls mood, sleep and metabolism - and detrimental changes to bone in a preclinical model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). [More]
Researcher explores link between PTSD and repeated alcohol use

Researcher explores link between PTSD and repeated alcohol use

As families gather for the holidays this year, many will reminisce, sharing fond memories as they break bread and pass the cranberry sauce. [More]
New mouse model provides key information for understanding cortical circuit development

New mouse model provides key information for understanding cortical circuit development

A day by day log of cortical electric activity in the mouse visual cortex was published in the Journal of Neuroscience by George Washington University researcher Matthew Colonnese, Ph.D. [More]
Newborns with low levels of vitamin D may more likely develop multiple sclerosis in later life

Newborns with low levels of vitamin D may more likely develop multiple sclerosis in later life

Babies born with low levels of vitamin D may be more likely to develop multiple sclerosis (MS) later in life than babies with higher levels of vitamin D, according to a study published in the November 30, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Study finds persistent cortical thinning in former collegiate football players

Study finds persistent cortical thinning in former collegiate football players

A growing body of research continues to raise concerns about the effects of head trauma sustained while participating in popular contact sports, particularly football. [More]
Symptom trends may help predict recovery of patients suffering from post-concussion syndrome

Symptom trends may help predict recovery of patients suffering from post-concussion syndrome

Researchers at the Krembil Neuroscience Centre's Canadian Concussion Centre have identified symptom trends that may not only help predict how soon patients suffering from post-concussion syndrome (PCS) will recover, but also provide insight on how to treat those who experience persistent concussion symptoms. [More]
Research reveals new insights into how sleep deprivation affects children's brains

Research reveals new insights into how sleep deprivation affects children's brains

Any parent can tell you about the consequences of their child not getting enough sleep. But there is far less known about the details of how sleep deprivation affects children's brains and what this means for early brain development. [More]
Research provides new insight into how diseases that disconnect brain and body occur

Research provides new insight into how diseases that disconnect brain and body occur

A huge colony of receptors must be optimally positioned and functioning on our muscle cells for our brains to talk with our bodies so we can walk and breathe. [More]
Moderate coffee consumption may offer protection against age-related cognitive decline

Moderate coffee consumption may offer protection against age-related cognitive decline

A new report from the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC), a not-for-profit organisation devoted to the study and disclosure of science related to coffee and health, highlights the potential role of coffee consumption in reducing the risk of cognitive decline. [More]
Study using Cubresa SPECT scanner finds potential non-invasive diagnosis for Alzheimer’s

Study using Cubresa SPECT scanner finds potential non-invasive diagnosis for Alzheimer’s

Cubresa’s SPECT scanner was used to determine if a novel molecular label, TRV6001, in development for in vivo imaging of the BChE enzyme present in the brains of Alzheimer’s Disease patients follows the known distribution of the enzyme in animal models of the disease. [More]
Experts come together to develop plan for managing and sharing neuroscience data

Experts come together to develop plan for managing and sharing neuroscience data

Three years ago the White House launched the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative to accelerate the development and application of novel technologies that will give us a better understanding about how brains work. [More]
Neurons appear to retain partial communication despite serious structural aberrations, study finds

Neurons appear to retain partial communication despite serious structural aberrations, study finds

Neuroscientists have long known that brain cells communicate with each other through the release of tiny bubbles packed with neurotransmitters—a fleet of vessels docked along neuronal ends ready to launch when a trigger arrives. [More]
Stuttering linked to changes in speech and language-based brain circuits

Stuttering linked to changes in speech and language-based brain circuits

Researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have conducted the first study of its kind, using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to look at brain regions in both adults and children who stutter. [More]
Research shows how paralyzed limbs can be controlled via implanted electrodes

Research shows how paralyzed limbs can be controlled via implanted electrodes

Patients with spinal cord injuries might one day regain use of paralyzed arms and legs thanks to research that demonstrates how limbs can be controlled via a tiny array of implanted electrodes. [More]
ADD Program receives $19.5 million NIH contract to test drugs for treating epilepsy

ADD Program receives $19.5 million NIH contract to test drugs for treating epilepsy

The University of Utah College of Pharmacy's Anticonvulsant Drug Development Program has been awarded a five-year $19.5 million contract renewal with the National Institutes of Health to test drugs to treat epilepsy, and the major focus of the project is to address needs that affect millions of people worldwide -identify novel investigational compounds to prevent the development of epilepsy or to treat refractory, or drug-resistant, epilepsy. [More]
Einstein researcher receives $7.5 million NIH grant to study genetics of congenital heart disease

Einstein researcher receives $7.5 million NIH grant to study genetics of congenital heart disease

The National Institutes of Health has awarded Bernice Morrow, Ph.D., at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and collaborators at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia a five-year, $7.5 million grant to study the genetics of congenital heart abnormalities. [More]
BIDMC researchers discover neural circuitry that plays role in promoting satiety

BIDMC researchers discover neural circuitry that plays role in promoting satiety

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center researchers have identified previously unknown neural circuitry that plays a role in promoting satiety, the feeling of having had enough to eat. [More]
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