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Researchers find promising technique for type 1 diabetics to restore insulin producing cells

Researchers find promising technique for type 1 diabetics to restore insulin producing cells

A new study by researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (Sanford-Burnham) has found that a peptide called caerulein can convert existing cells in the pancreas into those cells destroyed in type 1 diabetes-insulin-producing beta cells. [More]
Study provides platform for detailed study of nerve injury and repair during Wallerian degeneration

Study provides platform for detailed study of nerve injury and repair during Wallerian degeneration

Wallerian degeneration is a subject of major interest in neuroscience. A large number of genes are differentially regulated during the distinct stages of Wallerian degeneration: transcription factor activation, immune response, myelin cell differentiation and dedifferentiation. [More]
OUP, CINP partner to publish International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology

OUP, CINP partner to publish International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology

Oxford University Press is pleased to announce its new relationship with the International College of Neuropsychopharmacology. [More]
El Camino Hospital uses Leaf Patient Monitoring system to help prevent hospital-acquired pressure ulcers

El Camino Hospital uses Leaf Patient Monitoring system to help prevent hospital-acquired pressure ulcers

El Camino Hospital, a leader in the use of technology to improve patient care, is utilizing the Leaf Patient Monitoring system to help prevent hospital-acquired pressure ulcers by monitoring the position and movement of patients susceptible to bed sores. [More]
More accurate tests could be created to diagnose memory problems

More accurate tests could be created to diagnose memory problems

UEA research finds hope for more accurate diagnosis of memory problems. More accurate tests could be created to diagnose diseases such as Alzheimer's or memory problems stemming from head injuries, leading to earlier intervention, according to new findings from the University of East Anglia (UEA). [More]
Researchers discover new function of body's most important tumor-suppressing protein

Researchers discover new function of body's most important tumor-suppressing protein

Researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have discovered a new function of the body's most important tumor-suppressing protein. Called p53, this protein has been called "the guardian of the genome." [More]
Little-known supportive cells in brain may play major role in cognitive function

Little-known supportive cells in brain may play major role in cognitive function

When you're expecting something-like the meal you've ordered at a restaurant-or when something captures your interest, unique electrical rhythms sweep through your brain. [More]
Neuroscientists analyze imaging data using new technologies

Neuroscientists analyze imaging data using new technologies

In an age of "big data," a single computer cannot always find the solution a user wants. Computational tasks must instead be distributed across a cluster of computers that analyze a massive data set together. [More]
Parallel brain circuits associated with opposing emotional reactions

Parallel brain circuits associated with opposing emotional reactions

People choosing between two or more equally positive outcomes experience paradoxical feelings of pleasure and anxiety, feelings associated with activity in different regions of the brain, according to research led by Amitai Shenhav, an associate research scholar at the Princeton Neuroscience Institute at Princeton University. [More]
Melatonin has protective effects on traumatic brain injury-induced cerebral cortex

Melatonin has protective effects on traumatic brain injury-induced cerebral cortex

Traumatic brain injury can cause post-traumatic neurodegenerations with an increase in reactive oxygen species and reactive oxygen species-mediated lipid peroxidation. Melatonin, a non-enzymatic antioxidant and neuroprotective agent, has been shown to counteract oxidative stress-induced pathophysiologic conditions like cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, neuronal excitotoxicity and chronic inflammation. [More]
Montefiore-Einstein investigators to present new findings from eight abstracts at IFHNOS 2014

Montefiore-Einstein investigators to present new findings from eight abstracts at IFHNOS 2014

Clinicians and researchers from Montefiore Medical Center and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University will present new findings from eight abstracts at the International Federation of Head and Neck Oncologic Societies World Congress being held July 26 - July 30 in New York. [More]
Neuregulin 1 effective in promoting peripheral nerve regrowth

Neuregulin 1 effective in promoting peripheral nerve regrowth

Neuregulin 1 (NRG1) is a pleiotropic factor characterized by the existence of numerous isoforms arising from alternative splicing of exons that confer to the protein deeply different characteristics. [More]
GW researcher awarded SFARI grant for autism research

GW researcher awarded SFARI grant for autism research

The link between autism and disrupted brain development is an essential part of the puzzle of the disease, and is largely unknown. However, thanks to funding from the Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative, George Washington University researcher Anthony-Samuel LaMantia, Ph.D. may be able to offer truly integrative and in-depth answers to these key questions in the field of autism research. [More]
Discovery could lead to new therapies for treating Type 2 diabetes, obesity

Discovery could lead to new therapies for treating Type 2 diabetes, obesity

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified neural pathways that increase understanding of how the brain regulates body weight, energy expenditure, and blood glucose levels - a discovery that can lead to new therapies for treating Type 2 diabetes and obesity. [More]
Study: Slow walking, memory complaints may predict future dementia

Study: Slow walking, memory complaints may predict future dementia

A study involving nearly 27,000 older adults on five continents found that nearly 1 in 10 met criteria for pre-dementia based on a simple test that measures how fast people walk and whether they have cognitive complaints. [More]
CCC study provides hope that SapC-DOPS could be used for metastatic brain cancer treatment

CCC study provides hope that SapC-DOPS could be used for metastatic brain cancer treatment

Over half of patients being seen in the clinic for a diagnosed brain tumor have metastatic cancer, which has no treatment and detrimental outcomes in most cases. [More]
Deleting enzyme favorably impacts behaviors associated with autistic behaviors

Deleting enzyme favorably impacts behaviors associated with autistic behaviors

Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a genetic disorder that causes obsessive-compulsive and repetitive behaviors, and other behaviors on the autistic spectrum, as well as cognitive deficits. It is the most common inherited cause of mental impairment and the most common cause of autism. [More]
New therapeutic interventions that target brain regions can prevent obesity

New therapeutic interventions that target brain regions can prevent obesity

Unlocking the secrets to better treating the pernicious disorders of obesity and dementia reside in the brain, according to a paper from American University's Center for Behavioral Neuroscience. [More]
Compounds developed for cancer treatment show promise as potential oral therapy for Alzheimer's

Compounds developed for cancer treatment show promise as potential oral therapy for Alzheimer's

Currently, no cure exists for Alzheimer's disease, the devastating neurological disease affecting more than 5 million Americans. But scientists are now reporting new progress on a set of compounds, initially developed for cancer treatment, that shows promise as a potential oral therapy for Alzheimer's. Their study appears in ACS' Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. [More]
Monitoring pulse regularly after stroke helps prevent next stroke

Monitoring pulse regularly after stroke helps prevent next stroke

New research suggests that regularly monitoring your pulse after a stroke or the pulse of a loved one who has experienced a stroke may be a simple and effective first step in detecting irregular heartbeat, a major cause of having a second stroke. [More]