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Study suggests potential treatment for cardiovascular disease in people with apoE4 gene variant

Study suggests potential treatment for cardiovascular disease in people with apoE4 gene variant

Researchers at UT-Southwestern Medical Center have found that the most common variant of the circulating protein apolipoprotein E, called apoE3, helps repair the lining of blood vessels. Individuals with another variant, called apoE4, do not get the benefit of this repair, putting them at higher risk for cardiovascular disease. [More]
Study links slowed processing speed with executive deficits in individuals with multiple sclerosis

Study links slowed processing speed with executive deficits in individuals with multiple sclerosis

Kessler Foundation researchers have published a study supporting the role of slowed processing speed in the executive deficits found in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
Researchers gain new knowledge about complex processes that cause Parkinson's disease

Researchers gain new knowledge about complex processes that cause Parkinson's disease

Using advanced computer models, neuroscience researchers at the University of Copenhagen have gained new knowledge about the complex processes that cause Parkinson's disease. The findings have recently been published in the prestigious Journal of Neuroscience. [More]
Janssen announces availability of PREZCOBIX for Canadians living with HIV

Janssen announces availability of PREZCOBIX for Canadians living with HIV

Janssen Inc. announced today that PREZCOBIX (darunavir/cobicistat), a once-daily, oral medication for the treatment of HIV infection in combination with other antiretroviral agents, is now available in Canada. It is the first HIV treatment option available to patients that provides boosted darunavir in a single tablet. [More]
New study sheds light on relationship between schizophrenia and smoking stems

New study sheds light on relationship between schizophrenia and smoking stems

Schizophrenia is associated with increased rates and intensity of tobacco smoking. A growing body of research suggests that the relationship between schizophrenia and smoking stems, in part, from an effort by patients to use nicotine to self-medicate symptoms and cognitive impairment associated with the disease. [More]
Research findings could help explain how some people stave off dementia

Research findings could help explain how some people stave off dementia

The human brain is capable of a neural workaround that compensates for the buildup of beta-amyloid, a destructive protein associated with Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley. [More]
Scientists develop new method to get clearer picture of how drug abuse affects the brain

Scientists develop new method to get clearer picture of how drug abuse affects the brain

One thing leads to another, especially in research. When Stony Brook University School of Medicine scientists developed a new method to measure how cocaine disrupts blood flow in the brains of mice, doctors and researchers got a way to form a clearer picture of how drug abuse affects the brain. [More]
New research illustrates how fear arises in the brain

New research illustrates how fear arises in the brain

An estimated 8% of Americans will suffer from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at some point during their lifetime. Brought on by an overwhelming or stressful event or events, PTSD is the result of altered chemistry and physiology of the brain. [More]
Lilly, AstraZeneca partner to co-develop and commercialize potential Alzheimer's disease treatment

Lilly, AstraZeneca partner to co-develop and commercialize potential Alzheimer's disease treatment

Eli Lilly and Company and AstraZeneca today announced an agreement to co-develop and commercialize AZD3293, an oral beta secretase cleaving enzyme (BACE) inhibitor currently in development as a potential treatment for Alzheimer's disease. [More]
UC San Francisco researchers use brain scans to predict reading difficulties in young children

UC San Francisco researchers use brain scans to predict reading difficulties in young children

UC San Francisco researchers have used brain scans to predict how young children learn to read, giving clinicians a possible tool to spot children with dyslexia and other reading difficulties before they experience reading challenges. [More]

Brain structure 'significantly predictive' of individual risk attitudes

There is a link between our brain structure and our tolerance of risk, new research suggests. [More]
Researchers find learning and memory components of neurofibromatosis using zebrafish model

Researchers find learning and memory components of neurofibromatosis using zebrafish model

Using a zebrafish model of a human genetic disease called neurofibromatosis (NF1), a team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has found that the learning and memory components of the disorder are distinct features that will likely need different treatment approaches. [More]
UC Irvine study sheds light on cognitive losses

UC Irvine study sheds light on cognitive losses

Brain inflammation can rapidly disrupt our ability to retrieve complex memories of similar but distinct experiences, according to UC Irvine neuroscientists Jennifer Czerniawski and John Guzowski. [More]

Olympus launches objective lenses, enabling super-deep imaging of tissues, live-cell imaging and light sheet microscopy techniques

Dedicated to multiphoton excitation microscopy, Olympus introduces its XLPLN10XSVMP and XLSLPLN25XGMP objective lenses with an 8 mm working distance and support for a large range of refractive indices (RI). The objectives enable super-deep imaging of tissues treated with the latest clearing agents as well as live-cell imaging and light sheet microscopy techniques. [More]
Research gives scientists new insight into evolution of gibbon genome

Research gives scientists new insight into evolution of gibbon genome

A team led by an Oregon Health & Science University researcher has sequenced and annotated the genome of the only ape whose DNA had yet to be sequenced - the gibbon, an endangered small ape that inhabits the tropical forests of Southeast Asia. [More]
Study looks at blood type and risk of cognitive impairment

Study looks at blood type and risk of cognitive impairment

People with blood type AB may be more likely to develop memory loss in later years than people with other blood types, according to a study published in the September 10, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Different regions of brain help to visually locate objects relative to one's own body

Different regions of brain help to visually locate objects relative to one's own body

Serena Williams won her third consecutive US Open title a few days ago, thanks to reasons including obvious ones like physical strength and endurance. But how much did her brain and its egocentric and allocentric functions help the American tennis star retain the cup? [More]
Sanofi contributes $2.5 million to CCNA for dementia research

Sanofi contributes $2.5 million to CCNA for dementia research

Sanofi announced today its $2.5 million contribution to co-fund the Canadian Consortium on Neurodegeneration in Aging, a partnership officially launched in Montreal today in the presence of The Honourable Rona Ambrose, Minister of Health. [More]
Working memory may be underlying mechanism of cognitive reserve in MS

Working memory may be underlying mechanism of cognitive reserve in MS

Kessler Foundation scientists have shown that working memory may be an underlying mechanism of cognitive reserve in multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]

New way to preserve flexibility and resilience of the brain

As Alzheimer's disease progresses, it kills brain cells mainly in the hippocampus and cortex, leading to impairments in "neuroplasticity," the mechanism that affects learning, memory, and thinking. [More]