Neuroscience News and Research RSS Feed - Neuroscience News and Research

SCS therapy can be key to reducing use of opioids in patients battling chronic pain, study finds

SCS therapy can be key to reducing use of opioids in patients battling chronic pain, study finds

New research has found spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy can be key to reducing or stabilizing the use of opioids in patients battling chronic pain. [More]
Salk Institute researchers reveal how to curb immune enthusiasm

Salk Institute researchers reveal how to curb immune enthusiasm

Normally when we think of viruses, from the common cold to HIV, we want to boost people's immunity to fight them. [More]
Tau pathology underlies deterioration of spatial cognition in Alzheimer's disease

Tau pathology underlies deterioration of spatial cognition in Alzheimer's disease

Columbia University Medical Center researchers have discovered that the spatial disorientation that leads to wandering in many Alzheimer's disease patients is caused by the accumulation of tau protein in navigational nerve cells in the brain. [More]
Salk scientists show how microenvironment signals encourage growth of pancreatic tumors

Salk scientists show how microenvironment signals encourage growth of pancreatic tumors

Just as an invasive weed might need nutrient-rich soil and water to grow, many cancers rely on the right surroundings in the body to thrive. [More]
U of I scientists discuss piglet model used for pediatric nutrition and neurodevelopment research

U of I scientists discuss piglet model used for pediatric nutrition and neurodevelopment research

Pediatric nutrition research has sh own the important effects of early-life nutrition on a baby's development--especially the gastrointestinal tract--and more recent research indicates that nutrition may also have an influence on an infant's brain as it develops. [More]
Mutations in gene that enables memories, sense of direction can contribute to schizophrenia symptoms

Mutations in gene that enables memories, sense of direction can contribute to schizophrenia symptoms

Mutations in a gene that should enable memories and a sense of direction instead can result in imprecise communication between neurons that contributes to symptoms of schizophrenia, scientists report. [More]
Mandarin speakers have musical pitch at much earlier age than previously thought

Mandarin speakers have musical pitch at much earlier age than previously thought

Mandarin makes you more musical - and at a much earlier age than previously thought. That's the suggestion of a new study from the University of California San Diego. But hold on there, overachiever parents, don't' rush just yet to sign your kids up for Chinese lessons instead of piano. [More]
Study identifies molecular signals that maintain nerve cell structures in the adult brain

Study identifies molecular signals that maintain nerve cell structures in the adult brain

Humans and other vertebrates depend on a portion of the brain called the hippocampus for learning, memory and their sense of location. Nerve cell structures in the adult hippocampus are sustained by factors whose identities have remained largely mysterious so far. [More]
Researchers show how adult learning is impaired in females using mouse models of Rett syndrome

Researchers show how adult learning is impaired in females using mouse models of Rett syndrome

Neurodevelopmental disorders like autism very likely have their origin at the dawn of life, with the emergence of inappropriate connectivity between nerve cells in the brain. [More]
Mapping premature infant's brain after birth may help better predict developmental problems

Mapping premature infant's brain after birth may help better predict developmental problems

Scanning a premature infant's brain shortly after birth to map the location and volume of lesions, small areas of injury in the brain's white matter, may help doctors better predict whether the baby will have disabilities later, according to a new study published in the January 18, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Study challenges concept of gender differences in the human brain

Study challenges concept of gender differences in the human brain

How different are men and women's brains? The latest evidence to address this controversy comes from a study at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, where a meta-analysis of human amygdala volumes found no significant difference between the sexes. [More]
Researchers discover role of neuron protein in learning abilities and AIDS-related dementia

Researchers discover role of neuron protein in learning abilities and AIDS-related dementia

Researchers from the University of California and Cardiff University have made a breakthrough in the understanding of AIDS-related dementia, discovering the role of a neuron protein which was also found to affect learning abilities in healthy subjects. [More]
Diminishing levels of GABA may play role in age-related cognitive decline

Diminishing levels of GABA may play role in age-related cognitive decline

Diminishing levels of GABA, the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, may play a role in cognitive decline as we age, according to a study published in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging. [More]
People with schizophrenia more likely to have diabetes than general population

People with schizophrenia more likely to have diabetes than general population

People with early schizophrenia are at an increased risk of developing diabetes, even when the effects of antipsychotic drugs, diet and exercise are taken out of the equation, according to an analysis by researchers from King's College London. [More]
AAN issues new guideline on mapping the brain before epilepsy surgery

AAN issues new guideline on mapping the brain before epilepsy surgery

Before epilepsy surgery, doctors may consider using brain imaging to locate language and memory functions in the brain instead of the more invasive procedure that is commonly used, according to a guideline published by the American Academy of Neurology in the January 11, 2017, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Essen BioScience’s IncuCyte live-cell analysis platform cited in more than 1000 publications

Essen BioScience’s IncuCyte live-cell analysis platform cited in more than 1000 publications

The IncuCyte live-cell analysis platform from Essen BioScience has been cited in more than 1000 peer-reviewed publications since its introduction. [More]
UNICEF launches new campaign to stress importance of early childhood development

UNICEF launches new campaign to stress importance of early childhood development

UNICEF today launched #EarlyMomentsMatter, a new campaign supported by the LEGO Foundation to drive increased awareness about the importance of the first 1,000 days of a child’s life and the impact of early experiences on the developing brain. [More]
Chair yoga may be effective approach to reduce osteoarthritis pain in older adults, study shows

Chair yoga may be effective approach to reduce osteoarthritis pain in older adults, study shows

For the millions of older adults who suffer from osteoarthritis in their lower extremities (hip, knee, ankle or foot), chair yoga is proving to be an effective way to reduce pain and improve quality of life while avoiding pharmacologic treatment or adverse events. [More]
CSHL scientists create first model of genetically induced obesity in fruit flies

CSHL scientists create first model of genetically induced obesity in fruit flies

Why do people become obese? Poor dietary choices and overeating seem like clear causes, but what is at the root of these behaviors? Significantly overweight people may be genetically predisposed to be affected disproportionately when faced with the ready availability of calorie-laden treats. [More]
Hormonal fluctuations make women more sensitive to addictive properties of cocaine, study reveals

Hormonal fluctuations make women more sensitive to addictive properties of cocaine, study reveals

Hormonal fluctuations women undergo make them particularly sensitive, compared to men, to the addictive properties of cocaine, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published January 10 in the journal Nature Communications. [More]
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