Neuroscience News and Research RSS Feed - Neuroscience News and Research

FDA approves MagVenture MagVita TMS Therapy system for treatment of Major Depressive Disorder

FDA approves MagVenture MagVita TMS Therapy system for treatment of Major Depressive Disorder

On July 31, 2015 the US Food and Drug Administration cleared the MagVita TMS Therapy system for the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder in adult patients who have failed to receive satisfactory improvement from prior antidepressant medication in the current episode. [More]
Cholinergic neurons in basal forebrain broadcast message throughout the cerebral cortex

Cholinergic neurons in basal forebrain broadcast message throughout the cerebral cortex

When a large combat unit, widely dispersed in dense jungle, goes to battle, no single soldier knows precisely how his actions are affecting the unit's success or failure. But in modern armies, every soldier is connected via an audio link that can instantly receive broadcasts - reporting both positive and negative surprises - based on new intelligence. The real-time broadcasts enable dispersed troops to learn from these reports and can be critical since no solider has an overview of the entire unit's situation. [More]
Consumers willing to pay 30% more for Fair Trade products, study finds

Consumers willing to pay 30% more for Fair Trade products, study finds

Products labeled with a Fair Trade logo cause prospective buyers to dig deeper into their pockets. In an experiment conducted at the University of Bonn, participants were willing to pay on average 30 percent more for ethically produced goods, compared to their conventionally produced counterparts. [More]
New study may lead to effective treatment to prevent common chemotherapy side effects in cancer patients

New study may lead to effective treatment to prevent common chemotherapy side effects in cancer patients

Annually, hundreds of thousands of patients battling cancer undergo chemotherapy, which often results in poorly tolerated side effects such as nausea, vomiting, and loss of the desire to eat. [More]
Aphantasia: A condition that describes people born with diminished visual imagery ability

Aphantasia: A condition that describes people born with diminished visual imagery ability

If counting sheep is an abstract concept, or you are unable to visualise the faces of loved ones, you could have aphantasia - a newly defined condition to describe people who are born without a "mind's eye". [More]
Experimental gene therapy may prevent neuronal degeneration in patients with Alzheimer's disease

Experimental gene therapy may prevent neuronal degeneration in patients with Alzheimer's disease

Degenerating neurons in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) measurably responded to an experimental gene therapy in which nerve growth factor (NGF) was injected into their brains, report researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine in the current issue of JAMA Neurology. [More]
Discovery could help in development of novel cancer-selective viral therapies

Discovery could help in development of novel cancer-selective viral therapies

Every organism--from a seedling to a president--must protect its DNA at all costs, but precisely how a cell distinguishes between damage to its own DNA and the foreign DNA of an invading virus has remained a mystery. [More]
Dementia sufferers may begin to lose awareness of memory problems 2-3 years before onset

Dementia sufferers may begin to lose awareness of memory problems 2-3 years before onset

People who will develop dementia may begin to lose awareness of their memory problems two to three years before the actual onset of the disease, according to a new study published in the August 26, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Theresa Alenghat receives 2015 AGA-CCFA-Janssen Research Award in IBD Epigenetics Research

Theresa Alenghat receives 2015 AGA-CCFA-Janssen Research Award in IBD Epigenetics Research

The American Gastroenterological Association, in partnership with the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America and Janssen Biotech, Inc., announced today that Theresa Alenghat, VMD, PhD, from Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, OH, was awarded with the 2015 AGA-CCFA-Janssen Research Award in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) Epigenetics Research. [More]
Study provides insight into how the ability to inhibit an action affects attention and memory

Study provides insight into how the ability to inhibit an action affects attention and memory

You're driving on a busy road and you intend to switch lanes when you suddenly realize that there's a car in your blind spot. You have to put a stop to your lane change -- and quickly. A new study by Duke University researchers suggests that this type of scenario makes a person less likely to remember what halted the action -- for example, the make and model of the car in the blind spot. [More]
Physical inactivity poses important clinical, public health and fiscal challenges for the U.S.

Physical inactivity poses important clinical, public health and fiscal challenges for the U.S.

What do a prominent physiologist and two-time survivor of pancreatic cancer and a world-renowned researcher whose landmark discoveries on aspirin, drug therapies of proven benefit and therapeutic lifestyle changes that have saved more than 1.1 million lives have in common? They are both passionate about the importance of regular physical activity in reducing risks of dying from heart attacks and strokes, as well as developing diabetes, hypertension and colon cancer. And more importantly, enhancing mental health and fostering healthy muscles, bones and joints in all Americans from childhood to the elderly. [More]
Researchers find that 26% of senior oncology patients use complementary or alternative medicines

Researchers find that 26% of senior oncology patients use complementary or alternative medicines

Alternative medicines are widely thought to be at least harmless and very often helpful for a wide range of discomforts and illnesses. However, although they're marketed as "natural," they often contain active ingredients that can react chemically and biologically with other therapies. [More]
Mental visual imagery training may improve AM/EFT functioning in RR-MS patients

Mental visual imagery training may improve AM/EFT functioning in RR-MS patients

Patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR-MS), the most common form of the disease, often have deficits in two neuropsychological functions, autobiographical memory (AM) and episodic future thinking (EFT), which impact quality of life. [More]
Shire enters into agreement with Sanquin for CINRYZE

Shire enters into agreement with Sanquin for CINRYZE

Shire plc announced today it has entered into an agreement with Sanquin Blood Supply, the manufacturer of CINRYZE (C1 esterase inhibitor [human]), providing Shire access to its manufacturing technology and allowing Shire to source additional manufacturers to meet the growing demand for CINRYZE. [More]
BET inhibitors can cause molecular changes in neurons, lead to memory loss in mice

BET inhibitors can cause molecular changes in neurons, lead to memory loss in mice

Cancer researchers are constantly in search of more-effective and less-toxic approaches to stopping the disease, and have recently launched clinical trials testing a new class of drugs called BET inhibitors. These therapies act on a group of proteins that help regulate the expression of many genes, some of which play a role in cancer. [More]
Researchers evaluate use of pharmacy-based naloxone education and distribution to fight opioid overdoses

Researchers evaluate use of pharmacy-based naloxone education and distribution to fight opioid overdoses

In response to the growing opioid crisis, several states, including Massachusetts and Rhode Island, have granted pharmacists the authority to provide naloxone rescue kits without a prescription to at-risk patients. This model of pharmacy-based naloxone (PBN) education and distribution is one of the public health strategies currently being evaluated at hundreds of pharmacies in both states to determine the impact on opioid overdose death rates. [More]
Brief exposure to sudden sounds or mild trauma can form long-term memories

Brief exposure to sudden sounds or mild trauma can form long-term memories

Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center have found how even brief exposure to sudden sounds or mild trauma can form permanent, long-term brain connections, or memories, in a specific region of the brain. Moreover, the research team, working with rats, says it was able to chemically stimulate those biological pathways in the locus coeruleus -- the area of the brain best known for releasing the "fight or flight" hormone noradrenaline -- to heighten and improve the animals' hearing. [More]
Repetitive sacral root magnetic stimulation can reduce frequency of nighttime bedwetting

Repetitive sacral root magnetic stimulation can reduce frequency of nighttime bedwetting

Bedwetting, or nocturnal enuresis, causes distress in children and young adults, as well as for their parents or caregivers. The causes are not fully understood and there may be both physiological and psychological components to the condition. In a new study published in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, researchers report that repetitive sacral root magnetic stimulation (rSMS) can reduce the frequency of nighttime bedwetting and improve quality-of-life for sufferers. [More]
Older people drink unsafe amounts of alcohol, study finds

Older people drink unsafe amounts of alcohol, study finds

One in five older people who drink alcohol are consuming it at unsafe levels - over 21 units of alcohol for men and 14 units for women each week - according to a study by King's College London. The research in inner-city London, published in BMJ Open, found these unsafe older drinkers are more likely to be of higher socioeconomic status. [More]
Cognitive factors associated with activity, participation in everyday life among people with MS

Cognitive factors associated with activity, participation in everyday life among people with MS

Kessler Foundation researchers found that processing speed is the primary limiting factor associated with activity and participation in everyday life among people with multiple sclerosis (MS). "Factors that moderate activity limitation and participation restriction in people with multiple sclerosis" was published in the American Journal of Occupational Therapy. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement