Neurosurgery News and Research RSS Feed - Neurosurgery News and Research

Children's Hospital Los Angeles receives $2 million to spur research on brain, spinal cord tumors

Children's Hospital Los Angeles receives $2 million to spur research on brain, spinal cord tumors

A life-changing event for a Los Angeles family has resulted in their funding an endowment to support The Kort Family Foundation Brain and Spinal Cord Tumor Research Program in the Division of Neurosurgery at Children's Hospital Los Angeles. [More]
University of Maryland Medicine offers MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment to Parkinson's patients

University of Maryland Medicine offers MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment to Parkinson's patients

University of Maryland Medicine (the University of Maryland Medical Center and the University of Maryland School of Medicine) and its Center for Metabolic Imaging and Image-Guided Therapeutics (CMIT) has begun to use MRI-guided focused ultrasound on a deep structure within the brain related to Parkinson's disease - the globus pallidus. [More]
UCLA scientists develop promising new combination treatment for glioblastoma

UCLA scientists develop promising new combination treatment for glioblastoma

UCLA scientists have developed a potentially promising new combination therapy for glioblastoma, the deadliest form of brain cancer. [More]
Person with chronic, complete paralysis regains voluntary control to work with robotic device

Person with chronic, complete paralysis regains voluntary control to work with robotic device

A 39-year-old man who had had been completely paralyzed for four years was able to voluntarily control his leg muscles and take thousands of steps in a "robotic exoskeleton" device during five days of training -- and for two weeks afterward -- a team of UCLA scientists reports this week. [More]
Researchers perform first focused ultrasound treatments in the U.S. for dyskinesia

Researchers perform first focused ultrasound treatments in the U.S. for dyskinesia

Researchers at the University of Maryland and the University of Virginia have performed the first focused ultrasound treatments in the United States for dyskinesia associated with Parkinson's disease. [More]
Study: Inner-city neighbourhoods may affect risk of dying from cardiovascular disease

Study: Inner-city neighbourhoods may affect risk of dying from cardiovascular disease

The inner-city neighbourhood in which someone lives may affect his or her risk of developing or dying from cardiovascular disease, a new research paper suggests. [More]
Brain tumor is not always the death sentence

Brain tumor is not always the death sentence

Only half of brain cancers actually start in the brain. The rest - as in the case of former president Jimmy Carter - are metastatic tumors from cancer that originated elsewhere in the body. [More]
Key modifiable Alzheimer’s risk factors pinpointed

Key modifiable Alzheimer’s risk factors pinpointed

A meta-analysis has identified the key modifiable factors associated with an increased or decreased risk of Alzheimer’s disease. [More]
Medeon Biodesign gets FDA clearance for new lens cleaning device

Medeon Biodesign gets FDA clearance for new lens cleaning device

Medeon Biodesign, Inc., a Taiwan medical device company, is pleased to announce that the company has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration 510(k) clearance for ClickClean, a lens cleaning device. [More]
SI-BONE announces publication of results from INSITE and SIFI studies

SI-BONE announces publication of results from INSITE and SIFI studies

SI-BONE, Inc., a medical device company that pioneered the use of the iFuse Implant System, a minimally invasive surgical (MIS) device indicated for fusion for certain disorders of the sacroiliac (SI) joint, announced the publication of one-year results from two separate prospective multicenter clinical trials as well as the publication of a systematic review of 18 MIS SI joint fusion studies. [More]
Novel wound closure technique may reduce complication rates for patients with scoliosis

Novel wound closure technique may reduce complication rates for patients with scoliosis

Patients with scoliosis who undergo surgery may be less likely to develop an infection or other complications after the procedure when a novel wound closure technique pioneered at NYU Langone Medical Center is utilized, according to new research. [More]
New study finds significant association between ADHD and TBI

New study finds significant association between ADHD and TBI

A new study has found a "significant association" between adults who have suffered a traumatic brain injury at some point in their lives and who also have attention deficit hyperactive disorder. [More]
Complete removal of visible tumor improves outcomes in children with high-grade glioma

Complete removal of visible tumor improves outcomes in children with high-grade glioma

For children with aggressive brain cancers called high-grade gliomas (HGG), the chances of survival are improved when surgery is successful in eliminating all visible cancer, reports a study in the September issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. [More]
Patient satisfaction a poor proxy for quality of care in elective cranial neurosurgery

Patient satisfaction a poor proxy for quality of care in elective cranial neurosurgery

Patient satisfaction is a very poor proxy for quality of care comparisons in elective cranial neurosurgery. Because deaths are rare events in elective cranial neurosurgery, reporting of surgeon or even department-specific mortality figures cannot differentiate a high or low level of the quality of care. [More]
Breastfeeding may lead to substantial reduction in common infections among Indigenous babies

Breastfeeding may lead to substantial reduction in common infections among Indigenous babies

Promoting breastfeeding could lead to a substantial reduction in common infections and even deaths that are more common in Indigenous infants than non-Indigenous infants, a new study suggests. [More]
Ontario nearing ambitious UN targets for ending AIDS epidemics

Ontario nearing ambitious UN targets for ending AIDS epidemics

A new study suggests Ontario is nearing ambitious United Nations targets for ending the AIDS epidemics: By 2020, 90 per cent of all people living with HIV should know their HIV status, 90 per cent of all people diagnosed with HIV are receiving sustained antiretroviral drug therapy and 90 per cent of people on ART have a very low or undetectable levels of the virus. [More]
Rice and UTHealth scientists awarded $1.02 million NSF grant to examine how the brain processes language

Rice and UTHealth scientists awarded $1.02 million NSF grant to examine how the brain processes language

The National Science Foundation has awarded a $1.02 million grant to scientists at Rice University and the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School to study how the brain processes language. The joint research may one day help people who lose the ability to communicate. [More]
Flowonix Medical's new Patient Therapy Controller approved for market release

Flowonix Medical's new Patient Therapy Controller approved for market release

Flowonix Medical, Inc., announced today that its newest product, the Patient Therapy Controller (PTC), has been approved for market release. The PTC interfaces with the company's Prometra platform of intrathecal infusion devices. A small, hand-held device with a touch-screen, the PTC allows the patient to initiate a bolus delivery of medication from the implanted pump. [More]
St. Luke’s neurosurgeon partners with Medtronic to perform first live feed neurosurgery

St. Luke’s neurosurgeon partners with Medtronic to perform first live feed neurosurgery

St. Luke’s University Health Network’s functional neurosurgeon Steven Falowski, MD, has partnered with Medtronic medical device company to promote faster and better product development within the field of neuromodulation for patients with pain and disability related to nerve disorders. [More]
New technology that tracks patients' eye movements may accurately measure brain injury

New technology that tracks patients' eye movements may accurately measure brain injury

New technology that tracks the eye movements of patients may be a more accurate measure of brain injury than any other diagnostic measurements currently in use, according to a study recently published in the journal Concussion. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement