Neurosurgery News and Research RSS Feed - Neurosurgery News and Research

Novel non-invasive method of vagus nerve stimulation reduces depressive symptoms

Novel non-invasive method of vagus nerve stimulation reduces depressive symptoms

Researchers of a new study published in the current issue of Biological Psychiatry report successful reduction of depressive symptoms in patients using a novel non-invasive method of vagus nerve stimulation, or VNS. [More]
New study finds steep decline in basic science publications

New study finds steep decline in basic science publications

A new study has found a steep decline in the number of scholarly papers about basic science published in leading medical journals in the last 20 years. [More]
MYB-QKI fusion gene that drives pediatric low-grade gliomas poses a triple threat

MYB-QKI fusion gene that drives pediatric low-grade gliomas poses a triple threat

Oncology researchers have discovered that an abnormal fused gene that drives pediatric brain tumors poses a triple threat, operating simultaneously through three distinct biological mechanisms—the first such example in cancer biology. [More]
MRI safe for patients with implantable cardiac devices

MRI safe for patients with implantable cardiac devices

The findings of a major study led by cardiovascular imaging specialists at Allegheny General Hospital, part of the Allegheny Health Network, suggest that magnetic resonance imaging is a safe and effective diagnostic procedure for patients with implantable cardiac devices. [More]
Neuroprotection powers for phenytoin in acute optic neuritis

Neuroprotection powers for phenytoin in acute optic neuritis

Selective sodium channel blockade with the anti-epileptic drug phenytoin protects against acute demyelinating optic neuritis, researchers report. [More]
Refugee women have higher risk of giving birth too early than non-refugee immigrants

Refugee women have higher risk of giving birth too early than non-refugee immigrants

Refugee women who come to Canada have greater risk of giving birth prematurely than non-refugee immigrants, a study by a St. Michael's Hospital researcher has found. Those risks are fueled by the fact that the preterm birth rate was 7.1 per cent among secondary refugees - those who spent more than six months in a transit country before arriving in Canada -compared to five per cent among secondary, non-refugee immigrants. [More]
New computational techniques could help researchers pinpoint anatomical source of seizures

New computational techniques could help researchers pinpoint anatomical source of seizures

For the third of all epilepsy patients who don't respond to medication, an alternative is to locate the small cluster of neurons that act as the seed of a seizure's aberrant electrical activity and surgically remove it. Unfortunately, such surgeries often fail to bring any relief. The ability to reliably pinpoint the anatomical source of seizures, different for each patient, remains elusive. [More]
Study provides detailed new information about diffuse glioma

Study provides detailed new information about diffuse glioma

An international collaborative study has revealed detailed new information about diffuse glioma, the most common type of tumor found in some 80 percent of adult brain cancer patients, raising hopes that better understanding of these disease groups may aid improved clinical outcomes. [More]
Higher-order thalamus enhances and temporarily stores sensory signals

Higher-order thalamus enhances and temporarily stores sensory signals

Every day, we constantly absorb information through our sensory organs, which the brain then needs to process correctly. The information initially reaches the main relay center, the thalamus, and then travels to the cerebral cortex. [More]
Oxeia accelerating development of neurometabolic treatments for concussions

Oxeia accelerating development of neurometabolic treatments for concussions

Oxeia Biopharmaceuticals, Inc., a biotechnology company, is catalyzing the development of first-in-class neurometabolic treatments for concussions and other aspects of brain injury. [More]
Twice-daily stimulation of vagus nerve with gammaCore nVNS device reduces number of migraine attacks

Twice-daily stimulation of vagus nerve with gammaCore nVNS device reduces number of migraine attacks

A study published in the Journal of Headache and Pain, carried out by Dr. Thomas Kinfe of the University of Bonn, found that twice daily stimulation of the vagus nerve with the hand-held gammaCore nVNS device reduced the number of headache days per month from 14.7 to 8.9 (p<0.001) and the number of monthly migraine attacks from 7.3 to 4.5 (p<0.001). [More]
Four USF professors selected as AIMBE College of Fellows

Four USF professors selected as AIMBE College of Fellows

Four University of South Florida professors have been elected to the 2016 College of Fellows of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE): Cesario Borlongan and Shyam Mohapatra from the USF Morsani College of Medicine, USF Health; and Robert Frisina, Jr., and Sudeep Sarkar from the USF College of Engineering. [More]
New study finds that living in high-rise buildings may affect survival after cardiac arrest

New study finds that living in high-rise buildings may affect survival after cardiac arrest

The number of people living in high-rise buildings in rising, but along with the convenience and panoramic views of a downtown condo comes a risk: a new study found that survival rates from cardiac arrest decrease the higher up the building a person lives. [More]
Scientists develop wireless brain sensors

Scientists develop wireless brain sensors

A team of neurosurgeons and engineers has developed wireless brain sensors that monitor intracranial pressure and temperature and then are absorbed by the body, negating the need for surgery to remove the devices. [More]

Loyola neurosurgeon examines issue of hydrocephalus in Uganda

Every year, thousands of babies worldwide die from untreated hydrocephalus, a condition in which the head swells from a buildup of excess fluid. But no baby need die from this condition, once called "water on the brain." Neurosurgeons now have the skills and tools to deal with the condition very effectively. [More]
Higher-fat DASH diet significantly reduces blood pressure and triglycerides

Higher-fat DASH diet significantly reduces blood pressure and triglycerides

The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) dietary pattern, which is high in fruits, vegetables and low fat dairy foods, significantly lowers blood pressure as well as low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. [More]
1 in 10 veterans and civilian patients experiences new ICU-related PTSD up to one year after discharge

1 in 10 veterans and civilian patients experiences new ICU-related PTSD up to one year after discharge

One in ten patients is at risk of having new post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) related to their ICU experience up to a year post-discharge. This was the finding from a multicenter, prospective cohort research study of veterans and civilians. [More]
New, personalized approach to detecting low back pain

New, personalized approach to detecting low back pain

Scientists at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research have discovered a new, personalized approach to diagnosing low back pain. The findings from a clinical study show that serum levels of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) vary in individuals with lumbar intervertebral disc disease and that biochemical profiling of circulating cytokines may assist in refining personalized diagnoses of disc diseases. [More]
UC San Diego School of Medicine study compares payments among different specialties

UC San Diego School of Medicine study compares payments among different specialties

The Physician Payments Sunshine Act, passed under the Affordable Care Act, requires all pharmaceutical and medical device companies to report payments to physicians, including consulting fees, gifts, speaking fees, meals, travel and research grants. This information is searchable to the public on a database called Open Payments, managed by the Centers for Medicare & Medical Services. [More]
Researchers identify factors that may predict outcomes in pediatric patients with intracranial GSWs

Researchers identify factors that may predict outcomes in pediatric patients with intracranial GSWs

Researchers from Memphis, Tennessee, have examined intracranial gunshot wounds (GSWs) in children and adolescents, and identified nine clinical, laboratory, and radiological factors that were predictive of these patients' outcomes. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement