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Brain-controlled prosthesis could improve quality of life in people with spinal cord injuries

Brain-controlled prosthesis could improve quality of life in people with spinal cord injuries

When we type or perform other precise tasks, our brains and muscles usually work together effortlessly. But when a neurological disease or spinal cord injury severs the connection between the brain and limbs, once-easy motions become difficult or impossible. [More]
Researchers uncover strong evidence for genetic causes of cerebral palsy

Researchers uncover strong evidence for genetic causes of cerebral palsy

Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common cause of physical disability in children. It has historically been considered to be caused by factors such as birth asphyxia, stroke and infections in the developing brain of babies. [More]
3D-printed models of children's brain anatomy help reduce operative risk of complex procedures

3D-printed models of children's brain anatomy help reduce operative risk of complex procedures

Boston Children's Hospital physicians report the first cases of children benefiting from 3D printing of their anatomy before undergoing high-risk brain procedures. [More]
Researchers at Barrow Neurological Institute uncover brain surgery that changed history

Researchers at Barrow Neurological Institute uncover brain surgery that changed history

Researchers at Barrow Neurological Institute have spent years of medical sleuthing across three continents to uncover a brain surgery that changed history. [More]
New computer-based system provides real-time feedback before and during facial transplant surgery

New computer-based system provides real-time feedback before and during facial transplant surgery

Following several years of research and collaboration, physicians and engineers at Johns Hopkins and Walter Reed National Military Medical Center say they have developed a computer platform that provides rapid, real-time feedback before and during facial transplant surgery, which may someday improve face-jaw-teeth alignment between donor and recipient. [More]
Despite efforts to improve stroke treatment, delays in emergency transport still prevalent

Despite efforts to improve stroke treatment, delays in emergency transport still prevalent

Despite efforts to close the time gap between symptom onset and stroke treatment - including improvements in public education, 911 dispatch operations, pre-hospital detection and triage, hospital stroke system development, and stroke unit management - a new study presented today at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery (SNIS) 12th Annual Meeting suggests that delays in emergency transport are still prevalent and that improvements are needed to ensure patients can be treated within the optimal time window. [More]
New technique improves survival time for glioblastoma patients by 50%

New technique improves survival time for glioblastoma patients by 50%

The rapid spread of a common and deadly brain tumor has been slowed down significantly in a mouse model by cutting off the way some cancer cells communicate, according to a team of researchers that includes UF Health faculty. [More]
Organ donor honored at Reagan UCLA Medical Center

Organ donor honored at Reagan UCLA Medical Center

Two years ago, Rachel Greenberg went out to run a few errands. While she was gone, her husband Glenn suffered a massive brain hemorrhage. He was immediately taken to Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center where physicians explained he had suffered the worst kind of brain bleed. [More]
Family members who avoid major medical decisions may suffer from PTSD

Family members who avoid major medical decisions may suffer from PTSD

Family members who make major medical decisions for relatives in an intensive care unit (ICU) may suffer posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) if they cope by avoiding the situation, according to a new study by scientists at Case Western Reserve University's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. [More]
Reduced pain, disability predict satisfaction after spine surgery

Reduced pain, disability predict satisfaction after spine surgery

Patient satisfaction ratings after surgery for spinal degenerative disease—especially in terms of reduced pain and disability—are a good indicator of the procedure's effectiveness, reports a study in the August issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. [More]
Vanderbilt researchers hope to give new dexterity to needlescopic surgery with tiny mechanical wrist

Vanderbilt researchers hope to give new dexterity to needlescopic surgery with tiny mechanical wrist

With the flick of a tiny mechanical wrist, a team of engineers and doctors at Vanderbilt University's Medical Engineering and Discovery Laboratory hope to give needlescopic surgery a whole new degree of dexterity. [More]
Mercy Medical Center named third best hospital in Maryland

Mercy Medical Center named third best hospital in Maryland

U.S. News & World Report has released its annual "Best Hospital" rankings. This 26th annual edition includes information on nearly 5,000 hospitals nationwide. U.S. News & World Report named Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore as the third best hospital in Maryland, behind only the academic medical centers at Johns Hopkins and the University of Maryland. Mercy also retained its status from last year as the state's top-ranked community hospital. [More]
UCLA Health's hospitals named among nation's best in U.S. News and World Report

UCLA Health's hospitals named among nation's best in U.S. News and World Report

UCLA Health's hospitals in Westwood and Santa Monica have been named to U.S. News and World Report's 2015-2016 Best Hospitals Honor Roll. UCLA, which previously ranked No. 5 in the country, tied for No. 3 this year. [More]
UC San Diego Health ranked again among nation's best hospitals by U.S. News & World Report

UC San Diego Health ranked again among nation's best hospitals by U.S. News & World Report

Once again, UC San Diego Health and its hospitals are ranked #1 in San Diego, and recognized among the best in the nation, by U.S. News & World Report for 2015-16. The annual U.S. News "Best Hospitals" rankings distinguish hospitals that excel in treating the most challenging health conditions. [More]
Loyola stroke expert co-edits new textbook on cerebrovascular disease

Loyola stroke expert co-edits new textbook on cerebrovascular disease

Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine professor and chair of the Department of Neurology, José Biller, MD, an internationally known expert on stroke, is co-editor of a major new textbook, Common Pitfalls in Cerebrovascular Disease. [More]
New study may help identify novel ways to treat immune thrombocytopenia

New study may help identify novel ways to treat immune thrombocytopenia

Immune thrombocytopenia, or ITP, is an autoimmune disease whereby the immune system sends antibodies to attack and destroy the body's platelets--blood cells responsible for controlling bleeding. [More]
INSIGHTEC announces additional positive coverage policies for ExAblate MRgFUS procedure for bone metastases

INSIGHTEC announces additional positive coverage policies for ExAblate MRgFUS procedure for bone metastases

INSIGHTEC announced today that Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Mississippi, Wellmark Blue Cross Blue Shield, Blue Cross of Idaho and Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona have published an updated coverage policy regarding INSIGHTEC's ExAblate MRgFUS (Magnetic Resonance Imaging-guided Focused Ultrasound) procedure which provides benefits for bone metastases patients. The ExAblate treatment is FDA-approved for patients suffering from pain associated with bone metastases. [More]
Iowa researchers gain important insight into sudden unexpected death in epilepsy

Iowa researchers gain important insight into sudden unexpected death in epilepsy

Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is becoming increasingly recognized as a very real and devastating problem in which impaired breathing is thought to play a critical role. Researchers believe breathing may be impaired during and after seizures, without the patient's knowledge. [More]
Housing First approach helps reduce alcohol-related problems among homeless people with mental illness

Housing First approach helps reduce alcohol-related problems among homeless people with mental illness

A "Housing First" approach, where homeless people with mental illness are provided with a place to live without preconditions such as sobriety or seeing a psychiatrist, coupled with intensive case management, helps to reduce alcohol-related problems, a new study has found. [More]
New research may explain why youngsters' recovery times vary widely after traumatic brain injury

New research may explain why youngsters' recovery times vary widely after traumatic brain injury

Why do some youngsters bounce back quickly from a traumatic brain injury, while others suffer devastating side effects for years? New UCLA/USC research suggests that damage to the fatty sheaths around the brain's nerve fibers--not injury severity-- may explain the difference. Published in the July 15 edition of the Journal of Neuroscience, the finding identifies possible biomarkers that physicians could use to predict higher-risk patients who require closer monitoring. [More]
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