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Clinical study to evaluate safety of investigational cell therapy to treat chronic motor deficits after stroke

Clinical study to evaluate safety of investigational cell therapy to treat chronic motor deficits after stroke

University Hospitals Case Medical Center is the first surgical site for a Phase 2b clinical trial study to further evaluate the safety and efficacy of an investigational cell therapy for the treatment of chronic motor deficit following an ischemic stroke. [More]
Researchers test potential positive effects of micro-injury in mice modeled with AD

Researchers test potential positive effects of micro-injury in mice modeled with AD

Researchers testing the potential positive effects of "micro-injury" by brief insertion of a small needle into the hippocampal region of mice modeled with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have found that the procedure not only stimulated the hippocampus into regenerative activity, but also reduced β-amyloid plaques, a hallmark of AD. [More]
Innovations in pre-clinical MRI: an interview with Priv. Doz. Dr. Dominik von Elverfeldt

Innovations in pre-clinical MRI: an interview with Priv. Doz. Dr. Dominik von Elverfeldt

To me the most exciting aspect of pre-clinical imaging is its broad range, from very basic science up to applied science. You deal with a range of disciplines including biology, chemistry, physics, biochemistry, biophysics, cell biology and of course medicine, as the aim is the translation of research to humans. [More]
Acute liver failure after massive hepatectomy improves with liver cell transplantation

Acute liver failure after massive hepatectomy improves with liver cell transplantation

Liver failure often occurs after an extensive hepatectomy, which is the surgical resection of the liver. While liver cell transplantation is a useful therapy for acute liver failure after massive hepatectomy, when cells are transplanted through liver portal veins raises the risk of embolization, such as the formation and movement of a blood clot, often with fatal consequences. [More]
Fructose common in western diet can damage brain genes

Fructose common in western diet can damage brain genes

A range of diseases -- from diabetes to cardiovascular disease, and from Alzheimer's disease to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder -- are linked to changes to genes in the brain. A new study by UCLA life scientists has found that hundreds of those genes can be damaged by fructose, a sugar that's common in the Western diet, in a way that could lead to those diseases. [More]
Cancer survivors at risk of death after organ transplant

Cancer survivors at risk of death after organ transplant

People who had cancer before receiving an organ transplant were more likely to die of any cause, die of cancer or develop a new cancer than organ recipients who did not previously have cancer, a new paper has found. However, the increased risk is less than that reported in some previous studies. [More]
Study aims to determine how aches, pains before and after concussion play role in recovery

Study aims to determine how aches, pains before and after concussion play role in recovery

Athletes who have medical complaints, like aches and pains, that have no known physical cause may take longer to recover after a concussion, according to a study published in the April 20, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Scientists find interaction between amyloid and tau proteins that cause brain damage linked with AD

Scientists find interaction between amyloid and tau proteins that cause brain damage linked with AD

For years, neuroscientists have puzzled over how two abnormal proteins, called amyloid and tau, accumulate in the brain and damage it to cause Alzheimer's disease (AD). Which one is the driving force behind dementia? The answer: both of them, according to a new study by researchers at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute. [More]
Athletes who have psychosomatic symptoms prior to concussion may take longer to recover

Athletes who have psychosomatic symptoms prior to concussion may take longer to recover

Athletes may take longer to recover after concussion if they had experienced psychosomatic symptoms before they became concussed, report researchers. [More]
Study shows beneficial effect of hNSC transplantation for TBI

Study shows beneficial effect of hNSC transplantation for TBI

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity, often causing lifelong disability for those who survive. Treatment is limited to supportive care, but stem cell therapy has received recent attention as a way to promote recovery for injuries to the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, researchers transplanted human neural stem cells (hNSCs) into the brains of mice modeled with TBI to investigate whether the hosts' immune systems and the stem cells acting in concert would enhance repair. [More]
Penn researchers report results of CAR therapy trial in brain cancer patients

Penn researchers report results of CAR therapy trial in brain cancer patients

Immune cells engineered to seek out and attack a type of deadly brain cancer known as glioblastoma (GBM) were found to have an acceptable safety profile and successfully migrate to and infiltrate tumors, researchers from Penn Medicine and Harvard University reported at the AACR Annual Meeting 2016. [More]
Study indicates mRS is poorly suited to evaluate, report quality of neuro-surgery

Study indicates mRS is poorly suited to evaluate, report quality of neuro-surgery

Surgery has become a volatile field during the past few years, with study after study challenging prevailing treatment practices. For example, surgical treatment of acute appendicitis and arthroscopic surgery on degenerative knees have been called into question by recent research results reached by Finnish researchers. [More]
Low-carbohydrate diet helps reduce growth of glioblastoma tumor cells in mouse models

Low-carbohydrate diet helps reduce growth of glioblastoma tumor cells in mouse models

University of Florida Health researchers have slowed a notoriously aggressive type of brain tumor in mouse models by using a low-carbohydrate diet. [More]
Scientists detect FFR signals from previously unknown part of the brain

Scientists detect FFR signals from previously unknown part of the brain

Scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital at McGill University have made an important discovery about the human auditory system and how to study it, findings that could lead to better testing and diagnosis of hearing-related disorders. [More]
Unhealthy BMIs, smoking, drinking alcohol and solid fuel use increase asthma risk in women

Unhealthy BMIs, smoking, drinking alcohol and solid fuel use increase asthma risk in women

Underweight and obese women who also drank alcohol and smoked tobacco had a two-fold higher risk of being diagnosed with asthma than women with a healthy body mass index who did not drink or smoke, a St. Michael's Hospital study found. [More]
NICE issues positive guidance on use of electroCore’s gammaCore treatment for migraine and cluster headache

NICE issues positive guidance on use of electroCore’s gammaCore treatment for migraine and cluster headache

The UK’s National Institute of Health and Care Excellence has published guidance that electroCore’s non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation treatment (gammaCore) for the prevention and acute treatment of migraine and cluster headache is safe and can now be used in the NHS. [More]
Simple blood test can help detect evidence of concussions up to 7 days after injury

Simple blood test can help detect evidence of concussions up to 7 days after injury

Researchers at Orlando Health detected evidence of concussions in patients up to 7 days after their injury using a simple blood test, according to a new study published in JAMA Neurology. The discovery could greatly expand the window for diagnosing concussions, especially in patients who experience a delayed onset of symptoms. [More]
Children with cardiomyopathy may benefit from family-linked treatment

Children with cardiomyopathy may benefit from family-linked treatment

A newly published national study by the Children's Hospital of Michigan and Wayne State University School of Medicine researchers shows that "parental impact and family functioning" become increasingly abnormal when children with cardiomyopathy-related chronic heart disease are more severely ill than children less affected by the disease. [More]
St. Luke’s surgeon first in world to implant Medtronic’s new, MRI-compatible neurostimulator system

St. Luke’s surgeon first in world to implant Medtronic’s new, MRI-compatible neurostimulator system

Steven Falowski, MD, Chief of Functional Neurosurgery at St. Luke’s University Health Network in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania today was the first surgeon in the world to implant Medtronic’s brand new, full-body, MRI-compatible paddle electrode leads for the Restore neurostimulator system. [More]
Innovative treatment may help prevent brain swelling, death in stroke patients

Innovative treatment may help prevent brain swelling, death in stroke patients

New research has provided more evidence that an innovative treatment strategy may help prevent brain swelling and death in stroke patients. J. Marc Simard, professor of neurosurgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, along with colleagues at Yale University and Massachusetts General Hospital, found that Cirara, an investigational drug, powerfully reduced brain swelling and death in patients who had suffered a type of large stroke called malignant infarction, which normally carries a high mortality rate. [More]
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