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Study sheds new light on how the brain forms memories

Study sheds new light on how the brain forms memories

In the first study of its kind, UCLA and United Kingdom researchers found that neurons in a specific brain region play a key role in rapidly forming memories about every day events, a finding that may result in a better understanding of memory loss and new methods to fight it in Alzheimer's and other neurological diseases. [More]
Researchers make significant progress in improving survival of adult patients with low-grade gliomas

Researchers make significant progress in improving survival of adult patients with low-grade gliomas

Using clinical data collected over the past decade through a U.S. cancer registry, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine demonstrated that significant strides have been made in improving the survival of adult patients with low-grade gliomas, a slow-growing yet deadly form of primary brain cancer. [More]
Penn State Health, CHI complete transfer of St. Joseph Regional Health Network ownership

Penn State Health, CHI complete transfer of St. Joseph Regional Health Network ownership

Penn State Health and Catholic Health Initiatives have completed the transfer of ownership of CHI's affiliate, St. Joseph Regional Health Network (St. Joseph) in Reading, Pa., to Penn State Health. [More]
Study: Around 6% survive cardiac arrest outside of hospital setting

Study: Around 6% survive cardiac arrest outside of hospital setting

Cardiac arrest strikes almost 600,000 people each year, killing the vast majority of those individuals, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. Every year in the U.S., approximately 395,000 cases of cardiac arrest occur outside of a hospital setting, in which less than 6 percent survive. Approximately 200,000 cardiac arrests occur each year in hospitals, and 24 percent of those patients survive. Estimates suggest that cardiac arrest is the third leading cause of death in the U.S. behind cancer and heart disease. [More]
Two migraine surgery techniques equally effective in reducing severity of migraine headaches

Two migraine surgery techniques equally effective in reducing severity of migraine headaches

Two migraine surgery techniques targeting a specific "trigger site" are both highly effective in reducing the frequency and severity of migraine headaches, according to a randomized trial in the July issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. [More]
New stroke treatment guidelines recommend use of stent retrievers as first-line treatment for eligible patients

New stroke treatment guidelines recommend use of stent retrievers as first-line treatment for eligible patients

Today, the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association published new stroke treatment guidelines that recommend the use of stent retriever technology – such as Medtronic plc’s SolitaireTM stent retriever device – in conjunction with the current standard of care, IV-tPA, as a first-line treatment for eligible patients. [More]
Patients have nothing to fear from having physicians-in-training to assist in brain and spine surgeries

Patients have nothing to fear from having physicians-in-training to assist in brain and spine surgeries

An analysis of the results of more than 16,000 brain and spine surgeries suggests patients have nothing to fear from having residents — physicians-in-training — assist in those operations. The contributions of residents, who work under the supervision and alongside senior physicians, do nothing to increase patients' risks of postoperative complications or of dying within 30 days of the surgery, the analysis showed. [More]
Residents’ participation does not increase patients’ risks of postoperative complications after brain and spine surgeries

Residents’ participation does not increase patients’ risks of postoperative complications after brain and spine surgeries

An analysis of the results of more than 16,000 brain and spine surgeries suggests patients have nothing to fear from having residents — physicians-in-training — assist in those operations. [More]
New research reveals that polluted Toronto neighbourhoods have high rates of childhood asthma

New research reveals that polluted Toronto neighbourhoods have high rates of childhood asthma

Children who develop asthma in Toronto are more likely to have been born in a neighbourhood that has a high level of traffic-related air pollution, new research suggests. [More]
Severe pediatric head injuries treated at U.S. combat support hospitals during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan

Severe pediatric head injuries treated at U.S. combat support hospitals during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan

During the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, U.S. combat support hospitals treated at least 650 children with severe, combat-related head injuries, according to a special article in the July issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. [More]
Detroit-area patients contribute to national study that redefines diagnosis, treatment of glioma

Detroit-area patients contribute to national study that redefines diagnosis, treatment of glioma

Sixty-seven patients from the Hermelin Brain Tumor Center at Henry Ford Hospital and their families made important contributions to a national cancer study that proposes a change in how some brain tumors are classified - and ultimately treated. [More]
OhioHealth Neuroscience Center launched at Riverside Methodist Hospital

OhioHealth Neuroscience Center launched at Riverside Methodist Hospital

On July 6, 2015, OhioHealth will open its doors to the new OhioHealth Neuroscience Center on Riverside Methodist Hospital's campus. [More]
NIH awards $1.8 million grant for brain imaging technique

NIH awards $1.8 million grant for brain imaging technique

A researcher at the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin has received a four-year, $1.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop a new technique for imaging blood flow across the surface of the brain that could help patients undergoing neurosurgery. [More]
Stanford researchers find how neurons work together to control movement in people with paralysis

Stanford researchers find how neurons work together to control movement in people with paralysis

Stanford University researchers studying how the brain controls movement in people with paralysis, related to their diagnosis of Lou Gehrig's disease, have found that groups of neurons work together, firing in complex rhythms to signal muscles about when and where to move. [More]
University of Utah-led study suggests that readmission to same hospital important for recovery

University of Utah-led study suggests that readmission to same hospital important for recovery

Up to 22 percent of surgical patients experience unexpected complications and must be readmitted for post-operative care. A study led by the University of Utah suggests that returning to the same hospital is important for recovery. Readmission to a different hospital was associated with a 26 percent increased risk for dying within 90 days. [More]
Certain anti-nausea medications used after operation could increase risk for irregular heartbeat

Certain anti-nausea medications used after operation could increase risk for irregular heartbeat

Certain commonly prescribed anti-nausea medications given to patients during or after an operation could increase their risk of developing an irregular heartbeat, new research has found. [More]
Researchers track down key gene mutation responsible for causing acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Researchers track down key gene mutation responsible for causing acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Two medical researchers from the Children's Hospital of Michigan and the Wayne State University School of Medicine have published the results of a nearly 10-year investigation that identified a key gene mutation that can trigger acute lymphoblastic leukemia, or ALL, and several other types of cancer. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers develop new imaging technology to help remove brain tumors safely

Johns Hopkins researchers develop new imaging technology to help remove brain tumors safely

Brain surgery is famously difficult for good reason: When removing a tumor, for example, neurosurgeons walk a tightrope as they try to take out as much of the cancer as possible while keeping crucial brain tissue intact — and visually distinguishing the two is often impossible. [More]
Elekta's Esteya electronic brachytherapy improves outcomes in patients with basal cell carcinoma

Elekta's Esteya electronic brachytherapy improves outcomes in patients with basal cell carcinoma

Physicians at La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital - Valencia presented their early clinical outcome data on the use of Esteya electronic brachytherapy for the treatment of basal cell carcinoma in a paper in the current issue of Journal of Contemporary Brachytherapy. The ongoing study showed 100 percent complete response and excellent cosmetic outcome in all lesions treated to date with Esteya. [More]
New noninvasive brain stimulator may help tamp down Parkinson's symptoms at home

New noninvasive brain stimulator may help tamp down Parkinson's symptoms at home

Parkinson's disease patients whose symptoms such as tremor, muscle stiffness and slowed movement make it tough to hold an eating utensil steady have few options for relief outside of a hospital or clinic. Medication can help, but over time it tends to become less effective. [More]
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