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Researchers seek to develop novel antibody to treat glioblastoma

Researchers seek to develop novel antibody to treat glioblastoma

Scientists of Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Munich University Hospital are developing a novel antibody to treat brain tumors. [More]
Pipeline Embolization Device safe, effective for treatment of complex brain aneurysms

Pipeline Embolization Device safe, effective for treatment of complex brain aneurysms

A recently introduced technology called the Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) can provide a less-invasive approach for difficult-to-treat aneurysms of the arteries supplying blood to the front of the brain, reports a study in the July issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Simple model can help predict complication risks after surgery for CSM

Simple model can help predict complication risks after surgery for CSM

A simple model consisting of four risk factors can help surgeons to predict the risk of complications after surgery for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM)—a common condition causing compression of the spinal cord in the neck, reports a study in the July issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Caribbean, African-born women more likely to be admitted at ICU during delivery

Caribbean, African-born women more likely to be admitted at ICU during delivery

Women born in the Caribbean or Africa are two times more likely to be admitted to an intensive care unit at the time of their delivery than Canadian-born women, a new study has found. [More]
Stroke can cause long-term damage to blood-spinal cord barrier, study finds

Stroke can cause long-term damage to blood-spinal cord barrier, study finds

A team of researchers at the University of South Florida investigating the short and long-term effects of ischemic stroke in a rodent model has found that stroke can cause long-term damage to the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB), creating a "toxic environment" in the spinal cord that might leave stroke survivors susceptible to motor dysfunction and disease pathology. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers develop lab test that accurately predicts glioblastoma aggression and spread

Johns Hopkins researchers develop lab test that accurately predicts glioblastoma aggression and spread

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report they have developed an experimental laboratory test that accurately clocks the “speed” of human brain tumor cell movement along a small glass “track.” [More]
Standard and intensive blood pressure treatments equally effective in controlling acute intracerebral hemorrhage

Standard and intensive blood pressure treatments equally effective in controlling acute intracerebral hemorrhage

An international stroke study found that standard and intensive blood pressure treatments were equally effective in the emergency treatment of acute intracerebral hemorrhage, a type of stroke caused by bleeding into the brain. [More]
Barley products lower levels of two types of bad cholesterol linked to cardiovascular risk

Barley products lower levels of two types of bad cholesterol linked to cardiovascular risk

Eating barley or foods containing barley significantly reduced levels of two types of "bad cholesterol" associated with cardiovascular risk, a St. Michael's Hospital research paper has found. [More]
Human stem cells restore motor function in chronic stroke patients

Human stem cells restore motor function in chronic stroke patients

Injecting modified, human, adult stem cells directly into the brains of chronic stroke patients proved not only safe but effective in restoring motor function, according to the findings of a small clinical trial led by Stanford University School of Medicine investigators. [More]
Advances in precision diagnostics aid accurate detection of CNS tumors

Advances in precision diagnostics aid accurate detection of CNS tumors

Thanks to new methods of precision diagnostics, such as DNA sequencing and epigenetic analyses, it is becoming increasingly possible to identify specific central nervous system (CNS) tumors accurately and to provide targeted treatment. The Comprehensive Cancer Center of MedUni Vienna and Vienna General Hospital is one of the top centers in the world for diagnosing and treating this type of tumor. [More]
Retroviral replicating vector can extend lives of brain cancer patients

Retroviral replicating vector can extend lives of brain cancer patients

Doctors at UCLA, Cleveland Clinic, University of California San Diego School of Medicine and additional institutions have achieved a milestone in the development of a treatment for people with recurrent glioblastoma, the most common and aggressive form of brain cancer, by successfully demonstrating a modified virus that can extend the lives of patients with the disease. [More]
Multiple cell and gene therapies can enhance cardiac function in mice modeled with MI

Multiple cell and gene therapies can enhance cardiac function in mice modeled with MI

Researchers at the University of Utah compared the therapeutic potential of umbilical cord-derived sub-epithelial cells (UC-SECs), bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) -- all derived from human tissue -- along with genes (S100a1 and SDF-1a) and growth factor (VEGF165) to evaluate how injected biologics might enhance cardiac function in mice modeled with myocardial infarction (MI; commonly referred to as heart attack). [More]
CD34+ cell therapy improves angina frequency in no option patients with class III/IV angina refractory

CD34+ cell therapy improves angina frequency in no option patients with class III/IV angina refractory

A two-year, multi-center clinical study with 167 patients with class III-IV refractory angina randomized to low and high dose CD34+ cells or placebo has revealed that patients who received either a high or low dose of CD34 -- a member of a family of proteins that have an impact on vascular-associated tissue -- cells had a significant reduction in angina frequency over patients who received placebo. [More]
Clinical trial to test safety, efficacy of Roswell Park-developed SurVaxM in multiple myeloma patients

Clinical trial to test safety, efficacy of Roswell Park-developed SurVaxM in multiple myeloma patients

An immune-based therapy developed at Roswell Park Cancer Institute is moving forward with its third clinical trial. The early-stage clinical trial will assess whether SurVaxM — a cancer vaccine developed at Roswell Park — is a safe and effective treatment option for patients with multiple myeloma, a rare type of blood cancer. [More]
Researcher explores whether DBS can help improve life of bipolar disorder patients

Researcher explores whether DBS can help improve life of bipolar disorder patients

Jennifer Sweet, MD, a neurosurgeon at University Hospitals Case Medical Center, recently opened a clinical research study to learn if there is a structural target in the brain for patients suffering from bipolar disorder and whether deep brain stimulation (DBS) can bring them relief. [More]

Two new optical devices could accelerate disease diagnosis, cut healthcare costs

Two new optical devices could reduce the need to take tissue samples during medical examinations and operations and to then send them for testing – potentially speeding up diagnosis and treatment and cutting healthcare costs. [More]
Microglia plays vital role in reducing effects of cocaine in the brain

Microglia plays vital role in reducing effects of cocaine in the brain

A type of brain cell known as microglia plays a key role in reducing the effects of cocaine in the brain, according to a major study by a team from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre in Montreal. [More]
Risk factors for hospital readmission after pediatric neurosurgical procedures

Risk factors for hospital readmission after pediatric neurosurgical procedures

Researchers at The University of Alabama at Birmingham have determined specific risk factors associated with hospital readmission following pediatric neurosurgery. [More]
Alan R. Cohen named Chief of Pediatric Neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins

Alan R. Cohen named Chief of Pediatric Neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins

Alan R. Cohen, M.D., has been named the new chief of Johns Hopkins Medicine’s Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery and holder of the Benjamin S. Carson Sr., M.D., and Dr. Evelyn Spiro, R.N., Professorship in Pediatric Neurosurgery. Cohen comes to Johns Hopkins from Boston Children’s Hospital, where he served as the neurosurgeon-in-chief and chairman of the Department of Neurosurgery, as well as the Franc D. Ingraham Professor of Neurosurgery at Harvard Medical School. [More]
Cedars-Sinai researchers explore whether healthy lifestyle choices can slow or prevent Alzheimer's disease

Cedars-Sinai researchers explore whether healthy lifestyle choices can slow or prevent Alzheimer's disease

Cedars-Sinai neuroscience researchers are studying whether extensive changes in lifestyle among patients with mild cognitive impairment can slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
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