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Scientists discover how Zika virus replicates in the placenta

Scientists discover how Zika virus replicates in the placenta

Zika virus can infect and replicate in immune cells from the placenta, without killing them, scientists have discovered. The finding may explain how the virus can pass through the placenta of a pregnant woman, on its way to infect developing brain cells in her fetus. [More]
NR supplements can reduce diabetes-related complications in mice

NR supplements can reduce diabetes-related complications in mice

A naturally occurring vitamin, nicotinamide riboside (NR), can lower blood sugar levels, reduce fatty liver, and prevent peripheral nerve damage in mouse models of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes (T2D), according to a new study by researchers at the University of Iowa and the Iowa City VA Health Care System. [More]
Cell phone radiation exposure may lead to increased rates of rare cancers

Cell phone radiation exposure may lead to increased rates of rare cancers

According to new report from Microwave News, the U.S. National Toxicology Program has found increased rates of rare cancers of the heart and brain in animals exposed to cell phone radiation in a long-awaited multi-million dollar two-year study. [More]
Meta-genomics analysis tool Taxonomer can rapidly and accurately detect pathogens

Meta-genomics analysis tool Taxonomer can rapidly and accurately detect pathogens

Scientists at the University of Utah, ARUP Laboratories, and IDbyDNA, Inc., have developed ultra-fast, meta-genomics analysis software called Taxonomer that dramatically improves the accuracy and speed of pathogen detection. [More]
Majority of young adults with abdominal obesity unaware of CKD risk

Majority of young adults with abdominal obesity unaware of CKD risk

Many young adults with abdominal obesity exhibit a readily detectable risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD), yet the vast majority don't know they're at risk, according to a study of nationwide health data led by Albert Einstein College of Medicine researchers that was published online today in the journal PLOS ONE. [More]
Even light or non-drinkers who become easily inebriated may develop fatty liver disease

Even light or non-drinkers who become easily inebriated may develop fatty liver disease

People who have reduced enzyme activity to breakdown active aldehyde, i.e., those who become easily inebriated, are more likely to develop fatty liver disease even if they do not drink alcohol. [More]
Nutrition, safety tips for grilling season

Nutrition, safety tips for grilling season

Cooking meat, including beef, pork, fish, or poultry, with high-temperature methods such as pan frying or grilling directly over an open flame can increase exposure to chemicals that can cause changes in DNA that may increase the risk of cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute. [More]
Obese individuals who consume aspartame may have worse glucose management

Obese individuals who consume aspartame may have worse glucose management

Artificial sweeteners help individuals with obesity to cut calories and lose weight but may have negative health effects, according to researchers at York University's Faculty of Health. [More]
Urinary sodium excretion study attracts controversy

Urinary sodium excretion study attracts controversy

A pooled analysis in The Lancet showing a U-shaped association between urinary sodium excretion and cardiovascular disease has drawn criticism. [More]
School obesity prevention program helps seventh graders lose weight over long-term period

School obesity prevention program helps seventh graders lose weight over long-term period

A five-week obesity prevention program for seventh grade students in Southern California helped obese students lose weight over a long-term period, according to a new study from the RAND Corporation, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School and the Los Angeles Unified School District. [More]
Study links low- and high-birthweight babies to increased cardiovascular disease risk

Study links low- and high-birthweight babies to increased cardiovascular disease risk

For reasons that remain unclear at least in the smaller babies, both birthweight extremes appear to increase the likelihood of early development of dangerous fat around major organs in the abdomen that significantly increases these risks, said Dr. Brian Stansfield, neonatologist at the Children's Hospital of Georgia and the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University. [More]
Researchers identify mutations that may stimulate early cancer growth in precancerous colorectal tissue

Researchers identify mutations that may stimulate early cancer growth in precancerous colorectal tissue

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered mutations that may fuel early cancer growth in precancerous colorectal tissue from high-risk patients. [More]
Epigenetic modification of Igfbp2 gene may increase risk of obesity and fatty liver

Epigenetic modification of Igfbp2 gene may increase risk of obesity and fatty liver

Scientists of the German Center for Diabetes Research led by the German Institute of Human Nutrition have shown in a mouse model that the epigenetic modification of the Igfbp2 gene observed in the young animal precedes a fatty liver in the adult animal later in life. [More]
Nine creative ways to improve cognitive development of children in developing countries

Nine creative ways to improve cognitive development of children in developing countries

Grand Challenges Canada, funded by the Government of Canada, and the "Saving Brains" partners today announced investments in nine creative ways to protect and nurture the cognitive development of children in developing countries. [More]
CSU researchers develop colorful potatoes that are high in antioxidants, rich in nutrients

CSU researchers develop colorful potatoes that are high in antioxidants, rich in nutrients

Purple potatoes might not be the first thing that comes to mind when trying to increase vitamin, mineral and antioxidant intake. However, a group of researchers from Colorado State University have recently developed potato varieties that satisfy these nutritional needs and could act as a preventive measure to several diseases. [More]
Four major phenotypes may help improve prediction, prevention of cardiometabolic risk in prediabetes

Four major phenotypes may help improve prediction, prevention of cardiometabolic risk in prediabetes

Prediabetes is associated with increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, dementia and cancer. However, the disease risk considerably varies among subjects. [More]
SUSTAIN study to test effect of high-dose selenium on recovery of cardiac surgery patients

SUSTAIN study to test effect of high-dose selenium on recovery of cardiac surgery patients

Queen's University researcher Daren Heyland is leading a study that aims to reduce the risk of complications and improves recovery of cardiac surgery patients. [More]
Bifodan announces expansion of global operations

Bifodan announces expansion of global operations

Bifodan, a distinct provider of probiotic solutions for the private label nutritional industry, announces a significant expansion of its global operations. [More]
Introducing allergenic foods early in life may decrease sensitization risk

Introducing allergenic foods early in life may decrease sensitization risk

Children who had a diet that included cow's milk products, egg and peanut before age one were less likely to develop sensitization to the corresponding foods, according to new research presented at the ATS 2016 International Conference. [More]
Real-time intracellular oxygen assay

Real-time intracellular oxygen assay

AMSBIO has introduced MitoXpress® Intra, a novel intracellular oxygen assay based on a 96 or 384-well fluorescence plate reader-based approach that facilitates the real-time assessment of transient changes in cell respiration, oxygen gradients and physiological responses across a range of cell models. [More]
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