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New supplement could help reduce urge to consume high-calorie foods

New supplement could help reduce urge to consume high-calorie foods

Eating a type of powdered food supplement, based on a molecule produced by bacteria in the gut, reduces cravings for high-calorie foods such as chocolate, cake and pizza, a new study suggests. [More]
Nutritional interventions may help prevent detrimental brain ageing

Nutritional interventions may help prevent detrimental brain ageing

Ageing is a highly complex process marked by a succession of events that may lead to an altered brain function, including neurodegenerative diseases. To date, the precise cause of cognitive decline remains quite elusive. [More]
Undiagnosed hearing issues may lead to social isolation, cognitive impairment in seniors

Undiagnosed hearing issues may lead to social isolation, cognitive impairment in seniors

Senior citizens with undiagnosed or untreated hearing problems are more likely to suffer from social isolation and cognitive impairment, a UBC study has found. [More]
Resistant starch in diet improves balance of gut bacteria, decreases cholesterol

Resistant starch in diet improves balance of gut bacteria, decreases cholesterol

The secret ingredient is in the flour, but its impact lies within the gut. Adding resistant starch to the diets of people with metabolic syndrome can improve bacteria in the gut, according to research from South Dakota State University. [More]
Study finds little to no link between butter consumption and chronic disease or all-cause mortality

Study finds little to no link between butter consumption and chronic disease or all-cause mortality

Butter consumption was only weakly associated with total mortality, not associated with cardiovascular disease, and slightly inversely associated (protective) with diabetes, according to a new epidemiological study which analyzed the association of butter consumption with chronic disease and all-cause mortality. [More]
Scientists reveal metabolic reasons why low calorie diets may lead to longer life

Scientists reveal metabolic reasons why low calorie diets may lead to longer life

Overeating can lead to health issues that can shorten one's life, such as obesity, diabetes and heart disease. [More]
Diet rich in vegetables and fruit may decrease type 2 diabetes risk

Diet rich in vegetables and fruit may decrease type 2 diabetes risk

A diet rich in vegetables and fruit may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, according to research published in the International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition. [More]
Omega-3 rich diet during pregnancy has no effect on weight of babies

Omega-3 rich diet during pregnancy has no effect on weight of babies

In Europe, almost one in three schoolchildren under the age of ten is overweight, if not obese. In the search for the cause of this phenomenon, fetal programming inside a mother's womb was put under scrutiny as a potential culprit for this "heavy issue". [More]
Why does appetite loss occur during illness? An interview with Prof. Conti and Prof. Francesconi

Why does appetite loss occur during illness? An interview with Prof. Conti and Prof. Francesconi

Appetite, as a word, come from the Latin appetitus, meaning "desire for.” Therefore, appetite can be defined as a pleasurable sensation or the desire to eat. This sensation is coordinated by several brain areas associated with reward processing such amygdala, hippocampus, ventral pallidum, nucleus accumbens and striatum, and others. [More]
Blood levels of omega-3s fatty acids linked to lower risk of deadly heart attacks

Blood levels of omega-3s fatty acids linked to lower risk of deadly heart attacks

Blood levels of seafood and plant-based omega-3 fatty acids are moderately associated with a lower risk of dying from heart attacks, according to a new epidemiological study, published today in JAMA Internal Medicine, led by Liana C. Del Gobbo, Ph.D., a postdoctoral research fellow in the division of cardiovascular medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine and senior author Dariush Mozaffarian, M.D., Dr.P.H., dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University in Boston. [More]
Study shows one in five individuals from U.S. military sample have obesity

Study shows one in five individuals from U.S. military sample have obesity

Despite being held to stringent weight and body fat standards, newly published research shows that one in five individuals from a sample of U.S. military personnel from 2001 - 2008 have obesity. [More]
CD Laboratory at MedUni Vienna explores new therapeutic approaches to enhance peritoneal dialysis

CD Laboratory at MedUni Vienna explores new therapeutic approaches to enhance peritoneal dialysis

One of the main functions of the kidneys is to filter metabolic products out of the blood. If the kidneys are no longer able to do this, the blood has to be artificially purified and drained of excess fluid. [More]
Positive environment can reverse trauma-related behavioral alterations in mice

Positive environment can reverse trauma-related behavioral alterations in mice

Traumatic experiences in childhood increase the risk of developing behavioral and psychiatric disorders later in life. It is also known that the consequences of a trauma can likewise be observed in the children of people affected even if those children have themselves not experienced any trauma. [More]
Latest online version of German Diabetes Risk Score optimized for mobile devices

Latest online version of German Diabetes Risk Score optimized for mobile devices

The German Institute of Human Nutrition has updated the online version of its German Diabetes Risk Score and has optimized it for mobile devices. [More]
Latest comprehensive survey reveals top health concerns for South Siders

Latest comprehensive survey reveals top health concerns for South Siders

Residents on the South Side say cancer, violence prevention and sexually transmitted infections are among their top health concerns, according to the latest comprehensive assessment conducted by the University of Chicago Medicine. [More]
Presence of bite count feedback helps reduce overall food intake during meal

Presence of bite count feedback helps reduce overall food intake during meal

New wearable technology is helping to provide novel weight loss tools. One way is by providing bite count feedback, which allows users to keep track of the number of bites during a meal. [More]
Walnut consumption linked to reduced risk of developing physical function impairments in older women

Walnut consumption linked to reduced risk of developing physical function impairments in older women

A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition suggests that consuming 1-2 servings of walnuts per week (1/4 cup per serving) was associated with reduced risk of developing impairments in physical function, which helps enable older women to maintain independence throughout the aging process. [More]
Women who maintained healthier diet less likely to develop physical impairments at old age

Women who maintained healthier diet less likely to develop physical impairments at old age

In a large study conducted by at Brigham and Women's Hospital, researchers found an association between women who maintain a healthy diet and a reduction in the risk of developing impaired physical function as they age. [More]
Study to evaluate magnitude of health risks caused by Zika virus in pregnant women, infants

Study to evaluate magnitude of health risks caused by Zika virus in pregnant women, infants

The National Institutes of Health and Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz-Fiocruz, a national scientific research organization linked to the Brazilian Ministry of Health, have begun a multi-country study to evaluate the magnitude of health risks that Zika virus infection poses to pregnant women and their developing fetuses and infants. [More]
Study estimates real-world prevalence of myopic choroidal neovascularization in the U.S.

Study estimates real-world prevalence of myopic choroidal neovascularization in the U.S.

A new study estimates that 9.6 million adults in the United States are highly myopic, or severely nearsighted. Of those, nearly 820,000 have a degenerative form of the disease and more than 41,000 suffer a complication called myopic choroidal neovascularization that could cause long-term vision loss, with women at higher risk. [More]
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