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Gynecology and obstetrics are twin subjects that deal with the female reproductive system. While obstetrics deals with pregnancy and its associated procedures and complications, gynaecology involves treating women who are not pregnant.
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Study: Cervical pessary does not reduce preterm births, neonatal complications in twin pregnancies

Study: Cervical pessary does not reduce preterm births, neonatal complications in twin pregnancies

Having twins accounts for only 1.5% of all births but 25% of preterm births, the leading cause of infant mortality worldwide. Successful strategies for reducing singleton preterm births include prophylactic use of progesterone and cervical cerclage in patients with a prior history of preterm birth. [More]
Endocrine disrupting chemicals released during UOG operations potentially harm human development, reproduction

Endocrine disrupting chemicals released during UOG operations potentially harm human development, reproduction

More than 15 million Americans live within one mile of unconventional oil and gas (UOG) operations that combine directional drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking" to release natural gas from underground rock. Scientific studies still are inconclusive on the potential long-term effects on human development. [More]
Proper iodine nutrition necessary during pregnancy

Proper iodine nutrition necessary during pregnancy

New research published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, a journal of the Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology, found that pregnant women in Sweden had inadequate levels of iodine in their diets. Proper iodine nutrition is necessary for neurological development of the fetus. [More]
CONRAD announces new funding agreement to increase HIV prevention products for high risk women in Africa

CONRAD announces new funding agreement to increase HIV prevention products for high risk women in Africa

CONRAD is pleased to announce a new funding agreement, in collaboration with the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief and the U.S. Agency for International Development, in support of a human centered design (HCD) strategy to increase demand, use and adherence of HIV prevention products for high risk women in Africa. [More]
WHO and health cluster partners cope with health needs of internally displaced persons in South Sudan

WHO and health cluster partners cope with health needs of internally displaced persons in South Sudan

The World Health Organization and partners are racing to cope with the health needs of thousands of internally displaced persons (IDPs) in northeastern South Sudan where fighting continues and the humanitarian situation remains dire. [More]
Women's contraceptive choices often driven by relationships, sexual activity

Women's contraceptive choices often driven by relationships, sexual activity

Women's contraceptive choices are more often driven by current relationships and sexual activity than by long-term pregnancy intentions, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. [More]
Survey identifies key factors linked to pediatric safety events in out-of-hospital emergent care situations

Survey identifies key factors linked to pediatric safety events in out-of-hospital emergent care situations

A national survey of more than 750 emergency medical services providers conducted by researchers at Oregon Health & Science University identified airway management skills, personal anxiety and limited pediatric care proficiency among key factors that may contribute to pediatric safety events for children in out-of-hospital emergent care situations. [More]

Elsevier selected to publish Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, has announced that it has been selected by the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada to publish its journal, Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada, as of January 2016. [More]
UC Davis study finds higher survival rates for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer

UC Davis study finds higher survival rates for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer

Combing data collected on thousands of California ovarian cancer patients, UC Davis researchers have determined that almost one-third survived at least 10 years after diagnosis. [More]
Northwestern gets $17.5 million NIH grant to invent, develop implantable drug delivery system for HIV prevention

Northwestern gets $17.5 million NIH grant to invent, develop implantable drug delivery system for HIV prevention

Northwestern Medicine scientists have received a five-year, $17.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health for an interdisciplinary project that aims to invent, develop and test an implantable drug delivery system to protect high-risk individuals from HIV infection for up to a year at a time. [More]
Combining chemotherapy and birinapant effective against high-grade serous ovarian cancer

Combining chemotherapy and birinapant effective against high-grade serous ovarian cancer

High-grade serous ovarian cancer often responds well to the chemotherapy drug carboplatin, but why it so frequently comes back after treatment has been a medical mystery. [More]
ACP supports for eliminating non-medical vaccination exemptions

ACP supports for eliminating non-medical vaccination exemptions

Support for eliminating existing exemptions, except for medical reasons, from immunization laws was among the policy recommendations adopted last weekend at the summer meeting of the Board of Regents of the American College of Physicians. [More]
Lidocaine benefits breast cancer survivors who experience pain during intercourse

Lidocaine benefits breast cancer survivors who experience pain during intercourse

Scientists at Oregon Health & Science University report that breast cancer survivors who experience pain during sexual intercourse, a common side effect of breast cancer treatment, may achieve comfort when liquid lidocaine is applied strategically to prevent pain. [More]
Research findings may provide new approach to treating male infertility

Research findings may provide new approach to treating male infertility

A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore's (NUS) Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine has demonstrated for the first time that hydrogen sulphide (H2S), when applied exogenously, could protect testicular germ cells, which are male reproductive cells, against heat-induced injury, which is one of the major causes of male infertility. [More]
Endocrine Society selects 18 endocrinologists as winners of 2016 Laureate Awards

Endocrine Society selects 18 endocrinologists as winners of 2016 Laureate Awards

The Endocrine Society today announced it has chosen 18 accomplished endocrinologists as winners of the organization's prestigious 2016 Laureate Awards. [More]
Study finds that serum biomarkers can predict pre-eclampsia risk in pregnant women

Study finds that serum biomarkers can predict pre-eclampsia risk in pregnant women

Levels of biomarkers in the blood of pregnant women can be used to predict which women are at risk of pre-eclampsia, finds a study published today (22 July) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG). ADMA and Hcy, both known to be raised in women with pre-eclampsia, are present in the blood in higher than normal concentrations a month before the onset of the condition. [More]
Georgetown's Institute for Reproductive Health receives $30 million from USAID to support Passages Project

Georgetown's Institute for Reproductive Health receives $30 million from USAID to support Passages Project

The U.S. Agency for International Development has awarded $30 million to Georgetown University Medical Center's Institute for Reproductive Health to fund its Passages Project, which aims to improve healthy timing and spacing of pregnancies among youth and first-time parents in developing countries. [More]
Woman's weight during first pregnancy can negatively affect second baby

Woman's weight during first pregnancy can negatively affect second baby

A woman's weight during her first pregnancy can affect how her second baby fares, Saint Louis University research finds. [More]
Mothers with chemical intolerances more likely to have children with ASD or ADHD

Mothers with chemical intolerances more likely to have children with ASD or ADHD

A new study from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio found that mothers with chemical intolerances are two to three times more likely than other women to have a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). [More]
Adverse life events in childhood can increase woman's risk of preterm birth

Adverse life events in childhood can increase woman's risk of preterm birth

Like most health professionals, David Olson has known for some time of the dangers posed by excessive stress. His latest research, though, is giving surprising new insight into how chronic stress in childhood can have an impact years after it occurred in women giving birth. [More]
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