Obstetrics News and Research RSS Feed - Obstetrics News and Research

Gynecology and obstetrics are twin subjects that deal with the female reproductive system. While obstetrics deals with pregnancy and its associated procedures and complications, gynaecology involves treating women who are not pregnant.
Further Reading
Study attributes mild cognitive defects in women to post-traumatic stress induced by cancer diagnosis

Study attributes mild cognitive defects in women to post-traumatic stress induced by cancer diagnosis

Breast cancer patients often display mild cognitive defects even before the initiation of chemotherapy. A new study by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich researchers now attributes the syndrome to post-traumatic stress induced by diagnosis of the disease. [More]
Extreme morning sickness during pregnancy linked to developmental problems in children

Extreme morning sickness during pregnancy linked to developmental problems in children

Women who experience extreme morning sickness during pregnancy are three times more likely to have children with developmental issues, including attention disorders and language and speech delays, than woman who have normal nausea and vomiting, a UCLA study has found. [More]
New Dream Team dedicated to ovarian cancer research formed at AACR Annual Meeting 2015

New Dream Team dedicated to ovarian cancer research formed at AACR Annual Meeting 2015

Stand Up To Cancer, Ovarian Cancer Research Fund, Ovarian Cancer National Alliance, and National Ovarian Cancer Coalition, along with the American Association for Cancer Research, Scientific Partner to SU2C, announced today the formation of a Dream Team devoted to ovarian cancer research at the AACR Annual Meeting 2015, held here April 18-22. [More]
Patterns of DNA anomalies can predict outcomes in women with ovarian cancer

Patterns of DNA anomalies can predict outcomes in women with ovarian cancer

Nearly anyone touched by ovarian cancer will tell you: it's devastating. It's bad enough that cancer in almost 80 percent of patients reaches advanced stages before diagnosis, and that most patients are expected to die within five years. But just as painfully, roughly one quarter of women diagnosed have no warning that they are resistant to platinum-based chemotherapy, the main line of defense, nor that they will likely have 18 months to live. [More]
Setting standard of care for children born with cleft lip and palate

Setting standard of care for children born with cleft lip and palate

Representatives from Texas Children's Hospital joined an international group of medical professionals, patients and parents to determine a standard set of outcome measures for children born with cleft lip and palate. [More]
Around 90% of all breast cancers can be diagnosed using MRI, shows study

Around 90% of all breast cancers can be diagnosed using MRI, shows study

Around 90 per cent of all breast cancers can be definitively diagnosed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This compares to the combined methods of mammography and ultrasound which yielded a detection rate of just 37.5 per cent. [More]
Findings of Ariosa's non-invasive prenatal testing study published online in NEJM

Findings of Ariosa's non-invasive prenatal testing study published online in NEJM

Results from the largest clinical trial to date, comparing non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) using the Harmony Prenatal Test with conventional first trimester combined screening (FTS) in a general pregnancy population have been published online in The New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Researchers analyze false-positive results from new prenatal genetic screens

Researchers analyze false-positive results from new prenatal genetic screens

Prenatal blood screening for extra or missing chromosomes in the fetus might give false-positive results if the mother's genome contains more than the usual number of certain DNA segments. [More]
Combination of signaling molecules can inhibit growth of breast cancer cells

Combination of signaling molecules can inhibit growth of breast cancer cells

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have uncovered how the body's inflammatory response can alter how estrogen promotes the growth of breast cancer cells. [More]
BP monitoring essential for early diagnosis, management of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy

BP monitoring essential for early diagnosis, management of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy

Accurate blood pressure measurement (BP) is fundamental to the early diagnosis of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, says a review published 1 April, 2015, in The Obstetrician & Gynaecologist (TOG). [More]
New prenatal test introduced for detecting Down’s Syndrome

New prenatal test introduced for detecting Down’s Syndrome

A new prenatal test for Down’s Syndrome may be more effective at diagnosing the condition than the standard screening that is currently used, suggests a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
McGraw-Hill Education introduces ObGyn Collection on AccessMedicine

McGraw-Hill Education introduces ObGyn Collection on AccessMedicine

McGraw-Hill Education, a leading global provider of content and services for the science, technical, and medical communities, announced the launch of the ObGyn Collection on AccessMedicine, the latest addition to the McGraw-Hill Education suite of comprehensive online resources for medical students, residents, and healthcare professionals. [More]
Loyola takes holistic approach to help couples manage their sexual health

Loyola takes holistic approach to help couples manage their sexual health

Sexual dysfunction is common among couples, yet it often goes untreated, according to specialists at Loyola University Health System's Sexual Wellness Clinic. [More]
Ultrasound safer than other imaging modalities for imaging female pelvis, say OB/GYN experts

Ultrasound safer than other imaging modalities for imaging female pelvis, say OB/GYN experts

Ultrasound technology has evolved dramatically in recent years. A group of noted obstetricians and gynecologists maintain that ultrasound is more cost-effective and safer than other imaging modalities for imaging the female pelvis and should be the first imaging modality used for patients with pelvic symptoms. [More]
Investigational S-equol nutritional supplement may alleviate certain menopause symptoms

Investigational S-equol nutritional supplement may alleviate certain menopause symptoms

The investigational S-equol nutritional supplement may be a viable agent to alleviate certain menopause symptoms, such as hot flashes, according to a new peer-reviewed article in the March Journal of Women's Health. [More]
Society for Reproductive Investigation awards two top honors to Dr. Ayman Al-Hendy

Society for Reproductive Investigation awards two top honors to Dr. Ayman Al-Hendy

Dr. Ayman Al-Hendy, an obstetrician-gynecologist and molecular biologist at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University and GRHealth, has received two top honors from the Society for Reproductive Investigation. [More]
Two scientific studies may change clinical practices regarding medical abortions, miscarriages

Two scientific studies may change clinical practices regarding medical abortions, miscarriages

Two scientific studies led by researchers at Sweden's Karolinska Institutet are expected to form the basis of new international recommendations for the treatment of medical abortions and miscarriages. [More]
Laparoscopic hysterectomy with morcellation safer than abdominal procedure for treating presumed fibroid uterus

Laparoscopic hysterectomy with morcellation safer than abdominal procedure for treating presumed fibroid uterus

In a new study published in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology, researchers from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill compared the relative risks of laparoscopic hysterectomy (with morcellation) with abdominal surgery for hysterectomy in premenopausal women undergoing surgery for presumed uterine fibroids. [More]
Women who give birth to four or more children at risk of heart disease

Women who give birth to four or more children at risk of heart disease

Women who give birth to four or more children are more likely to have cardiovascular changes that can be early indicators of heart disease than women who have fewer children, new research by UT Southwestern Medical Center cardiologists finds. [More]
TRMC expands use of capnography to monitor patients during moderate sedation

TRMC expands use of capnography to monitor patients during moderate sedation

Tillamook Regional Medical Center recently strengthened patient safety measures by expanding its use of capnography to monitor patients during moderate sedation. Sedation is commonly used during procedures such as colonoscopies and in some instances can suppress breathing. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement