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Gynecology and obstetrics are twin subjects that deal with the female reproductive system. While obstetrics deals with pregnancy and its associated procedures and complications, gynaecology involves treating women who are not pregnant.
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UW-Madison scientists working to screen mosquitoes for ability to carry, transmit Zika virus

UW-Madison scientists working to screen mosquitoes for ability to carry, transmit Zika virus

It's no accident that researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have taken a lead role addressing the Zika virus epidemic gripping the Americas. Many of them were already at work fighting viruses and mosquito-borne diseases in Central and South America. [More]
Researchers develop tiny 3-D tissue models to study how ovarian cancer develops in women

Researchers develop tiny 3-D tissue models to study how ovarian cancer develops in women

With a unique approach that draws on 3-D printing technologies, a team of University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers is developing new tools for understanding how ovarian cancer develops in women. [More]
Study highlights need for effective support when pregnant women opt for C-section

Study highlights need for effective support when pregnant women opt for C-section

A study involving over 6,500 pregnant women from 6 countries in northern Europe highlights a clear need for appropriate support and advice when cesarean section (c-section) is elected for non-medical reasons, and for the accurate communication of the risk and benefits of c-section birth, suggests new research published in the Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics & Gynecology. [More]
Maternal placental syndromes increase short-term risk of developing cardiovascular disease

Maternal placental syndromes increase short-term risk of developing cardiovascular disease

The short-term risk of developing cardiovascular disease following a first pregnancy is higher for women experiencing placental syndromes and a preterm birth or an infant born smaller than the usual size, a University of South Florida study reports. [More]
Early and late menopause linked to increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes

Early and late menopause linked to increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes

Women who begin menopause before age 46 or after 55 have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a study of more than 124,000 women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative, a large national trial aimed at preventing disease in postmenopausal women. [More]
NYU Lutheran offers latest innovation in robotic surgery to patients in Brooklyn

NYU Lutheran offers latest innovation in robotic surgery to patients in Brooklyn

True to its commitment to bring world-class care to patients in Brooklyn, the NYU Langone Health System is building a sophisticated, technologically advanced and clinically integrated health network in the borough. [More]
Cancer risk screening for hereditary mutations: an interview with Ted Snelgrove

Cancer risk screening for hereditary mutations: an interview with Ted Snelgrove

Great question – the answer is actually unknown. Every month, there are publications that report on new cancer-related genes, so it's an area of great knowledge growth at the moment. [More]
Researchers develop first placenta-on-a-chip to model interface between mother and fetus

Researchers develop first placenta-on-a-chip to model interface between mother and fetus

Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have developed the first placenta-on-a-chip that can fully model the transport of nutrients across the placental barrier. [More]
Care4Moms study to identify, address health care needs of mothers with medically fragile infants

Care4Moms study to identify, address health care needs of mothers with medically fragile infants

An interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine has received nearly $900,000 in federal funding to identify and address the needs of mothers with medically fragile infants, a vastly understudied group. [More]
UAB receives NIH grants in three perinatal networks to improve maternal and infant health

UAB receives NIH grants in three perinatal networks to improve maternal and infant health

The University of Alabama at Birmingham is the only university to be awarded grants in all three perinatal networks from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to improve maternal and infant health. [More]
Use of nicotine patches or Zyban drug during pregnancy benefits both mother and child

Use of nicotine patches or Zyban drug during pregnancy benefits both mother and child

The results of a study conducted by Dr. Anick Bérard, Professor and Fonds de recherche du Québec - Santé Research Chair on Medications and Pregnancy, at the University of Montreal's Faculty of Pharmacy and the Ste-Justine University Hospital demonstrate that the use of nicotine patches or the drug Zyban has positive effects for the unborn child and allows pregnant women to stop smoking during and after pregnancy. [More]
Study shows feasibility to adopt salpingectomy in large scale clinical practice without surgical repercussions

Study shows feasibility to adopt salpingectomy in large scale clinical practice without surgical repercussions

A surgical procedure recommended to reduce the future risk of ovarian cancer has been successfully implemented throughout Kaiser Permanente in Northern California without a change in surgical outcomes, according to research published today in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology. [More]
Cryopreserved human umbilical cord patch shows promise in treating fetal spina bifida

Cryopreserved human umbilical cord patch shows promise in treating fetal spina bifida

A patch made from cryopreserved human umbilical cord may be a novel method for treating spina bifida in utero, according to researchers at McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
Bacterial infection may play role in causing OAB symptoms

Bacterial infection may play role in causing OAB symptoms

A team led by researchers at the University of Kent has identified bacterial infection as a possible cause of Overactive Bladder Syndrome (OAB). [More]
Exercise during pregnancy can have benefits for mom and baby

Exercise during pregnancy can have benefits for mom and baby

Researchers collected and re-examined clinical trial data on exercise during pregnancy and whether it plays a role in preterm birth, and found that exercise is safe and does not increase the risk of preterm birth. [More]
Endometrial scratching in women appears to increase chance of clinical pregnancy, live birth

Endometrial scratching in women appears to increase chance of clinical pregnancy, live birth

There is a much disputed claim that "injury" to the lining of the uterus - whether inadvertent or deliberate - increases the chance of embryo implantation and thus the chance of pregnancy in certain groups of women having IVF. [More]
Environmental toxins affect children's brain development, experts agree

Environmental toxins affect children's brain development, experts agree

An unprecedented alliance of leading scientists, health professionals, and children's and environmental health advocates agree for the first time that today's scientific evidence supports a link between exposures to toxic chemicals in air, water, food and everyday products and children's risks for neurodevelopmental disorders. [More]
Mitochondrial DNA levels may represent accurate, predictive measure of embryo viability in IVF

Mitochondrial DNA levels may represent accurate, predictive measure of embryo viability in IVF

Despite the claims and counter-claims for new embryo assessment techniques introduced over the past two decades, the search for the holy grail of assisted reproduction - the key to the embryo destined to implant - continues. [More]
Maternal HBsAg can serve as HBV vertical transmission marker

Maternal HBsAg can serve as HBV vertical transmission marker

Two studies have independently identified quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen as a marker to identify pregnant women with chronic hepatitis B virus infection whose infants are at high-risk of infection despite immunoprophylaxis. [More]
Fetal BPA exposure leads to harmful change in adult uterine response to estrogens

Fetal BPA exposure leads to harmful change in adult uterine response to estrogens

Low levels of BPA exposure may be considered safe, but new research published online in The FASEB Journal, suggests otherwise. In the report, researchers from Yale show that the genome is permanently altered in the uterus of mice that had been exposed to BPA during their fetal development. [More]
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