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Gynecology and obstetrics are twin subjects that deal with the female reproductive system. While obstetrics deals with pregnancy and its associated procedures and complications, gynaecology involves treating women who are not pregnant.
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Lidocaine benefits breast cancer survivors who experience pain during intercourse

Lidocaine benefits breast cancer survivors who experience pain during intercourse

Scientists at Oregon Health & Science University report that breast cancer survivors who experience pain during sexual intercourse, a common side effect of breast cancer treatment, may achieve comfort when liquid lidocaine is applied strategically to prevent pain. [More]
Research findings may provide new approach to treating male infertility

Research findings may provide new approach to treating male infertility

A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore's (NUS) Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine has demonstrated for the first time that hydrogen sulphide (H2S), when applied exogenously, could protect testicular germ cells, which are male reproductive cells, against heat-induced injury, which is one of the major causes of male infertility. [More]
Endocrine Society selects 18 endocrinologists as winners of 2016 Laureate Awards

Endocrine Society selects 18 endocrinologists as winners of 2016 Laureate Awards

The Endocrine Society today announced it has chosen 18 accomplished endocrinologists as winners of the organization's prestigious 2016 Laureate Awards. [More]
Study finds that serum biomarkers can predict pre-eclampsia risk in pregnant women

Study finds that serum biomarkers can predict pre-eclampsia risk in pregnant women

Levels of biomarkers in the blood of pregnant women can be used to predict which women are at risk of pre-eclampsia, finds a study published today (22 July) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG). ADMA and Hcy, both known to be raised in women with pre-eclampsia, are present in the blood in higher than normal concentrations a month before the onset of the condition. [More]
Georgetown's Institute for Reproductive Health receives $30 million from USAID to support Passages Project

Georgetown's Institute for Reproductive Health receives $30 million from USAID to support Passages Project

The U.S. Agency for International Development has awarded $30 million to Georgetown University Medical Center's Institute for Reproductive Health to fund its Passages Project, which aims to improve healthy timing and spacing of pregnancies among youth and first-time parents in developing countries. [More]
Woman's weight during first pregnancy can negatively affect second baby

Woman's weight during first pregnancy can negatively affect second baby

A woman's weight during her first pregnancy can affect how her second baby fares, Saint Louis University research finds. [More]
Mothers with chemical intolerances more likely to have children with ASD or ADHD

Mothers with chemical intolerances more likely to have children with ASD or ADHD

A new study from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio found that mothers with chemical intolerances are two to three times more likely than other women to have a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). [More]
Adverse life events in childhood can increase woman's risk of preterm birth

Adverse life events in childhood can increase woman's risk of preterm birth

Like most health professionals, David Olson has known for some time of the dangers posed by excessive stress. His latest research, though, is giving surprising new insight into how chronic stress in childhood can have an impact years after it occurred in women giving birth. [More]
Depression, urinary incontinence magnify effects of vaginal symptoms in postmenopausal women

Depression, urinary incontinence magnify effects of vaginal symptoms in postmenopausal women

Special efforts should be made to identify and treat depression and urinary incontinence in postmenopausal women with vaginal symptoms, according to UC San Francisco researchers, as these two common conditions not only tend to co-exist with vaginal symptoms but also may complicate the impact of these symptoms on women's daily activities and quality of life. [More]
Noninvasive prenatal screening could detect maternal cancer

Noninvasive prenatal screening could detect maternal cancer

A study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association shows that genetic test results, as revealed by non-invasive prenatal testing for fetal chromosome abnormalities, may detect underlying conditions in the mother, including cancer. [More]
Cedars-Sinai's groundbreaking online registry improves participation in clinical research

Cedars-Sinai's groundbreaking online registry improves participation in clinical research

Research for Her, Cedars-Sinai's groundbreaking online registry that matches women with research studies and clinical trials, enrolled study participants more quickly when compared with traditional paper-based registries, according to new research published in the journal Gynecologic Oncology. [More]
Researchers develop sperm RNA diagnostic test to help determine best infertility treatment for couples

Researchers develop sperm RNA diagnostic test to help determine best infertility treatment for couples

A Wayne State University School of Medicine professor, in collaboration with researchers at CReAte Fertility Center, University of Toronto, Harvard University and Georgia Reagents University, has developed the first diagnostic test for sperm RNA based on next-generation sequencing. For couples with unexplained infertility, the test may help determine the best infertility treatment for couples having difficulty conceiving. [More]
Revised work hour restrictions for resident physicians fail to improve surgical patient outcomes

Revised work hour restrictions for resident physicians fail to improve surgical patient outcomes

Work hour restrictions for resident physicians, revised nationally four years ago largely to protect patients against physician trainees' fatigue-related errors, have not had the desired effect of lowering postoperative complication rates in several common surgical specialties, according to new study results. [More]
Cost of childbirths can vary depending on the type of hospital, shows study

Cost of childbirths can vary depending on the type of hospital, shows study

The cost of having a baby can vary by almost $10,000 depending on which hospital is chosen, Yale School of Medicine researchers have found in a study published in the July issue of the journal Health Affairs. [More]
U-M researchers develop first-ever 3D model to help study treatment for pelvic organ prolapse

U-M researchers develop first-ever 3D model to help study treatment for pelvic organ prolapse

It's a mysterious condition often linked to childbirth that causes distress and discomfort and requires surgery for more than 200,000 women a year - but there's no good way to study it. Now, researchers at the University of Michigan have developed the first-ever 3D complete computer model to help study treatment for pelvic organ prolapse, a weakening of muscles and ligaments that causes organs like the bladder to drop from their normal place. For many women, the condition causes urinary problems, painful intercourse and uncomfortable pressure. [More]
WSU researcher secures $1.25 million NIH grant to study role of rosiglitazone drug in reversing preeclampsia

WSU researcher secures $1.25 million NIH grant to study role of rosiglitazone drug in reversing preeclampsia

Sascha Drewlo, Ph.D., assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology for the Wayne State University School of Medicine, has secured a $1.25 million grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health to study the role of approved drugs to improve placental function. [More]
Chromosomal abnormalities in embryos created for IVF can be predicted at earliest stage of human development

Chromosomal abnormalities in embryos created for IVF can be predicted at earliest stage of human development

Scientists at Oregon Health & Science University, Stanford University, University of Valencia and IGENOMIX have discovered that chromosomal abnormalities in human embryos created for in vitro fertilization, or IVF, can be predicted within the first 30 hours of development at the cell-1 stage which results from the union of a female egg and male sperm. [More]
Women who take stop-smoking drug Zyban during pregnancy give birth to a child with birth defects

Women who take stop-smoking drug Zyban during pregnancy give birth to a child with birth defects

The Arentz Law Group is currently investigating cases of birth defects caused by the stop-smoking drug Zyban. Women who have taken Zyban while pregnant, and given birth to a child born with a birth defect, are encouraged to contact the law firm immediately for a free legal consultation. [More]
New public guide addresses unrealistic expectations of screening tests

New public guide addresses unrealistic expectations of screening tests

Misconceptions about how screening works, its limitations and possible harms are still being perpetuated by media stories and high profile cases, such as Angelina Jolie's double mastectomy and emotive tabloid case studies of women under 25 dying from cervical cancer. [More]
Researchers unravel mechanisms that enable accumulation of tumour promoting protease in stressed cancer cells

Researchers unravel mechanisms that enable accumulation of tumour promoting protease in stressed cancer cells

A mechanism beyond the level of gene regulation, which is often the underlying reason for changes in protein levels, does enable the strong accumulation of a tumour promoting protease in stressed cancer cells. The group of BIOSS researcher Prof. Dr. Thomas Reinheckel teamed up with BIOSS investigator Prof. Dr. Sabine Rospert and their colleagues from the University Medical Center Freiburg, Prof. Dr. Elmar Stickeler and Dr. Peter Bronsert, in order to unravel mechanisms by which stress-resistant production of cancer promoting proteins occurs. [More]
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