Oncogene News and Research RSS Feed - Oncogene News and Research

An oncogene is a gene that, when mutated or expressed at high levels, helps turn a normal cell into a tumor cell.
Research findings point toward new therapeutic target for aggressive breast cancer

Research findings point toward new therapeutic target for aggressive breast cancer

One of the first-known oncogenes has a protein partner that helps breast cancer proliferate and when it's blocked, so is the cancer, scientists report. [More]
Scientists identify new biomarker for diagnosing cause of thyroid cancer

Scientists identify new biomarker for diagnosing cause of thyroid cancer

The expression of the protein CLIP2 provides information on whether a papillary thyroid carcinoma was induced by radiation or had a sporadic origin. With this discovery, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum München have identified a new biomarker for the diagnosis of the cancer cause. [More]
Trovagene begins new study to assess precision cancer monitoring technology in lung cancer management

Trovagene begins new study to assess precision cancer monitoring technology in lung cancer management

Trovagene, Inc., a developer of cell-free molecular diagnostics, announced today that it has expanded its clinical program to include a study designed to evaluate use of the Company's precision cancer monitoring technology in the management of lung cancer patients. [More]
Scientists discover mechanism that resists cancer drugs in estrogen-positive breast cancer

Scientists discover mechanism that resists cancer drugs in estrogen-positive breast cancer

Scientists have discovered a previously unknown mechanism by which estrogen prepares cells to divide, grow and, in the case of estrogen-positive breast cancers, resist cancer drugs. The researchers say the work reveals new targets for breast cancer therapy and will help doctors predict which patients need the most aggressive treatment. [More]
Scientists discover new clues about drug used in treating blood cancer

Scientists discover new clues about drug used in treating blood cancer

Keck Medicine of USC scientists have discovered new clues about a drug instrumental in treating a certain blood cancer that may provide important targets for researchers searching for cures. [More]
Sigma-Aldrich enters into new gene editing partnership with U-M Medical School's Vector Core

Sigma-Aldrich enters into new gene editing partnership with U-M Medical School's Vector Core

Sigma-Aldrich Corporation announced today it has entered into a new gene editing partnership with the University of Michigan Medical School's Vector Core. Under the partnership, Sigma-Aldrich will provide the Vector Core with Sigma CRISPR technology, experimental design consultation, and dedicated gene editing bioinformaticians. [More]
Disrupting cancer regulator MYC: an interview with Professor Kim Janda

Disrupting cancer regulator MYC: an interview with Professor Kim Janda

MYC is an oncogenic member of the basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper transcription factor family. In its monomeric form, MYC’s tertiary structure is intrinsically disordered and the protein is transcriptionally inactive. [More]
UCSD researchers launch phase 1 trial to assess novel monoclonal antibody for CLL patients

UCSD researchers launch phase 1 trial to assess novel monoclonal antibody for CLL patients

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have launched a phase 1 human clinical trial to assess the safety and efficacy of a new monoclonal antibody for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the most common form of blood cancer in adults. [More]
Researchers identify non-protein-coding RNA whose expression linked to ovarian cancer

Researchers identify non-protein-coding RNA whose expression linked to ovarian cancer

Over the years researchers have made tremendous strides in the understanding and treatment of cancer by searching genomes for links between genetic alterations and disease. [More]
Genetic mutation caused by ultraviolet light is likely driving force behind human skin cancers

Genetic mutation caused by ultraviolet light is likely driving force behind human skin cancers

A genetic mutation caused by ultraviolet light is likely the driving force behind millions of human skin cancers, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
Combination miRNA therapy offers promising therapeutic avenue for non-small-cell lung cancer

Combination miRNA therapy offers promising therapeutic avenue for non-small-cell lung cancer

Micro RNAs (miRNA) have recently emerged as key therapeutic agents against cancers and are actively being evaluated in pre-clinical models of various cancers as well as in human clinical trials. [More]
Clinical trial to assess safety and efficacy of novel monoclonal antibody for CLL patients

Clinical trial to assess safety and efficacy of novel monoclonal antibody for CLL patients

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, in partnership with the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) and Celgene Corporation, a New Jersey-based biopharmaceutical company, have launched a phase 1 human clinical trial to assess the safety and efficacy of a novel monoclonal antibody for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). [More]
Internal production of hydrogen peroxide can lead cells to exit cell cycle and become senescent

Internal production of hydrogen peroxide can lead cells to exit cell cycle and become senescent

What happens inside cells when they detect the activation of a cancer-inducing gene? Sometimes, cells are able to signal internally to stop the cell cycle. Such cells are able to enter, at least for a time, a protective non-growth state. [More]
Scientists discover predictive marker to classify breast cancer patients for effective treatment

Scientists discover predictive marker to classify breast cancer patients for effective treatment

Scientists have made it easier to predict both breast cancer relapses and responses to chemotherapy, through the identification of a unique gene. The newly found marker could help doctors classify each breast cancer patient and customise a treatment regimen that is more effective. [More]
Research offers promise for personalized RNA combination therapies to treat lung cancer

Research offers promise for personalized RNA combination therapies to treat lung cancer

Small RNA molecules, including microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), offer tremendous potential for new therapeutic agents to inhibit cancer cell growth. However, delivering these small RNAs to solid tumors remains a significant challenge, as the RNAs must target the correct cells and avoid being broken down by enzymes in the body. [More]
Researchers gain rare insight into pregnancy-associated breast cancer

Researchers gain rare insight into pregnancy-associated breast cancer

During pregnancy, certain hormones trigger specialized mammary stem cells to create milk-producing cells essential to lactation. [More]
MIT researchers generate liver tumors in adult mice

MIT researchers generate liver tumors in adult mice

Sequencing the genomes of tumor cells has revealed thousands of mutations associated with cancer. One way to discover the role of these mutations is to breed a strain of mice that carry the genetic flaw — but breeding such mice is an expensive, time-consuming process. [More]
Researchers find molecule that irreversibly interferes with activity of mutated cancer gene

Researchers find molecule that irreversibly interferes with activity of mutated cancer gene

UT Southwestern Medical Center cancer researchers have found a molecule that selectively and irreversibly interferes with the activity of a mutated cancer gene common in 30 percent of tumors. [More]
Cancer researchers find molecule that irreversibly interferes with KRAS gene

Cancer researchers find molecule that irreversibly interferes with KRAS gene

UT Southwestern Medical Center cancer researchers have found a molecule that selectively and irreversibly interferes with the activity of a mutated cancer gene common in 30 percent of tumors. [More]

TAZ represents a novel therapeutic target in NSCLC

Patients with non-small-cell lung cancer who express high levels of transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif may be a clinically distinct subgroup with an unfavourable prognosis, researchers report. [More]