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An oncogene is a gene that, when mutated or expressed at high levels, helps turn a normal cell into a tumor cell.
New research identifies key enzyme linked to age-related increases in cancer and inflammation

New research identifies key enzyme linked to age-related increases in cancer and inflammation

For the first time, researchers have shown that an enzyme key to regulating gene expression -- and also an oncogene when mutated -- is critical for the expression of numerous inflammatory compounds that have been implicated in age-related increases in cancer and tissue degeneration, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Researchers identify definitive genetic defect in angiocentric gliomas

Researchers identify definitive genetic defect in angiocentric gliomas

Diagnosis and treatment decisions for a recently recognized type of children's brain tumor should be improved by the discovery of the genetic mechanism that causes it, say researchers who identified the unusual DNA abnormality in angiocentric gliomas. [More]
FedMed gains access to Trovagene's Precision Cancer Monitoring tests and service

FedMed gains access to Trovagene's Precision Cancer Monitoring tests and service

Trovagene, Inc., a developer of cell-free molecular diagnostics, announced today that it has entered into an agreement with FedMed, Inc. establishing health benefit access to Trovagene's full line of Precision Cancer Monitoring (PCM) tests and services. [More]
Sphingosine kinase inhibitor slows castration-resistant prostate cancer cell growth

Sphingosine kinase inhibitor slows castration-resistant prostate cancer cell growth

A first-in-class sphingosine kinase 2 inhibitor slowed the growth of castration-resistant prostate cancer cells, in part by inhibiting the enzyme dihydroceramide desaturase (DEGS), but did not kill them, according to the results of preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies published in the December 2015 issue of Molecular Cancer Therapeutics by researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina and others. [More]
Nutrition and breast cancer; starving triple negative breast cancer cells to death: an interview with Associate Professor Jeff Holst

Nutrition and breast cancer; starving triple negative breast cancer cells to death: an interview with Associate Professor Jeff Holst

While there are a range of reports that different foods and food groups can increase or decrease your risk of cancer, these associations are very difficult to scientifically verify. [More]
Northwestern researchers use fruit fly genetics to understand how things may go wrong in cancer

Northwestern researchers use fruit fly genetics to understand how things may go wrong in cancer

Cancer cells are normal cells that go awry by making bad developmental decisions during their lives. In a study involving the fruit fly equivalent of an oncogene implicated in many human leukemias, Northwestern University researchers have gained insight into how developing cells normally switch to a restricted, or specialized, state and how that process might go wrong in cancer. [More]
Combination of PARP inhibitors and c-MET may benefit breast cancer patients

Combination of PARP inhibitors and c-MET may benefit breast cancer patients

Findings from a new study reveal that PARP inhibitors, an emerging class of drugs being studied in cancer clinical trials, may be enhanced by combining them with inhibitors targeting an oncogene known as c-MET which is overexpressed in many cancers. [More]
Health Canada approves immunotherapy clinical study to treat Epstein-Barr virus-related lymphomas

Health Canada approves immunotherapy clinical study to treat Epstein-Barr virus-related lymphomas

Health Canada recently approved, for the first time in Canada, a clinical project for a Phase I study aimed at treating lymphomas associated with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) through adoptive cellular immunotherapy that is specific to EBV. [More]
Researchers reveal totally new biological mechanism that underlies cancer

Researchers reveal totally new biological mechanism that underlies cancer

In a landmark study, researchers from the Broad Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital reveal a completely new biological mechanism that underlies cancer. By studying brain tumors that carry mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) genes, the team uncovered some unusual changes in the instructions for how the genome folds up on itself. [More]
LabCorp to offer Interpace's new ThyraMir microRNA classifier test

LabCorp to offer Interpace's new ThyraMir microRNA classifier test

Interpace Diagnostics announced today that Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings, the world's leading health care diagnostics company, will begin offering Interpace's new ThyraMir microRNA classifier test. [More]

Researchers outline novel molecular interactions affecting key cancer pathway in humans

Researchers from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore have delineated novel molecular interactions affecting the activity of the TGF-β pathway, a key cancer pathway in humans affecting cancer progression. [More]
Mirati announces initiation of glesatinib Phase 2 clinical trial in NSCLC patients

Mirati announces initiation of glesatinib Phase 2 clinical trial in NSCLC patients

Mirati Therapeutics, Inc. today announced that the Phase 2 clinical trial of glesatinib (MGCD265) has commenced. The Company also announced that "glesatinib" is the proposed generic name for MGCD265. [More]
TSRI-led study finds potential new therapeutic approach for hard-to-treat breast cancers

TSRI-led study finds potential new therapeutic approach for hard-to-treat breast cancers

Findings from a new study led by scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) suggest a potent new therapeutic approach for a number of hard-to-treat breast cancers. [More]
Researchers use endocytic pathways to sort out NSCLC lines into two distinct clusters

Researchers use endocytic pathways to sort out NSCLC lines into two distinct clusters

In the Age of Personalized Medicine, we've learned that one size doesn't fit all, least of all in cancer. Cancer is a disease of your cells, and sorting out your cancer from all others is a daunting challenge but one that cancer cell biologists are furiously pursuing. They are examining every aspect of cell function and cell structure, looking for clusters of phenotypes that could label a patient's cancer so precisely that it could be linked to therapies proven effective against just that type. [More]
Post-progression afatinib exposure boosts NSCLC outcomes

Post-progression afatinib exposure boosts NSCLC outcomes

Continued exposure to afatinib plus paclitaxel can benefit non-small-cell lung cancer patients who developed resistance to erlotinib or gefitinib and progressed after initially responding to afatinib monotherapy, suggest phase III trial results. [More]
Moffitt Cancer Center study finds link between common gene mutations and tumor immune surveillance

Moffitt Cancer Center study finds link between common gene mutations and tumor immune surveillance

Learning if a lung cancer patient has genetic mutations can help oncologists determine the best approach to treatment. There are four gene mutations (KRAS, TP53, STK11, and EGFR) that most commonly occur in lung cancer; however, there are limited effective therapies to target these mutations. With this in mind, Moffitt Cancer Center performed an extensive genetic analysis of lung cancer specimens to unravel how mutations in the two of those genes (TP53 and STK11) contribute to the biology of lung cancer and patient outcomes. [More]
Researchers identify tumor suppressor genes that drive subset of melanomas

Researchers identify tumor suppressor genes that drive subset of melanomas

Of the hundreds of genes that can be mutated in a single case of melanoma, only a handful may be true "drivers" of cancer. In research that appeared today in Nature Genetics, a Weizmann Institute of Science team has now revealed one of the drivers of a particularly deadly subset of melanomas - one that is still seeing a rise in new cases. This gene is a newly identified member of a group of genes called tumor suppressor genes. [More]
New research shows that autophagy can operate in cell nucleus to guard against start of cancer

New research shows that autophagy can operate in cell nucleus to guard against start of cancer

Autophagy, literally self-eating or the degradation of unwanted cellular bits and pieces by the cell itself, has been shown for the first time to also work in the cell nucleus. In addition, in this setting it plays a role in guarding against the start of cancer, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Discovery may open new doors to understanding how melanoma grows and spreads

Discovery may open new doors to understanding how melanoma grows and spreads

Of the hundreds of genes that can be mutated in a single case of melanoma, only a handful may be true "drivers" of cancer. In research that recently appeared in Nature Genetics, a Weizmann Institute of Science team has now revealed one of the drivers of a particularly deadly subset of melanomas that is seeing a rise in new cases. [More]
New joint initiative to explore clinical interpretation of molecular tests for cancers

New joint initiative to explore clinical interpretation of molecular tests for cancers

A new conference helping doctors navigate one of the most important scientific questions faced by the cancer community could help improve survival rates for patients. [More]
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