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An oncogene is a gene that, when mutated or expressed at high levels, helps turn a normal cell into a tumor cell.
New ULB study shows how cancer cell of origin controls malignant transition

New ULB study shows how cancer cell of origin controls malignant transition

Researchers at the Université libre de Bruxelles, ULB define for the first time how the cancer cell of origin controls invasive and metastatic properties of tumor cells. [More]
Blocking key nutrient uptake may be effective way of treating triple negative breast cancer

Blocking key nutrient uptake may be effective way of treating triple negative breast cancer

Cancer rewires the metabolism of tumor cells, converting them into lean, mean, replicating machines. [More]
Scientists develop new computer-based method to assess cell communication networks

Scientists develop new computer-based method to assess cell communication networks

A multi-institution academic-industrial partnership of researchers led by Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine has developed a new method to broadly assess cell communication networks and identify disease-specific network anomalies. [More]
Scientists identify new way to block action of genetic mutations found in most cancers

Scientists identify new way to block action of genetic mutations found in most cancers

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have identified a new way to block the action of genetic mutations found in nearly 30 percent of all cancers. [More]
Researchers describe new method that can reveal distinct invasive properties of cancer cells

Researchers describe new method that can reveal distinct invasive properties of cancer cells

A research team at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center has described the steps, in both written and video format, that allow cancer investigators to track, in real time, cancer cell invasion and metastasis in transparent zebrafish embryos. [More]
Researchers find certain short junk DNA play key role in development of Ewing sarcoma

Researchers find certain short junk DNA play key role in development of Ewing sarcoma

The stretches of DNA between genes, littered with repeating sequences, were once considered the "junk of the genome," but scientists are learning that some of this junk is far from harmless clutter. [More]
Researchers discover Hedgehog signaling pathway is key to formation of gastrointestinal stromal tumors

Researchers discover Hedgehog signaling pathway is key to formation of gastrointestinal stromal tumors

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Mayo Clinic provide the first evidence that the Hedgehog signaling pathway is central to the formation of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), which are frequently driven by the KIT oncogene. [More]
Supercomputer simulations of p53 protein could boost future anti-cancer drug discovery

Supercomputer simulations of p53 protein could boost future anti-cancer drug discovery

Even though it's almost impossible to see, computational biophysicist Rommie Amaro is using the Stampede supercomputer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center at The University of Texas at Austin to model the largest atomic level system of the tumor suppression protein p53 to date -- over 1.5 million atoms. [More]
Identification of new lung cancer subtypes could lead to personalized immunotherapies

Identification of new lung cancer subtypes could lead to personalized immunotherapies

Personalized therapies can potentially improve the outcomes of patients with lung cancer, but how to best design such an approach is not always clear. [More]
New oncogene may contribute to high incidence of prostate cancer among African American men

New oncogene may contribute to high incidence of prostate cancer among African American men

A team of scientists has identified MNX1 as a new oncogene - a gene than can cause cancer - that is more active in African American prostate cancer than in European American prostate cancer. [More]
Depriving deadly brain cancer cells of cholesterol causes tumor regression in mouse models

Depriving deadly brain cancer cells of cholesterol causes tumor regression in mouse models

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research and The Scripps Research Institute, with colleagues in Los Angeles and Japan, report that depriving deadly brain cancer cells of cholesterol, which they import from neighboring healthy cells, specifically kills tumor cells and caused tumor regression and prolonged survival in mouse models. [More]
HDAC inhibitors show potential to eliminate breast and ovarian cancer stem cells

HDAC inhibitors show potential to eliminate breast and ovarian cancer stem cells

A group of researchers, led by scientists at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, has shown that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have the potential to eliminate stubborn reservoirs of breast and ovarian cancer stem cells (CSCs). [More]
Researchers identify, validate three distinct molecular subtypes of prostate cancer

Researchers identify, validate three distinct molecular subtypes of prostate cancer

In the largest study of its kind to date, researchers have identified and validated three distinct molecular subtypes of prostate cancer that correlate with distant metastasis-free survival and can assist in future research to determine how patients will respond to treatment, according to research presented today at the 58th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
Mount Sinai and TJU researchers awarded grant for UM research

Mount Sinai and TJU researchers awarded grant for UM research

Uveal melanoma (UM) is the second most common type of skin cancer. Approximately 50 percent of patients will develop metastasis or spread of their cancer, most commonly to the liver. [More]
Study opens door to new class of therapies for Ras-dependent cancers

Study opens door to new class of therapies for Ras-dependent cancers

New research from The Tisch Cancer Institute at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai identifies a protein that may be an unexplored target to develop new cancer therapies. [More]
Overweight kidney cancer patients live longer than normal-weight counterparts, study shows

Overweight kidney cancer patients live longer than normal-weight counterparts, study shows

Obesity almost always increases cancer risk and worsens outcomes, but researchers led by scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute report that overweight patients with advanced kidney cancer had significantly longer survival than those who were normal or underweight. [More]
Researchers identify tantalizing target in fight against aggressive form of lung cancer

Researchers identify tantalizing target in fight against aggressive form of lung cancer

Researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have discovered a flaw in the armor of the most aggressive form of lung cancer, a weakness that doctors may be able to exploit to slow or even stop the disease. [More]
Researchers show how p53 protein can control gene expression at levels of transcription, mRNA translation

Researchers show how p53 protein can control gene expression at levels of transcription, mRNA translation

Proteins that bind DNA or RNA are usually put in different categories, but researchers at Umea University in Sweden and Inserm in France recently showed how the p53 protein has the capacity to bind both and how this controls gene expression on the levels of both transcription (RNA synthesis) and mRNA translation (protein synthesis). [More]
Brazilian study discovers promising therapeutic and diagnostic target for treatment of melanoma

Brazilian study discovers promising therapeutic and diagnostic target for treatment of melanoma

A Brazilian study shows that inhibition of an RNA named RMEL3, which is encoded by a previously uncharacterized gene (also named RMEL3), can reduce the viability of cultured melanoma cells by up to 95%. [More]
Scientists identify novel way to target lung cancer through KRAS gene

Scientists identify novel way to target lung cancer through KRAS gene

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a new way to target lung cancer through the KRAS gene, one of the most commonly mutated genes in human cancer and one researchers have so far had difficulty targeting successfully. [More]
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