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An oncogene is a gene that, when mutated or expressed at high levels, helps turn a normal cell into a tumor cell.
Pediatric Cancer Genome Project identifies genetic basis of three pediatric melanoma subtypes

Pediatric Cancer Genome Project identifies genetic basis of three pediatric melanoma subtypes

The St. Jude Children's Research Hospital—Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project found that melanoma in some adolescent and adult patients involves many of the same genetic alterations and would likely respond to the same therapy. [More]
Novogen's TRXE-009 therapy shows promise against brain cancer

Novogen's TRXE-009 therapy shows promise against brain cancer

Australian/US biotechnology company, Novogen Limited, today announces that it has confirmed that one of its lead candidate products, TRXE-009, is showing the potential to become an important new therapy in the fight against adult and pediatric brain cancer. [More]
New study finds increase in use of adjuvant systemic therapy for gastrointestinal stromal tumors

New study finds increase in use of adjuvant systemic therapy for gastrointestinal stromal tumors

A new study finds that the use of adjuvant systemic therapy for localized gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs ) has significantly increased over time and that patients treated with the therapy have better survival than those treated with surgery alone. [More]
Common protein may play strategic role in tumor growth

Common protein may play strategic role in tumor growth

A common, yet previously undistinguished protein, which is elevated in many late-stage cancers, may play a strategic role in tumor growth through a non-conventional pathway, researchers at the Indiana University School of Medicine report in the Feb. 10 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [More]
Trovagene to sell underwritten public offering of common stock

Trovagene to sell underwritten public offering of common stock

Trovagene, Inc., a developer of cell-free molecular diagnostics, today announced that it is offering to sell shares of its common stock in an underwritten public offering. The offering is expected to price on or about Friday, February 6, 2015. [More]
Genomics of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC): an interview with Professor Thomas J. Giordano

Genomics of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC): an interview with Professor Thomas J. Giordano

There are two types of thyroid cells and therefore there are two broad types of thyroid cancer. Medullary carcinoma is derived from parafollicular or C cells, whereas follicular cells give rise to several types of thyroid cancers. [More]
Study provides common model of cellular ageing

Study provides common model of cellular ageing

Researchers at the BBSRC-supported Babraham Institute have mapped the physical structure of the nuclear landscape in unprecedented detail to understand changes in genomic interactions occurring in cell senescence and ageing. Their findings have allowed them to reconcile the contradictory observations of two current models of ageing: cellular senescence of connective tissue cells called fibroblasts and cellular models of an accelerated ageing syndrome. [More]
Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation names 15 new Damon Runyon Fellows

Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation names 15 new Damon Runyon Fellows

The Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, a non-profit organization focused on supporting innovative early career researchers, named 15 new Damon Runyon Fellows at its fall Fellowship Award Committee review. The recipients of this prestigious, four-year award are outstanding postdoctoral scientists conducting basic and translational cancer research in the laboratories of leading senior investigators across the country. [More]
Androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells can activate different gene set when bound to antiandrogens

Androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells can activate different gene set when bound to antiandrogens

The androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells can activate different sets of genes depending on whether it binds with an androgen hormone or an antiandrogen drug, according to a new study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. [More]
NMR in cancer research: an interview with Andy Byrd

NMR in cancer research: an interview with Andy Byrd

My research these days is generally classified as structural biology, although as I trained in chemistry. I specialize in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applied to biological problems. Our lab is very interested in studying mammalian proteins, particularly systems involved in cancer, in order to try to understand mechanisms to provide that information for our collaborators, and for the general knowledge of the community as well. [More]
Trovagene, Genomac Research Institute to expand clinical collaboration

Trovagene, Genomac Research Institute to expand clinical collaboration

Trovagene, Inc., today announced it will expand the clinical collaboration with Genomac Research Institute in Prague, Czech Republic. Trovagene Precision Cancer Monitoring SM technology will be used in two prospective clinical studies for the early detection of emerging oncogene mutations indicative of resistance to targeted therapies used to treat colorectal and lung cancer. [More]
MET amplified in NSCLC irrespective of type, genetic background

MET amplified in NSCLC irrespective of type, genetic background

A third of non-small-cell lung cancers show low- to high-level amplification of the MET gene, according to a German study, with no significant difference in frequency across different types of cancer and genetic backgrounds. [More]
CML mouse model reveals previously unreported facets of disease

CML mouse model reveals previously unreported facets of disease

A humanised murine model of chronic phase chronic myeloid leukaemia, developed by a Swedish research team, provides insight into previously unexplored characteristics of the disease. [More]
PF-114 shows promise in therapy-resistant CML, Ph-positive ALL

PF-114 shows promise in therapy-resistant CML, Ph-positive ALL

PF-114, a selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is active against native and mutated forms of the BCR–ABL oncogene in Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukaemias, according to preclinical cellular and in vivo results published in Leukemia. [More]
Pre-clinical studies confirm TRXE-009 as new potential treatment for melanoma

Pre-clinical studies confirm TRXE-009 as new potential treatment for melanoma

Novogen Limited, Australian/US biotechnology company, today announces that it has confirmed that its lead candidate product, TRXE-009, originally developed for the treatment of brain cancers, has been shown in pre-clinical studies also to be highly active against melanoma. [More]
Metastatic lung cancer outcomes independent of KRAS mutation subtypes

Metastatic lung cancer outcomes independent of KRAS mutation subtypes

Overall survival in patients with metastatic lung cancer does not correlate with Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homologue mutation subtypes, US researchers report. [More]
PD-1, PD-L1 differentially expressed in NSCLC

PD-1, PD-L1 differentially expressed in NSCLC

The expression of the immune checkpoint protein programmed death-1 receptor and its ligand varies according to tumour and patient characteristics in oncogene-addicted non-small-cell lung cancer, research indicates. [More]
Scientists suspect role of mini-chromosomes in cancers, diseases caused by gene mutations

Scientists suspect role of mini-chromosomes in cancers, diseases caused by gene mutations

Cancers are due to genetic aberrations in certain cells that gain the ability to divide indefinitely. This proliferation of sick cells generates tumors, which gradually invade healthy tissue. Therefore, current therapies essentially seek to destroy cancer cells to stop their proliferation. Through high-throughput genetic sequencing of glioblastoma cells, one of the most deadly brain tumors, a team of geneticists from the University of Geneva's (UNIGE) Faculty of Medicine discovered that some of these mutations are caused by supplemental extrachromosomal DNA fragments, called double minutes, which enable cancer cells to better adapt to their environment and therefore better resist to treatments meant to destroy them. [More]
Study finds that cancer cells may be susceptible to metabolic stress

Study finds that cancer cells may be susceptible to metabolic stress

Research at the University of Adelaide has discovered cancer cells may be particularly susceptible to metabolic stress - opening the way for new targeted therapy that won't harm normal cells. [More]
CCR5 receptor plays key role in driving prostate cancer metastases

CCR5 receptor plays key role in driving prostate cancer metastases

Although prostate cancer can be successfully treated in many men, when the disease metastasizes to the bone, it is eventually lethal. In a study published online December 1st in the journal Cancer Research, researchers show that the receptor CCR5 best known for its role in HIV therapy, may also be involved in driving the spread of prostate cancer to the bone. [More]