Oncogene News and Research RSS Feed - Oncogene News and Research

An oncogene is a gene that, when mutated or expressed at high levels, helps turn a normal cell into a tumor cell.
Oncogene signatures could help design new drug treatments for breast cancer

Oncogene signatures could help design new drug treatments for breast cancer

Drug treatments for breast cancer patients might soon be designed based on the unique genetic autograph of their tumor. [More]
Breast cancer cells use new signaling pathway to cope with lack of oxygen levels inside tumors

Breast cancer cells use new signaling pathway to cope with lack of oxygen levels inside tumors

Researchers have identified a new signaling pathway that helps cancer cells cope with the lack of oxygen found inside tumors. These are the results of a study published in Nature Cell Biology on June 20, and led by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and its Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, the University of Toronto, Harvard Medical School and Oxford University. [More]
Researchers reveal how cancer cells use energy to move and divide so quickly

Researchers reveal how cancer cells use energy to move and divide so quickly

Cancer cells and normal cells both divide and move, but with cancer cells it's like they're on steroids: everything is bigger, faster, more. [More]
Scientists find new way to slow growth of triple negative breast cancer

Scientists find new way to slow growth of triple negative breast cancer

CANCER RESEARCH UK scientists have found a new way to slow the growth of the most aggressive type of breast cancer, according to research published in the journal Oncogene today (Monday). [More]
Study underscores importance of developing PRMT5 inhibitors as promising treatment for GB patients

Study underscores importance of developing PRMT5 inhibitors as promising treatment for GB patients

A new study suggests that blocking an enzyme called PRMT5 in tumor cells could be a promising new strategy for the treatment of glioblastoma (GB), the most aggressive and lethal form of brain cancer. [More]
Researchers discover AF1q protein linked to multiple myeloma, EMD

Researchers discover AF1q protein linked to multiple myeloma, EMD

A group of researchers from the University of Louisville, Japan and Austria is the first to identify a protein, AF1q, associated with multiple myeloma and a condition that occurs in approximately one-fourth of very aggressive multiple myeloma, extramedullary disease or EMD. [More]
Whole-exome sequencing can help characterize genetic alterations for commonly used bladder cancer cell lines

Whole-exome sequencing can help characterize genetic alterations for commonly used bladder cancer cell lines

Much of basic cancer research is based on studies with cultured cancer cells. However, the usefulness of these studies greatly depends on how accurately these cancer cells grown in a dish represent human tumors. [More]
New treatment shows promise against hard-to-treat eye cancer

New treatment shows promise against hard-to-treat eye cancer

Eye cancer took the life of author and neurologist Oliver Sacks last year, bringing attention to the rare and deadly disease. Scientists have tried to develop precision treatments against cancers like this one, but the mutations that cause them have proven difficult to block with drugs. [More]
First large-scale proteogenomic study helps pinpoint genes that drive breast cancer

First large-scale proteogenomic study helps pinpoint genes that drive breast cancer

Building on data from The Cancer Genome Atlas project, a multi-institutional team of scientists has completed the first large-scale "proteogenomic" study of breast cancer, linking DNA mutations to protein signaling and helping pinpoint the genes that drive cancer. [More]
Loss of HOXA5 protein may allow breast cancer cells to thrive

Loss of HOXA5 protein may allow breast cancer cells to thrive

Many breast cancers are marked by a lack of HOXA5 protein, a gene product known to control cell differentiation and death, and lower levels of the protein correspond to poorer outcomes for patients. [More]
Inhibiting autophagy can effectively block tumor cell migration, breast cancer metastasis

Inhibiting autophagy can effectively block tumor cell migration, breast cancer metastasis

Researchers from the University of Chicago have shown that inhibiting autophagy, a self-devouring process used by cells to degrade large intra-cellular cargo, effectively blocks tumor cell migration and breast cancer metastasis in tumor models. [More]
Novel animal model helps understand mechanisms that lead to multiple myeloma

Novel animal model helps understand mechanisms that lead to multiple myeloma

Researchers at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have developed an animal model that allows them to better understand the mechanisms that lead to the development of multiple myeloma, a hematologic cancer of plasma cells, and the amyloidosis that sometimes accompanies it. The study was published in the journal Scientific Reports. [More]
Study reveals new cell-signaling pathway that detects chromosome missegregation

Study reveals new cell-signaling pathway that detects chromosome missegregation

A recent research study at The Hormel Institute, University of Minnesota is providing insight into the regulation of chromosome segregation and the mechanisms used by cells to prevent them from forming tumors. [More]
Controlling cholesterol metabolism could help reduce pancreatic cancer spread

Controlling cholesterol metabolism could help reduce pancreatic cancer spread

Researchers have shown how controlling cholesterol metabolism in pancreatic cancer cells reduces metastasis, pointing to a potential new treatment using drugs previously developed for atherosclerosis. [More]
Novel function of PLK1 gene in prostate cancer metastasis

Novel function of PLK1 gene in prostate cancer metastasis

Researchers at VCU Massey Cancer Center have uncovered a novel function of the gene PLK1 (polo-like kinase 1) that helps prostate cancer cells metastasize (spread) to other parts of the body. This mechanism highlights new potential targets for cancer therapies and challenges the previous understanding of PLK1's role in cancer growth and progression. [More]
High levels of COMP protein may lead to worse breast cancer prognosis

High levels of COMP protein may lead to worse breast cancer prognosis

Research from Lund University in Sweden shows that the protein COMP, which mainly exists in cartilage, can also be found in breast cancer tumours in patients with a poor prognosis. Studies on mice also showed that COMP contributed to the development and metastasis of the breast cancer. [More]
Novel metabolic pathways help cancer cells thrive under certain conditions

Novel metabolic pathways help cancer cells thrive under certain conditions

Scientists at the Children's Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) have identified a novel metabolic pathway that helps cancer cells thrive in conditions that are lethal to normal cells. [More]
MicroRNA controls tumor cell proliferation in most aggressive large B-cell lymphoma

MicroRNA controls tumor cell proliferation in most aggressive large B-cell lymphoma

A recent study by researchers at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine showed that a microRNA called miR-181a dampens signals from the cancer-driving NFκB protein pathway in the most aggressive large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL). By reducing NFκB signaling, miR-181a controls tumor cell proliferation and survival and could be the target of novel therapies. The study was published in the journal Blood. [More]
Combination drug therapy may stop KRAS-mediated lung adenocarcinoma

Combination drug therapy may stop KRAS-mediated lung adenocarcinoma

Researchers on Mayo Clinic's Florida campus have shut down one of the most common and lethal forms of lung cancer by combining the rheumatoid arthritis drug auranofin with an experimental targeted agent. [More]
New discoveries reveal why smokers have increased risk of type 2 diabetes

New discoveries reveal why smokers have increased risk of type 2 diabetes

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have made two new discoveries with regard to the beta cells' ability to release insulin. The findings can also provide a possible explanation as to why smokers have an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. [More]
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