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An oncogene is a gene that, when mutated or expressed at high levels, helps turn a normal cell into a tumor cell.

New study identifies potential target for colorectal cancer treatment

A new study identifies a molecule that is a probable driving force in colorectal cancer and suggests that the molecule could be an important target for colorectal cancer treatment and a valuable biomarker of tumor progression. [More]
Research shows blocking DNA repair improves radiation therapy for glioblastomas

Research shows blocking DNA repair improves radiation therapy for glioblastomas

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have demonstrated in both cancer cell lines and in mice that blocking critical DNA repair mechanisms could improve the effectiveness of radiation therapy for highly fatal brain tumors called glioblastomas. [More]
Study uncovers one way that p53 acts to prevent cancer cell invasion

Study uncovers one way that p53 acts to prevent cancer cell invasion

The tumor suppressor p53 does all it can to prevent oncogenes from transforming normal cells into tumor cells by killing defective cells or causing them to become inactive. [More]
Trovagene reports net loss of $1 million for fourth quarter 2013

Trovagene reports net loss of $1 million for fourth quarter 2013

Trovagene, Inc., a developer of cell-free molecular diagnostics, today reported its financial results for the quarter and the year ended December 31, 2013. [More]

Cytoplasmic HIF-2α linked to poor prognosis in renal cell carcinoma

Cytoplasmic expression of hypoxia inducible factor-2α is associated with poor prognosis in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma, study findings indicate. [More]

Findings reveal potential drug targets for small cell lung cancer

Cancer cells undergo extensive genetic alterations as they grow and spread through the body. Some of these mutations, known as "drivers," help spur cells to grow out of control, while others ("passengers") are merely along for the ride. [More]
Synta Pharmaceuticals' Hsp90 inhibitor ganetespib selected for study in I-SPY 2 TRIAL

Synta Pharmaceuticals' Hsp90 inhibitor ganetespib selected for study in I-SPY 2 TRIAL

Synta Pharmaceuticals Corp. and QuantumLeap Healthcare Collaborative today announced that Synta's lead drug candidate, the Hsp90 inhibitor ganetespib, has been selected for study in the I-SPY 2 TRIAL (Investigation of Serial Studies to Predict Your Therapeutic Response with Imaging And moLecular Analysis 2). [More]
UH scientists working to develop next generation of prostate cancer therapies

UH scientists working to develop next generation of prostate cancer therapies

A University of Houston scientist and his team are working to develop the next generation of prostate cancer therapies, which are targeted at metabolism. [More]
New research points to potential target for treating triple negative breast cancer

New research points to potential target for treating triple negative breast cancer

New research from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center and Georgia Regents University finds that a protein that fuels an inflammatory pathway does not turn off in breast cancer, resulting in an increase in cancer stem cells. This provides a potential target for treating triple negative breast cancer, the most aggressive form of the disease. [More]
Two oncogenes work together to sustain population of cells in lung squamous cell carcinoma

Two oncogenes work together to sustain population of cells in lung squamous cell carcinoma

Patients with a common form of lung cancer — lung squamous cell carcinoma — have very few treatment options. That situation may soon change. [More]
Researchers identify potential genes that can be targeted for new treatments for hepatocellular cancer

Researchers identify potential genes that can be targeted for new treatments for hepatocellular cancer

Patients with advanced hepatocellular (or liver) cancer have high mortality rates, with existing drugs demonstrating only a small, but significant survival advantage. By combining a zebrafish model of liver cancer with data from human tumors, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai hope to identify potential genes of interest that can be targeted for new treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma, the most common form of liver cancer to develop from liver cells. [More]
UT Southwestern' faculty receives Stanley J. Korsmeyer Award for contributions to understanding of autophagy

UT Southwestern' faculty receives Stanley J. Korsmeyer Award for contributions to understanding of autophagy

Dr. Beth Levine, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and Director of the Center for Autophagy Research at UT Southwestern Medical Center, has received the 2014 Stanley J. Korsmeyer Award from the American Society for Clinical Investigation. [More]
Researchers suggest new targets may provide druggable alternatives to Ewing's Sarcoma

Researchers suggest new targets may provide druggable alternatives to Ewing's Sarcoma

Ewing's Sarcoma is an aggressive pediatric cancer, most commonly caused by the improper fusion of the gene EWS with the gene FLI1. Though the cause has long been known, therapeutic targeting of this fusion has to date proven very difficult. [More]
BRAF mutation associated with other cancers appears to drive papillary craniopharyngiomas

BRAF mutation associated with other cancers appears to drive papillary craniopharyngiomas

A team led by investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital, Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Broad Institute has found that a gene mutation associated with several types of cancer also may be responsible for a rare but debilitating brain tumor called papillary craniopharyngioma. [More]
Synta initiates three multicenter trials to evaluate ganetespib with chemotherapy for AML and MDS

Synta initiates three multicenter trials to evaluate ganetespib with chemotherapy for AML and MDS

Synta Pharmaceuticals Corp. today announced the initiation of three multicenter, randomized trials supported by the Leukemia & Lymphoma Research Fund and Cancer Research UK, evaluating ganetespib in combination with chemotherapy in first-line treatment of patients with AML and high risk MDS. [More]

IDMC recommends early stopping of Phase 3 study of ibrutinib in treatment of CLL/SLL

Janssen-Cilag International NV today announced the early stopping of PCYC-1112-CA, the Phase 3 study of ibrutinib in the treatment of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, based on the recommendation of an Independent Data Monitoring Committee, which concluded that the study showed a significant difference in progression-free survival as compared to the control, the primary endpoint of the study. [More]

Study suggests new target for drugs to treat head and neck tumors

The increased activation of a key oncogene in head and neck cancers could be the result of mutation and dysfunction of regulatory proteins that are supposed to keep the gene, which has the potential to cause cancer, in check, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. [More]

Study suggests that ROR1 could be an important therapeutic target for patients with CLL

​Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that an oncogene dubbed ROR1, found on chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B cells but not normal adult tissues, acts as an accelerant when combined with another oncogene, resulting in a faster-developing, more aggressive form of CLL in mice. [More]
Researchers complete genomic analysis of cervical cancer in two patient populations

Researchers complete genomic analysis of cervical cancer in two patient populations

​Researchers from the Boston area, Mexico, and Norway have completed a comprehensive genomic analysis of cervical cancer in two patient populations. The study identified recurrent genetic mutations not previously found in cervical cancer, including at least one for which targeted treatments have been approved for other forms of cancer. [More]

Researchers investigate how androgen receptors affect prostate cancer progression

Approximately 1 out of every 6 American men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer, and this year alone there are expected to be nearly a quarter of a million new cases diagnosed, making prostate cancer the most common malignancy among men in the United States. Center for Nuclear Receptors & Cell Signaling Assistant Professor Daniel Frigo and his research team recently published a study investigating the processes through which androgen receptors affect prostate cancer progression. [More]