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An oncogene is a gene that, when mutated or expressed at high levels, helps turn a normal cell into a tumor cell.
Protein imbalances within cells can cause ovarian cancer

Protein imbalances within cells can cause ovarian cancer

Cancer can be caused solely by protein imbalances within cells, a study of ovarian cancer has found. The discovery is a major breakthrough because, until now, genetic aberrations have been seen as the main cause of almost all cancer. [More]
Study points to new treatment strategies for liver cancer

Study points to new treatment strategies for liver cancer

A new study by researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, the National Cancer Institute, and the Chulabhorn Research Institute has found that blocking the activity of a key immune receptor, the lymphotoxin-beta receptor (LTβR), reduces the progression of liver cancer. [More]
BUSM investigators receive MRA's Jackie King Young Investigator Awards

BUSM investigators receive MRA's Jackie King Young Investigator Awards

Boston University School of Medicine researchers Neil Joseph Ganem, PhD and Anurag Singh, PhD, each have received the Jackie King Young Investigator Awards from the Melanoma Research Alliance (MRA), the largest private funder of melanoma research. Both serve as assistant professors of pharmacology & experimental therapeutics and medicine. [More]
Defects in mitochondria play key role in transition of normal cells to cancerous cells

Defects in mitochondria play key role in transition of normal cells to cancerous cells

Cancer cells defy the rules by which normal cells abide. They can divide without cease, invade distant tissues and consume glucose at abnormal rates. [More]
New research identifies potential treatment for primary effusion lymphoma

New research identifies potential treatment for primary effusion lymphoma

New research from the University of Southern California Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center has identified a potential treatment for a rare but previously incurable form of lymphoma that is observed primarily in patients with HIV/AIDS infection. [More]
Study aims to determine utility of Trovagene's PCM technology for predicting response to cancer immunotherapy

Study aims to determine utility of Trovagene's PCM technology for predicting response to cancer immunotherapy

Trovagene, Inc., a developer of cell-free molecular diagnostics, today announced the launch of a study that aims to determine utility of the Company's Precision Cancer Monitoring (PCM) technology for predicting response to treatment in advanced melanoma patients receiving one or a combination of the novel immunotherapy agents Yervoy (ipilumumab), a CTLA-4 inhibitor, and Opdivo (nivolumab), a PD-1 inhibitor. [More]
Certain colon cancer genes take a step back to move forward

Certain colon cancer genes take a step back to move forward

Recent Weizmann Institute studies are revealing a complex picture of cancer progression in which certain genes that drive tumor growth in the earlier stages get suppressed in later stages - taking a step back to move forward. [More]
Dr. Maurizio D'Incalci to receive Pezcoller-Prodi Award in Scientific Career

Dr. Maurizio D'Incalci to receive Pezcoller-Prodi Award in Scientific Career

Dr. Maurizio D'Incalci, MD, Ph.D., will receive an award in recognition of his scientific career at the new Special Conference on Anticancer Drug Action and Drug Resistance: from Cancer Biology to the Clinic organized by the European Association of Cancer Research, the American Association of Cancer Research and the Italian Cancer Society and that will be held in Florence, Italy, June 20-23. [More]
Hormones used in breast cancer treatment could affect disease progression, outcomes in some patients

Hormones used in breast cancer treatment could affect disease progression, outcomes in some patients

Recently, researchers have discovered that the hormone progesterone, an ingredient in contraceptives and menopausal hormone replacement therapies, might stimulate the growth of breast cancer cells that are resistant to anti-estrogen therapy and chemotherapy. [More]
Researchers find new way to potentially stop progression of late-stage cancers

Researchers find new way to potentially stop progression of late-stage cancers

An international research team led by Mayo Clinic oncologists has found a new way to identify and possibly stop the progression of many late-stage cancers, including bladder, blood, bone, brain, lung and kidney. [More]
Clinical data of Trovagene's Precision Cancer Monitoring platform to be presented at two medical conferences

Clinical data of Trovagene's Precision Cancer Monitoring platform to be presented at two medical conferences

Trovagene, Inc., a developer of cell-free molecular diagnostics, announced today that clinical data featuring its Precision Cancer MonitoringSM platform will be presented at the 2015 Cancer Markers and Liquid Biopsies conference in San Diego, CA on June 11-12, and at the AACR Precision Medicine Series: Integrating Clinical Genomics and Cancer Therapy in Salt Lake City, UT on June 13-16. [More]
Scientists identify novel mechanism that can reorganize cell's genetic architecture to promote senescence

Scientists identify novel mechanism that can reorganize cell's genetic architecture to promote senescence

Senescence, a phenomenon in which cells cease to divide and grow, can be caused by everything from natural DNA damage to treatment with chemotherapy. However, several mechanisms allow for cells to bypass senescence and grow out of control, eventually becoming cancerous. [More]
Caris Life Sciences: Study identifies benefit of targeted therapy in CRC with high microsatellite instability

Caris Life Sciences: Study identifies benefit of targeted therapy in CRC with high microsatellite instability

Caris Life Sciences, a leading biotechnology company focused on fulfilling the promise of precision medicine, today announced the results of a study identifying the clinical benefit of targeted therapy in colorectal cancer (CRC) with high microsatellite instability (MSI-H), a predisposition that occurs in 15% of all CRCs causing significantly different prognosis and response to treatment. [More]
Two grants to bolster research on why ovarian cancer is resistant to chemotherapy

Two grants to bolster research on why ovarian cancer is resistant to chemotherapy

Determining which strains of cancer will eventually become resistant to chemotherapy could be key in figuring out more effective and targeted forms of treatment. Finding the genes responsible for chemo-resistance is what Jeremy Chien, Ph.D., member of the Cancer Biology Program at The University of Kansas Cancer Center, is looking to do with an innovative system that draws inspiration from the early days of cancer gene research. [More]
Epic Sciences presents single cell sequencing data from mCRPC patients at 2015 ASCO

Epic Sciences presents single cell sequencing data from mCRPC patients at 2015 ASCO

Epic Sciences announced today that the company will present single cell sequencing data, from metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer patients, at the 2015 annual meeting of the American Society for Clinical Oncology. This application expands the investigational utility of Epic Sciences' no cell left behind™ platform to characterize circulating tumor cell (CTC) genomic alterations. [More]
Study reveals new molecular mechanism that helps protect genome from harmful effect of UV radiations

Study reveals new molecular mechanism that helps protect genome from harmful effect of UV radiations

Researchers have uncovered a new molecular mechanism whereby human cells protect their genome from the detrimental effect of UV radiation and govern DNA replication in cellular mitosis, which, when it malfunctions, leads to harmful results. [More]
Alternative generic strategy for breast cancer treatment

Alternative generic strategy for breast cancer treatment

Maxing out the inherently stressed nature of treatment-resistant breast cancer cells thwarts their adaptive ability to evolve genetic workarounds to treatment, a new study suggests. [More]
CNIO researchers identify new strategy to combat cancer

CNIO researchers identify new strategy to combat cancer

Scientists from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre have discovered a new strategy to fight cancer, which is very different from those described to date. Their work shows for the first time that telomeres -- the structures protecting the ends of the chromosomes -- may represent an effective anti-cancer target: by blocking the TRF1 gene, which is essential for the telomeres, they have shown dramatic improvements in mice with lung cancer. [More]
Discovery may have opened up new frontier in fight against breast cancer

Discovery may have opened up new frontier in fight against breast cancer

For years, scientists have been puzzled by the presence of short stretches of genetic material floating inside a variety of cells, ranging from bacteria to mammals, including humans. These fragments are pieces of the genetic instructions cells use to make proteins, but are too short a length to serve their usual purpose. [More]
Proteomics helps identify previously unrecognized proteins and pathways in nerve regeneration

Proteomics helps identify previously unrecognized proteins and pathways in nerve regeneration

Using proteomics techniques to study injured optic nerves, researchers at Boston Children's Hospital have identified previously unrecognized proteins and pathways involved in nerve regeneration. Adding back one of these proteins--the oncogene c-myc--they achieved unprecedented optic nerve regeneration in mice when combined with two other known strategies. [More]
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