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Ophthalmology is the specialized field of medicine that focuses on the health of the eye. It includes the anatomy, physiology and diseases that may affect the eye. Historically, the science of ophthalmology encompassed all aspects of visual function, both in health and in illness. Additionally, ophthalmology also includes animal eyes as ocular function and optic diseases are similar among humans and animals.
MSHS introduces DigniCap scalp cooling system to reduce chemotherapy-induced hair loss

MSHS introduces DigniCap scalp cooling system to reduce chemotherapy-induced hair loss

The Mount Sinai Health System announced the launch of the DigniCap scalp cooling system, which was recently cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to reduce the likelihood of chemotherapy-induced hair loss in women with breast cancer, in three of its cancer center locations. [More]
MSBI surgeons perform first endoscopic transoral thyroidectomy in New York

MSBI surgeons perform first endoscopic transoral thyroidectomy in New York

A team of surgeons at Mount Sinai Beth Israel, led by William B. Inabnet III, MD, the Eugene W. Friedman, MD, Professor of Surgery and Chair for the Department of Surgery at MSBI and Chief of Endocrine Surgery Quality for the Mount Sinai Health System, have performed the first endoscopic transoral thyroidectomy in New York, and one of the first of its kind in the nation. [More]
Zika virus can cause glaucoma in infants, report reveals

Zika virus can cause glaucoma in infants, report reveals

A team of researchers in Brazil and at the Yale School of Public Health has published the first report demonstrating that the Zika virus can cause glaucoma in infants who were exposed to the virus during gestation. [More]
Research shows how machine-learning models can interpret echocardiographic images and enable HCM diagnosis

Research shows how machine-learning models can interpret echocardiographic images and enable HCM diagnosis

Computer algorithms can automatically interpret echocardiographic images and distinguish between pathological hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and physiological changes in athletes' hearts, according to research from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, published online yesterday in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
Study examines frequency of patient-reported visual symptoms after LASIK surgery

Study examines frequency of patient-reported visual symptoms after LASIK surgery

In a study published online by JAMA Ophthalmology, Malvina Eydelman, M.D., of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Md., and colleagues examined the frequency of patient-reported visual symptoms, dry eye symptoms, satisfaction with vision, and satisfaction with laser insitu keratomileusis (LASIK) surgery in the Patient-Reported Outcomes With LASIK (PROWL) studies. [More]
Allergan gets FDA approval for new XEN Glaucoma Treatment System

Allergan gets FDA approval for new XEN Glaucoma Treatment System

Allergan plc announced today the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has cleared the XEN Glaucoma Treatment System (consisting of the XEN45 Gel Stent and the XEN Injector) for use in the U.S. [More]
Noninvasive biomedical imaging technology uses light to map the brain

Noninvasive biomedical imaging technology uses light to map the brain

Scientific progress has provided a solid understanding of the anatomy of the brain. However, there is still no reliable way to examine neuron to neuron communication, as it happens--a key to understanding the correlation between brain structure and brain function. [More]
Mount Sinai cardiologists receive awards at AHA Scientific Sessions 2016

Mount Sinai cardiologists receive awards at AHA Scientific Sessions 2016

​Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Director of Mount Sinai Heart and Physician-in-Chief of The Mount Sinai Hospital, and Jeffrey W. Olin, DO, FAHA, Professor of Cardiology and Director of the Vascular Medicine and Vascular Diagnostics Laboratory at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, received awards at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions, November 12-16, 2016. [More]
NYU Langone-led study to examine longer-term use of suppressive antiviral medication to reduce shingles

NYU Langone-led study to examine longer-term use of suppressive antiviral medication to reduce shingles

NYU Langone Medical Center will lead a five-year, 60-center clinical trial to evaluate new treatment protocols for herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO), a form of shingles that can seriously and permanently affect the eye. [More]
Fight for Sight, Thomas Pocklington collaborate to fund new neuro-ophthalmology research

Fight for Sight, Thomas Pocklington collaborate to fund new neuro-ophthalmology research

Retinal activity in autism, ADHD and Duchenne muscular dystrophy [More]
Education has greater influence on development of myopia than cognitive ability, study finds

Education has greater influence on development of myopia than cognitive ability, study finds

Environmental factors such as education and leisure activities have a greater influence on the development of short-sightedness or myopia than the ability to think logically and solve problems. [More]
Retinitis pigmentosa can be slowed by reprogramming metabolism of photoreceptors, study shows

Retinitis pigmentosa can be slowed by reprogramming metabolism of photoreceptors, study shows

Columbia University Medical Center researchers have demonstrated that vision loss associated with a form of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) can be slowed dramatically by reprogramming the metabolism of photoreceptors, or light sensors, in the retina. [More]
Low-cost eye drops just as effective as antibiotics in treating bacterial keratitis, study reports

Low-cost eye drops just as effective as antibiotics in treating bacterial keratitis, study reports

Bacterial keratitis, an infection of the cornea often caused by contact lenses, malnutrition, or an injury, can lead to corneal scarring, one of the leading causes of blindness around the globe, according to the World Health Organization. It has blinded more than 400,000 children worldwide. [More]
UofL ophthalmic scientist receives grant for improving recovery from amblyopia

UofL ophthalmic scientist receives grant for improving recovery from amblyopia

Aaron W. McGee, Ph.D., assistant professor at the University of Louisville School of Medicine, has received the Disney Award for Amblyopia Research in the amount of $100,000 from Research to Prevent Blindness. [More]
Researchers start enrolling patients for Phase II gene therapy trial for choroideremia

Researchers start enrolling patients for Phase II gene therapy trial for choroideremia

Following on from a successful world’s first Phase I gene therapy trial for choroideremia, Professor Robert MacLaren and his team at Oxford University and the Oxford Eye Hospital at the John Radcliffe Hospital have started a Phase II trial enrolling 30 patients. [More]

Ophthalmologists focus on dim-light driving situations that can endanger drivers and pedestrians

As the end of daylight saving time draws near, ophthalmologists at the Vanderbilt Eye Institute want to focus on a real issue — dim-light driving situations that can endanger drivers and pedestrians. [More]
Sports-related eye injuries higher among young people, study finds

Sports-related eye injuries higher among young people, study finds

Roughly 30,000 sports-related eye injuries serious enough to end in a visit to the emergency room occur each year in the United States, and the majority happen to those under the age of 18, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-led research suggests. [More]
Mount Sinai Health System introduces first enterprise-wide digital medicine care delivery system

Mount Sinai Health System introduces first enterprise-wide digital medicine care delivery system

Researchers in the Sinai App Lab at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have developed RxUniverse, the first enterprise-wide digital medicine care delivery system that enables physicians to digitally prescribe evidence-based mobile health applications to patients at the point of care. [More]
GW scientist awarded $2.8 million NIH grant to continue research on corneal wound healing

GW scientist awarded $2.8 million NIH grant to continue research on corneal wound healing

George Washington University researcher Mary Ann Stepp, Ph.D., received a $2.8 million, five-year R01 grant from the National Institutes of Health to continue her 27 years of research on corneal wound healing. [More]
Scientists develop new model to provide predictions linking brain circuits to brain activity

Scientists develop new model to provide predictions linking brain circuits to brain activity

For as long as scientists have been listening in on the activity of the brain, they have been trying to understand the source of its noisy, apparently random, activity. [More]
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