Ophthalmology News and Research RSS Feed - Ophthalmology News and Research

Ophthalmology is the specialized field of medicine that focuses on the health of the eye. It includes the anatomy, physiology and diseases that may affect the eye. Historically, the science of ophthalmology encompassed all aspects of visual function, both in health and in illness. Additionally, ophthalmology also includes animal eyes as ocular function and optic diseases are similar among humans and animals.
Ophthalmology expert offers tips to help relieve seasonal dry eye

Ophthalmology expert offers tips to help relieve seasonal dry eye

If your eyes feel like the Sahara desert or your vision seems blurrier than usual, don't panic. It may just be seasonal dry eye. [More]
Gestational diabetes raises postpartum depression risk in first-time mothers

Gestational diabetes raises postpartum depression risk in first-time mothers

Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the Karolinska Institutet have found that gestational diabetes raises the risk of postpartum depression (PPD) in first-time mothers. [More]
New techniques and treatments show promise for eliminating retinopathy of prematurity

New techniques and treatments show promise for eliminating retinopathy of prematurity

A mini-symposium published in the Journal of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus provides important insights into new techniques and treatments that show promise for eliminating retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) throughout the world. [More]
New Vanderbilt Center offers comprehensive care for patients with Marfan syndrome and aortic disease

New Vanderbilt Center offers comprehensive care for patients with Marfan syndrome and aortic disease

With the recent opening of the Vanderbilt Marfan Syndrome and Aortic Disorders Center, the state's only comprehensive clinic serving entire families, hundreds of patients with connective tissue disorders now have a one-stop shop for health care. [More]
Hormonal fluctuations make women more sensitive to addictive properties of cocaine, study reveals

Hormonal fluctuations make women more sensitive to addictive properties of cocaine, study reveals

Hormonal fluctuations women undergo make them particularly sensitive, compared to men, to the addictive properties of cocaine, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published January 10 in the journal Nature Communications. [More]
Researchers uncover two factors that play crucial role in chronic autoimmune disorders

Researchers uncover two factors that play crucial role in chronic autoimmune disorders

Researchers from Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear have uncovered two factors responsible for the chronic, lifelong nature of autoimmune disorders, which tend to "flare up" intermittently in affected patients. [More]
How does the brain control appetite?

How does the brain control appetite?

Energy balance between energy intake and expenditure in our bodies is important for maintaining energy homeostasis to keep our bodies functioning properly. The appetite determines how much we eat, the energy intake, by communication between the brain and body. [More]
Gun violence is least-researched and underfunded cause of death, study shows

Gun violence is least-researched and underfunded cause of death, study shows

Funding and publication of gun violence research are disproportionately low compared to other leading causes of death in the United States, according to new research from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai published online today in the Journal of the American Medical Association. [More]
New imaging technique could revolutionize assessment of eye health and disease

New imaging technique could revolutionize assessment of eye health and disease

Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center have developed a new imaging technique that could revolutionize how eye health and disease are assessed. [More]
Mount Sinai researchers laying groundwork to find effective treatment for Zika virus

Mount Sinai researchers laying groundwork to find effective treatment for Zika virus

Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai are working on the basic science that lays the groundwork to finding a way to treat and prevent the Zika virus, a global health risk. [More]
New glasses may help expand sight of person with limited peripheral vision

New glasses may help expand sight of person with limited peripheral vision

Vision scientists may have discovered how to reduce pedestrian collisions in crowded and chaotic open space environments like bus terminals, shopping malls and city plazas involving individuals with partial blindness. [More]
Telemedicine eye screening programs could help bridge gap in caring for premature babies

Telemedicine eye screening programs could help bridge gap in caring for premature babies

Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) occurs when abnormal blood vessels grow over the retina and may lead to blindness in premature babies. [More]
Home-visit based vision rehabilitation can improve lives of partially-sighted people

Home-visit based vision rehabilitation can improve lives of partially-sighted people

The visual function and daily life of people whose sight can't be corrected with glasses or contact lenses can be significantly improved through home visits by rehabilitation specialists, concludes a study by Cardiff University. [More]
New contact lens therapy effective in slowing progression of juvenile-onset myopia, study shows

New contact lens therapy effective in slowing progression of juvenile-onset myopia, study shows

A groundbreaking contact lens therapy has potential to impact the fast-growing issue of myopia (nearsightedness) among children, based on research presented at the American Academy of Optometry's 95th Annual Meeting. [More]
TSRI scientists reveal how vision-loss treatment may leave the eyes, kidneys vulnerable to cellular damage

TSRI scientists reveal how vision-loss treatment may leave the eyes, kidneys vulnerable to cellular damage

A common class of drugs for vision loss may actually add to the problem in some patients, according to new research co-led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI). [More]
Mount Sinai introduces first-ever Coursera course on HPV-associated oral and throat cancer

Mount Sinai introduces first-ever Coursera course on HPV-associated oral and throat cancer

Mount Sinai's Departments of Academic Informatics and Technology and Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, in conjunction with the Office of Continuing Medical Education at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, have launched the first-ever Coursera course on HPV-associated oral and throat cancer. [More]
New drug treatment can override genetic fault that causes choroideremia

New drug treatment can override genetic fault that causes choroideremia

Researchers with funding from Fight for Sight have demonstrated that a new drug treatment for cystic fibrosis and Duchenne muscular dystrophy can override a genetic fault that causes choroideremia – a severe blinding disorder. [More]
MSHS introduces DigniCap scalp cooling system to reduce chemotherapy-induced hair loss

MSHS introduces DigniCap scalp cooling system to reduce chemotherapy-induced hair loss

The Mount Sinai Health System announced the launch of the DigniCap scalp cooling system, which was recently cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to reduce the likelihood of chemotherapy-induced hair loss in women with breast cancer, in three of its cancer center locations. [More]
MSBI surgeons perform first endoscopic transoral thyroidectomy in New York

MSBI surgeons perform first endoscopic transoral thyroidectomy in New York

A team of surgeons at Mount Sinai Beth Israel, led by William B. Inabnet III, MD, the Eugene W. Friedman, MD, Professor of Surgery and Chair for the Department of Surgery at MSBI and Chief of Endocrine Surgery Quality for the Mount Sinai Health System, have performed the first endoscopic transoral thyroidectomy in New York, and one of the first of its kind in the nation. [More]
Zika virus can cause glaucoma in infants, report reveals

Zika virus can cause glaucoma in infants, report reveals

A team of researchers in Brazil and at the Yale School of Public Health has published the first report demonstrating that the Zika virus can cause glaucoma in infants who were exposed to the virus during gestation. [More]
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