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New drug cocktail may show promise in NSCLC patients

New drug cocktail may show promise in NSCLC patients

A drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration for melanoma in combination with a common cholesterol-lowering drug may show promise in controlling cancer growth in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to new research from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
ST Asia signs licensing deal with PharmaMar to distribute new multiple myeloma drug in South East Asia

ST Asia signs licensing deal with PharmaMar to distribute new multiple myeloma drug in South East Asia

International biopharmaceutical company Specialised Therapeutics Asia will supply and distribute a novel oncology drug candidate throughout South East Asia, following an exclusive licensing deal with European pharmaceutical company PharmaMar. [More]
Mount Sinai researchers report new method to restore microbiome of newborns delivered via C-section

Mount Sinai researchers report new method to restore microbiome of newborns delivered via C-section

Scientists from the Icahn Institute for Genomics and Multiscale Biology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, collaborating with NYU Langone Medical Center and a multi-center team of researchers, demonstrated for the first time that the microbiome of newborn babies delivered via cesarean section (C-section) can be partially restored to resemble that of vaginally delivered infants. [More]
RegeneRx Biopharmaceuticals announces completion of enrollment for Phase 2b/3 dry eye trial in U.S.

RegeneRx Biopharmaceuticals announces completion of enrollment for Phase 2b/3 dry eye trial in U.S.

RegeneRx Biopharmaceuticals, Inc., a clinical-stage drug development company focused on tissue protection, repair and regeneration, today announced that its U.S. joint venture with G-treeBNT, ReGenTree LLC, has completed enrollment of its Phase 2b/3 dry eye trial in the U.S. [More]
Brain's natural plasticity could compensate for inner ear damage

Brain's natural plasticity could compensate for inner ear damage

Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School have described, for the first time, the adult brain's ability to compensate for a near-complete loss of auditory nerve fibers that link the ear to the brain. The findings, published in the current issue of Neuron, suggest that the brain's natural plasticity can compensate for inner ear damage to bring sound detection abilities back within normal limits; however, it does not recover speech intelligibility. [More]
Uncorrected hyperopia may affect reading ability among preschoolers

Uncorrected hyperopia may affect reading ability among preschoolers

A study funded by the National Eye Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, has shown that uncorrected farsightedness (hyperopia) in preschool children is associated with significantly worse performance on a test of early literacy. [More]
CUMC, Iowa scientists use CRISPR to repair genetic mutation responsible for retinitis pigmentosa

CUMC, Iowa scientists use CRISPR to repair genetic mutation responsible for retinitis pigmentosa

Columbia University Medical Center and University of Iowa scientists have used a new gene-editing technology called CRISPR, to repair a genetic mutation responsible for retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited condition that causes the retina to degrade and leads to blindness in at least 1.5 million cases worldwide. [More]
MU School of Medicine researchers find link between varicella zoster virus vaccine and corneal inflammation

MU School of Medicine researchers find link between varicella zoster virus vaccine and corneal inflammation

In use for more than 20 years, the varicella zoster virus vaccine for chickenpox and shingles is considered an essential medicine by the World Health Organization. However, researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have found, in rare instances, a link between the vaccine and corneal inflammation. [More]
Incidence of childhood myopia has more than doubled over last 50 years among American children

Incidence of childhood myopia has more than doubled over last 50 years among American children

The largest study of childhood eye diseases ever undertaken in the U.S. confirms that the incidence of childhood myopia among American children has more than doubled over the last 50 years. The findings echo a troubling trend among adults and children in Asia, where 90 percent or more of the population have been diagnosed with myopia, up from 10 to 20 percent 60 years ago. [More]
Mount Sinai Heart starts TANSNIP-PESA study to determine how workplace-based lifestyle intervention reduces CV risk

Mount Sinai Heart starts TANSNIP-PESA study to determine how workplace-based lifestyle intervention reduces CV risk

World-renowned cardiologist Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Director of Mount Sinai Heart and Physician-in-Chief of The Mount Sinai Hospital, is undertaking a three-year study, known as the TANSNIP-PESA study, to determine whether a workplace-based lifestyle intervention, accompanied by imaging data, will lead to a reduction in the prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) disease risk factors related to lifestyle. [More]
First patient enrolled in ThromboGenics' Phase II CIRCLE study of ocriplasmin in NPDR patients

First patient enrolled in ThromboGenics' Phase II CIRCLE study of ocriplasmin in NPDR patients

ThromboGenics NV, an integrated biopharmaceutical company focused on developing and commercializing innovative treatments for diabetic eye disease, today announces that the first patient has been enrolled in its Phase II CIRCLE study evaluating the efficacy and safety of multiple doses of ocriplasmin in inducing total posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) in patients with non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR). [More]
New clinical study reveals previously unknown risk factors linked to keratoconus

New clinical study reveals previously unknown risk factors linked to keratoconus

A large new study reveals previously unknown risk factors associated with an eye condition that causes serious progressive nearsightedness at a relatively young age. [More]
Salvat, Lee's Pharmaceutical partner to market Duoxal ear drops in Greater China

Salvat, Lee's Pharmaceutical partner to market Duoxal ear drops in Greater China

Laboratorios SALVAT, S.A. and Lee's Pharmaceutical (HK) Limited, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Lee's Pharmaceutical Holdings Limited, jointly announced today the signing of an exclusive License and Supply Agreement for the marketing and distribution of Duoxal ear drops (patented combination solution of Ciprofloxacin and Fluocinolone Acetonide) in the People's Republic of China, Hong Kong S.A.R., Macau S.A.R., and Taiwan and an option to add Thailand to the contractual territory. [More]
Three new genetic associations identified for primary open angle glaucoma

Three new genetic associations identified for primary open angle glaucoma

Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have led an international effort to identify three genetic associations that influence susceptibility to primary open angle glaucoma -- the most common form of adult onset glaucoma and the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the world. [More]
Strathspey Crown Holdings announces acquisition of Novus Via assets

Strathspey Crown Holdings announces acquisition of Novus Via assets

Strathspey Crown Holdings LLC announced today the acquisition of the portfolio companies of Novus Via LP, a Nevada-based venture capital investment firm focused on end-stage development and commercialization of advanced electromagnetic and electrochemical technologies spanning healthcare, clean energy and coherent acoustics. The terms of the transaction were not disclosed. [More]
Chromoendoscopy superior to other surveillance methods in detecting dysplasia in IBD patients

Chromoendoscopy superior to other surveillance methods in detecting dysplasia in IBD patients

Chromoendoscopy is superior to random biopsy or white-light colonoscopy in detecting dysplasia in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), according to a long-term surveillance study led by James F. Marion, MD, Professor of Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Director of Education and Outreach at The Susan and Leonard Feinstein Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinical Center at The Mount Sinai Hospital, published online in the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. [More]
Head-down yoga positions fatal for glaucoma patients

Head-down yoga positions fatal for glaucoma patients

Glaucoma patients may experience increased eye pressure as the result of performing several different head-down positions while practicing yoga, according to a new study published by researchers at New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai in the journal PLOS ONE. [More]
Failure to accurately assess optic nerve drives IIH overdiagnosis

Failure to accurately assess optic nerve drives IIH overdiagnosis

Researchers put overdiagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) down to inaccurate ophthalmoscopic examination in headache patients and wrongly suspecting the condition in young obese women with headaches. [More]
Palliative care improves care quality, reduces costs for advanced cancer patients with comorbidities

Palliative care improves care quality, reduces costs for advanced cancer patients with comorbidities

Patients with incurable cancer and numerous other serious health conditions who consulted with a palliative care team within two days of hospitalization had significant savings in hospital costs, according to a new study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
Physician-researchers find link between 'dry eye' and chronic pain syndromes

Physician-researchers find link between 'dry eye' and chronic pain syndromes

Physician-researchers with Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, part of UHealth--the University of Miami Health System, have found a link between "dry eye" and chronic pain syndromes -- a finding that suggests that a new paradigm is needed for diagnosis and treatment to improve patient outcomes. [More]
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