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Scientists discover group of genes that can help predict damage in transplanted kidney

Scientists discover group of genes that can help predict damage in transplanted kidney

A multicenter team of researchers led by Barbara Murphy, MD, of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has identified a panel of genes which can help predict whether a transplanted kidney will later develop fibrosis, an injury which can cause the organ to fail. Their results were published in the July 21 edition of Lancet. [More]
Study shows physicians accept shaken baby syndrome, abusive head trauma as valid diagnoses

Study shows physicians accept shaken baby syndrome, abusive head trauma as valid diagnoses

Survey data reveals a high degree of medical consensus that shaking a young child is capable of producing subdural hematoma (a life-threatening pooling of blood outside the brain), severe retinal hemorrhage, coma or death, according to a study published in The Journal of Pediatrics. [More]
Clinical trial to assess safety of using umbilical cord cells to treat macular degeneration

Clinical trial to assess safety of using umbilical cord cells to treat macular degeneration

UIC is part of a national phase 2 clinical trial to evaluate the safety and tolerability of using cells derived from multipotent umbilical cord cells to treat age-related macular degeneration, the most common cause of vision loss in people over 55. [More]
Study pinpoints how immune abnormalities in retina may lead to macular degeneration

Study pinpoints how immune abnormalities in retina may lead to macular degeneration

In a study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a University of Wisconsin-Madison research team pinpoints how immune abnormalities beneath the retina result in macular degeneration, a common condition that often causes blindness. [More]
Buprenorphine implants could be effective option to treat adults with opioid dependence

Buprenorphine implants could be effective option to treat adults with opioid dependence

While buprenorphine has long been used to treat adults with opioid dependence, its efficacy can be hindered by lack of adherence to daily, sublingual (beneath the tongue) doses of the medication. [More]
New method helps characterize immune cells in tumor tissues

New method helps characterize immune cells in tumor tissues

Despite recent achievements in the development of cancer immunotherapies, only a small group of patients typically respond to them. Predictive markers of disease course and response to immunotherapy are urgently needed. [More]
Findings offer renewed hope for speedy development curative medicines for people with toxoplasmosis

Findings offer renewed hope for speedy development curative medicines for people with toxoplasmosis

In the July 14 edition of Scientific Reports (Nature), 39 researchers from 14 leading institutions in the United States, United Kingdom and France suggest novel approaches that could hasten the development of better medications for people suffering from toxoplasmosis. [More]
Interim results from clinical trial demonstrate safety of cell-based therapy for retinitis pigmentosa

Interim results from clinical trial demonstrate safety of cell-based therapy for retinitis pigmentosa

Regenerative medicine company jCyte and the Sue & Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center at the University of California, Irvine report that their investigational therapy for retinitis pigmentosa (RP) has demonstrated a favorable safety and tolerability profile in an ongoing Phase I/II clinical trial. [More]
Study shows parvalbumin-interneurons in the amygdala influence fear memory encoding

Study shows parvalbumin-interneurons in the amygdala influence fear memory encoding

Fear memory encoding, the process responsible for persistent reactions to trauma-associated cues, is influenced by a sparse but potent population of inhibitory cells called parvalbumin-interneurons (PV-INs) in the amygdala, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published online July 14 in the journal Neuron. [More]
New, minimally invasive procedure may be effective for patients with FED

New, minimally invasive procedure may be effective for patients with FED

A new, minimally invasive procedure appears to be effective for many patients with Fuchs endothelial dystrophy (FED), a common eye disease, without the potential side effects and cost of the current standard of care, a cornea transplant. [More]
Shire’s Xiidra receives FDA approval for treating dry eye disease in adult patients

Shire’s Xiidra receives FDA approval for treating dry eye disease in adult patients

Shire plc announces that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Xiidra (lifitegrast ophthalmic solution) 5%, a twice-daily eye drop solution indicated for the treatment of the signs and symptoms of dry eye disease in adult patients. [More]
Scientists create new eye technology for detecting Alzheimer's before onset of symptoms

Scientists create new eye technology for detecting Alzheimer's before onset of symptoms

Scientists may have overcome a major roadblock in the development of Alzheimer's therapies by creating a new technology to observe - in the back of the eye - progression of the disease before the onset of symptoms. [More]
TBI with LOC linked to late-life neurodegeneration but not Alzheimer's disease

TBI with LOC linked to late-life neurodegeneration but not Alzheimer's disease

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) with a loss of consciousness (LOC) may be associated with later development of Parkinson's disease but not Alzheimer's disease or incident dementia, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the University of Washington School of Medicine. [More]
Thousands of volunteers join clinical trial to help transform early detection of diabetic eye disease

Thousands of volunteers join clinical trial to help transform early detection of diabetic eye disease

More than 4,500 people from Liverpool with diabetes have volunteered to join a clinical trial funded by the National Institute for Health Research to help transform early detection of diabetic eye disease. [More]
USC, CHLA receive prestigious Clinical and Translational Science Award from NIH

USC, CHLA receive prestigious Clinical and Translational Science Award from NIH

On June 30, 2016, a team of researchers led by Thomas Buchanan, MD, Michele Kipke PhD and Jonathan Samet, MD, of the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California received a prestigious Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) from the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Roche Diagnostics responds to HPV announcement

Roche Diagnostics responds to HPV announcement

Roche Diagnostics welcomes the announcement by Public Health Minister, Jane Ellison, to introduce Human Papillomavirus (HPV) primary screening in England. [More]
Emergency physicians encourage safe fireworks practices

Emergency physicians encourage safe fireworks practices

Fireworks sales will be blazing across the country from now through the Fourth of July. As retailers begin their promotions, the Pennsylvania Academy of Ophthalmology, the Pennsylvania College of Emergency Physicians, and the Pennsylvania Medical Society join the American Academy of Ophthalmology in shining light on the explosive fact: fireworks injuries cause approximately 10,000 visits to the emergency room each year, according to the data from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. [More]
Risk of blindness from spinal-fusion surgery has declined, study shows

Risk of blindness from spinal-fusion surgery has declined, study shows

The risk of blindness caused by spinal fusion, one of the most common surgeries performed in the U.S., has dropped almost three-fold since the late 1990s, according to the largest study of the topic to date. [More]
New technique can help identify aggressive forms of DCIS

New technique can help identify aggressive forms of DCIS

When a woman is diagnosed with the earliest stage of breast cancer, how aggressive should her treatment be? Will the non-invasive cancer become invasive? Or is it a slow-growing variety that will likely never be harmful? [More]

Researchers develop 2D culture system that mimics development of the whole eye

Research groups led by Professor Kohji Nishida of the Department of Ophthalmology and Endowed Associate Professor Ryuhei Hayashi of the Department of Stem Cells and Applied Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, developed a 2D culture system which mimics the development of the whole eye by promoting cell-autonomous differentiation of human iPS cells. [More]
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