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Scientists discover underlying mechanisms of proptosis in patients with thyroid eye disease

Scientists discover underlying mechanisms of proptosis in patients with thyroid eye disease

Researchers from the Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear have identified new underlying mechanisms of proptosis, or bulging of the eyes, in patients with acute thyroid eye disease. [More]
Children living in poor communities less likely to receive diagnosis for strabismus, study shows

Children living in poor communities less likely to receive diagnosis for strabismus, study shows

Children are less likely to be diagnosed with crossed eyes, a condition known as strabismus, if they live in poor communities, according to an analysis led by researchers at the University of Michigan's Kellogg Eye Center. [More]
Steroid treatment linked to increased risk of retinopathy in very low birth weight infants

Steroid treatment linked to increased risk of retinopathy in very low birth weight infants

Because of the beneficial effect of corticosteroids on lung function, especially in infants who are ventilator dependent, corticosteroids are, at times, administered to very low birth weight neonates to treat established or evolving lung disease. However, it has long been suspected that steroids may have negative neurodevelopmental effects on very premature infants. [More]
Novel dual molecular tuner offers easy way to perform in-depth analyses in mammalian cells

Novel dual molecular tuner offers easy way to perform in-depth analyses in mammalian cells

A research team headed by investigators at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has developed a tool that allows scientists to quickly manipulate levels of two proteins in the same cell. [More]
Young children appear to be at great risk of chemical ocular burns

Young children appear to be at great risk of chemical ocular burns

One- and two-year-old children are at the highest risk of burning their eyes with chemicals, despite the long held belief that working-age adults were the most at risk from this type of severe eye injury, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-led research suggests. [More]
Research shows alcohol abuse drug inhibits ocular conjunctival scarring in mouse model

Research shows alcohol abuse drug inhibits ocular conjunctival scarring in mouse model

New research from University College London, Moorfields Eye Hospital and Duke University School of Medicine has identified a gene that drives scarring, together with a rapidly translatable therapy, for the UK's most common cause of blinding conjunctivitis. [More]
Mount Sinai neurosurgeon first to use CaptiView image injection system during microscopic surgery

Mount Sinai neurosurgeon first to use CaptiView image injection system during microscopic surgery

Joshua Bederson, MD, Professor and System Chair for the Department of Neurosurgery at Mount Sinai Health System, is the first neurosurgeon to use CaptiView - a microscope image injection system from Leica Microsystems that overlays critical virtual reality imaging directly onto the brain when viewed through the eyepiece, known as the ocular, during surgery. [More]
Roche announces FDA approval of  new VENTANA PD-L1 assay

Roche announces FDA approval of new VENTANA PD-L1 assay

Roche today announced approval of the VENTANA PD-L1 (SP142) Assay by the US Food and Drug Administration as a complementary diagnostic to provide PD-L1 status on patients who are considering treatment with the FDA approved Roche immunotherapy TECENTRIQâ„¢ (atezolizumab) for metastatic urothelial cancer (mUC). [More]
Article sheds light on driving problems for glaucoma patients

Article sheds light on driving problems for glaucoma patients

Concerns about driving often come up with glaucoma and may be brought to the doctor's attention by the patient or a family member. Common complaints include glare, poor night vision and decreased contrast sensitivity. [More]
Innovative program shows promise in helping deaf, hard-of-hearing children gain literacy skills

Innovative program shows promise in helping deaf, hard-of-hearing children gain literacy skills

Those can be some of the most powerful words in the development of any child's ability to read and write. [More]
Scientists discover group of genes that can help predict damage in transplanted kidney

Scientists discover group of genes that can help predict damage in transplanted kidney

A multicenter team of researchers led by Barbara Murphy, MD, of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has identified a panel of genes which can help predict whether a transplanted kidney will later develop fibrosis, an injury which can cause the organ to fail. Their results were published in the July 21 edition of Lancet. [More]
Study shows physicians accept shaken baby syndrome, abusive head trauma as valid diagnoses

Study shows physicians accept shaken baby syndrome, abusive head trauma as valid diagnoses

Survey data reveals a high degree of medical consensus that shaking a young child is capable of producing subdural hematoma (a life-threatening pooling of blood outside the brain), severe retinal hemorrhage, coma or death, according to a study published in The Journal of Pediatrics. [More]
Clinical trial to assess safety of using umbilical cord cells to treat macular degeneration

Clinical trial to assess safety of using umbilical cord cells to treat macular degeneration

UIC is part of a national phase 2 clinical trial to evaluate the safety and tolerability of using cells derived from multipotent umbilical cord cells to treat age-related macular degeneration, the most common cause of vision loss in people over 55. [More]
Study pinpoints how immune abnormalities in retina may lead to macular degeneration

Study pinpoints how immune abnormalities in retina may lead to macular degeneration

In a study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a University of Wisconsin-Madison research team pinpoints how immune abnormalities beneath the retina result in macular degeneration, a common condition that often causes blindness. [More]
Buprenorphine implants could be effective option to treat adults with opioid dependence

Buprenorphine implants could be effective option to treat adults with opioid dependence

While buprenorphine has long been used to treat adults with opioid dependence, its efficacy can be hindered by lack of adherence to daily, sublingual (beneath the tongue) doses of the medication. [More]
New method helps characterize immune cells in tumor tissues

New method helps characterize immune cells in tumor tissues

Despite recent achievements in the development of cancer immunotherapies, only a small group of patients typically respond to them. Predictive markers of disease course and response to immunotherapy are urgently needed. [More]
Findings offer renewed hope for speedy development curative medicines for people with toxoplasmosis

Findings offer renewed hope for speedy development curative medicines for people with toxoplasmosis

In the July 14 edition of Scientific Reports (Nature), 39 researchers from 14 leading institutions in the United States, United Kingdom and France suggest novel approaches that could hasten the development of better medications for people suffering from toxoplasmosis. [More]
Interim results from clinical trial demonstrate safety of cell-based therapy for retinitis pigmentosa

Interim results from clinical trial demonstrate safety of cell-based therapy for retinitis pigmentosa

Regenerative medicine company jCyte and the Sue & Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center at the University of California, Irvine report that their investigational therapy for retinitis pigmentosa (RP) has demonstrated a favorable safety and tolerability profile in an ongoing Phase I/II clinical trial. [More]
Study shows parvalbumin-interneurons in the amygdala influence fear memory encoding

Study shows parvalbumin-interneurons in the amygdala influence fear memory encoding

Fear memory encoding, the process responsible for persistent reactions to trauma-associated cues, is influenced by a sparse but potent population of inhibitory cells called parvalbumin-interneurons (PV-INs) in the amygdala, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published online July 14 in the journal Neuron. [More]
New, minimally invasive procedure may be effective for patients with FED

New, minimally invasive procedure may be effective for patients with FED

A new, minimally invasive procedure appears to be effective for many patients with Fuchs endothelial dystrophy (FED), a common eye disease, without the potential side effects and cost of the current standard of care, a cornea transplant. [More]
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