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Asian manufacturers wear testing offered by Lucideon & Hong Kong standards and testing center collaboration

Asian manufacturers wear testing offered by Lucideon & Hong Kong standards and testing center collaboration

Lucideon, the international materials technology company, has announced that it has extended its collaboration agreement with the Hong Kong Standards and Testing Centre (STC) to include wear testing of orthopaedic hip and knee implants. [More]
CHLA researchers to discuss how novel 3-D motion analysis could be used to predict risk for ACL injuries

CHLA researchers to discuss how novel 3-D motion analysis could be used to predict risk for ACL injuries

Children's Hospital Los Angeles expert to discuss how novel 3-D motion analysis can be used as a tool to predict risk for knee injuries. [More]
Bariatric surgery prior to knee replacement benefits morbidly obese patients with end-stage osteoarthritis

Bariatric surgery prior to knee replacement benefits morbidly obese patients with end-stage osteoarthritis

Previous research studies have linked obesity to adverse outcomes and increased costs following total knee replacement surgery (TKR). A new, computer model-based evaluation appearing in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, supports bariatric surgery in morbidly obese patients with end-stage osteoarthritis (loss of cartilage and joint pain, caused by aging and use) prior to TKR. [More]

NSSA offers tips to avoid winter sports injuries

If you're suited up and ready to ski or snowboard, you're not alone. These popular sports draw more than 9.5 million participants a year, according to the National Ski Areas Association, and they accounted for 53.6 million total skier and snowboarder visits to ski areas in the 2014-15 season. [More]
Scientists develop wireless brain sensors

Scientists develop wireless brain sensors

A team of neurosurgeons and engineers has developed wireless brain sensors that monitor intracranial pressure and temperature and then are absorbed by the body, negating the need for surgery to remove the devices. [More]
UConn-led researchers identify specific gene linked to Hajdu-Cheney syndrome

UConn-led researchers identify specific gene linked to Hajdu-Cheney syndrome

Fragile bones are usually an old person's affliction, but sometimes children are born with them. Now, a team of researchers led by UConn professor Ernesto Canalis has shown in mice that a specific gene can cause the disease, called Hajdu-Cheney syndrome. Overabundant bone-absorbing cells may be causing the disorder's characteristic bone loss, and the researchers hope to find a potential treatment. [More]
Aria 3B Orthopaedic Institute announces winners of first annual High School Sportsmanship Award

Aria 3B Orthopaedic Institute announces winners of first annual High School Sportsmanship Award

The Aria 3B Orthopaedic Institute, a part of the Aria Health system, today announced the winners of the first annual High School Sportsmanship Award, a local scholarship program, sponsored by the Aria Health Foundation, developed to recognize those high school athletes who embody sportsmanship on and off the field. [More]
Study illuminates ways to better treat knee meniscus tears, other injuries

Study illuminates ways to better treat knee meniscus tears, other injuries

Fibrocartilage tissue in the knee is comprised of a more varied molecular structure than researchers previously appreciated, according to a new study by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Delaware. [More]

Braces halt further progression of spinal curve, surgery in adolescent scoliosis patients

Bracing often is recommended for adolescents diagnosed with idiopathic adolescent scoliosis, and a spinal curve between 25 and 45 degrees. When worn consistently and as directed, braces have been found to effectively halt or slow further progression of a spinal curve, often preventing surgery. [More]
Combining NELL-1 with BMP2 therapy may promote bone development

Combining NELL-1 with BMP2 therapy may promote bone development

Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) is used clinically to promote bone repair. However, the high BMP2 concentrations required to stimulate bone growth in humans may produce life-threatening adverse effects such as cervical swelling in spinal fusion procedures, a problem that prompted an FDA warning in 2008. [More]
Back pain becoming more common in children and adolescents

Back pain becoming more common in children and adolescents

According to a new literature review in the January issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, it's becoming more common for children and adolescents to seek medical care for back pain. Even with expensive, advanced tests like MRI scans, doctors may not be able to find the exact cause for the pain. [More]
Five Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush physicians named ‘Top Doctors’ in Chicago Magazine

Five Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush physicians named ‘Top Doctors’ in Chicago Magazine

Five Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush physicians were named among the Chicago area's "Top Doctors" in the January 2016 issue of Chicago Magazine. T [More]
Concussion expert shares important information on sports-related concussions

Concussion expert shares important information on sports-related concussions

The Sports Concussion Program in the Children's Orthopaedic Center at Children's Hospital Los Angeles is the only pediatric program of its kind in Southern California. [More]
New NYUCN study examines validity of symptoms for detecting breast cancer-related lymphedema

New NYUCN study examines validity of symptoms for detecting breast cancer-related lymphedema

Many are aware that hair loss is a common side effect associated with chemotherapy. However, another albeit common late side effect of cancer treatment is the abnormal swelling of one or more limbs, known as lymphedema. Lymphedema is most commonly the result of an obstruction or disruption of the lymphatic system that occurs immediately after cancer treatment or 1-5, even 20 years after. [More]

UIC's orthopaedic residency program earns accreditation from American Physical Therapy Association

Physical therapists who want to advance their skills and opportunities can apply to a 13-month orthopaedic residency program at the University of Illinois at Chicago that emphasizes training along with patient care. [More]
Soap and water less effective than saline water for cleaning wounds

Soap and water less effective than saline water for cleaning wounds

Many scientific advances have been made in the delivery of care and infection prevention for open fractures, but the standard practice of wound cleaning with soap and water before surgery has remained unchanged. [More]
Columbia Engineering professor wins grant to study tendon-to-bone integration for rotator cuff repair

Columbia Engineering professor wins grant to study tendon-to-bone integration for rotator cuff repair

Helen H. Lu, professor of biomedical engineering at Columbia Engineering, has won a three-year $1.125 million Translational Research Award grant from the Department of Defense's Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs for her research on tendon-to-bone integration for rotator cuff repair. [More]
CHLA announces availability of the EOS Imaging System to improve pediatric care

CHLA announces availability of the EOS Imaging System to improve pediatric care

Children's Hospital Los Angeles announces the availability of the EOS Imaging System, the first technology capable of providing head-to-toe images of patients in both 2D and 3D while using up to 90 percent less radiation than X-rays. [More]
Instratek announces record revenue growth for 10th straight year and release of ToeTac implant

Instratek announces record revenue growth for 10th straight year and release of ToeTac implant

Instratek, a privately held medical device company focused on minimally invasive endoscopic surgery and extremity implants, announces record revenue growth for the 10th straight year. The company recorded solid year over year revenue growth of its extremity endoscopy business and extremity implants, including the recently released nitinol fixation staple, STAPiX. [More]
Novel technology can improve quality of life for children with scoliosis

Novel technology can improve quality of life for children with scoliosis

Scoliosis - typically defined as the curvature of the spine— affects around 3 out of every 100 people. While most cases of scoliosis are mild, some children develop spine deformities that continue to get more severe as they grow. An especially severe spinal curve can reduce the amount of space within the chest, making it difficult for the lungs to function properly. [More]
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