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Vitamin D supplements encouraged to eliminate deficiencies in new borns

Vitamin D supplements encouraged to eliminate deficiencies in new borns

New research stating mothers must take a vitamin D supplement to protect new-borns from brittle bones and rickets, has been welcomed by health experts BetterYou. [More]
New review finds successful outcomes for Achilles tendon tear with surgical and nonsurgical treatments

New review finds successful outcomes for Achilles tendon tear with surgical and nonsurgical treatments

A new literature review published in the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons found successful outcomes for an Achilles tendon tear with either minimally invasive surgery or nonsurgical bracing with a removable boot, especially in recreational athletes. [More]
Hospitals eliminate bedsore occurrence using early detection technology

Hospitals eliminate bedsore occurrence using early detection technology

Using technology adapted from NASA's Mars lander as part of a large-scale bedsore reduction program, over half of the 13 participating hospitals were able to eliminate the occurrence of new bedsores completely; an additional 3 hospitals achieved reductions ranging from 11% to 90%. [More]
Clemson researchers focus on improving overall safety of football helmet facemasks

Clemson researchers focus on improving overall safety of football helmet facemasks

A team of Clemson University researchers and an Upstate businessman believe they can help make football a little safer by creating a facemask that can help reduce the severity of head injuries by increasing overall helmet protection. [More]
A positive announcement for DePuy Synthes’ ATTUNE® Knee System

A positive announcement for DePuy Synthes’ ATTUNE® Knee System

DePuy Synthes, part of the Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies, today announced that implant survivorship data from the 2016 Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry (AOANJRR) confirm positive early results for DePuy Synthes’ ATTUNE® Knee System. These data add to recent UK Joint Registry evidence which indicate that survivorship for the ATTUNE Knee compares favorably to other cemented knee systems in its class. In addition, recently-presented interim data on two studies suggest improved patient reported outcomes measures with the ATTUNE Knee compared to other leading knee systems. [More]
New review explores approaches for prevention of hip fracture in very high risk patients

New review explores approaches for prevention of hip fracture in very high risk patients

Hip fractures are of great concern as they are the most severe type of fracture in osteoporotic patients, associated with premature death, and commonly leading to long-term physical disability, impaired capacity to perform daily activities and live independently, and reduced quality of life. [More]
First-in-human study of cell bandage for common sporting knee injury shows promising results

First-in-human study of cell bandage for common sporting knee injury shows promising results

A 'living bandage' made from stem cells, which could revolutionise the treatment and prognosis of a common sporting knee injury, has been trialled in humans for the first time by scientists at the Universities of Liverpool and Bristol. [More]
Study finds high rates of marijuana use among Baby Boomers

Study finds high rates of marijuana use among Baby Boomers

The recent legalization of recreational marijuana (cannabis) use in California, Colorado, and Washington reflect the sweeping changes in the attitudes and perceptions towards marijuana use in the United States. [More]
New data shows positive results for DePuy Synthes ATTUNE Knee System

New data shows positive results for DePuy Synthes ATTUNE Knee System

DePuy Synthes Joint Reconstruction, today announced the latest clinical evidence of the performance of the ATTUNE Knee System. [More]
Griffith research aims to reduce complications, high costs with nano-engineered dental implants

Griffith research aims to reduce complications, high costs with nano-engineered dental implants

The complications and high costs associated with dental implants could be a thing of the past as Griffith research aims to reduce the associated risks of infection using new cutting edge nanotechnology. [More]
AAOS: Shoulder replacement surgeries skyrocketing nationally

AAOS: Shoulder replacement surgeries skyrocketing nationally

The number of shoulder replacement surgeries has skyrocketed nationally and at Loyola University Medical Center as technology improves and aging Baby Boomers seek to relieve pain and restore function to arthritic shoulders. [More]
Study finds persistent cortical thinning in former collegiate football players

Study finds persistent cortical thinning in former collegiate football players

A growing body of research continues to raise concerns about the effects of head trauma sustained while participating in popular contact sports, particularly football. [More]
Active older population, better technology may be cause for more hip and knee replacement surgeries

Active older population, better technology may be cause for more hip and knee replacement surgeries

An active aging population is a good thing for society. It also keeps John Shields, M.D., very busy. [More]
Surgery more effective in reducing sex life-related pain in patients with spinal disorders, study finds

Surgery more effective in reducing sex life-related pain in patients with spinal disorders, study finds

For patients with degenerative spinal disease, surgery is more effective in reducing pain that interferes with sexual activity, compared to nonsurgical treatment, reports a study in the November 15 issue of Spine, published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Suppressing bone specific protein can alleviate radiotherapy-induced osteoporosis

Suppressing bone specific protein can alleviate radiotherapy-induced osteoporosis

Radiotherapy destroys cancer cells using high-energy ionizing radiation to damage DNA and induce cell death. About two million patients per year in the United States - more than 50 percent of all cancer patients -- receive radiotherapy at some stage during their illness, either alone or in combination with chemotherapy, surgery, and targeted medicines. [More]
Orthopaedists use new technology to assess patient outcomes, research shows

Orthopaedists use new technology to assess patient outcomes, research shows

Orthopaedists traditionally rely on X-rays, MRI, CT scans, physical measurements, and functional tests for patient outcomes assessments, but this is changing thanks to new technology that communicates ongoing, real-time outcomes feedback from patients, according to research published in the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. [More]
Low intensity pulsed ultrasound does not improve recovery of bone fractures

Low intensity pulsed ultrasound does not improve recovery of bone fractures

Low intensity ultrasound after surgical repair of a bone fracture is a popular treatment to improve recovery, but it doesn't work, says a large international study led by researchers at McMaster University. [More]
Study shows spinal supporting muscles may weaken during spaceflight

Study shows spinal supporting muscles may weaken during spaceflight

How does space travel affect the spine? Astronauts on long missions in space have atrophy of the muscles supporting the spine—which don't return to normal even several weeks after their return to Earth, reports a study in Spine, published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Simple instruction sheet can increase patients' compliance to prescribed medications

Simple instruction sheet can increase patients' compliance to prescribed medications

Patients may be more likely to take their regularly prescribed medications for chronic conditions such as diabetes and hypertension correctly before surgery when provided a simple instruction sheet, reveals a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2016 annual meeting. [More]
Novel nanofiber coating shows potential to prevent bacterial infections of orthopaedic prostheses

Novel nanofiber coating shows potential to prevent bacterial infections of orthopaedic prostheses

In a proof-of-concept study with mice, scientists at The Johns Hopkins University show that a novel coating they made with antibiotic-releasing nanofibers has the potential to better prevent at least some serious bacterial infections related to total joint replacement surgery. [More]
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