Orthopaedic News and Research RSS Feed - Orthopaedic News and Research

First Edition: April 15, 2014

Today's headlines include reports about the Congressional Budget Office's latest estimate of the costs for expanding health insurance. [More]
New guidelines on management and return to play of Female Athlete Triad discussed at AMSSM

New guidelines on management and return to play of Female Athlete Triad discussed at AMSSM

The Female Athlete Triad is a medical condition often observed in physically active girls and women, and involves three components: low energy availability with or without disordered eating, menstrual dysfunction and low bone mineral density. [More]

Study shows link between overuse injury rates in young athletes and their socioeconomic status

A Loyola University Medical Center study is reporting for the first time a link between overuse injury rates in young athletes and their socioeconomic status. [More]

Loyola study reports link between overuse injury rates and socioeconomic status in young athletes

​A Loyola University Medical Center study is reporting for the first time a link between overuse injury rates in young athletes and their socioeconomic status. [More]

Violent behavior of middle school students can be reduced by implementation of Vanderbilt’s program

Violent behavior and beliefs among middle school students can be reduced through the implementation of a targeted violence intervention program, according to a Vanderbilt study released in the Journal of Injury and Violence Research. [More]

Findings confirm importance of brain activity during sleep for memory strength and accuracy

The sense of smell might seem intuitive, almost something you take for granted. But researchers from NYU Langone Medical Center have found that memory of specific odors depends on the ability of the brain to learn, process and recall accurately and effectively during slow-wave sleep — a deep sleep characterized by slow brain waves. [More]
10% of neurosurgeons follow routine psychological screenings of patients prior to back surgery

10% of neurosurgeons follow routine psychological screenings of patients prior to back surgery

In a report published in the April edition of the Journal of Spinal Disorders and Techniques, a Johns Hopkins team says that only 10 percent of orthopaedic surgeons and neurosurgeons follow professional guidelines recommending routine psychological screenings of patients prior to major surgery for severe back and leg pain. [More]

Postdoctoral fellow of Shriners Hospitals wins Ernest Bors, MD Award for Scientific Development

​The editors of the Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine (JSCM) and the leadership of the Academy of Spinal Cord Injury Professionals (ASCIP) have announced the winner of this year's This prestigious award acknowledges the best research article by a young investigator during the calendar year. [More]

Enrollment commences for Daiichi Sankyo's ENSURE-AF multinational phase 3 study in NVAF patients

Daiichi Sankyo Company, Limited today announced that it has started enrolling patients into the ENSURE-AF multinational phase 3 study, which will evaluate the efficacy and safety of its investigational oral, once-daily direct factor Xa-inhibitor edoxaban compared to enoxaparin/warfarin for the prevention of stroke and other blood clot complications in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) undergoing electrical cardioversion (low-energy shocks to trigger normal heart rhythm). [More]
Researchers develop new responsive coating for implants used in surgery

Researchers develop new responsive coating for implants used in surgery

A research group at Uppsala University, Sweden has developed a new responsive coating for implants used in surgery to improve their integration into bone and to prevent rejection. Neutron scattering experiments at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble, France have shown how a protein that promotes bone growth binds to this surface and can be released in a controlled way. [More]

Choosing better treatment for ankle fractures

Many people associate ankle fractures with sports, but you don't have to be an athlete to develop a serious ankle injury. Ankle fractures, in which there is a partial or complete break in a bone, can happen to anyone. People can break an ankle after a fall, car accident or twisting injury. [More]
Marriage linked to lower risk of cardiovascular disease

Marriage linked to lower risk of cardiovascular disease

Marriage is criticized for many things — justly and unjustly — but not heart disease, according to findings of a recent study conducted by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center. [More]
Marital status affects risk of heart disease, survey shows

Marital status affects risk of heart disease, survey shows

Analysis of surveys of more than 3.5 million American men and women, administered at some 20,000 health centers across the country - believed to be the largest analysis of its kind ever performed - found that married people, regardless of age, sex, or even cardiovascular risk factors, had significantly less chances of having any kind of cardiovascular disease than those who were single, divorced or widowed. [More]
Researchers devise computerized process to make minimally invasive surgery more accurate

Researchers devise computerized process to make minimally invasive surgery more accurate

Johns Hopkins researchers have devised a computerized process that could make minimally invasive surgery more accurate and streamlined using equipment already common in the operating room. [More]
Fracture liaison services effective in identifying, treating older adults who suffer fragility fracture

Fracture liaison services effective in identifying, treating older adults who suffer fragility fracture

Studies have shown that anyone age 50 or older who suffers a fragility fracture - a bone break sustained in a fall from a standing height or less - is two to five times more likely to experience a second fracture than someone who hasn't had one. The odds that a person who's suffered two such fractures will have a third are even higher. [More]

Adolescents who have ACL reconstruction are more likely to demonstrate osteoarthritic changes later in life

Researchers presented results today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Specialty Day in New Orleans that adolescents who have an Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction are more likely to demonstrate osteoarthritic changes later in life. [More]

Study of high school players find no link between years of play and decline in neurocognitive function

As more parents consider whether it's safe for adolescents to play football, a new Tulane University study of high school players found no link between years of play and any decline in neurocognitive function. [More]
Dr. Basil R. Besh honored with 2013 Compassionate Doctor Award

Dr. Basil R. Besh honored with 2013 Compassionate Doctor Award

Vitals is pleased to announce that Dr. Basil R. Besh has been honored with the prestigious 2013 Compassionate Doctor Award. [More]

Patients with damaged knees can benefit from Mat surgery

Patients undergoing meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) surgery require an additional operation approximately 32% of the time, but overall see a 95% success rate after an average five-year follow-up, according to new research released today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Specialty Day. [More]
Sports medicine physicians to convene at 2014 AMSSM Annual Meeting

Sports medicine physicians to convene at 2014 AMSSM Annual Meeting

More than 1,400 sports medicine physicians from the United States and abroad will attend the 23rd Annual Meeting of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM), the largest primary care sports medicine physician organization in the nation. [More]