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IOF urges clinicians in Asia to prepare for escalating crisis of osteoporosis among elderly people

IOF urges clinicians in Asia to prepare for escalating crisis of osteoporosis among elderly people

The International Osteoporosis Foundation is calling on doctors in the Asia-Pacific region to prepare for an immense rise in the number of elderly people suffering broken bones as a result of osteoporosis. [More]
New collaborative research program connects canine and human cancers

New collaborative research program connects canine and human cancers

A new collaborative research program pairs oncologists who treat childhood and adult sarcomas with veterinarians who manage the same cancers in canine patients. [More]
Study shows no higher cancer risk in patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery with rhBMP

Study shows no higher cancer risk in patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery with rhBMP

Adding to previous evidence, a study based on a statewide cancer database shows no increase in cancer risk in patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery with the bone-promoting growth factor recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP). The study appears in Spine, published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Ways to prevent, treat knee and hip joint pain

Ways to prevent, treat knee and hip joint pain

In the past four weeks, more than one-third of people over the age of 55 in the United States have complained about hip or knee pain to their physician. In a lifetime, our hips and knees get a lot of use. There are various ways individuals can reduce the strain placed on their joints to maintain the health of their hips and knees. [More]
Deployed military soldiers three times more likely to suffer non-combat musculoskeletal injuries

Deployed military soldiers three times more likely to suffer non-combat musculoskeletal injuries

Since September 11, 2001, an estimated 60,000 U.S. military service members have been injured in combat during the Afghanistan and Iraq wars. Nearly 45,000 of all combat injuries are caused by improvised explosive devices, also known as IEDs. [More]
New osseointegrated press-fit implant reduces infection risk for above knee amputees

New osseointegrated press-fit implant reduces infection risk for above knee amputees

A new study in today's issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery found minimal risk for severe infection with osseointegrated implants--a newer prosthetic system, press-fitted directly into the femur bone--that enables bone growth over a metal, robotic prosthetic limb in patients with above knee amputations. [More]
New study aims to identify biomarkers linked to cartilage degradation in OA patients

New study aims to identify biomarkers linked to cartilage degradation in OA patients

Joint injury can lead to post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). In fact, about half of all people who rupture the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in their knee will develop PTOA within 10-20 years of the injury. [More]
Suture anchor technique supports more knee movement during recovery process

Suture anchor technique supports more knee movement during recovery process

Quadriceps tendon ruptures are disabling knee injuries that typically occur in adults ages 40 and older. Obesity, illness or traumatic injuries can cause these types of injuries. [More]
Research findings on K2M’s RAVINE® lateral access system to be presented at SpineWeek 2016

Research findings on K2M’s RAVINE® lateral access system to be presented at SpineWeek 2016

K2M Group Holdings, Inc., a global medical device company focused on designing, developing and commercializing innovative and proprietary complex spine and minimally invasive spine technologies and techniques, today announced that research on K2M’s RAVINE® Lateral Access System will be presented at the SpineWeek 2016 Annual Meeting, occurring May 16–20 in Singapore. [More]
Stimulating stem cells to make special type of cartilage may potentially heal broken bones

Stimulating stem cells to make special type of cartilage may potentially heal broken bones

Stem cells could one day be stimulated to make a special type of cartilage to help repair large, hard-to-heal bone fractures - a potential boon for doctors treating big-money athletes, USC researchers say. [More]
Researchers develop bio-glass material that mimics real cartilage

Researchers develop bio-glass material that mimics real cartilage

Scientists have developed a material that can mimic cartilage and potentially encourage it to re-grow. [More]
Visiting consultant clinics improve access to orthopaedic care in rural areas

Visiting consultant clinics improve access to orthopaedic care in rural areas

Patients living in rural areas are more likely to be older, overweight and less physically active--all risk factors for orthopaedic conditions. And yet, with few orthopaedic surgeons practicing in rural areas, access to care is limited. [More]
Researchers find link between BPD and risk of STI/HIV in male inmates

Researchers find link between BPD and risk of STI/HIV in male inmates

Sexually transmitted infections (STI), including HIV, disproportionately affect incarcerated populations. In 2010, over 90% of the inmates living with HIV in U.S. prisons were men and the prevalence of STIs such as chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis, continues to be much higher among male inmates as compared to the U.S. population at large. [More]
Implantable brain device shows promising results in animal study

Implantable brain device shows promising results in animal study

An implantable brain device that literally melts away at a pre-determined rate minimizes injury to tissue normally associated with standard electrode implantation, according to research led by a team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Researchers examine critical role of hypoxia in induction, amplification of FOP lesions

Researchers examine critical role of hypoxia in induction, amplification of FOP lesions

The cellular response to the lack of oxygen fans the flames of flare-ups in a rare bone disorder. In fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), a mutation triggers bone growth in muscles, which limits motion, breathing, and swallowing, among a host of progressive symptoms. [More]
Study explores benefits of hand and shoulder surgeries performed at outpatient centers

Study explores benefits of hand and shoulder surgeries performed at outpatient centers

A large study of hand and shoulder surgeries performed at a freestanding, outpatient center found few complications--0.2 percent in nearly 29,000 patients over an 11-year period. The study appears in the new issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. [More]
Study supports screening for HLA-B*5801 gene variant in Asian, black patients with gout

Study supports screening for HLA-B*5801 gene variant in Asian, black patients with gout

A multi-institutional study led by a Massachusetts General Hospital investigator finds significant racial disparities in the risk that patients being treated for gout will develop a serious, sometimes life-threatening adverse reaction to the most commonly prescribed medication. The increased risk closely correlates with the frequency of a gene variant previously associated with that adverse reaction, supporting recommendations to screen for that variant in patients from those populations. [More]
New consensus statement guides student-athletes to respond to sudden cardiac arrest

New consensus statement guides student-athletes to respond to sudden cardiac arrest

The Journal of the American College of Cardiology today published a consensus statement that establishes guidance for conducting pre-participation screenings of college athletes and encourages emergency action plans for quickly responding to sudden cardiac arrest. [More]
Orthopedic wear and mechanical testing webinar to be hosted by Lucideon

Orthopedic wear and mechanical testing webinar to be hosted by Lucideon

Lucideon, the international materials technology company, together with Knight Mechanical Testing, is hosting a webinar entitled ‘Wear and Mechanical Testing of Hips and Knees - What the Standards Don’t Tell You’ on the 28th April at 3PM (UK time) 10AM (EST). [More]
Carbohydrate-binding protein controls inflammation in osteoarthritis patients

Carbohydrate-binding protein controls inflammation in osteoarthritis patients

More and more people, particularly older people, are suffering from osteoarthritis due to wear and tear on their joints. This primarily affects the knee and hip joints but also the spine. In earlier studies, scientists at MedUni Vienna Department of Orthopaedics showed that raised levels of certain proteins, so-called galectins, and their docking sites are found in patients with osteoarthritis. [More]
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