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Taste deficits appear to be more prevalent in MS patients

Taste deficits appear to be more prevalent in MS patients

Taste deficits appear to be more prevalent among multiple sclerosis (MS) patients than previously reported and correlate with brain lesions left by the debilitating disease, a new study from the University of Pennsylvania's Smell and Taste Center and the department of Radiology found. [More]
Loyola offers multidisciplinary digestive health program

Loyola offers multidisciplinary digestive health program

Loyola University Health System now offers a multidisciplinary digestive health program to treat digestive tract and related medical conditions. Bipan Chand, MD, FACS, FASGE, FASMBS, and Neil Gupta, MD, MPH, are co-directors of the new program. [More]
Scientists identify potential marker for recurring HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer

Scientists identify potential marker for recurring HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer

A look-back analysis of HPV infection antibodies in patients treated for oropharyngeal (mouth and throat) cancers linked to HPV infection suggests at least one of the antibodies could be useful in identifying those at risk for a recurrence of the cancer, say scientists at The Johns Hopkins University. [More]
Brain's natural plasticity could compensate for inner ear damage

Brain's natural plasticity could compensate for inner ear damage

Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School have described, for the first time, the adult brain's ability to compensate for a near-complete loss of auditory nerve fibers that link the ear to the brain. The findings, published in the current issue of Neuron, suggest that the brain's natural plasticity can compensate for inner ear damage to bring sound detection abilities back within normal limits; however, it does not recover speech intelligibility. [More]
Standardized treatment approach makes outpatient thyroid surgery a safe option for elderly patients

Standardized treatment approach makes outpatient thyroid surgery a safe option for elderly patients

A standardized treatment approach that starts with good screening and ends with patients going home to well-prepared caregivers, means outpatient thyroid surgery is safe for the vast majority of patients, including the elderly and super-elderly, physician-scientists say. [More]
Three new genetic associations identified for primary open angle glaucoma

Three new genetic associations identified for primary open angle glaucoma

Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have led an international effort to identify three genetic associations that influence susceptibility to primary open angle glaucoma -- the most common form of adult onset glaucoma and the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the world. [More]
FDA permits Sound Pharmaceuticals to start SPI-1005 clinical trial for treatment of Meniere's Disease

FDA permits Sound Pharmaceuticals to start SPI-1005 clinical trial for treatment of Meniere's Disease

Sound Pharmaceuticals is pleased to announce that it began enrolling a clinical trial to test SPI-1005 in the treatment of Meniere's Disease (MD). MD or idiopathic endolymphatic hydrops is an inner ear disease that involves episodic vertigo, sensorineural hearing loss, and tinnitus. [More]
Emotions affect brain's creative network, new study finds

Emotions affect brain's creative network, new study finds

The workings of neural circuits associated with creativity are significantly altered when artists are actively attempting to convey emotions, according to a new brain-scanning study of jazz pianists. [More]
New study reveals why some vestibular schwannomas cause hearing loss

New study reveals why some vestibular schwannomas cause hearing loss

A new study at Massachusetts Eye and Ear showed that in some cases of vestibular schwannoma, a sometimes-lethal tumor often associated with neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2), secretions from the tumor contain toxic molecules that damage the inner ear. [More]
Novel strategies on the way for difficult-to-treat head and neck cancer

Novel strategies on the way for difficult-to-treat head and neck cancer

Novel strategies are on the way for difficult-to-treat and advanced head and neck cancer, the most heterogeneous group of malignancies which are generally associated with poor survival, and encouraging results have been presented at the first ESMO Asia 2015 Congress in Singapore. [More]
REGENSCIENTIFIC obtains CE-mark for Renú Soft Tissue (Volumizing) Implant

REGENSCIENTIFIC obtains CE-mark for Renú Soft Tissue (Volumizing) Implant

REGENSCIENTIFIC announced today that it has received the CE-mark (CE 630688) for the Renú Soft Tissue (Volumizing) Implant for Lipoatrophy, Vocal Fold Insufficiency and Soft Tissue Augmentation. [More]
ALPHAEON agrees to bring Zelegent's office-based Elevoplasty technology to sleep specialists

ALPHAEON agrees to bring Zelegent's office-based Elevoplasty technology to sleep specialists

ALPHAEON Corporation, a subsidiary of Strathspey Crown Holdings LLC, and Zelegent, Inc. jointly announced today that the two companies have entered into an exclusive worldwide agreement to bring Zelegent's office-based Elevoplasty technology to board certified sleep specialists. [More]

New prosthesis brings hope to patients with hearing loss

A new prosthesis for a traditional ear surgery is bringing hope to patients diagnosed with a hereditary disorder that causes hearing loss. After 63-year-old Diane Duncan was diagnosed with otosclerosis in her thirties, she transitioned into an isolated world where conversations with other people became limited, everyday noises like car engines running and cell phones ringing became almost inaudible. [More]
Sound deprivation causes irreversible damage to the inner ear

Sound deprivation causes irreversible damage to the inner ear

Massachusetts Eye and Ear investigators have shown that sound deprivation in adult mice causes irreversible damage to the inner ear. The findings, published in PLOS ONE, suggest that chronic conductive hearing loss, such as that caused by recurrent ear infections, leads to permanent hearing impairment if it remains untreated. [More]
AAO recognizes outstanding eye physicians and surgeons for innovation in patient care

AAO recognizes outstanding eye physicians and surgeons for innovation in patient care

The American Academy of Ophthalmology will pay tribute to outstanding eye physicians and surgeons who have made significant achievements in various areas of the profession. These range from scientific innovation and humanitarian service to education and advocacy. The honorees will be recognized AAO 2015, the Academy's 119th annual meeting in Las Vegas. [More]
Inner ear damage brain warnings from nerve cells

Inner ear damage brain warnings from nerve cells

Some nerve cells in the inner ear can signal tissue damage in a way similar to pain-sensing nerve cells in the body, according to new research from Johns Hopkins. [More]
UAMS researchers report positive results from treating Metastatic Merkel-cell carcinoma with idelalisib drug

UAMS researchers report positive results from treating Metastatic Merkel-cell carcinoma with idelalisib drug

Identifying a patient's genetic mutation led University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) physician-researcher Ling Gao, M.D., Ph.D., to an existing drug that eliminated the patient's stage IV Merkel-cell carcinoma. Gao's findings, made in collaboration with two other UAMS researchers, were published today in The New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
3D printed model of fetus face helps determine life-threatening airway mass in unborn child

3D printed model of fetus face helps determine life-threatening airway mass in unborn child

Megan Thompson was about 30 weeks pregnant when an ultrasound showed a walnut-sized lump on her tiny, unborn child's face that could prevent him from breathing after birth. [More]
New computer program can predict cochlear implant outcomes in hearing-impaired children

New computer program can predict cochlear implant outcomes in hearing-impaired children

A new computer program that analyzes functional brain MRIs of hearing impaired children can predict whether they will develop effective language skills within two years of cochlear implant surgery, according to a study in the journal Brain and Behavior. [More]

Surgeons use 3D printing techniques to create low-cost pediatric rib cartilage model

When surgical residents need to practice a complicated procedure to fashion a new ear for children without one, they typically get a bar of soap, carrot or an apple. [More]
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