Otolaryngology News and Research RSS Feed - Otolaryngology News and Research

Groundbreaking study looks at how puberty affects voice changes in male singers

Groundbreaking study looks at how puberty affects voice changes in male singers

The first round of tests have been completed for members of the Cincinnati Boychoir who are part of a joint study with Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center to look at the changing voices of male singers. [More]
Loyola otolaryngologist offers tips to identify, treat ear infection in children

Loyola otolaryngologist offers tips to identify, treat ear infection in children

Earaches in babies are not uncommon. But a baby's inability to communicate symptoms can leave most parents feeling helpless. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, three-fourths of babies will get at least one ear infection before the age of one. [More]
Oral, Head & Neck Cancer Awareness Week: Mount Sinai experts to share tips on cancer prevention

Oral, Head & Neck Cancer Awareness Week: Mount Sinai experts to share tips on cancer prevention

Mouth and throat cancers are the fastest rising cancers today. They account for over 40,000 cases per year in the U.S. The American Cancer Society estimates that there will be 121,790 new cases of head and neck cancer diagnosed in 2015 and 14,240 deaths. These numbers include tongue cancer, throat cancers caused by the human papillomavirus or HPV, voice box cancer, melanoma of the face and thyroid cancers. [More]
HPV may cause oropharyngeal cancer

HPV may cause oropharyngeal cancer

Tobacco and alcohol use may be the most common cause of head and neck cancers, but a new culprit has come on the scene in recent years. [More]
Aging associated with development of dysphagia

Aging associated with development of dysphagia

Nearly 40 percent of Americans 60 and older are living with a swallowing disorder known as dysphagia. Although it is a major health problem associated with aging, it is unknown whether the condition is a natural part of healthy aging or if it is caused by an age-related disease that has yet to be diagnosed, such as Parkinson's disease or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). [More]
Thomas Jefferson University, Exosome Sciences team up to evaluate new liquid biopsy platform

Thomas Jefferson University, Exosome Sciences team up to evaluate new liquid biopsy platform

Today, Thomas Jefferson University announces a partnership with Exosome Sciences Inc. to evaluate a novel liquid biopsy platform that might offer clinicians new and actionable information about a patient's cancer as the disease progresses and changes, via a simple blood test. [More]
Wearable collision warning device may help patients with peripheral vision loss

Wearable collision warning device may help patients with peripheral vision loss

People who have lost some of their peripheral vision, such as those with retinitis pigmentosa, glaucoma, or brain injury that causes half visual field loss, often face mobility challenges and increased likelihood of falls and collisions. [More]
Study explores outcomes of thyroid surgery in professional singers

Study explores outcomes of thyroid surgery in professional singers

A diagnosis of thyroid cancer can be devastating to professional singers, because surgical removal of the thyroid commonly causes voice changes. Massachusetts Eye and Ear surgeons developed a neural monitoring system to be used intraoperatively to improve outcomes. [More]
New radiation treatment for brain cancer implanted in first human being at CTRC

New radiation treatment for brain cancer implanted in first human being at CTRC

David Williams is the first human being ever to have a new radiation treatment implanted in the center of his brain tumor. [More]
New study show how baking soda can also improve vision

New study show how baking soda can also improve vision

Bicarbonate (baking soda) makes sparkling water sparkle, causes bread to rise, absorbs odors and can be used for cleaning all sorts of stuff, including your teeth. In the body, it plays essential roles in buffering pH, aiding in digestion and neutralizing lactic acid produced during physical exertion. Much of the bicarbonate in our bodies comes from carbon dioxide, which is produced as a waste product in all cells, although some is ingested with carbonated beverages and certain types of foods. [More]
Novogen's TRXE-009 therapy shows promise against brain cancer

Novogen's TRXE-009 therapy shows promise against brain cancer

Australian/US biotechnology company, Novogen Limited, today announces that it has confirmed that one of its lead candidate products, TRXE-009, is showing the potential to become an important new therapy in the fight against adult and pediatric brain cancer. [More]
Physicians urge households to add 'clean my medicine cabinet' to Spring cleaning chores list

Physicians urge households to add 'clean my medicine cabinet' to Spring cleaning chores list

After marijuana and alcohol, the most commonly abused drugs by those over the age of 14 are prescription and over-the-counter medications. [More]
Cook Medical Launches SialoCathâ„¢ Salivary Duct Catheter

Cook Medical Launches SialoCathâ„¢ Salivary Duct Catheter

SialoCath is one device in a growing suite of Cook Medical sialendoscopy access and interventional tools that are now available to clinicians in the United Kingdom, Germany, France, Italy and North America. [More]
Monell Center to promote Anosmia Awareness Day with new educational outreach initiatives

Monell Center to promote Anosmia Awareness Day with new educational outreach initiatives

The Monell Center announces three new educational outreach initiatives to promote Anosmia Awareness Day, which takes place on February 27. Each was designed to increase awareness and increase the limited information currently available about anosmia, the loss of our sense of smell, which affects over six million Americans and many millions more worldwide. [More]
Researchers reveal new understanding of pathobiology behind vestibular schwannoma

Researchers reveal new understanding of pathobiology behind vestibular schwannoma

Researchers from the Eaton-Peabody Laboratories of Massachusetts Eye and Ear and the Harvard Medical School/ Massachusetts Institute of Technology Program in Speech and Hearing Bioscience and Technology have revealed new understanding of the pathobiology behind a head and neck tumor that may someday lead to new methods of targeted drug therapy. [More]
Cochlear announces winners of Graeme Clark and Anders Tjellstrom Scholarships

Cochlear announces winners of Graeme Clark and Anders Tjellstrom Scholarships

Cochlear Limited (ASX: COH), the global leader in implantable hearing solutions, announced today the winners of the 13th annual Graeme Clark and the fourth annual Anders Tjellstrom Scholarships. [More]
USF researchers awarded grant to test new drug for age-related hearing loss

USF researchers awarded grant to test new drug for age-related hearing loss

A successful treatment for age-related hearing loss (ARHL) is a step closer to reality, thanks to a group of researchers from the University of South Florida. The research team comprised of faculty and students has been awarded $400,000 by Autifony Therapeutics, Ltd, a company based in the United Kingdom, to test a new drug the company developed for ARHL. [More]
Salicylates drugs reduce proliferation, viability of cultured vestibular schwannoma cells

Salicylates drugs reduce proliferation, viability of cultured vestibular schwannoma cells

Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear and the Harvard Medical School/ Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Program in Speech and Hearing Bioscience and Technology have demonstrated that salicylates, a class of non-steroidal inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), reduced the proliferation and viability of cultured vestibular schwannoma cells that cause a sometimes lethal intracranial tumor that typically causes hearing loss and tinnitus. [More]
Researchers offer critical new information about head and neck squamous cell cancer

Researchers offer critical new information about head and neck squamous cell cancer

Head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) ranks among the top ten most prevalent cancers in the United States. Despite its prevalence, little is known about how this cancer develops and spreads. However, in a paper published in the January 29, 2015 edition of Nature, researchers offer critical new information about head and neck cancers. [More]
Experts recommend sublingual immunotherapy for treatment of allergic rhinitis

Experts recommend sublingual immunotherapy for treatment of allergic rhinitis

Sublingual immunotherapy is one of several state-of-the-science treatments for allergic rhinitis, or "hay fever," being recommended by a panel of experts in a new guideline published Feb. 2, 2015, by the American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement