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Research sheds new light on the development of HPV-associated cancer

It's long been known that certain strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) cause cancer. Now, researchers at The Ohio State University have determined a new way that HPV might spark cancer development - by disrupting the human DNA sequence with repeating loops when the virus is inserted into host-cell DNA as it replicates. [More]

Head and neck cancers associated with genetic alterations could be sensitive to existing cancer drug

An examination of the genetic landscape of head and neck cancers indicates that while metastatic and primary tumor cells share similar mutations, recurrent disease is associated with gene alterations that could be exquisitely sensitive to an existing cancer drug. [More]

20% of adults with tonsillectomies have higher complication than previously shown

Twenty percent of adults who have tonsillectomies will have a complication, which is significantly higher than previously shown, according to a team of researchers. The team also found that these complications substantially increase health care expenditures. [More]

Surgeons use Cyberknife robotic device for treatment of vocal cord cancer

Stephen Wiley, a lifelong cowboy from Terrell, has helped UT Southwestern Medical Center pioneer a new treatment for vocal cord cancer. Mr. Wiley volunteered to be the world's first known patient to be treated for vocal cord cancer with Cyberknife, a surgeon-controlled robotic device that destroys tumors with highly precise doses of radiation. [More]

Study examines complications in adult tonsillectomies and impact on health care expenditures

​A study released today of 36,210 adult tonsillectomy patients finds that 20 percent will have a complication, offering valuable new insights to a decades long discussion. The study, featured in the April 2014 issue of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, examines the prevalence of complications in adult tonsillectomies and the impact on health care expenditures. [More]

Researchers discover anesthetic technique to reduce patients' blood pressure

Researchers at the University of Adelaide have discovered that a commonly used anesthetic technique to reduce the blood pressure of patients undergoing surgery could increase the risk of starving the brain of oxygen. [More]
Surgeons perform first auditory brainstem implant operation in Northeast Ohio

Surgeons perform first auditory brainstem implant operation in Northeast Ohio

Surgeons at University Hospitals Case Medical Center have completed the first auditory brainstem implant (ABI) operation in Northeast Ohio on a woman who has lost most of her hearing due to benign tumors on her auditory nerves. [More]
Driving simulator may help people with hemianopia to drive safely

Driving simulator may help people with hemianopia to drive safely

​A diagnosis of hemianopia, or blindness in one half of the visual field in both eyes as the result of strokes, tumors or trauma often means the end of driving. [More]

Researchers receive $3 million grant from NIH to study effects of asymmetric hearing loss

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have received a five-year, $3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study the effects of asymmetric hearing loss in adults and children. [More]

MUSC, Alliance Oncology announce strategic radiation therapy affiliation

The Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), one of the nation's top academic health science centers, and Alliance Oncology, a division of Alliance HealthCare Services, Inc., announce a newly formed affiliation designed to strengthen and expand MUSC's Hollings Cancer Center as the radiation therapy market leader in Charleston, South Carolina. [More]
National clinical trial to test new avenue for tinnitus treatment

National clinical trial to test new avenue for tinnitus treatment

UT Southwestern Medical Center will take part in a national clinical trial to test a device that could provide relief for people suffering from tinnitus, a persistent buzzing or ringing sound in the ears. The device uses nervous system stimuli to rewire parts of the brain, in hopes of significantly reducing or removing tinnitus. [More]

UNM physician performs TORS procedure on patient with stage IV throat cancer

When Charlie Guinn sits down to eat with his lovely wife of 39 years, he thoroughly enjoys each bite. It's not just the food; the entire experience is a celebration. Just over a year ago, Mr. Guinn learned that he had stage IV throat cancer. [More]
Goal: Therapies for hearing loss and communications problems

Goal: Therapies for hearing loss and communications problems

Research scientist Christine Portfors will study how the brain chemical dopamine influences hearing with support from the National Institutes of Health. The work may ultimately lead to better therapies for people with hearing loss and communication problems. [More]
Sinus and Allergy Center receives $8.4M NIH grant to help advance development of new treatments

Sinus and Allergy Center receives $8.4M NIH grant to help advance development of new treatments

​The Northwestern Medicine- Sinus and Allergy Center has received a grant for more than $8.4 million from the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) to help advance the understanding of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and the development of new methods for its treatment over the next five years. [More]
Study: Recurrence of SCCOP may differ in HPV-positive and HPV-negative patients

Study: Recurrence of SCCOP may differ in HPV-positive and HPV-negative patients

Patients with HPV-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx (SCCOP) had a longer time to development of distant metastasis (DM) after initial treatment, and had more metastatic sites in more atypical locations compared to HPV-negative patients, according to research presented today at the 2014 Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Symposium. [More]
HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer patients show longer survival pattern than those related to smoking

HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer patients show longer survival pattern than those related to smoking

People with late-stage cancer at the back of the mouth or throat that recurs after chemotherapy and radiation treatment are twice as likely to be alive two years later if their cancer is caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), new research led by a Johns Hopkins scientist suggests. [More]

HPV-positive patients with OPSCC show higher overall survival rate than HPV-negative patients

A retrospective analysis of oropharyngeal patients with recurrence of disease after primary therapy in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) studies 0129 or 0522 found that HPV-positive patients had a higher overall survival (OS) rate than HPV-negative patients (at two years post-treatment, 54.6 percent vs. 27.6 percent, respectively), according to research presented today at the 2014 Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Symposium. [More]
UPV/EHU researchers develop method for diagnosis, prognosis of cutaneous melanoma

UPV/EHU researchers develop method for diagnosis, prognosis of cutaneous melanoma

​UPV/EHU researchers have developed a method for the diagnosis and prognosis of cutaneous melanoma, the type of skin cancer with the highest mortality rate.This method will help not only in the more effective early detection of this cancer, but also in the development of more personalised treatments. [More]

Cook Medical launches new treatment option for otolaryngologists

Cook Medical has launched a new treatment option for otolaryngologists (ear, nose and throat specialists) who repair the dura mater following cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks at the base of the skull. Cook's Biodesign Duraplasty Graft is the latest Biodesign product from Cook Medical's Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery clinical division. [More]

Researchers design prototype system-on-chip that could make fully implanted cochlear implant

Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Harvard Medical School, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology have designed a prototype system-on-chip that could make possible a fully implanted cochlear implant. They will present their findings on Feb. 11at the IEEE International Solid State Circuits Conference in San Francisco. [More]