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Oxytocin hormone inhibits fear center in brain, shows study

Oxytocin hormone inhibits fear center in brain, shows study

Frightening experiences do not quickly fade from memory. A team of researchers under the guidance of the University of Bonn Hospital has now been able to demonstrate in a study that the bonding hormone oxytocin inhibits the fear center in the brain and allows fear stimuli to subside more easily. [More]
International organizations join forces to develop inhaled form of oxytocin for postpartum hemorrhage

International organizations join forces to develop inhaled form of oxytocin for postpartum hemorrhage

An international group of public and private organizations is collaborating to accelerate development of an innovative heat-stable and low-cost inhaled form of oxytocin to manage postpartum hemorrhage in resource-poor settings. [More]
Epidurals and reduced postpartum depression: an interview with Dr. Zakowski

Epidurals and reduced postpartum depression: an interview with Dr. Zakowski

The “maternity blues”, which resolve within 10 days of giving birth, occurs in up to 80% of new moms. A major depressive episode, by Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) criteria, is defined as having at least a 2-week period of persistent depressed mood ... [More]
Investigators report on potential effects of hormone in borderline personality disorder

Investigators report on potential effects of hormone in borderline personality disorder

In the current issue of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics a group of German investigators is reporting on the potential effects of a hormone in borderline personality disorder. [More]
UT Southwestern launches regional brain tissue collection program

UT Southwestern launches regional brain tissue collection program

To promote greater understanding of autism, UT Southwestern Medical Center has launched a regional brain tissue collection program that will support research on this condition, which affects an estimated one in 68 children. [More]
Study presents oxytocin as latest treatment target for age-related muscle wasting

Study presents oxytocin as latest treatment target for age-related muscle wasting

Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have discovered that oxytocin -- a hormone associated with maternal nurturing, social attachments, childbirth and sex -- is indispensable for healthy muscle maintenance and repair, and that in mice, it declines with age. [More]
Oxytocin promotes group-serving dishonesty, says study

Oxytocin promotes group-serving dishonesty, says study

According to a new study by researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) and the University of Amsterdam, oxytocin caused participants to lie more to benefit their groups, and to do so more quickly and without expectation of reciprocal dishonesty from their group. [More]
Drug and alcohol abuse could be linked with poor development of "love hormone"

Drug and alcohol abuse could be linked with poor development of "love hormone"

Addictive behavior such as drug and alcohol abuse could be associated with poor development of the so-called "love hormone" system in our bodies during early childhood, according to researchers at the University of Adelaide. [More]
Stress undermines our relationships with other people

Stress undermines our relationships with other people

Stress, this enemy that haunts us every day, could be undermining not only our health but also our relationships with other people, especially if we are men. In fact, stressed women apparently become more "prosocial". These are the main findings of a study carried out with the collaboration of Giorgia Silani, from the International School for Advanced Studies of Trieste. [More]
Harvard Review of Psychiatry provides updates on ASD research

Harvard Review of Psychiatry provides updates on ASD research

Recent years have seen exciting progress in key areas of research on autism spectrum disorders (ASD): from possible genetic causes, to effective treatments for common symptoms and clinical problems, to promoting success for young people with ASD entering college. Updates on these and other advances in ASD research are presented in the March special issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. [More]
Study demonstrates impact of vitamin D on social behavior linked with ASD

Study demonstrates impact of vitamin D on social behavior linked with ASD

A new study by Rhonda Patrick, PhD and Bruce Ames, PhD of Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute (CHORI) demonstrates the impact that Vitamin D may have on social behavior associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). [More]
Falling in love causes body to release feel-good chemicals that trigger specific physical reactions

Falling in love causes body to release feel-good chemicals that trigger specific physical reactions

Getting struck by Cupid's arrow may very well take your breath away and make your heart go pitter-patter this Valentine's Day, reports sexual wellness specialists at Loyola University Health System. [More]
Complex intervention successful in reducing C-sections and neonatal morbities, say researchers

Complex intervention successful in reducing C-sections and neonatal morbities, say researchers

In a study to be presented on Feb. 6 in an oral plenary session at 8 a.m. CST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting-, in New Orleans, researchers will report that Cesarean deliveries reviews and best practices implementation are effective to provide optimal care by an appropriate management of medical interventions, leading to a significant reduction of cesarean deliveries and neonatal morbidity. [More]
New biomarker for stress in wild animals facing global climate change

New biomarker for stress in wild animals facing global climate change

Chemical analyses by neuroscientist Jerrold Meyer and colleagues at the University of Massachusetts Amherst are helping to establish hair cortisol concentration (HCC) as an important new biomarker for stress in wild animals facing global climate change. [More]
Variation in oxytocin receptor gene influences face recognition skills, study finds

Variation in oxytocin receptor gene influences face recognition skills, study finds

New findings suggest the oxytocin receptor, a gene known to influence mother-infant bonding and pair bonding in monogamous species, also plays a special role in the ability to remember faces. This research has important implications for disorders in which social information processing is disrupted, including autism spectrum disorder. In addition, the finding may lead to new strategies for improving social cognition in several psychiatric disorders. [More]
Retrophin to acquire privately-held company, Kyalin Biosciences

Retrophin to acquire privately-held company, Kyalin Biosciences

Retrophin, Inc. today announced that it will acquire privately-held Kyalin Biosciences, Inc., an early-stage company based in San Diego, CA, that is developing therapies targeting the core symptoms of autism and related conditions. [More]
Retrophin signs agreement with Novartis for exclusive U.S. license for Syntocinon Nasal Spray

Retrophin signs agreement with Novartis for exclusive U.S. license for Syntocinon Nasal Spray

Retrophin, Inc. today announced that it has signed an agreement with Novartis Pharma AG for an exclusive U.S. license for Syntocinon Nasal Spray, the intranasal formulation of a synthetic version of the naturally occurring peptide hormone oxytocin, for an upfront payment of $5.0 million plus milestone payments and royalties. [More]
Oxytocin maintains bond between loving couples, promotes monogamy

Oxytocin maintains bond between loving couples, promotes monogamy

How is the bond between people in love maintained? Scientists at the Bonn University Medical Center have discovered a biological mechanism that could explain the attraction between loving couples. [More]

Study shows oxytocin hormone enhances placebo response in analgesia model

The hormone oxytocin may mediate processes such as empathy, trust, and social learning. These are key elements of the patient-physician relationship, which is an important mediator of placebo responses, according to background information in a Research Letter appearing in the October 23/30 issue of JAMA. [More]
Childbirth not major contributor to sexual dysfunction in women later in life

Childbirth not major contributor to sexual dysfunction in women later in life

Childbirth is not a major contributor to sexual dysfunction in women later in life, according to a new study led by UC San Francisco researchers. [More]