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Eindhoven researchers develop patient-friendly method to determine severity of heart failure

Eindhoven researchers develop patient-friendly method to determine severity of heart failure

Methods currently employed to determine the severity of a heart failure are very limited. Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology and the Catharina Hospital in Eindhoven have therefore developed a method that is very quick, non-invasive, cost-effective and can be performed at the hospital bedside. [More]
Immune checkpoint cancer therapies may cause rare cardiac side effects linked to unexpected immune response

Immune checkpoint cancer therapies may cause rare cardiac side effects linked to unexpected immune response

Combination therapy utilizing two approved immunotherapy drugs for cancer treatment may cause rare and sometimes fatal cardiac side effects linked to an unexpected immune response. [More]
Salk scientist wins NIH grant for new technique to precisely target specific cells using sound waves

Salk scientist wins NIH grant for new technique to precisely target specific cells using sound waves

Salk Associate Professor Sreekanth Chalasani has been awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health's Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies Initiative for developing a way to selectively activate brain, heart, muscle and other cells using ultrasonic waves, which could be a boon to neuroscience research as well as medicine. [More]
Simplified approach to TAVI holds potential to save lives of many patients with rheumatic heart disease

Simplified approach to TAVI holds potential to save lives of many patients with rheumatic heart disease

A novel heart valve replacement method is revealed today that offers hope for the thousands of patients with rheumatic heart disease who need the procedure each year. The research is being presented at the SA Heart Congress 2016 [More]
TUM researchers use luminous jellyfish proteins to investigate cardiac rhythm dysfunctions

TUM researchers use luminous jellyfish proteins to investigate cardiac rhythm dysfunctions

Cell models from stem cells serve an ever-increasing role in research of cardiac dysfunction. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich have succeeded in producing cells which offer new insights into properties of the heart. [More]
Implanted nerve stimulator shows promise in treating central sleep apnea patients

Implanted nerve stimulator shows promise in treating central sleep apnea patients

Results from an international, randomized study show that an implanted nerve stimulator significantly improves symptoms in those with central sleep apnea, without causing serious side effects. [More]
Remote monitoring shows no improvement in outcomes for heart failure patients with CIEDs

Remote monitoring shows no improvement in outcomes for heart failure patients with CIEDs

For heart failure patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs), remote monitoring of their condition does not improve outcomes compared to usual care, according to Hot Line results presented at ESC Congress 2016 and to be simultaneously published in JAMA. [More]
High-tech alternative to brain surgery safe, effective for treatment of essential tremor

High-tech alternative to brain surgery safe, effective for treatment of essential tremor

A study published today in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine offers the most in-depth assessment yet of the safety and effectiveness of a high-tech alternative to brain surgery to treat the uncontrollable shaking caused by the most common movement disorder. [More]
Research highlights interaction between biological clock and sleep loss at regional brain level

Research highlights interaction between biological clock and sleep loss at regional brain level

Ever wondered what happens inside your brain when you stay awake for a day, a night and another day, before you finally go to sleep? In a new study published today in the journal Science, a team of researchers from the University of Liege and the University of Surrey have scanned the brains of 33 participants across such a 2-day sleep deprivation period and following recovery sleep. [More]
FDA approves scalpel-free brain surgery to treat essential tremor

FDA approves scalpel-free brain surgery to treat essential tremor

The Food and Drug Administration has approved the first focused ultrasound device to treat essential tremor, the most common movement disorder, in patients who do not respond to medication. [More]
FDA approves new ExAblate Neuro to treat patients with essential tremor

FDA approves new ExAblate Neuro to treat patients with essential tremor

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the first focused ultrasound device to treat essential tremor in patients who have not responded to medication. ExAblate Neuro uses magnetic resonance (MR) images taken during the procedure to deliver focused ultrasound to destroy brain tissue in a tiny area thought to be responsible for causing tremors. [More]
New electric mesh device wraps around the heart to deliver electrical impulses

New electric mesh device wraps around the heart to deliver electrical impulses

A research team led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Seoul National University has developed a new electric mesh device that can be wrapped around the heart to deliver electrical impulses and thereby improve cardiac function in experimental models of heart failure, a major public health concern and leading cause of mortality and disability. [More]
Pharmacotherapy reduces conduction system disease risk

Pharmacotherapy reduces conduction system disease risk

Lisinopril therapy significantly reduces incident conduction system disease, indicates a post-hoc analysis of ALLHAT data. [More]
Epclusa drug receives FDA approval for treating adult patients with chronic HCV

Epclusa drug receives FDA approval for treating adult patients with chronic HCV

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Epclusa to treat adult patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) both with and without cirrhosis (advanced liver disease). [More]
Scientists develop novel bionic cardiac patch to treat heart problems

Scientists develop novel bionic cardiac patch to treat heart problems

Scientists and doctors in recent decades have made vast leaps in the treatment of cardiac problems - particularly with the development in recent years of so-called "cardiac patches," swaths of engineered heart tissue that can replace heart muscle damaged during a heart attack. [More]
Study evaluates effectiveness of robotic approach over manual ablation in treating heart arrhythmia

Study evaluates effectiveness of robotic approach over manual ablation in treating heart arrhythmia

Whether ablation of the highest-risk heart arrhythmia is best handled by a robot or the hands of an electrophysiologist should be answered by an international comparison of the two. [More]
New, implantable device offers promise for patients with OSA

New, implantable device offers promise for patients with OSA

Since the 1980s, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) - in which positive pressure is pushed through the nasal airways to help users breathe while sleeping - has been by far the most widely used treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). [More]
Prolonged exposure to EAS systems can affect health of cardiac device patients

Prolonged exposure to EAS systems can affect health of cardiac device patients

Electronic anti-theft systems still post a threat to cardiac device patients, according to research presented today at CARDIOSTIM - EHRA EUROPACE 2016 by Professor Robert Stevenson, senior scientist at Greatbatch Medical in Santa Clarita, California, US. [More]
TAVI matches SAVR for early and midterm mortality

TAVI matches SAVR for early and midterm mortality

Transcatheter aortic valve implantation has similar early and midterm mortality to surgical aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis, including those at low to intermediate risk, show results of a systematic review and meta-analysis. [More]
Research shows weekend admissions in NHS hospital can affect AF patients

Research shows weekend admissions in NHS hospital can affect AF patients

Patients suffering from the most common form of heart rhythm disorder who are admitted to NHS hospital over the weekend face a higher risk of dying over the next five years than those admitted during normal hours. [More]
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