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SCS therapy can be key to reducing use of opioids in patients battling chronic pain, study finds

SCS therapy can be key to reducing use of opioids in patients battling chronic pain, study finds

New research has found spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy can be key to reducing or stabilizing the use of opioids in patients battling chronic pain. [More]
Experimental treatment shows early promise for improving Parkinson's symptoms

Experimental treatment shows early promise for improving Parkinson's symptoms

About fourteen years ago, Bill Crawford noticed a persistent twitching in one of his fingers that was interfering with his rehearsal time as the music pastor at Porter Memorial Church. [More]
Georgia Tech researchers find new way to improve treatment for inflammatory diseases

Georgia Tech researchers find new way to improve treatment for inflammatory diseases

Is a treatment only making things better or maybe also making some things a little worse? That can be a nagging question in some medical decisions, where side effects are possible. [More]
Study provides real-life data on potential of solar cells to power medical implants

Study provides real-life data on potential of solar cells to power medical implants

The notion of using solar cells placed under the skin to continuously recharge implanted electronic medical devices is a viable one. [More]
Canadian-Israeli researchers develop new biological pacemaker

Canadian-Israeli researchers develop new biological pacemaker

Using human embryonic stem cells to create a type of cardiac cells known as sinotrial (SA) node pacemaker cells, a team of scientists from Israel and Canada have developed a biological pacemaker that overcomes many of the limitations of electrical pacemakers. [More]
Technology could help improve health care quality

Technology could help improve health care quality

Technology has promised to transform health care for years now. Multiple apps, devices, and other e-health approaches are being created to help the patient increase their awareness, education and accountability in their own health. [More]
Scientists develop first functional biological pacemaker from human stem cells

Scientists develop first functional biological pacemaker from human stem cells

Scientists from the McEwen Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University Health Network, have developed the first functional pacemaker cells from human stem cells, paving the way for alternate, biological pacemaker therapy. [More]
Eindhoven researchers develop patient-friendly method to determine severity of heart failure

Eindhoven researchers develop patient-friendly method to determine severity of heart failure

Methods currently employed to determine the severity of a heart failure are very limited. Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology and the Catharina Hospital in Eindhoven have therefore developed a method that is very quick, non-invasive, cost-effective and can be performed at the hospital bedside. [More]
Immune checkpoint cancer therapies may cause rare cardiac side effects linked to unexpected immune response

Immune checkpoint cancer therapies may cause rare cardiac side effects linked to unexpected immune response

Combination therapy utilizing two approved immunotherapy drugs for cancer treatment may cause rare and sometimes fatal cardiac side effects linked to an unexpected immune response. [More]
Salk scientist wins NIH grant for new technique to precisely target specific cells using sound waves

Salk scientist wins NIH grant for new technique to precisely target specific cells using sound waves

Salk Associate Professor Sreekanth Chalasani has been awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health's Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies Initiative for developing a way to selectively activate brain, heart, muscle and other cells using ultrasonic waves, which could be a boon to neuroscience research as well as medicine. [More]
Simplified approach to TAVI holds potential to save lives of many patients with rheumatic heart disease

Simplified approach to TAVI holds potential to save lives of many patients with rheumatic heart disease

A novel heart valve replacement method is revealed today that offers hope for the thousands of patients with rheumatic heart disease who need the procedure each year. The research is being presented at the SA Heart Congress 2016 [More]
TUM researchers use luminous jellyfish proteins to investigate cardiac rhythm dysfunctions

TUM researchers use luminous jellyfish proteins to investigate cardiac rhythm dysfunctions

Cell models from stem cells serve an ever-increasing role in research of cardiac dysfunction. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich have succeeded in producing cells which offer new insights into properties of the heart. [More]
Implanted nerve stimulator shows promise in treating central sleep apnea patients

Implanted nerve stimulator shows promise in treating central sleep apnea patients

Results from an international, randomized study show that an implanted nerve stimulator significantly improves symptoms in those with central sleep apnea, without causing serious side effects. [More]
Remote monitoring shows no improvement in outcomes for heart failure patients with CIEDs

Remote monitoring shows no improvement in outcomes for heart failure patients with CIEDs

For heart failure patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs), remote monitoring of their condition does not improve outcomes compared to usual care, according to Hot Line results presented at ESC Congress 2016 and to be simultaneously published in JAMA. [More]
High-tech alternative to brain surgery safe, effective for treatment of essential tremor

High-tech alternative to brain surgery safe, effective for treatment of essential tremor

A study published today in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine offers the most in-depth assessment yet of the safety and effectiveness of a high-tech alternative to brain surgery to treat the uncontrollable shaking caused by the most common movement disorder. [More]
Research highlights interaction between biological clock and sleep loss at regional brain level

Research highlights interaction between biological clock and sleep loss at regional brain level

Ever wondered what happens inside your brain when you stay awake for a day, a night and another day, before you finally go to sleep? In a new study published today in the journal Science, a team of researchers from the University of Liege and the University of Surrey have scanned the brains of 33 participants across such a 2-day sleep deprivation period and following recovery sleep. [More]
FDA approves scalpel-free brain surgery to treat essential tremor

FDA approves scalpel-free brain surgery to treat essential tremor

The Food and Drug Administration has approved the first focused ultrasound device to treat essential tremor, the most common movement disorder, in patients who do not respond to medication. [More]
FDA approves new ExAblate Neuro to treat patients with essential tremor

FDA approves new ExAblate Neuro to treat patients with essential tremor

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the first focused ultrasound device to treat essential tremor in patients who have not responded to medication. ExAblate Neuro uses magnetic resonance (MR) images taken during the procedure to deliver focused ultrasound to destroy brain tissue in a tiny area thought to be responsible for causing tremors. [More]
New electric mesh device wraps around the heart to deliver electrical impulses

New electric mesh device wraps around the heart to deliver electrical impulses

A research team led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Seoul National University has developed a new electric mesh device that can be wrapped around the heart to deliver electrical impulses and thereby improve cardiac function in experimental models of heart failure, a major public health concern and leading cause of mortality and disability. [More]
Pharmacotherapy reduces conduction system disease risk

Pharmacotherapy reduces conduction system disease risk

Lisinopril therapy significantly reduces incident conduction system disease, indicates a post-hoc analysis of ALLHAT data. [More]
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