Pancreas News and Research RSS Feed - Pancreas News and Research

The pancreas is a gland organ in the digestive and endocrine system of vertebrates. It is both an endocrine gland producing several important hormones, including insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin, as well as an exocrine gland, secreting pancreatic juice containing digestive enzymes that pass to the small intestine. These enzymes help in the further breakdown of the carbohydrates, protein, and fat in the chyme.
UChicago Medicine contributes to Illinois Transplant Fund

UChicago Medicine contributes to Illinois Transplant Fund

The University of Chicago Medicine has become the first transplant center to contribute to the Illinois Transplant Fund (ITF), a new not-for-profit that provides financial support for organ transplants to qualified uninsured residents of northern and central Illinois and Northwest Indiana. [More]
New research shows promising progress in use of anti-inflammatory cytokine for T1D treatment

New research shows promising progress in use of anti-inflammatory cytokine for T1D treatment

New research from Uppsala University shows promising progress in the use of anti-inflammatory cytokine for treatment of type 1 diabetes. The study, published in the open access journal Scientific Reports (Nature Publishing Group), reveals that administration of interleukin-35 (a protein made by immune cells) to mice with type 1 diabetes, reverses or cures the disease by maintaining a normal blood glucose level and the immune tolerance. [More]
Low blood level of 4 proteins can help diabetics protect against immune attack

Low blood level of 4 proteins can help diabetics protect against immune attack

Patients with type 1 diabetes have significantly lower blood levels of four proteins that help protect their tissue from attack by their immune system, scientists report. [More]
Weight loss through lifestyle modifications, bariatric surgery can reduce features of NASH

Weight loss through lifestyle modifications, bariatric surgery can reduce features of NASH

Weight loss through both lifestyle modification and bariatric surgery can significantly reduce features of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a disease characterized by fat in the liver, according to two new studies published in Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
New paper describes positive effects of CRAC channel inhibitors in animal models of acute pancreatitis

New paper describes positive effects of CRAC channel inhibitors in animal models of acute pancreatitis

Researchers from CalciMedica, Inc. and the University of Liverpool today announced the publication of a paper describing positive effects of calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channel inhibitors in animal models of acute pancreatitis. The paper, titled "Inhibitors of ORAI1 prevent cytosolic calcium-associated injury of human pancreatic acinar cells and acute pancreatitis in 3 mouse models" appears in the August edition of the journal Gastroenterology. [More]
Researchers use gene-editing technique involving low-dose irradiation to repair human stem cells

Researchers use gene-editing technique involving low-dose irradiation to repair human stem cells

For the first time, researchers have employed a gene-editing technique involving low-dose irradiation to repair patient cells, according to a study published in the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine. This method, developed by researchers in the Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute, is 10 times more effective than techniques currently in use. [More]
Genetic variation influences survival in patients with multiple myeloma

Genetic variation influences survival in patients with multiple myeloma

As part of a multi-institutional effort, researchers with Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah have found that multiple myeloma patients with a genetic variation in the gene FOPNL die on average 1-3 years sooner than patients without it. [More]
Study examines link between use of diabetes drug pioglitazone and increased risk of bladder cancer

Study examines link between use of diabetes drug pioglitazone and increased risk of bladder cancer

Although some previous studies have suggested an increased risk of bladder cancer with use of the diabetes drug pioglitazone, analyses that included nearly 200,000 patients found no statistically significant increased risk, however a small increased risk could not be excluded, according to a study in the July 21 issue of JAMA. [More]
Alefacept drug offers clinical benefit to certain individuals with new-onset type 1 diabetes

Alefacept drug offers clinical benefit to certain individuals with new-onset type 1 diabetes

Individuals with new-onset type 1 diabetes who took two courses of alefacept (AmeviveĀ®, Astellas Pharma Inc.) soon after diagnosis show preserved beta cell function after two years compared to those who received a placebo. [More]
Binghamton University researchers creating 3-D printing process to help treat incurable diseases

Binghamton University researchers creating 3-D printing process to help treat incurable diseases

A team of Binghamton University researchers are creating a 3-D printing process to build implantable tissues and organs to treat otherwise incurable diseases. [More]
New project aims to revolutionize application of optogenetics in neuroscience

New project aims to revolutionize application of optogenetics in neuroscience

The revolution that optogenetics technology has brought to biology -- neuroscience in particular -- could be transformed all over again if a new project getting underway at Brown University and Central Michigan University is successful. [More]
New non-invasive glucose monitoring device could transform lives of people with diabetes

New non-invasive glucose monitoring device could transform lives of people with diabetes

A new laser sensor that monitors blood glucose levels without penetrating the skin could transform the lives of millions of people living with diabetes. [More]
Biosimilars show promise for children with IBD, but more research needed

Biosimilars show promise for children with IBD, but more research needed

Children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who are doing well on specific biological medications should not be switched to recently approved "biosimilar" products, concludes an expert consensus statement of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. [More]
New understanding of keratin 17 protein could lead to development of better ways to prevent cancer

New understanding of keratin 17 protein could lead to development of better ways to prevent cancer

New research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests that the protein keratin 17 - the presence of which is used in the lab to detect and stage various types of cancers - is not just a biomarker for the disease, but may play a critical role in tumor growth. [More]
Huntsman Cancer Institute receives NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Center designation

Huntsman Cancer Institute receives NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Center designation

The National Cancer Institute has awarded Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah its Comprehensive Cancer Center status, the highest designation possible. [More]
Simple blood test could detect early stages of type 1 diabetes

Simple blood test could detect early stages of type 1 diabetes

Scientists at the MRC's Clinical Sciences Centre in West London are the first to show that a small molecule circulates in the blood of people who are in the early stages of type 1 diabetes. A simple blood test could detect this biological marker years, maybe decades, before symptoms develop. [More]
City of Hope offers islet cell transplant program to cure type 1 diabetes

City of Hope offers islet cell transplant program to cure type 1 diabetes

For patients with severe type 1 diabetes, a strict diet and insulin shots are sometimes not enough to sufficiently control their disease. What they need are insulin-producing cells of their own - currently only available through a still-experimental procedure known as islet cell transplantation. [More]
Expectant management remains underused for men with low-risk prostate cancer

Expectant management remains underused for men with low-risk prostate cancer

Monitoring men with very low- and low-risk prostate cancers using watchful waiting or active surveillance, called expectant management, is a useful approach for a large number of men with localized tumors and could spare them the debilitating side effects of aggressive treatments that are too often unnecessarily used in this patient population, a UCLA review of common practices in prostate cancer has found. [More]
Celtaxsys receives FDA clearance to begin acebilustat Phase 2 trial in adult CF patients in the US

Celtaxsys receives FDA clearance to begin acebilustat Phase 2 trial in adult CF patients in the US

Celtaxsys, Inc., a clinical stage pharmaceutical development company focusing on anti-inflammatory therapeutics, including those with rare and orphan inflammatory disease indications, announced today that it has gained clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to begin a Phase 2 clinical trial of its flagship drug candidate, acebilustat (CTX-4430), in adult CF patients in the US. [More]
Scientists develop implantable 'artificial pancreas' to help control blood sugar in diabetes patients

Scientists develop implantable 'artificial pancreas' to help control blood sugar in diabetes patients

Living with Type 1 diabetes requires constant monitoring of blood sugar levels and injecting insulin daily. Now scientists are reporting in the ACS journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research the development of an implantable "artificial pancreas" that continuously measures a person's blood sugar, or glucose, level and can automatically release insulin as needed. [More]
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