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The pancreas is a gland organ in the digestive and endocrine system of vertebrates. It is both an endocrine gland producing several important hormones, including insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin, as well as an exocrine gland, secreting pancreatic juice containing digestive enzymes that pass to the small intestine. These enzymes help in the further breakdown of the carbohydrates, protein, and fat in the chyme.
Moffitt researchers hope to improve pancreatic cancer survival rates by developing blood test to identify IPMNs

Moffitt researchers hope to improve pancreatic cancer survival rates by developing blood test to identify IPMNs

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in the United States and has a 5-year survival rate of only 6 percent, which is the lowest rate of all types of cancer according to the American Cancer Society. [More]
Scientists generate pluripotent stem cells with more stable genomes

Scientists generate pluripotent stem cells with more stable genomes

Damaged tissue, such as pancreas, heart, and neuronal tissue, which is regenerated to treat cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, or neurodegenerative diseases. This is one of the ambitious scenarios to which regenerative medicine aspires and that is being announced as one of the great promises of twenty-first century biomedicine for the treatment of a long list of diseases affecting people today. [More]
Johns Hopkins scientists develop novel fish embryo technique to identify potential new treatments for diabetes

Johns Hopkins scientists develop novel fish embryo technique to identify potential new treatments for diabetes

In experiments with 500,000 genetically engineered zebrafish embryos, Johns Hopkins scientists report they have developed a potentially better and more accurate way to screen for useful drugs, and they have used it to identify 24 drug candidates that increase the number of insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. [More]
Study reports results of genetic testing for 22 genetic causes of neonatal diabetes

Study reports results of genetic testing for 22 genetic causes of neonatal diabetes

Over a 10 year period, the time that babies receive genetic testing after being diagnosed with diabetes has fallen from over four years to under two months. Pinpointing the exact genetic causes of sometimes rare forms of diabetes is revolutionising healthcare for these patients. [More]
FSU study reveals new method for treating diabetes

FSU study reveals new method for treating diabetes

A new Florida State University study is changing how researchers look at diabetes research and the drugs used to treat the disease. [More]
‘Medical foods’ for patients with rare IEMs may cause harm when not carefully managed

‘Medical foods’ for patients with rare IEMs may cause harm when not carefully managed

Many "medical foods" are designed to help manage patients with rare inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs), and can help prevent serious and life-threatening complications. However, such special foods may cause harm in some patients when their use is not carefully monitored and managed, according to a research team led by scientists at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Tumor cells associated with pancreatic cancer work with each other to increase tumor spread

Tumor cells associated with pancreatic cancer work with each other to increase tumor spread

Tumor cells associated with pancreatic cancer often behave like communities by working with each other to increase tumor spread and growth to different organs. Groups of these cancer cells are better than single cancer cells in driving tumor spread, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania published in Cancer Discovery online in advance of the print issue. [More]
Researchers show how microbiota protects against type 1 diabetes development

Researchers show how microbiota protects against type 1 diabetes development

Our bodies have ten times the amount of microbes than human cells. This set of bacteria is called microbiota. In some instances, bacteria known as pathogens can cause infectious diseases. However, these micro-organisms can also protect us from certain diseases. Researchers from Inserm, Paris Descartes University and the CNRS (French National Centre for Scientific Research), through collaboration with teams from China and Sweden, have recently shown how microbiota protects against the development of type 1 diabetes. [More]
MSK and LVHN collaborate to improve patients’ access to innovative cancer treatments

MSK and LVHN collaborate to improve patients’ access to innovative cancer treatments

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) and Lehigh Valley Health Network (LVHN) announced today the beginning of a unique and forward-thinking collaboration aimed at improving patient access to the latest and most effective cancer treatment advances and highest-caliber cancer care. [More]
Certain genes exposed to harsh environmental factors can increase diabetes risk

Certain genes exposed to harsh environmental factors can increase diabetes risk

Arsenic, which can be present in ground water, modifies an enzyme that alters the secretion of insulin in the pancreas. Physicians, usually, show type II diabetes as a consequence of an exaggerated food intake and lack of exercise; however, there are about 50 genes that cause changes in the DNA, known as polymorphisms, that when combined with harsh environmental factors are at increased risk of developing the disease, mentioned PhD Marta Ostrosky Wegman, director of the Institute for Biomedical Research the National University of Mexico (UNAM). [More]
UChicago Medicine contributes to Illinois Transplant Fund

UChicago Medicine contributes to Illinois Transplant Fund

The University of Chicago Medicine has become the first transplant center to contribute to the Illinois Transplant Fund (ITF), a new not-for-profit that provides financial support for organ transplants to qualified uninsured residents of northern and central Illinois and Northwest Indiana. [More]
New research shows promising progress in use of anti-inflammatory cytokine for T1D treatment

New research shows promising progress in use of anti-inflammatory cytokine for T1D treatment

New research from Uppsala University shows promising progress in the use of anti-inflammatory cytokine for treatment of type 1 diabetes. The study, published in the open access journal Scientific Reports (Nature Publishing Group), reveals that administration of interleukin-35 (a protein made by immune cells) to mice with type 1 diabetes, reverses or cures the disease by maintaining a normal blood glucose level and the immune tolerance. [More]
Low blood level of 4 proteins can help diabetics protect against immune attack

Low blood level of 4 proteins can help diabetics protect against immune attack

Patients with type 1 diabetes have significantly lower blood levels of four proteins that help protect their tissue from attack by their immune system, scientists report. [More]
Weight loss through lifestyle modifications, bariatric surgery can reduce features of NASH

Weight loss through lifestyle modifications, bariatric surgery can reduce features of NASH

Weight loss through both lifestyle modification and bariatric surgery can significantly reduce features of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a disease characterized by fat in the liver, according to two new studies published in Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
New paper describes positive effects of CRAC channel inhibitors in animal models of acute pancreatitis

New paper describes positive effects of CRAC channel inhibitors in animal models of acute pancreatitis

Researchers from CalciMedica, Inc. and the University of Liverpool today announced the publication of a paper describing positive effects of calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channel inhibitors in animal models of acute pancreatitis. The paper, titled "Inhibitors of ORAI1 prevent cytosolic calcium-associated injury of human pancreatic acinar cells and acute pancreatitis in 3 mouse models" appears in the August edition of the journal Gastroenterology. [More]
Researchers use gene-editing technique involving low-dose irradiation to repair human stem cells

Researchers use gene-editing technique involving low-dose irradiation to repair human stem cells

For the first time, researchers have employed a gene-editing technique involving low-dose irradiation to repair patient cells, according to a study published in the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine. This method, developed by researchers in the Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute, is 10 times more effective than techniques currently in use. [More]
Genetic variation influences survival in patients with multiple myeloma

Genetic variation influences survival in patients with multiple myeloma

As part of a multi-institutional effort, researchers with Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah have found that multiple myeloma patients with a genetic variation in the gene FOPNL die on average 1-3 years sooner than patients without it. [More]
Study examines link between use of diabetes drug pioglitazone and increased risk of bladder cancer

Study examines link between use of diabetes drug pioglitazone and increased risk of bladder cancer

Although some previous studies have suggested an increased risk of bladder cancer with use of the diabetes drug pioglitazone, analyses that included nearly 200,000 patients found no statistically significant increased risk, however a small increased risk could not be excluded, according to a study in the July 21 issue of JAMA. [More]
Alefacept drug offers clinical benefit to certain individuals with new-onset type 1 diabetes

Alefacept drug offers clinical benefit to certain individuals with new-onset type 1 diabetes

Individuals with new-onset type 1 diabetes who took two courses of alefacept (Amevive®, Astellas Pharma Inc.) soon after diagnosis show preserved beta cell function after two years compared to those who received a placebo. [More]

Binghamton University researchers creating 3-D printing process to help treat incurable diseases

A team of Binghamton University researchers are creating a 3-D printing process to build implantable tissues and organs to treat otherwise incurable diseases. [More]
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