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The pancreas is a gland organ in the digestive and endocrine system of vertebrates. It is both an endocrine gland producing several important hormones, including insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin, as well as an exocrine gland, secreting pancreatic juice containing digestive enzymes that pass to the small intestine. These enzymes help in the further breakdown of the carbohydrates, protein, and fat in the chyme.
Mistakes in mismatch repair genes may accurately predict response to certain immunotherapy drugs

Mistakes in mismatch repair genes may accurately predict response to certain immunotherapy drugs

In a report of a proof-of-principle study of patients with colon and other cancers for whom standard therapies failed, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say that mistakes in so-called mismatch repair genes, first identified by Johns Hopkins and other scientists two decades ago, may accurately predict who will respond to certain immunotherapy drugs known as PD-1 inhibitors. Such drugs aim to disarm systems developed by cancer cells to evade detection and destruction by immune system cells. [More]
New research shows wide variation in organ donation rates across the country

New research shows wide variation in organ donation rates across the country

More than 123,000 Americans are currently waiting for lifesaving organ transplants, but 21 patients die each day because there aren't enough organs to go around. New research shows wide variation in the number of eligible organ donors whose loved ones consent to organ donation across the country. [More]
Lilly Diabetes Alliance, Boehringer Ingelheim to present study results at ADA’s Scientific Sessions

Lilly Diabetes Alliance, Boehringer Ingelheim to present study results at ADA’s Scientific Sessions

The presentation of 35 abstracts will demonstrate the breadth and depth of the Boehringer Ingelheim and Eli Lilly and Company Diabetes alliance portfolio at the 75th American Diabetes Association's (ADA) Scientific Sessions® in Boston, June 5-9. [More]
UCLA researchers successfully measure liver function in potential organ donors using finger-probe device

UCLA researchers successfully measure liver function in potential organ donors using finger-probe device

A portable, finger-probe device successfully measured liver function in brain dead adult organ donors, a finding that could change the way organs are assessed and save thousands of dollars per transplant, a UCLA study has found. [More]
Janssen, Bayer HealthCare initiate CALLISTO program to study rivaroxaban in patients with active cancer

Janssen, Bayer HealthCare initiate CALLISTO program to study rivaroxaban in patients with active cancer

Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and its development partner, Bayer HealthCare, today announced the initiation of CALLISTO, a new comprehensive clinical research program for their novel oral anticoagulant, rivaroxaban, in patients with active cancer. The studies are evaluating the medicine for the prevention and treatment of life-threatening blood clots in patients with a wide range of cancer types. [More]
Functional foods help reduce obesity, control diabetes

Functional foods help reduce obesity, control diabetes

The so called functional foods such as cactus pads, chia and soybean, when included in a balanced diet, help reduce obesity and control diabetes, says Nimbe Torres y Torres, from the Institute of Biomedical Research at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. [More]
Treatment outcomes in type 1 diabetes could be improved across all age groups

Treatment outcomes in type 1 diabetes could be improved across all age groups

In a sweeping analysis assessing the current state of diabetes treatment in the U.S., T1D Exchange researchers conclude that there remains considerable room for improving treatment outcomes in type 1 diabetes across all age groups, but especially for adolescents and young adults. [More]
Risk prediction model can help target hepatitis C treatment to patients with most urgent need

Risk prediction model can help target hepatitis C treatment to patients with most urgent need

A team of researchers at the University of Michigan Health System has developed a risk prediction model that helps identify which hepatitis C patients have the most urgent need for new anti-viral drugs. [More]
Scripps Proton Therapy Center reports exceptional results in treating patients with pencil-beam scanning

Scripps Proton Therapy Center reports exceptional results in treating patients with pencil-beam scanning

The nation's first and only proton therapy center to treat patients exclusively with pencil-beam scanning is reporting exceptional results in delivering cancer treatment since opening for patient care just more than a year ago. [More]
MIT researchers find way to develop implantable devices that can avoid scar-tissue buildup

MIT researchers find way to develop implantable devices that can avoid scar-tissue buildup

Biomedical devices that can be implanted in the body for drug delivery, tissue engineering, or sensing can help improve treatment for many diseases. However, such devices are often susceptible to attack by the immune system, which can render them useless. [More]
Combined therapy shows promise in cystic fibrosis patients

Combined therapy shows promise in cystic fibrosis patients

Treatment with two medications that target the most common genetic cause of cystic fibrosis improves lung function and lowers the rate of pulmonary exacerbations, according to the results from a Phase III international clinical trial published online in the New England Journal of Medicine on May 17, 2015. [More]
Small-molecule drug simultaneously rejuvenates old muscles, aging brains

Small-molecule drug simultaneously rejuvenates old muscles, aging brains

Whether you're brainy, brawny or both, you may someday benefit from a drug found to rejuvenate aging brain and muscle tissue. Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have discovered that a small-molecule drug simultaneously perks up old stem cells in the brains and muscles of mice, a finding that could lead to drug interventions for humans that would make aging tissues throughout the body act young again. [More]
Obese people at greater risk of developing cancer

Obese people at greater risk of developing cancer

Cancer is more likely to develop in people who are very overweight (obese), because surplus body fat interferes with various hormone cycles and with glucose and fat metabolism. On the occasion of European Obesity Day this coming Saturday (16 May), metabolic expert Alexandra Kautzky-Willer, Comprehensive Cancer Center at MedUni Vienna and Vienna General Hospital, draws attention to the fact that, even in Austria, more and more people are suffering from obesity. [More]
Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany granted FDA Fast Track designation for development of evofosfamide

Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany granted FDA Fast Track designation for development of evofosfamide

Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, a leading company for innovative and top-quality high-tech products in healthcare, life science and performance materials today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted Fast Track designation for the development of evofosfamide (previously known as TH-302), administered in combination with gemcitabine, for the treatment of previously untreated patients with metastatic or locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. [More]
Debiotech agrees to acquire exclusive rights on iSense CGM technology for use with patch pumps

Debiotech agrees to acquire exclusive rights on iSense CGM technology for use with patch pumps

Debiotech of Switzerland and iSense CGM, Inc. of the US, announced today having entered into an Agreement under which Debiotech has the option to acquire the exclusive rights on the iSense CGM product and technology for use with patch pumps for diabetes therapy. Financial terms and conditions of the Agreement are not disclosed. [More]
Researchers reveal mechanisms involved in development of metabolic complications linked to obesity

Researchers reveal mechanisms involved in development of metabolic complications linked to obesity

Metabolic complications of obesity and overweight, such as type 2 diabetes, are an important challenge to public health. Teams led by Nicolas Venteclef, Inserm Research Fellow (Cordeliers Research Centre, Inserm/Pierre and Marie Curie University Joint Research Unit 1138, Paris, France) and Irina Udalova (Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, University of Oxford, UK) in collaboration with several teams, have succeeded in elucidating part of the mechanisms involved in the development of these metabolic complications associated with obesity. [More]
Penn study highlights need for more guidance on contraceptive use in women with cystic fibrosis

Penn study highlights need for more guidance on contraceptive use in women with cystic fibrosis

Only half of women with cystic fibrosis (CF) report using contraception and frequently apt to become pregnant unintentionally, according to a new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Cardiff scientists develop novel anti-cancer stem cell compound

Cardiff scientists develop novel anti-cancer stem cell compound

Cardiff University scientists have developed a novel anti-cancer stem cell agent capable of targeting aggressive tumour forming cells common to breast, pancreas, colon and prostate cancers. [More]
JDRF, Lilly partner to make life better for people with type 1 diabetes

JDRF, Lilly partner to make life better for people with type 1 diabetes

JDRF, the leading global organization funding type 1 diabetes (T1D) research, and Eli Lilly and Company, a global leader in diabetes care announced a two-year partnership that will provide $1.8 Million in support of JDRF's mission to improving the lives of people with T1D. [More]
Scientists identify mechanism that explains how some stem cells get new identity

Scientists identify mechanism that explains how some stem cells get new identity

Scientists at the University of Copenhagen have identified one mechanism that explains how some stem cells choose to become a given cell type: the cells combine specific sets of proteins at precise positions along the DNA. When these particular groups of proteins are combined, the gates are opened so that certain groups of genes can now be used, giving the cells a new identity. [More]
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