Pandemic News and Research RSS Feed - Pandemic News and Research

A pandemic is a global disease outbreak. During a pandemic, transmission can be anticipated in the workplace, not only from patient to workers in health care settings, but also among co-workers in general work settings. A pandemic would cause high levels of illness, death, social disruption, and economic loss. Everyday life would be disrupted because so many people in so many places become seriously ill at the same time. Impacts could range from school and business closings to the interruption of basic services such as public transportation and food delivery.
Research may provide insight into identifying, helping children with emotional behavior issues

Research may provide insight into identifying, helping children with emotional behavior issues

Research on children orphaned by HIV/AIDS in South Africa may provide insight on how to identify and help children with emotional behavior issues in other areas of the world, which may have limited access to healthcare and further research that could lead to successful interventions. [More]
Guidance on use of Tamiflu needs to be reviewed in light of most recent evidence

Guidance on use of Tamiflu needs to be reviewed in light of most recent evidence

Tamiflu (the antiviral drug oseltamivir) shortens symptoms of influenza by half a day, but there is no good evidence to support claims that it reduces admissions to hospital or complications of influenza. [More]
PeptiDream develops novel macrocyclic peptide inhibitor for treatment of multiple influenza strains

PeptiDream develops novel macrocyclic peptide inhibitor for treatment of multiple influenza strains

PeptiDream Inc., a public Tokyo-based biopharmaceutical company ("PeptiDream")( TOKYO:4587) announced today, in collaboration with The Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science ("Tokyo Metropolitan Institute") the discovery and development of a novel macrocyclic peptide inhibitor for the treatment of multiple influenza strains. [More]
Obese people take less time to feel full than those of normal weight

Obese people take less time to feel full than those of normal weight

Obese people take less time to feel full than those of normal weight. Despite this, they consume more calories. A faster speed of eating could play an important role in obesity, according to a study funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation. [More]
Research roundup: New medical coding system; choosing a hospice; revamping Medicare

Research roundup: New medical coding system; choosing a hospice; revamping Medicare

On October 1, 2014, all health plans, health data clearinghouses, and health care providers that transmit health information electronically must use a new, significantly broader, coding system, called ICD-10, for diagnoses and inpatient procedures. [More]
Tamiflu cuts H1N1 pandemic deaths by 25%, shows study

Tamiflu cuts H1N1 pandemic deaths by 25%, shows study

Adults hospitalised with H1N1 influenza during the 2009–2010 pandemic were 25% less likely to die from the disease if they were given antiviral drugs called neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) such as Tamiflu, according to a large meta-analysis involving more than 29 000 patients from 38 countries, published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine journal. The findings also indicate that treatment within 2 days of flu symptoms developing halved the risk of death compared with later treatment or no treatment. [More]
VaxInnate starts Phase 1 clinical trial to evaluate VAX2012Q for prevention of seasonal influenza

VaxInnate starts Phase 1 clinical trial to evaluate VAX2012Q for prevention of seasonal influenza

VaxInnate Corporation today announced that enrollment has commenced in a Phase 1 clinical trial to evaluate VAX2012Q, a recombinant quadrivalent vaccine in development for the prevention of seasonal influenza. VaxInnate is a biotechnology firm pioneering a breakthrough technology platform for the development of novel vaccines. [More]

China manages to halve TB prevalence in 20 years

Over the last 20 years, China has more than halved its tuberculosis (TB) prevalence, with rates falling from 170 to 59 per 100 000 population. This unrivalled success has been driven by a massive scale-up of the directly observed, short-course (DOTS) strategy, from half the population in the 1990s to the entire country after 2000, according to findings from a 20-year-long analysis of national survey data, published in The Lancet. [More]
Study shows only 23% of seasonal and pandemic flu caused symptoms

Study shows only 23% of seasonal and pandemic flu caused symptoms

Around 1 in 5 of the population were infected in both recent outbreaks of seasonal flu and the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, but just 23% of these infections caused symptoms, and only 17% of people were ill enough to consult their doctor. [More]
Teen researcher wins top award from Intel Foundation for research on potential drugs to treat influenza

Teen researcher wins top award from Intel Foundation for research on potential drugs to treat influenza

From new cancer treatments to an exploration of how technology affects the adolescent brain, the innovative research of America's future scientists, engineers and inventors took center stage in the nation's capital today. [More]
Studies identify gene signals involved with BMI and their connection to: heart disease, diabetes

Studies identify gene signals involved with BMI and their connection to: heart disease, diabetes

Two recent genetic studies expand the list of genes involved with body fat and body mass index, and their connection to major Western health problems: heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes. [More]

Two genetic studies expand list of genes connected to major Western health problems

Two recent genetic studies expand the list of genes involved with body fat and body mass index, and their connection to major Western health problems: heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes. One study showed that higher body mass index (BMI) caused harmful effects on the risk of type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and inflammation, while another study found gene signals linked to higher levels of body fat metrics, without showing causality. [More]
Gentiva Health Services' total net revenues increase 14% to $486.1 million in Q4 2013

Gentiva Health Services' total net revenues increase 14% to $486.1 million in Q4 2013

Gentiva Health Services, Inc., one of the largest providers of home health, hospice and community care services in the United States, today reported fourth quarter and full-year 2013 results. [More]
Scientists develop new anti-viral drugs that may be effective against flu virus

Scientists develop new anti-viral drugs that may be effective against flu virus

New analysis of the influenza A virus by scientists at the University of Hertfordshire shows potential for developing new anti-viral drugs which are more likely to be universally effective against the flu virus originating from avian, swine or human virus strains. [More]

Study: Direct camel-to-human transmission of MERS virus is possible in Saudi Arabia

An estimated three-quarters of camels recently surveyed in Saudi Arabia have evidence of infection with the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), the virus responsible for human cases of MERS. [More]
Origin of deadly human malaria parasite linked to primates in Africa, not Asia

Origin of deadly human malaria parasite linked to primates in Africa, not Asia

An international team of scientists has traced the origin of Plasmodium vivax, the second-worst malaria parasite of humans, to Africa, according to a study published this week in Nature Communications. [More]

CDC report reveals that younger age group is mostly hit by flu this season

This influenza season was particularly hard on younger- and middle-age adults, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported in today's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. [More]
Samoa Island harbors a global health mystery that could predict obesity crisis

Samoa Island harbors a global health mystery that could predict obesity crisis

The South Pacific archipelago of Samoa and American Samoa harbors a global health mystery that may seem both remote and extreme but could foretell trends in obesity and related conditions across much of the developing world. [More]

Upstream interventions may provide options to contain emerging pathogens at source

While many endemic infectious diseases of humans have been largely contained, new microbes continue to emerge to threaten human and animal health. [More]
Experts sound alarm about the dangers of industrial chemicals on children’s health

Experts sound alarm about the dangers of industrial chemicals on children’s health

In a Review published in The Lancet Neurology, two of the world’s leading experts on the link between environment and children’s health are sounding the alarm on the dangers of industrial chemicals. They are calling on countries to transform their chemical risk-assessment procedures in order to protect children from everyday toxins that may be causing a global “silent epidemic” of brain development disorders. [More]