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Paralysis is the loss of muscle function in part of your body. It happens when something goes wrong with the way messages pass between your brain and muscles. Paralysis can be complete or partial. It can occur on one or both sides of your body. It can also occur in just one area, or it can be widespread. Paralysis of the lower half of your body, including both legs, is called paraplegia. Paralysis of the arms and legs is quadriplegia.
Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation awards Quality of Life grants to 79 nonprofit organizations

Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation awards Quality of Life grants to 79 nonprofit organizations

The Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation, a national nonprofit dedicated to improving quality of life for individuals living with paralysis, announced it has awarded $575,704 in Quality of Life grants to 79 nonprofit organizations nationwide. [More]
Virtual reality training helps paralyzed patients regain movement

Virtual reality training helps paralyzed patients regain movement

Eight people with long-term paralysis from spinal cord injuries have regained some motor control after learning to control their own brain activity. [More]
Long-term brain-machine interface use could lead to recovery in paraplegic patients

Long-term brain-machine interface use could lead to recovery in paraplegic patients

During the 2014 FIFA World Cup opening ceremony, a young Brazilian man, paralyzed from the chest down, delivered the opening kickoff. He used a brain-machine interface, allowing him to control the movements of a lower-limb robotic exoskeleton. [More]
Scientists unravel effect of prion proteins on the nerves

Scientists unravel effect of prion proteins on the nerves

Ever since the prion gene was discovered in 1985, its role and biological impact on the neurons has remained a mystery. [More]
Researchers clarify beneficial function of brain protein linked to mad cow disease

Researchers clarify beneficial function of brain protein linked to mad cow disease

Scientists have clarified details in understanding the beneficial function of a type of protein normally associated with prion diseases of the brain, such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (commonly known as mad cow disease) and its human counterpart, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. [More]
Botulinum toxins may cause remote effects by moving between neurons

Botulinum toxins may cause remote effects by moving between neurons

The botulinum toxins are among the deadliest substances on Earth, and two specific toxins — including the popular drug Botox — have multiple uses for treating many neuromuscular conditions, including frown lines, disabling muscle spasms and migraine headaches. [More]
Neurologists identify cause of immune-mediated neuropathies

Neurologists identify cause of immune-mediated neuropathies

Würzburg neurologists have discovered an antibody that is involved in triggering certain forms of neuropathies. This discovery also allowed them to show a way to treat these diseases successfully. [More]
Large study of familial ALS finds new gene variant present in 3% of all patients with disease

Large study of familial ALS finds new gene variant present in 3% of all patients with disease

Variations in a gene with multiple functions in neurons are present in approximately 3 percent of all cases of ALS in North American and European populations, both sporadic and familial, making it one of the most common genetic causes of the disease, according to a paper published in Nature Genetics. [More]
Penn researchers develop plant-based oral vaccine booster

Penn researchers develop plant-based oral vaccine booster

Jonas Salk created a vaccine against polio that has been used since 1955; Albert Sabin created another version that has been on the market since 1961. Together, these two vaccines have nearly eliminated polio from the face of the earth. [More]
Researchers develop antibody with potential therapeutic effects against multiple sclerosis

Researchers develop antibody with potential therapeutic effects against multiple sclerosis

Inserm Unit U919, directed by Prof. Denis Vivien has developed an antibody with potential therapeutic effects against multiple sclerosis. [More]
VIB research reveals new insights into ALS

VIB research reveals new insights into ALS

Research into amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) conducted by VIB-KU Leuven has led to interesting and unexpected conclusions. [More]
Cryopreserved human umbilical cord patch shows promise in treating fetal spina bifida

Cryopreserved human umbilical cord patch shows promise in treating fetal spina bifida

A patch made from cryopreserved human umbilical cord may be a novel method for treating spina bifida in utero, according to researchers at McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
SLU researchers receive federal grant to study Zika virus

SLU researchers receive federal grant to study Zika virus

Saint Louis University vaccine researchers have received $1.3 million in federal funding to study Zika, as part of a multi-site study funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Stem cell procedure may be safe for ALS patients

Stem cell procedure may be safe for ALS patients

A phase II clinical trial in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig's disease, suggests that transplanting human stem cells into the spinal cord may be done safely. [More]
SLU to conduct human clinical trial of vaccine to protect people from Zika virus

SLU to conduct human clinical trial of vaccine to protect people from Zika virus

Saint Louis University's vaccine center has been tapped by the National Institutes of Health to conduct a human clinical trial of a vaccine to prevent the Zika virus, which can cause devastating birth defects in babies. [More]
Experts use next-generation genetic sequencing to diagnose suspected brain infections

Experts use next-generation genetic sequencing to diagnose suspected brain infections

In a proof-of-principle study, a team of physicians and bioinformatics experts at Johns Hopkins reports they were able to diagnose or rule out suspected brain infections using so called next-generation genetic sequencing of brain tissue samples. [More]
TUM scientists identify four new risk genes altered in MS patients

TUM scientists identify four new risk genes altered in MS patients

Scientists of the Technical University of Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry have identified four new risk genes that are altered in German patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
Air pollution becomes leading risk factor for stroke worldwide

Air pollution becomes leading risk factor for stroke worldwide

Air pollution – including environmental and household air pollution - has emerged as a leading risk factor for stroke worldwide, associated with about a third of the global burden of stroke in 2013, according to a new study published in The Lancet Neurology journal. [More]
Researchers deploy mobile DNA sequencing laboratories to help combat Zika virus spread in Brazil

Researchers deploy mobile DNA sequencing laboratories to help combat Zika virus spread in Brazil

Researchers from the University of Birmingham are working with health partners in Brazil to combat the spread of Zika virus by deploying a pair of mobile DNA sequencing laboratories on a medical 'road trip' through the worst-hit areas of the country. [More]
Experts at EAN Congress discuss spread of Zika virus threat across Europe

Experts at EAN Congress discuss spread of Zika virus threat across Europe

The Zika epidemic has long assumed global proportions, experts told the Congress of the European Academy of Neurology in Copenhagen. Europe needs to get prepared to deal with the relentless spread of the health threat, in particular with a view to "imported" infection. [More]
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