Paralysis News and Research RSS Feed - Paralysis News and Research

Paralysis is the loss of muscle function in part of your body. It happens when something goes wrong with the way messages pass between your brain and muscles. Paralysis can be complete or partial. It can occur on one or both sides of your body. It can also occur in just one area, or it can be widespread. Paralysis of the lower half of your body, including both legs, is called paraplegia. Paralysis of the arms and legs is quadriplegia.
New device turns paralysis victims' breath into words

New device turns paralysis victims' breath into words

A new device which transforms paralysis victims' breath into words - believed to be the first invention of its kind - has been developed by academics from Loughborough University. [More]
Two studies highlight important new discovery around most common genetic defect linked to ALS

Two studies highlight important new discovery around most common genetic defect linked to ALS

In today's issue of Nature, two new studies funded in part by The ALS Association both highlight an important new discovery around the C9orf72 mutation, the most common genetic defect associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). [More]
Scientists reveal how a common gene mutation in ALS and FTD disrupts normal cell function

Scientists reveal how a common gene mutation in ALS and FTD disrupts normal cell function

Researchers have determined how the most common gene mutation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) disrupts normal cell function, providing insight likely to advance efforts to develop targeted therapies for these brain diseases. [More]
Early exposure to inflammatory cytokines can paralyze CD4 T cells

Early exposure to inflammatory cytokines can paralyze CD4 T cells

In a discovery that is likely to rewrite immunology text books, researchers at UC Davis have found that early exposure to inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin 2, can "paralyze" CD4 T cells, immune components that help orchestrate the body's response to pathogens and other invaders. [More]
Tips for preventing ticks, Lyme disease

Tips for preventing ticks, Lyme disease

When a mosquito decides to dine on your blood, you typically know it - there's pain, itch, and annoyance. Ticks, on the other hand, take a stealthier approach, burrowing into hard-to-spot areas and hanging around for hours or days at a time. [More]
Rush researchers explore new stem cell therapy to treat spinal cord injuries

Rush researchers explore new stem cell therapy to treat spinal cord injuries

Researchers at Rush University Medical Center are exploring a new therapy using stem cells to treat spinal cord injuries within the first 14 to 30 days of injury. Rush is only the second center in the country currently studying this new approach. [More]
Study suggests potential target for treating familial form of ALS

Study suggests potential target for treating familial form of ALS

A healthy motor neuron needs to transport its damaged components from the nerve-muscle connection all the way back to the cell body in the spinal cord. If it cannot, the defective components pile up and the cell becomes sick and dies. Researchers at the NIH's National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke have learned how a mutation in the gene for superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), which causes ALS, leads cells to accumulate damaged materials. [More]

UH engineer receives funding to help kids with spinal cord injuries, other mobility disorders walk

A University of Houston engineer has received funding to create a pediatric exoskeleton, designed to help children with spinal cord injuries and other mobility disorders walk. [More]
Einstein and Montefiore researchers receive $1.2 million grant to advance spinal cord injury research

Einstein and Montefiore researchers receive $1.2 million grant to advance spinal cord injury research

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System have received a $1.2 million grant from New York State to advance their promising technology for treating paralysis and other effects of spinal cord injuries (SCI). [More]
Brain-controlled prosthesis could improve quality of life in people with spinal cord injuries

Brain-controlled prosthesis could improve quality of life in people with spinal cord injuries

When we type or perform other precise tasks, our brains and muscles usually work together effortlessly. But when a neurological disease or spinal cord injury severs the connection between the brain and limbs, once-easy motions become difficult or impossible. [More]
New non-invasive spinal cord stimulation helps paralyzed men voluntarily move their legs

New non-invasive spinal cord stimulation helps paralyzed men voluntarily move their legs

Five men with complete motor paralysis were able to voluntarily generate step-like movements thanks to a new strategy that non-invasively delivers electrical stimulation to their spinal cords, according to a new study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health. The strategy, called transcutaneous stimulation, delivers electrical current to the spinal cord by way of electrodes strategically placed on the skin of the lower back. [More]

ALS Ice Bucket Challenge making splash again this August

Led by co-founders Pete Frates, Pat Quinn and Anthony Senerchia, and with the help of celebrities, the Boston Red Sox and Major League Baseball, the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge is making a splash again this August. [More]
UVA Children's Hospital finds potential cause of child paralysis outbreak

UVA Children's Hospital finds potential cause of child paralysis outbreak

A mysterious outbreak of child paralysis cases previously linked to enterovirus D68 may instead have another cause, doctors at the University of Virginia Children's Hospital are cautioning after determining that a stricken child appeared to be suffering from a different virus. [More]
Neuroscientists interpret code the brain uses to make noisy neuronal circuits

Neuroscientists interpret code the brain uses to make noisy neuronal circuits

By analyzing the signals of individual neurons in animals undergoing behavioral tests, neuroscientists at Rice University, Baylor College of Medicine, the University of Geneva and the University of Rochester have deciphered the code the brain uses to make the most of its inherently "noisy" neuronal circuits. [More]
Scientists propose new spinal cord stimulation strategy to activate motor neurons

Scientists propose new spinal cord stimulation strategy to activate motor neurons

Patients, doctors and researchers look with great expectations to epidural electrostimulation, a medical technique that could alleviate the condition of subjects affected by paralysis due to spinal cord injury. Although still relatively rudimentary, the technique is constantly being improved thanks to research. [More]
Cysticercosis now fully controlled in Mexico

Cysticercosis now fully controlled in Mexico

Dr. Ana Flisser was recognized for 40 years of research regarding this disease. The parasite can not be eradicated; however, it is important to present simple preventive measures. [More]
International consensus panel reviews new diagnostic criteria for neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder

International consensus panel reviews new diagnostic criteria for neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder

New diagnostic criteria were introduced this week for neuromyelitis optica, now called neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, which is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system that is sometimes mistaken for multiple sclerosis. [More]
Older patients with traumatic spinal cord injury less likely to get surgical treatment compared with younger patients

Older patients with traumatic spinal cord injury less likely to get surgical treatment compared with younger patients

Older patients with traumatic spinal cord injury are less likely than younger patients to receive surgical treatment and experience a significant lag between injury and surgery, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). [More]
HKUST scientists find way to stimulate growth of corticospinal tract axons

HKUST scientists find way to stimulate growth of corticospinal tract axons

Researchers at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology have found a way to stimulate the growth of axons, which may spell the dawn of a new beginning on chronic SCI treatments. [More]

ALS ACT initiative to speed discovery of new ALS treatments

The ALS Association and the ALS Finding a Cure Foundation are pleased to announce $3 million in funding for two new Phase II clinical studies through the ALS Accelerated Therapeutics (ALS ACT) initiative. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement