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Paralysis is the loss of muscle function in part of your body. It happens when something goes wrong with the way messages pass between your brain and muscles. Paralysis can be complete or partial. It can occur on one or both sides of your body. It can also occur in just one area, or it can be widespread. Paralysis of the lower half of your body, including both legs, is called paraplegia. Paralysis of the arms and legs is quadriplegia.
Cancer drug promotes neuronal regeneration after spinal cord injury

Cancer drug promotes neuronal regeneration after spinal cord injury

Damage to the spinal cord rarely heals because the injured nerve cells fail to regenerate. The regrowth of their long nerve fibers is hindered by scar tissue and molecular processes inside the nerves. [More]

Wings for Life World Run to fund breakthrough clinical study on spinal cord injury

It all started with a single toe. Even today, Dr. Susan Harkema recalls the words spoken by one of the research participants: "Look Susie, I can move my toe." The patient's name was Rob Summers and he was completely paralyzed from the neck down. After a car accident he was told he would never be able to walk again. [More]
Asterias begins enrollment for AST-OPC1 Phase 1/2a trial to treat complete cervical spinal cord injury

Asterias begins enrollment for AST-OPC1 Phase 1/2a trial to treat complete cervical spinal cord injury

Asterias Biotherapeutics, Inc., a leading biotechnology company in the emerging field of regenerative medicine, announced today that Atlanta-based Shepherd Center, one of the nation's top rehabilitation hospitals for spinal cord injury and brain injury, has commenced enrollment for the Phase 1/2a clinical trial of AST-OPC1 (oligodendrocyte progenitor cells) in newly injured patients with sensory and motor complete cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). [More]
New pharmacological compounds block nerve cell damage in mouse models of MS

New pharmacological compounds block nerve cell damage in mouse models of MS

A newly characterized group of pharmacological compounds block both the inflammation and nerve cell damage seen in mouse models of multiple sclerosis, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published online this week in the journal Nature Neuroscience. [More]
Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation announces Quality of Life grants for 75 nonprofit organizations

Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation announces Quality of Life grants for 75 nonprofit organizations

The Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation, a leading nonprofit dedicated to improving quality of life for individuals living with paralysis, announced it has awarded $600,137 in Quality of Life grants to 75 nonprofit organizations nationwide. [More]
Experts provide suggestions to prevent neurological injuries associated with epidural steroid injections

Experts provide suggestions to prevent neurological injuries associated with epidural steroid injections

Epidural steroid injections are commonly used to treat pain; however, they can in rare situations produce life-threatening neurological injuries such as stroke and paralysis. In the Online First edition of February's Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists, a panel of experts representing 13 national medical organizations provided 17 suggestions aimed at preventing such injuries and improving patient safety. [More]
Health Canada: Parents advised not to feed honey to infants less than one year old

Health Canada: Parents advised not to feed honey to infants less than one year old

In Canada, honey is the only food which has been linked to infant botulism – a rare but serious illness that is caused by ingesting the bacterium C. botulinum. [More]
Salicylates drugs reduce proliferation, viability of cultured vestibular schwannoma cells

Salicylates drugs reduce proliferation, viability of cultured vestibular schwannoma cells

Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear and the Harvard Medical School/ Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Program in Speech and Hearing Bioscience and Technology have demonstrated that salicylates, a class of non-steroidal inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), reduced the proliferation and viability of cultured vestibular schwannoma cells that cause a sometimes lethal intracranial tumor that typically causes hearing loss and tinnitus. [More]
ISP shows promise in stopping fatal arrhythmias after heart attack

ISP shows promise in stopping fatal arrhythmias after heart attack

Case Western Reserve's chemical compound aimed at restoring spinal cord function may have an additional purpose: stopping potentially fatal arrhythmias after heart attack. [More]
UCLA offers new hope to patients suffering from phrenic nerve damage

UCLA offers new hope to patients suffering from phrenic nerve damage

David Powell could not catch his breath. The 35-year-old from San Diego got winded walking up the stairs, exercising or even just bending over to tie his shoes. [More]
Scientists reveal mechanism underlying cellular degeneration of upper motor neurons

Scientists reveal mechanism underlying cellular degeneration of upper motor neurons

For the first time, scientists have revealed a mechanism underlying the cellular degeneration of upper motor neurons, a small group of neurons in the brain recently shown to play a major role in ALS pathology. [More]
Rare respiratory virus could be linked to severe neurological illness in children

Rare respiratory virus could be linked to severe neurological illness in children

A cluster of children from Colorado in the USA have been treated for muscle weakness or paralysis that may be connected to a nationwide outbreak of a usually rare respiratory virus called enterovirus D68 (EV-D68), one of more than 100 non-polio enteroviruses. [More]
Atypical features common in bipolar disorder subtypes, associated with therapy

Atypical features common in bipolar disorder subtypes, associated with therapy

Atypical features are prevalent in all subtypes of bipolar disorder, a Chinese survey published in Neuroscience Bulletin, shows, and are associated with the use of antidepressant medication in patients with mixed stage and remission subtypes. [More]
Education can help people better understand individuals with facial paralysis

Education can help people better understand individuals with facial paralysis

A little bit of sensitivity training can help people form better first impressions of those with facial paralysis, reducing prejudices against people with a visible but often unrecognizable disability, new research from Oregon State University indicates. [More]
Daiichi Sankyo receives FDA approval for SAVAYSA (edoxaban) Tablets

Daiichi Sankyo receives FDA approval for SAVAYSA (edoxaban) Tablets

Daiichi Sankyo Company, Limited (hereafter, Daiichi Sankyo) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved SAVAYSA (edoxaban) Tablets, an oral, once-daily selective factor Xa-inhibitor, to reduce the risk of stroke and systemic embolism (SE) in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). [More]
Migraine headache may double risk of nervous system condition that causes Bell's palsy

Migraine headache may double risk of nervous system condition that causes Bell's palsy

Migraine headache may double the risk of a nervous system condition that causes facial paralysis, called Bell's palsy, according to a new study published in the December 17, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
CARLINA, Atlangram partner to develop antibiotics for osteoarticular infectious diseases

CARLINA, Atlangram partner to develop antibiotics for osteoarticular infectious diseases

CARLINA Technologies, a biotechnology company specializing in the development of nanomedicines, today announces the signing of a partnership agreement with Atlangram for the development of innovative pharmaceutical forms of antibiotics for the targeting of osteoarticular infectious diseases. [More]
ALS Association announces research funds to further understand genetic cause of ALS

ALS Association announces research funds to further understand genetic cause of ALS

The ALS Association is pleased to announce the award of $326,662 in research funds to expand ongoing natural history studies in order to further understand the most common genetic cause of ALS, in preparation for clinical trials in those whose disease is affected by this gene. [More]
Researchers reveal that genetic mutations may cause more cases of ALS

Researchers reveal that genetic mutations may cause more cases of ALS

Genetic mutations may cause more cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) than scientists previously had realized, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. The scientists also showed that the number of mutated genes influences the age when the fatal paralyzing disorder first appears. [More]
New chemical compound shows promise in restoring function lost to spinal cord injury

New chemical compound shows promise in restoring function lost to spinal cord injury

Case Western Reserve scientists have developed a new chemical compound that shows extraordinary promise in restoring function lost to spinal cord injury. The compound, which the researchers dubbed intracellular sigma peptide (ISP), allowed paralyzed muscles to activate in more than 80 percent of the animals tested. [More]
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