Paralysis News and Research RSS Feed - Paralysis News and Research

Paralysis is the loss of muscle function in part of your body. It happens when something goes wrong with the way messages pass between your brain and muscles. Paralysis can be complete or partial. It can occur on one or both sides of your body. It can also occur in just one area, or it can be widespread. Paralysis of the lower half of your body, including both legs, is called paraplegia. Paralysis of the arms and legs is quadriplegia.
Nearly 179 million cases of acute diarrhea occur each year in the U.S.

Nearly 179 million cases of acute diarrhea occur each year in the U.S.

In the United States, approximately 179 million cases of acute diarrhea occur each year, and most of those cases are entirely preventable, a researcher from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston concluded in a New England Journal of Medicine review article. [More]
India's shocking rates of suicide are highest in areas with most debt-ridden farmers

India's shocking rates of suicide are highest in areas with most debt-ridden farmers

A new study has found that India's shocking rates of suicide are highest in areas with the most debt-ridden farmers who are clinging to tiny smallholdings - less than one hectare - and trying to grow 'cash crops', such as cotton and coffee, that are highly susceptible to global price fluctuations. [More]

State highlights: State mental hospitals compared to prisons; Johnson & Johnson ruling; Va. hospitals pick new leader

Arkansas Attorney General Dustin McDaniel asked the state Supreme Court on Monday to reconsider its decision tossing out a $1.2 billion judgment against drugmaker Johnson & Johnson, saying justices did "significant harm" to the state and broke from 170 years of precedent. [More]

First Edition: April 8, 2014

Kaiser Health News staff writer Jay Hancock reports: "Under intense, bipartisan political pressure, the Obama administration backed down for the second year in a row on proposed payment cuts for insurance companies that offer private plans to Medicare members. [More]

Study shows spinal stimulation therapy may have potential to change prognosis of people with paralysis

Four people with paraplegia are able to voluntarily move previously paralyzed muscles as a result of a novel therapy that involves electrical stimulation of the spinal cord, according to a study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health and the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation. [More]
Pradaxa receives FDA approval for treatment and reduction of risk of recurrence of DVT and PE

Pradaxa receives FDA approval for treatment and reduction of risk of recurrence of DVT and PE

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Pradaxa® (dabigatran etexilate mesylate) for the treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients who have been treated with a parenteral anticoagulant for five to 10 days, and to reduce the risk of recurrent DVT and PE in patients who have been previously treated. DVT and PE are collectively referred to as venous thromboembolism (VTE). [More]

Rare case of tuberculous otitis media described

South Korean researchers have reported a rare case of tuberculous otitis media and say that ear tuberculosis should be considered in patients presenting with otitis media complicated by facial paralysis. [More]
UCL scientists find new way to artificially control paralyzed muscles using light

UCL scientists find new way to artificially control paralyzed muscles using light

​A new way to artificially control muscles using light, with the potential to restore function to muscles paralysed by conditions such as motor neuron disease and spinal cord injury, has been developed by scientists at UCL and King's College London. [More]
Researcher pinpoints error in protein formation that could be root of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Researcher pinpoints error in protein formation that could be root of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

By studying nerve cells that originated in patients with a severe neurological disease, a University of Wisconsin-Madison researcher has pinpointed an error in protein formation that could be the root of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. [More]

New clinic that focuses on diagnosis and treatment for vertigo launched in Mumbai

In a first, a city hospital has launched a clinic dedicated to vertigo. Dr Rajeev Boudhankar, vice-president, Kohinoor Hospital, said, "We observed that vertigo is a highly under-diagnosed ailment and patients run from post to pillar looking for effective treatment. [More]
Researchers identify possible mechanism to repair damaged nerves after spinal cord injury

Researchers identify possible mechanism to repair damaged nerves after spinal cord injury

A new discovery suggests it could one day be possible to chemically reprogram and repair damaged nerves after spinal cord injury or brain trauma. [More]
CDC receives 2014 Franz Edelman Award for Achievement in Operations Research and Management Sciences

CDC receives 2014 Franz Edelman Award for Achievement in Operations Research and Management Sciences

​The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which collaborated with Kid Risk, Inc. to use analytics and operations research to combat the remaining pockets of polio around the world, last night won the 2014 Franz Edelman Award for Achievement in Operations Research and the Management Sciences at a banquet sponsored by the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) in Boston. [More]
New neuromonitoring method prevents malpositioning of pedicle screws during thoracic spine surgery

New neuromonitoring method prevents malpositioning of pedicle screws during thoracic spine surgery

Researchers from Syracuse, New York, report a new, highly accurate, neuromonitoring method that can be used during thoracic spine surgery to prevent malpositioning of pedicle screws such that they enter the spinal canal and possibly cause postoperative neurological impairment. [More]
Cedars-Sinai earns grant to conduct clinical trial of gene therapy product for patients with Lou Gehrig's disease

Cedars-Sinai earns grant to conduct clinical trial of gene therapy product for patients with Lou Gehrig's disease

The Cedars-Sinai Regenerative Medicine Institute has received a $2.5 million grant from the Department of Defense to conduct animal studies that, if successful, could provide the basis for a clinical trial of a gene therapy product for patients with Lou Gehrig's disease, also called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. [More]
Researchers identify possible mechanism for re-growing damaged nerve fibres in central nervous system

Researchers identify possible mechanism for re-growing damaged nerve fibres in central nervous system

A new discovery suggests it could one day be possible to chemically reprogram and repair damaged nerves after spinal cord injury or brain trauma. [More]
New research implicates that RNA processing is central to ALS disease process

New research implicates that RNA processing is central to ALS disease process

In work supported by The ALS Association, researchers have discovered a new ALS-causing gene and have linked its function to that of another prominent disease gene. The study was published in the journal Nature Neuroscience. [More]
CDC receives 2014 Franz Edelman Award for Achievement in Operations Research, Management Sciences

CDC receives 2014 Franz Edelman Award for Achievement in Operations Research, Management Sciences

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which collaborated with Kid Risk, Inc. to use analytics and operations research to combat the remaining pockets of polio around the world, tonight won the 2014 Franz Edelman Award for Achievement in Operations Research and the Management Sciences at a banquet sponsored by the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) in Boston. [More]

'Mini heart' invented to aid blood flow through venous segments

George Washington University researcher Narine Sarvazyan, Ph.D., has invented a new organ to help return blood flow from veins lacking functional valves. A rhythmically contracting cuff made of cardiac muscle cells surrounds the vein acting as a 'mini heart' to aid blood flow through venous segments. The cuff can be made of a patient's own adult stem cells, eliminating the chance of implant rejection. [More]
National MS Society invests $29M to support new MS research projects, training awards

National MS Society invests $29M to support new MS research projects, training awards

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society has committed another $29 million to support an expected 83 new MS research projects and training awards. [More]
New urinary catheter design can eliminate nearly all hard-to-kill biofilm

New urinary catheter design can eliminate nearly all hard-to-kill biofilm

For the millions of people forced to rely on a plastic tube to eliminate their urine, developing an infection is nearly a 100 percent guarantee after just four weeks. But with the help of a little bubble-blowing, biomedical engineers hope to bring relief to urethras everywhere. [More]