Paralysis News and Research RSS Feed - Paralysis News and Research

Paralysis is the loss of muscle function in part of your body. It happens when something goes wrong with the way messages pass between your brain and muscles. Paralysis can be complete or partial. It can occur on one or both sides of your body. It can also occur in just one area, or it can be widespread. Paralysis of the lower half of your body, including both legs, is called paraplegia. Paralysis of the arms and legs is quadriplegia.
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center releases November tip sheet of story ideas

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center releases November tip sheet of story ideas

Following is the November 2014 tip sheet of story ideas from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. [More]
Research paves way for improving efficacy of ALS treatement

Research paves way for improving efficacy of ALS treatement

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is a neurodegenerative disease that primarily kills motor neurons, leading to paralysis and death 2 to 5 years from diagnosis. Currently ALS has no cure. Despite promising early-stage research, the majority of drugs in development for ALS have failed. Now researchers have uncovered a possible explanation. [More]
Research breakthrough offers hope for patients with severe spinal cord injuries

Research breakthrough offers hope for patients with severe spinal cord injuries

Case Western Reserve researchers have developed a procedure that restores function to muscles involved in the control of breathing - even when they have been paralyzed for more than a year. The breakthrough offers hope that one day patients with severe spinal cord injuries will be able to breathe again without the assistance of a ventilator. [More]
Electrical stimulation technology can help SCI patients regain bladder control

Electrical stimulation technology can help SCI patients regain bladder control

When individuals suffer a spinal cord injury, paralysis is only a part of the major impact on quality of life. Often they also lose bladder control, which frequently causes infections that can lead to kidney damage. [More]
Study points to major role of obesity in triggering, prolonging autoimmune diseases

Study points to major role of obesity in triggering, prolonging autoimmune diseases

Autoimmune diseases like Crohn's Disease and multiple sclerosis, in which the immune system attacks its own body rather than predatory invaders, affect 5-20% of the global community. A study published recently in Autoimmunity Reviews by Prof. Yehuda Shoenfeld, the Laura Schwarz-Kipp Chair for Research of Autoimmune Diseases at Tel Aviv University's Sackler Faculty of Medicine and Head of Zabludowicz Center for Autoimmune Diseases at Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, points to the major role obesity plays in triggering and prolonging these autoimmune diseases. [More]
Scientists awarded grant to investigate new drug-based treatment for NF2

Scientists awarded grant to investigate new drug-based treatment for NF2

Scientists from Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry have been awarded a grant from young person's cancer charity The Laura Crane Youth Cancer Trust to investigate a new drug-based treatment for a multi-tumour brain and nervous system cancer which affects teenagers and young adults. [More]
Aging astrocytes lose ability to protect motor neurons, reveal Cedars-Sinai ALS researchers

Aging astrocytes lose ability to protect motor neurons, reveal Cedars-Sinai ALS researchers

Lou Gehrig's disease, also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, attacks muscle-controlling nerve cells – motor neurons – in the brain, brainstem and spinal cord, leading to progressive weakness and eventual paralysis of muscles throughout the body. Patients typically survive only three to five years after diagnosis. [More]
Royal Holloway-led researchers to develop novel spinal cord injury treatment

Royal Holloway-led researchers to develop novel spinal cord injury treatment

Dr Rafael Yáñez-Muñoz, from the School of Biological Sciences at Royal Holloway, University of London, is leading a team of researchers working to develop a novel treatment for spinal cord injury - which leaves sufferers with devastating, life-long effects including paralysis. [More]
Digoxin drug may be adaptable for ALS treatment, study suggests

Digoxin drug may be adaptable for ALS treatment, study suggests

Digoxin, a medication used in the treatment of heart failure, may be adaptable for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive, paralyzing disease, suggests new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Scientists use innovative exome sequencing strategy to identify new gene associated with ALS

Scientists use innovative exome sequencing strategy to identify new gene associated with ALS

Using an innovative exome sequencing strategy, a team of international scientists led by John Landers, PhD, at the University of Massachusetts Medical School has shown that TUBA4A, the gene encoding the Tubulin Alpha 4A protein, is associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurological disorder also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease. [More]
YEDA and XL-protein sign deal to commercialize PASylated IFN superagonis

YEDA and XL-protein sign deal to commercialize PASylated IFN superagonis

YEDA Research and Development Company Ltd., the technology transfer arm of the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel, and XL-protein GmbH, Germany, a privately owned biopharmaceutical company, have signed a business collaboration agreement to commercialize a PASylated interferon superagonist -- PAS-YNSα8 -- which has been jointly developed by scientists at the Weizmann Institute and XL-protein. [More]
Asterias, CIRM sign NGA to begin AST-OPC1 study for complete cervical spinal cord injury

Asterias, CIRM sign NGA to begin AST-OPC1 study for complete cervical spinal cord injury

Asterias Biotherapeutics, Inc. announced today that the Company has signed a Notice of Grant Award (NGA) with the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine (CIRM), effective October 1, 2014. [More]
Cell transplantation treatment may benefit people with spinal cord injury

Cell transplantation treatment may benefit people with spinal cord injury

Two studies recently published in Cell Transplantation reveal that cell transplantation may be an effective treatment for spinal cord injury (SCI), a major cause of disability and paralysis with no current restorative therapies. [More]
Loyola neurologist lists seven surprising things about strokes

Loyola neurologist lists seven surprising things about strokes

In recognition of World Stroke Day Oct. 29, Loyola University Medical Center neurologist Jose Biller, MD, lists seven surprising things you may not know about strokes. [More]

Study: People with PSP experience more severe cognitive impairments than those with PD

Researchers from the University of Melbourne have established how two diseases that present in similar ways are in fact quite different. [More]
CHLA reports first confirmed case of enterovirus D68 in Los Angeles

CHLA reports first confirmed case of enterovirus D68 in Los Angeles

In September, Children's Hospital Los Angeles physicians predicted it was a matter of when, and not if, Los Angeles children would become infected with Enterovirus EV-D68, commonly referred to as enterovirus D68. On Oct. 1, that day came. CHLA and public health officials announced that a young patient who had been hospitalized at CHLA with a respiratory illness and later experienced partial limb paralysis had tested positive for enterovirus D68. [More]
OMRF scientist selected to receive EMD Serono's Grant for Multiple Sclerosis Innovation

OMRF scientist selected to receive EMD Serono's Grant for Multiple Sclerosis Innovation

An Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation scientist has been selected to receive one of only five Grants for Multiple Sclerosis Innovation awarded this year by the pharmaceutical company EMD Serono. [More]
Placenta-derived cells are safe for MS patients

Placenta-derived cells are safe for MS patients

Patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) were able to safely tolerate treatment with cells cultured from human placental tissue, according to a study published today in the journal Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders. [More]
OSU engineers develop simple device to improve hand function after surgery

OSU engineers develop simple device to improve hand function after surgery

Engineers at Oregon State University have developed and successfully demonstrated the value of a simple pulley mechanism to improve hand function after surgery. [More]
Enlargement of left atrial appendage may be a risk factor of strokes with cardiac origin: Finnish study

Enlargement of left atrial appendage may be a risk factor of strokes with cardiac origin: Finnish study

More than half of the patients who have suffered a stroke with no well-defined aetiology have an enlarged left atrial appendage of the heart, according to a Finnish study. The results indicate that the enlargement of the left atrial appendage may be an independent risk factor of strokes with cardiac origin. [More]