Paralysis News and Research RSS Feed - Paralysis News and Research

Paralysis is the loss of muscle function in part of your body. It happens when something goes wrong with the way messages pass between your brain and muscles. Paralysis can be complete or partial. It can occur on one or both sides of your body. It can also occur in just one area, or it can be widespread. Paralysis of the lower half of your body, including both legs, is called paraplegia. Paralysis of the arms and legs is quadriplegia.
Janssen, Bayer announce expansion of EXPLORER global cardiovascular research program for XARELTO

Janssen, Bayer announce expansion of EXPLORER global cardiovascular research program for XARELTO

Janssen Research & Development, LLC and its development partner, Bayer HealthCare, announced today the expansion of the EXPLORER global cardiovascular research program for XARELTO (rivaroxaban) to include additional high-risk patient populations. [More]
Asterias receives clearance from FDA to initiate Phase 1/2a clinical trial of AST-OPC1

Asterias receives clearance from FDA to initiate Phase 1/2a clinical trial of AST-OPC1

Asterias Biotherapeutics Inc. has received clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to initiate a Phase 1/2a clinical trial of its product, AST-OPC1, in patients with complete cervical spinal cord injury. [More]
Mylan launches Potassium Chloride Extended-release Tablets

Mylan launches Potassium Chloride Extended-release Tablets

Mylan Inc. today announced that it has launched Potassium Chloride Extended-release Tablets USP, 8 mEq (600 mg) and 10 mEq (750 mg), which is the generic version of Upsher-Smith's Klor-Con. [More]
Blocking nerve signals could be effective treatment for stomach cancer

Blocking nerve signals could be effective treatment for stomach cancer

Research from Columbia University Medical Center shows that nerves may play a critical role in stomach cancer growth and that blocking nerve signals using surgery or Botox® (onabotulinumtoxinA) could be an effective treatment for the disease. [More]

ALS Association surpasses $10 million in "Ice Bucket" donations

Today, The ALS Association announced it has surpassed $10 million in "Ice Bucket" donations. Specifically, as of Saturday, August 16, 2014, The ALS Association has received $11.4 million in donations compared to $1.7 million during the same time period last year (July 29 to August 16). [More]
ALS Association awards 21 new research grants to find cure for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

ALS Association awards 21 new research grants to find cure for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

The ALS Association announced today that it has awarded 21 new research grants totaling nearly $3.5 million to find treatments and a cure for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The grants were awarded to scientists from laboratories located in nine different states in the United States as well as from the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Switzerland, Israel and Australia. [More]
Neurons derived from human iPSC and grafted into rats after spinal cord injury produce cells

Neurons derived from human iPSC and grafted into rats after spinal cord injury produce cells

Building upon previous research, scientists at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Veteran's Affairs San Diego Healthcare System report that neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) and grafted into rats after a spinal cord injury produced cells with tens of thousands of axons extending virtually the entire length of the animals' central nervous system. [More]
Small molecule may be able to convince damaged nerves to effectively rewire circuits

Small molecule may be able to convince damaged nerves to effectively rewire circuits

Frogs, dogs, whales, snails can all do it, but humans and primates can't. Regrow nerves after an injury, that is—while many animals have this ability, humans don't. [More]
Lack of reporting standards delays progress in developing robust therapies for SCI, TBI

Lack of reporting standards delays progress in developing robust therapies for SCI, TBI

Progress in developing robust therapies for spinal cord injury (SCI), traumatic brain injury (TBI) and peripheral nerve injury has been slow. [More]
Study reveals new invasion mechanism of Enterovirus 71

Study reveals new invasion mechanism of Enterovirus 71

A new study determines glycosylation and pH-dependent conformational changes of virus receptor SCARB2 as crucial for EV71 attachment, entry and uncoating. [More]

Genervon generates biomarker data for its Phase 2a clinical trial for ALS

Genervon Biopharmaceuticals LLC ("Genervon") today announced that it has analyzed and generated a Biomarker Data Report for its recent Phase 2a clinical trial for ALS disease modification. [More]
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in veterans: an interview with Milan Michael Karol, The Robert Packard Center for ALS Research at Johns Hopkins

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in veterans: an interview with Milan Michael Karol, The Robert Packard Center for ALS Research at Johns Hopkins

ALS stands for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, better known as “Lou Gehrig’s Disease”. It is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the death of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. [More]
Increasing clearance of ALS misfolded protein from neurons improves their survival

Increasing clearance of ALS misfolded protein from neurons improves their survival

In work supported by The ALS Association, researchers have shown that increasing the clearance of misfolded protein from neurons improves their survival. The study was published today in the journal Nature Chemical Biology. [More]
FDA approves marketing of first motorized device for patients with spinal cord injuries

FDA approves marketing of first motorized device for patients with spinal cord injuries

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today allowed marketing of the first motorized device intended to act as an exoskeleton for people with lower body paralysis (paraplegia) due to a spinal cord injury. [More]
International leaders redefine phenotypes of multiple sclerosis

International leaders redefine phenotypes of multiple sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis manifests itself in many different ways and different courses. A recent effort to fine-tune descriptions - or phenotypes -- of MS was undertaken by an international team of leaders in MS research and clinical care. [More]
Viewpoints: Michelle Obama and school lunches; more about the VA health system 'scandal'; context and caution on Medicare's physician data release

Viewpoints: Michelle Obama and school lunches; more about the VA health system 'scandal'; context and caution on Medicare's physician data release

When we began our Let's Move! initiative four years ago, we set one simple but ambitious goal: to end the epidemic of childhood obesity in a generation so that kids born today will grow up healthy. [More]
Researchers take another promising step toward developing universal antidote for snakebite

Researchers take another promising step toward developing universal antidote for snakebite

A team of researchers, led by Dr. Matthew Lewin of the California Academy of Sciences and Dr. Stephen P. Samuel of Trinity College Dublin, Ireland has taken another promising step toward developing a universal antidote for snakebite. [More]
New report raises important questions about transcranial direct current stimulation

New report raises important questions about transcranial direct current stimulation

Over the past several decades, neurostimulation techniques such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have gradually gained favour in the public eye. In a new report, published yesterday in the prestigious scientific journal Neuron, IRCM ethics experts raise important questions about the rising tide of tDCS coverage in the media, while regulatory action is lacking and ethical issues need to be addressed. [More]
Serious complications due to anesthesia during childbirth are very rare

Serious complications due to anesthesia during childbirth are very rare

Expectant mothers concerned about receiving an epidural, spinal or general anesthesia during childbirth can breathe a little easier. According to a study published in the June issue of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists, serious complications due to anesthesia during childbirth are very rare, occurring in one out of every 3,000 deliveries. [More]
Pharmaceutical and academic leaders come together to discuss biomarkers in ALS

Pharmaceutical and academic leaders come together to discuss biomarkers in ALS

Leaders from academic institutions, non-profit organizations, and pharmaceutical companies will meet in Cambridge, Mass., on Monday, May 19, to discuss biomarkers in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). [More]