Paralysis News and Research RSS Feed - Paralysis News and Research

Paralysis is the loss of muscle function in part of your body. It happens when something goes wrong with the way messages pass between your brain and muscles. Paralysis can be complete or partial. It can occur on one or both sides of your body. It can also occur in just one area, or it can be widespread. Paralysis of the lower half of your body, including both legs, is called paraplegia. Paralysis of the arms and legs is quadriplegia.
Blocking molecular signaling pathway could prevent or reverse peripheral neuropathy

Blocking molecular signaling pathway could prevent or reverse peripheral neuropathy

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, the University of Manitoba and St. Boniface Hospital Albrechtsen Research Centre in Canada, have identified a molecular signaling pathway that, when blocked, promotes sensory neuron growth and prevents or reverses peripheral neuropathy in cell and rodent models of type 1 and 2 diabetes, chemotherapy-induced neuropathy and HIV. [More]
Synthesized steroid prevents lethal protein buildup in animal model of Parkinson's disease

Synthesized steroid prevents lethal protein buildup in animal model of Parkinson's disease

A synthesized steroid mirroring one naturally made by the dogfish shark prevents the buildup of a lethal protein implicated in some neurodegenerative diseases, reports an international research team studying an animal model of Parkinson's disease. [More]
Naturally-occurring compound can inhibit early formation of toxins linked to Parkinson's Disease

Naturally-occurring compound can inhibit early formation of toxins linked to Parkinson's Disease

A naturally-occurring compound has been found to block a molecular process thought to underlie Parkinson's Disease, and to suppress its toxic products, scientists have reported. [More]
Study finds that T cells play important role in control of Zika infections

Study finds that T cells play important role in control of Zika infections

The worst of the global Zika virus outbreak may be over but many key questions remain, such as why the virus persists in certain tissues after the systemic infection has cleared; how does the immune system counteract the virus and protect against reinfection; what determines the likelihood of long-term complications? [More]
Could pathogen infection really lead to Alzheimer’s?

Could pathogen infection really lead to Alzheimer’s?

New concepts of infectious disease are evolving with the realization that pathogens are key players in the development of progressive chronic diseases that originally were not thought to be infectious. Infection is well-known to be associated with numerous neurological diseases for which... [More]
Researchers find high-resolution structure of immature Zika virus

Researchers find high-resolution structure of immature Zika virus

Researchers at Purdue University have determined the high-resolution structure of immature Zika virus, a step toward better understanding how the virus infects host cells and spreads. [More]
Virtual reality intervention shows promise to repair mobility and motor skills in impaired limb

Virtual reality intervention shows promise to repair mobility and motor skills in impaired limb

A combination of traditional physical therapy and technology may improve the motor skills and mobility of an impaired hand by having its partner, more mobile hand lead by example through virtual reality training, new Tel Aviv University research suggests. [More]
Researchers show how common bacterium in improperly cooked chicken triggers GBS

Researchers show how common bacterium in improperly cooked chicken triggers GBS

A Michigan State University research team is the first to show how a common bacterium found in improperly cooked chicken causes Guillain-Barre Syndrome, or GBS. [More]
NIH scientists unravel chain of events that lead to fatal outcomes in cerebral malaria

NIH scientists unravel chain of events that lead to fatal outcomes in cerebral malaria

Using state-of-the-art brain imaging technology, scientists at the National Institutes of Health filmed what happens in the brains of mice that developed cerebral malaria (CM). [More]
New research shows immune paralysis in sepsis patients can be reversed

New research shows immune paralysis in sepsis patients can be reversed

Failure of the immune system during blood poisoning (sepsis) can be reversed by a specific sugar. [More]
Brain implant enables ALS patient to operate speech computer with the mind

Brain implant enables ALS patient to operate speech computer with the mind

In the UMC Utrecht a brain implant has been placed in a patient enabling her to operate a speech computer with her mind. [More]
Spinal cord rehabilitation and repair: an interview with Quentin Barraud

Spinal cord rehabilitation and repair: an interview with Quentin Barraud

There are many grades of spinal cord injuries, in terms of range of movement, from small disabilities to becoming wheelchair bound for the rest of your life, the range is very broad. [More]
Bone gene in mammals may take additional role to promote cognition in humans

Bone gene in mammals may take additional role to promote cognition in humans

A gene that regulates bone growth and muscle metabolism in mammals may take on an additional role as a promoter of brain maturation, cognition and learning in human and nonhuman prim ates, according to a new study led by neurobiologists at Harvard Medical School. [More]
Fruits, vegetables rich in antioxidants and carotenoids linked to better function in ALS patients

Fruits, vegetables rich in antioxidants and carotenoids linked to better function in ALS patients

New research at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health reveals that foods like fruits and vegetables that are high in antioxidant nutrients and carotenoids are associated with better function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients around the time of diagnosis. [More]
New study to explore therapeutic pill for treatment of concussion

New study to explore therapeutic pill for treatment of concussion

The goal of finding a treatment for concussion may be one step closer due to a new study being launched by University of Miami researchers. [More]
Experts meet at Hyderabad for four-day World Stroke Congress

Experts meet at Hyderabad for four-day World Stroke Congress

Stroke is devastating. Everyone can have a stroke. For many people, the stroke happens suddenly and without warning. According to Stroke Association, when it happens, there is a little time to prepare. It can affect how one moves, feels and thinks. [More]
Innovative surgery to repair phrenic nerve injury improves breathing function

Innovative surgery to repair phrenic nerve injury improves breathing function

A study led by UCLA researchers found that in people with breathing difficulties caused by phrenic nerve injury surgical reconstruction of the nerve can lead to significant improvement in breathing and an increase in regular physical activities. [More]
Researchers design small compounds with potential to correct mitochondrial dysfunction

Researchers design small compounds with potential to correct mitochondrial dysfunction

Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is an inherited disorder that leads to a gradual loss of motor neurons and, eventually, paralysis. The condition is caused by genetic mutations that disrupts cells' energy factories, called mitochondria. [More]
Research findings underscore striking heterogeneity of depression

Research findings underscore striking heterogeneity of depression

Depression is generally considered to be a specific and consistent disorder characterised by a fixed set of symptoms and often treated with a combination of psychotherapy and medication. [More]
Adult brain cells may be vulnerable to Zika infection, new study suggests

Adult brain cells may be vulnerable to Zika infection, new study suggests

Concerns over the Zika virus have focused on pregnant women due to mounting evidence that it causes brain abnormalities in developing fetuses. However, new research in mice from scientists at The Rockefeller University and La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology suggests that certain adult brain cells may be vulnerable to infection as well. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement