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Paralysis is the loss of muscle function in part of your body. It happens when something goes wrong with the way messages pass between your brain and muscles. Paralysis can be complete or partial. It can occur on one or both sides of your body. It can also occur in just one area, or it can be widespread. Paralysis of the lower half of your body, including both legs, is called paraplegia. Paralysis of the arms and legs is quadriplegia.
Study reveals new invasion mechanism of Enterovirus 71

Study reveals new invasion mechanism of Enterovirus 71

A new study determines glycosylation and pH-dependent conformational changes of virus receptor SCARB2 as crucial for EV71 attachment, entry and uncoating. [More]
Genervon generates biomarker data for its Phase 2a clinical trial for ALS

Genervon generates biomarker data for its Phase 2a clinical trial for ALS

Genervon Biopharmaceuticals LLC ("Genervon") today announced that it has analyzed and generated a Biomarker Data Report for its recent Phase 2a clinical trial for ALS disease modification. [More]
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in veterans: an interview with Milan Michael Karol, The Robert Packard Center for ALS Research at Johns Hopkins

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in veterans: an interview with Milan Michael Karol, The Robert Packard Center for ALS Research at Johns Hopkins

ALS stands for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, better known as “Lou Gehrig’s Disease”. It is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the death of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. [More]
Increasing clearance of ALS misfolded protein from neurons improves their survival

Increasing clearance of ALS misfolded protein from neurons improves their survival

In work supported by The ALS Association, researchers have shown that increasing the clearance of misfolded protein from neurons improves their survival. The study was published today in the journal Nature Chemical Biology. [More]
FDA approves marketing of first motorized device for patients with spinal cord injuries

FDA approves marketing of first motorized device for patients with spinal cord injuries

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today allowed marketing of the first motorized device intended to act as an exoskeleton for people with lower body paralysis (paraplegia) due to a spinal cord injury. [More]
International leaders redefine phenotypes of multiple sclerosis

International leaders redefine phenotypes of multiple sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis manifests itself in many different ways and different courses. A recent effort to fine-tune descriptions - or phenotypes -- of MS was undertaken by an international team of leaders in MS research and clinical care. [More]
Viewpoints: Michelle Obama and school lunches; more about the VA health system 'scandal'; context and caution on Medicare's physician data release

Viewpoints: Michelle Obama and school lunches; more about the VA health system 'scandal'; context and caution on Medicare's physician data release

When we began our Let's Move! initiative four years ago, we set one simple but ambitious goal: to end the epidemic of childhood obesity in a generation so that kids born today will grow up healthy. [More]
Researchers take another promising step toward developing universal antidote for snakebite

Researchers take another promising step toward developing universal antidote for snakebite

A team of researchers, led by Dr. Matthew Lewin of the California Academy of Sciences and Dr. Stephen P. Samuel of Trinity College Dublin, Ireland has taken another promising step toward developing a universal antidote for snakebite. [More]
New report raises important questions about transcranial direct current stimulation

New report raises important questions about transcranial direct current stimulation

Over the past several decades, neurostimulation techniques such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have gradually gained favour in the public eye. In a new report, published yesterday in the prestigious scientific journal Neuron, IRCM ethics experts raise important questions about the rising tide of tDCS coverage in the media, while regulatory action is lacking and ethical issues need to be addressed. [More]
Serious complications due to anesthesia during childbirth are very rare

Serious complications due to anesthesia during childbirth are very rare

Expectant mothers concerned about receiving an epidural, spinal or general anesthesia during childbirth can breathe a little easier. According to a study published in the June issue of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists, serious complications due to anesthesia during childbirth are very rare, occurring in one out of every 3,000 deliveries. [More]
Pharmaceutical and academic leaders come together to discuss biomarkers in ALS

Pharmaceutical and academic leaders come together to discuss biomarkers in ALS

Leaders from academic institutions, non-profit organizations, and pharmaceutical companies will meet in Cambridge, Mass., on Monday, May 19, to discuss biomarkers in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). [More]
Study focuses on mutated protein associated with early onset torsion dystonia

Study focuses on mutated protein associated with early onset torsion dystonia

A collaborative discovery involving Kansas State University researchers may lead to the first universal treatment for dystonia, a neurological disorder that affects nearly half a million Americans. [More]
Equatorial Guinea launches first phase of campaign to immunize children against polio

Equatorial Guinea launches first phase of campaign to immunize children against polio

The government of Equatorial Guinea launched the first phase of a campaign to immunize the nation's children against polio last week. The government has been working closely with World Health Organization, UNICEF, United Nations, Center for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and others to implement this proactive campaign. [More]
Sinovac Biotech commits to commercialize Sabin Inactivated Polio Vaccine in China

Sinovac Biotech commits to commercialize Sabin Inactivated Polio Vaccine in China

Sinovac Biotech Ltd., a leading provider of biopharmaceutical products in China that focuses on the research, development, manufacturing and commercialization of vaccines, announced today that it has entered into a license agreement with Intravacc (Institute for Translational Vaccinology) from The Netherlands to develop and commercialize the Sabin Inactivated Polio Vaccine (sIPV) for distribution to China and other countries. [More]
Nearly 179 million cases of acute diarrhea occur each year in the U.S.

Nearly 179 million cases of acute diarrhea occur each year in the U.S.

In the United States, approximately 179 million cases of acute diarrhea occur each year, and most of those cases are entirely preventable, a researcher from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston concluded in a New England Journal of Medicine review article. [More]
India's shocking rates of suicide are highest in areas with most debt-ridden farmers

India's shocking rates of suicide are highest in areas with most debt-ridden farmers

A new study has found that India's shocking rates of suicide are highest in areas with the most debt-ridden farmers who are clinging to tiny smallholdings - less than one hectare - and trying to grow 'cash crops', such as cotton and coffee, that are highly susceptible to global price fluctuations. [More]
State highlights: State mental hospitals compared to prisons; Johnson & Johnson ruling; Va. hospitals pick new leader

State highlights: State mental hospitals compared to prisons; Johnson & Johnson ruling; Va. hospitals pick new leader

Arkansas Attorney General Dustin McDaniel asked the state Supreme Court on Monday to reconsider its decision tossing out a $1.2 billion judgment against drugmaker Johnson & Johnson, saying justices did "significant harm" to the state and broke from 170 years of precedent. [More]
First Edition: April 8, 2014

First Edition: April 8, 2014

Kaiser Health News staff writer Jay Hancock reports: "Under intense, bipartisan political pressure, the Obama administration backed down for the second year in a row on proposed payment cuts for insurance companies that offer private plans to Medicare members. [More]
Study shows spinal stimulation therapy may have potential to change prognosis of people with paralysis

Study shows spinal stimulation therapy may have potential to change prognosis of people with paralysis

Four people with paraplegia are able to voluntarily move previously paralyzed muscles as a result of a novel therapy that involves electrical stimulation of the spinal cord, according to a study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health and the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation. [More]
Pradaxa receives FDA approval for treatment and reduction of risk of recurrence of DVT and PE

Pradaxa receives FDA approval for treatment and reduction of risk of recurrence of DVT and PE

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Pradaxa® (dabigatran etexilate mesylate) for the treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients who have been treated with a parenteral anticoagulant for five to 10 days, and to reduce the risk of recurrent DVT and PE in patients who have been previously treated. DVT and PE are collectively referred to as venous thromboembolism (VTE). [More]