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Breakthroughs against Plasmodium falciparum pave way for latest advancement

Breakthroughs against Plasmodium falciparum pave way for latest advancement

When the highly-influential European Medicines Agency announced its recommendation to approve what could be the world's first licensed vaccine against malaria in infants and children, there was much celebrating in the research community at NYU Langone Medical Center. [More]
Europe has increasing prevalence of fungal resistance, warns ESCMID

Europe has increasing prevalence of fungal resistance, warns ESCMID

The European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Disease – an organization that explores the risks and best practices in infectious disease – is imploring global healthcare professionals and bodies to take a more active role in the growing problem of fungal resistance. [More]
Cysticercosis now fully controlled in Mexico

Cysticercosis now fully controlled in Mexico

Dr. Ana Flisser was recognized for 40 years of research regarding this disease. The parasite can not be eradicated; however, it is important to present simple preventive measures. [More]

NSF awards $500,000 grant to digitally preserve parasite specimens

A $500,000 grant from the National Science Foundation will allow the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology to digitally preserve four major collections of parasite specimens donated to the University of Nebraska-Lincoln during the past five years. [More]
Research findings pave way for development of new treatments for respiratory diseases

Research findings pave way for development of new treatments for respiratory diseases

The research has discovered a link between a vital pumping system that does not function correctly in people with cystic fibrosis and the parasite Toxoplasma. [More]
Malaria parasites with Ap2mu gene mutation less sensitive to antimalarial drug artemisinin

Malaria parasites with Ap2mu gene mutation less sensitive to antimalarial drug artemisinin

Early indicators of the malaria parasite in Africa developing resistance to the most effective drug available have been confirmed, according to new research published in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy. [More]
Inflammation plays causal role in neurologic changes associated with Lyme disease

Inflammation plays causal role in neurologic changes associated with Lyme disease

About 15% of patients with Lyme disease develop peripheral and central nervous system involvement, often accompanied by debilitating and painful symptoms. New research indicates that inflammation plays a causal role in the array of neurologic changes associated with Lyme disease, according to a study published in The American Journal of Pathology. [More]
New study describes economic consequences of using T2Candida Panel for detection of candidemia

New study describes economic consequences of using T2Candida Panel for detection of candidemia

A new study describes a model that estimates the economic consequences of using the T2Candida Panel (a novel diagnostic product that provides Candida detection) as an adjunct to the current blood culture-based diagnostic strategy in a high-risk hospital patient cohort. [More]
New review highlights future research initiatives to eradicate polio

New review highlights future research initiatives to eradicate polio

April 12th 2015 marks the 60th anniversary of the publication of Jonas Salk's landmark polio vaccine trial results, which confirmed that the first vaccine against polio was safe and effective. A new review, which was published online ahead of print in Future Microbiology, provides a comprehensive overview of current polio vaccines, and highlights new and future research initiatives, such as new vaccine formulations, that could help ensure that polio is eradicated and eradication is maintained. [More]
Researchers pinpoint molecular mechanisms that inhibit Hippo pathway in pediatric bone cancers

Researchers pinpoint molecular mechanisms that inhibit Hippo pathway in pediatric bone cancers

A particular molecular pathway permits stem cells in pediatric bone cancers to grow rapidly and aggressively, according to researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and its Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center. [More]
MSU researchers discover cause of death in children who get malaria

MSU researchers discover cause of death in children who get malaria

Researchers from Michigan State University have uncovered the cause of death in children who die from cerebral malaria. [More]
Climate change causes emergence of more infectious diseases

Climate change causes emergence of more infectious diseases

The appearance of infectious diseases in new places and new hosts, such as West Nile virus and Ebola, is a predictable result of climate change, says a noted zoologist affiliated with the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. [More]
LSU Health New Orleans researcher discovers fragment of toxic Ebola virus protein

LSU Health New Orleans researcher discovers fragment of toxic Ebola virus protein

William Gallaher, PhD, Emeritus Professor of Microbiology, Immunology & Parasitology at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, has discovered a fragment of an Ebola virus protein that is toxic to cells and may contribute to infection and illness. [More]
COUNTDOWN research consortium focuses on neglected tropical diseases

COUNTDOWN research consortium focuses on neglected tropical diseases

The COUNTDOWN research consortium has been launched today following a £7 million grant allocation from the UK Department for International Development earlier in the year. [More]
Study reports effective treatment approach to inhibit herpes virus infection

Study reports effective treatment approach to inhibit herpes virus infection

A multi-institutional study reports an effective treatment approach to inhibit and keep latent viruses like herpes simplex from reactivating and causing disease. The work, whose lead author is the late James Hill, PhD, LSU Health New Orleans Professor and Director of Pharmacology and Infectious Disease at the LSU Eye Center, is published in the December 3, 2014, issue of Science Translational Medicine. [More]
Research breakthroughs may pave way for new drugs to fight against parasitic worm infections

Research breakthroughs may pave way for new drugs to fight against parasitic worm infections

Recent breakthroughs may pave the way for vaccines and new drugs for those infected by parasitic helminths. These flatworms, including tapeworms that cause hydatid diseases and neurocysticercosis, liver flukes, and blood flukes (schistosomes), infect more than 300 million people and cause approximately four million disability-adjusted life years lost due to chronic illness and death each year. [More]
Sequencing the Asian liver fluke genome: an interview with Dr Neil Young

Sequencing the Asian liver fluke genome: an interview with Dr Neil Young

Opisthorchis viverrini is a parasitic flatworm (or liver fluke) endemic throughout Thailand, the Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Vietnam and Cambodia. Humans are infected with this parasite when they eat a fluke encysted in inadequately cooked/preserved freshwater fish. [More]
LSU Health researchers reveal how Chop plays crucial role to combat cancer

LSU Health researchers reveal how Chop plays crucial role to combat cancer

Research led by Paulo Rodriguez, PhD, an assistant research professor of Microbiology, Immunology & Parasitology at LSU Health New Orleans' Stanley S. Scott Cancer Center, has identified the crucial role an inflammatory protein known as Chop plays in the body's ability to fight cancer. [More]
Scientists crack genetic code of liver fluke parasite

Scientists crack genetic code of liver fluke parasite

Singapore-An international team of scientists from Singapore, Thailand, China and Australia has cracked the genetic code of the liver fluke parasite, Opisthorchis viverrini, using a unique DNA analysis technique developed at A*STAR's Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS). [More]
Vaccine for Chagas disease expected to be available within the next three years

Vaccine for Chagas disease expected to be available within the next three years

The medical development has been tested in animal models, where it was observed that the disease stopped in 80 percent of cases; physicians expect similar results from a human control group. [More]
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