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Pathology is the study and diagnosis of disease through examination of organs, tissues, bodily fluids, and whole bodies (autopsies). The term also encompasses the related scientific study of disease processes, called General pathology.

Medical pathology is divided in two main branches, Anatomical pathology and Clinical pathology. Veterinary pathology is concerned with animal disease whereas Phytopathology is the study of plant diseases.
Female sex hormone estradiol may protect women against sexually transmitted viral infections

Female sex hormone estradiol may protect women against sexually transmitted viral infections

A team of researchers led by McMaster University's Charu Kaushic has revealed for the first time how estradiol, a female sex hormone present during the menstrual cycle and found in oral contraceptives, may work to protect women against sexually transmitted viral infections. [More]
Implantable brain device shows promising results in animal study

Implantable brain device shows promising results in animal study

An implantable brain device that literally melts away at a pre-determined rate minimizes injury to tissue normally associated with standard electrode implantation, according to research led by a team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Researchers link global increase in type 1 diabetes to advances in medical care

Researchers link global increase in type 1 diabetes to advances in medical care

Researchers from the University of Adelaide say the global increase in cases of type 1 diabetes is directly linked to advances in medical care, with the underlying genetics of the disease more likely to be passed from one generation to the next. [More]
Barrow research focuses on use of new technology for imaging brain tumors

Barrow research focuses on use of new technology for imaging brain tumors

Scientists at Barrow Neurological Institute have recently made discoveries about use of a new technology for imaging brain tumors in the operating room -- a finding that could have important implications for identifying and locating invading cells at the edge of a brain tumor. [More]
OGT launches Cytocell FISH probes for glial tumours

OGT launches Cytocell FISH probes for glial tumours

Oxford Gene Technology (OGT), The Molecular Genetics Company, has launched its CE-IVD labelled Cytocell Aquarius® 1p36/1q25 and 19q13/19p13 Deletion Probe Kit*, a cost-effective fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) kit for the reliable investigation of glial tumours. [More]
University hospital in Finland invests in digital pathology from Sectra

University hospital in Finland invests in digital pathology from Sectra

Kuopio University Hospital will be Finland's first fully digital pathology department following its investment in Sectra's IT solution for efficient storage, review and sharing of digital pathology images. The Diagnostic Imaging Center at Kuopio University Hospital is thereby extending its existing solution for handling radiology images (PACS) to also include pathology images. This enables in-depth cooperation between the hospital's radiologists and pathologists; two of the key functions in effective clinical care. [More]
Oral administration of Jakinibs reduces Parkinson's disease pathogenesis in rat model

Oral administration of Jakinibs reduces Parkinson's disease pathogenesis in rat model

University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers report the first documentation that suppressing a key cell-signaling pathway in a rat model of Parkinson's disease reduces pathogenesis. Oral administration of AZD1480 — one of the JAK/STAT pathway inhibitors generally known as Jakinibs — lessened the destructive inflammation and nerve cell degradation in the area of the brain affected by Parkinson's. [More]
Aggregation of SOD1 protein in nerve cells can lead to ALS

Aggregation of SOD1 protein in nerve cells can lead to ALS

Persons with the serious disorder ALS, can have a genetic mutation that causes the protein SOD1 to aggregate in motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Researchers at Umea University have discovered that, when injected into mice, the SOD1 aggregation spreads rapidly leading to ALS. The discovery has been described in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. [More]
Controlling cholesterol metabolism could help reduce pancreatic cancer spread

Controlling cholesterol metabolism could help reduce pancreatic cancer spread

Researchers have shown how controlling cholesterol metabolism in pancreatic cancer cells reduces metastasis, pointing to a potential new treatment using drugs previously developed for atherosclerosis. [More]
Combination of two diagnostic tests can decrease chance of missing tumors by sevenfold

Combination of two diagnostic tests can decrease chance of missing tumors by sevenfold

Cytopathology researchers at Houston Methodist Hospital recently found that combining two diagnostic tests, Pap and high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV), dramatically decreased the chance of missing tumors and high-grade lesions by sevenfold. [More]
Lumbar drain placement lowers postoperative CSF leak rate for patients undergoing endoscopic endonasal surgery

Lumbar drain placement lowers postoperative CSF leak rate for patients undergoing endoscopic endonasal surgery

Winner of the Synthes Skull Base Award, Nathan T. Zwagerman, MD, presented his research, A Prospective, Randomized Control Trial for Lumbar Drain Placement after Endoscopic Endonasal Skull Base Surgery, during the 2016 American Association of Neurological Surgeons Annual Scientific Meeting. [More]
Biomedical researcher wins 2016 Gutenberg Research Award for work on programmed cell death

Biomedical researcher wins 2016 Gutenberg Research Award for work on programmed cell death

The Gutenberg Research College of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz has chosen to give the 2016 Gutenberg Research Award to American biomedical researcher Dr. Vishva Dixit for his groundbreaking work in the field of programmed cell death. [More]
New investigational inhibitor JQEZ5 can block specific molecular malfunctions driving cancer

New investigational inhibitor JQEZ5 can block specific molecular malfunctions driving cancer

In a step forward in the push for targeted treatments that can block the specific molecular malfunctions driving cancer, University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have demonstrated how a genetic mutation can drive the most common type of lymphoma as well as melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. [More]
Promising method may help identify new antimicrobials to target CRE infection

Promising method may help identify new antimicrobials to target CRE infection

In recent years, hospitals have reported dramatic increases in the number of cases of the highly contagious, difficult-to-treat, and often deadly antibiotic-resistant bacteria carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE). Now, investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center have developed a promising method of identifying new antimicrobials that target these organisms. The research is published in April issue of the journal ASSAY and Drug Development Technologies. [More]
Understanding how individuals respond to aspirin

Understanding how individuals respond to aspirin

Researchers have learned new information about how different people respond to aspirin, a globally prescribed drug in cardioprotection. The research team, led by scientists at Cardiff University in the United Kingdom and including representatives from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the University of Colorado, identified more than 5,600 lipids — or fats — in blood platelets and gained new insights into how these cells respond to aspirin. [More]
New model can increase active surveillance for low-risk prostate cancer patients

New model can increase active surveillance for low-risk prostate cancer patients

Urologists at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Genesis Healthcare Partners have tested a new model of care for patients with low-risk prostate cancer. The evidence-based approach uses best practices to appropriately select and follow patients to avoid disease overtreatment. Results of the three-year study are now published online in the journal of Urology. [More]
Exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles increases bacterial infection of HeLa cells

Exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles increases bacterial infection of HeLa cells

When human cells are exposed to titanium dioxide without the presence of UV light from the sun, the risk for bacterial infection more than doubles. This finding by a Stony Brook University-led research team, published early online in the Journal of Nanobiotechnology, raises concerns about exposure to titanium dioxide, a nanoparticle commonly used in millions of products worldwide ranging from cosmetics to toothpaste, gum, food coloring, and medicines. [More]
Investigators explore possible causes for cancer recurrence after LRC

Investigators explore possible causes for cancer recurrence after LRC

Although laparoscopic radical cystectomy (LRC) and robotic assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) continue to grow in popularity and are successful in the treatment of bladder cancer, they are still considered experimental approaches. Using data collected by the Section of Uro-Technology of the European Association of Urology (ESUT), a team of researchers found that about 5% of patients experienced unexpected relapses of cancer after LRC, even with favorable pathology. [More]
Protea signs license agreement with Yale to develop new technology for detecting malignant melanoma

Protea signs license agreement with Yale to develop new technology for detecting malignant melanoma

Protea Biosciences Group, Inc. announced today that it had entered into an exclusive license agreement with Yale University for new technology to improve the differential diagnosis of malignant melanoma. [More]
Series of routine tests may not be beneficial to patients with age-related disorder

Series of routine tests may not be beneficial to patients with age-related disorder

A series of tests physicians routinely order to help diagnose and follow their patients with an elevated antibody level that is a marker for cancer risk, often do not benefit the patient but do increase health care costs, pathologists report. [More]
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