Pathology News and Research RSS Feed - Pathology News and Research

Pathology is the study and diagnosis of disease through examination of organs, tissues, bodily fluids, and whole bodies (autopsies). The term also encompasses the related scientific study of disease processes, called General pathology.

Medical pathology is divided in two main branches, Anatomical pathology and Clinical pathology. Veterinary pathology is concerned with animal disease whereas Phytopathology is the study of plant diseases.
Single-family room environment can optimize care for preterm infants

Single-family room environment can optimize care for preterm infants

The prevalence of preterm birth - the birth of an infant prior to 37 weeks of pregnancy - is a significant health problem that has increased over the past two decades. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, preterm birth affects nearly 500,000 babies each year, or one of every eight born in the U.S. While medical care has improved survival rates for preterm infants, questions remain about ways to positively impact the neurodevelopmental outcomes of preterm infants. [More]
Avalon Ventures, GSK jointly launch two new early-stage life science companies

Avalon Ventures, GSK jointly launch two new early-stage life science companies

Avalon Ventures today announced the launch of two new companies formed through its collaboration with GlaxoSmithKline to fund and launch up to 10 early-stage life science companies. [More]
TauRx achieves target enrolment in second LMTX Phase III clinical trial for Alzheimer's disease

TauRx achieves target enrolment in second LMTX Phase III clinical trial for Alzheimer's disease

TauRx Therapeutics Ltd has achieved its target enrolment of 700 subjects with mild Alzheimer's disease into the second of its two Phase III clinical trials of LMTX, a tau aggregation inhibitor, for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Dry roasted peanuts more likely to trigger allergy risk

Dry roasted peanuts more likely to trigger allergy risk

Dry roasted peanuts are more likely to trigger an allergy to peanuts than raw peanuts, suggests an Oxford University study involving mice. [More]
NPS MedicineWise launches new diagnostic approach for fatigue

NPS MedicineWise launches new diagnostic approach for fatigue

Fatigue is a common complaint accounting for around 3-7% of all presentations to general practitioners. To help health professionals understand the limitations and appropriate use of diagnostic tests relating to fatigue NPS MedicineWise has launched a new program—Back to basics for fatigue: a diagnostic approach. [More]
Penn Medicine, Wistar Institute awarded NCI grants for four new melanoma research projects

Penn Medicine, Wistar Institute awarded NCI grants for four new melanoma research projects

Penn Medicine and The Wistar Institute have been awarded a prestigious $12.1 million SPORE grant from the National Cancer Institute. The five-year Specialized Programs of Research Excellence, or SPORE, grant will fund four new melanoma research projects that aim to translate fundamental laboratory discoveries into new therapeutics to treat melanoma and other skin cancers. [More]
Research findings can help speech therapists, parents broaden toddlers' vocabularies

Research findings can help speech therapists, parents broaden toddlers' vocabularies

Research has shown that most 18-month-olds learn an average of two to five new words a day; however, little is known about how children process information to learn new words as they move through the preschool years. [More]
Scientists find 23 new genetic variants that increase risk for prostate cancer

Scientists find 23 new genetic variants that increase risk for prostate cancer

In an analysis of genetic information among more than 87,000 men, a global team of scientists says it has found 23 new genetic variants - common differences in the genetic code -- that increase a man's risk for prostate cancer. The so-called "meta-analysis," believed to be the largest of its kind, has revealed once hidden mutations among men in a broad array of ethnic groups comprising men of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry. [More]

Modern forensic analysis solves mystery of King Richard III's death

New research led by the University of Leicester in the UK gives a blow-by-blow account of the injuries inflicted on King Richard III’s body at the Battle of Bosworth Field on Aug 22, 1485. Modern forensic analysis of the King’s skeletal remains reveals that three of his injuries had the potential to cause death quickly—two to the skull and one to the pelvis. [More]
Study links slowed processing speed with executive deficits in individuals with multiple sclerosis

Study links slowed processing speed with executive deficits in individuals with multiple sclerosis

Kessler Foundation researchers have published a study supporting the role of slowed processing speed in the executive deficits found in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]

OGT to highlight NGS and FISH methods for tumour screening at BSGM 2014

Oxford Gene Technology, The Molecular Genetics Company, is inviting attendees of the British Society for Genetic Medicine annual conference to its seminar entitled ‘Approaches to tumour screening and therapy stratification: case studies in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer’ on Monday 22nd September, 13.10-13.50, room 2N. [More]
NIH awards grant to scientist to link drugs, genes and diseases

NIH awards grant to scientist to link drugs, genes and diseases

The National Institutes of Health wants to make the process of finding new drugs faster and better. The effort will help all 27 of its research institutes and centers. So, the nation's medical research agency awarded Tudor Oprea, MD, PhD, a 2-year $4.9 million grant to develop a tool scientists can use to link information about drugs, diseases and genes. [More]
Novel genetic discovery identifies new avenues for prostate cancer treatment

Novel genetic discovery identifies new avenues for prostate cancer treatment

A genetic discovery out of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine is leading to a highly accurate test for aggressive prostate cancer and identifies new avenues for treatment. [More]
New ACD European subsidiary aims to provide faster, enhanced support for local customers

New ACD European subsidiary aims to provide faster, enhanced support for local customers

Advanced Cell Diagnostics Inc., a technology and market leader in the field of molecular pathology and developer of cell and tissue-based analysis tools, has announced the establishment of a European subsidiary which will start business in October 2014. [More]
Blocking bacteria's access to iron: an interview with Dr. Laxminarayana Devireddy

Blocking bacteria's access to iron: an interview with Dr. Laxminarayana Devireddy

Iron is a key nutrient for nearly all living organisms, including bacteria. Iron is a cofactor for many enzymes necessary for basic metabolic reactions such as DNA synthesis and electron transport. Iron serves as the conduit for the electron transport chain that generates the energy necessary to drive the bacterial cell. [More]
University of Michigan Health System becomes one of best places for young doctors to train

University of Michigan Health System becomes one of best places for young doctors to train

Doctors nationwide rate the University of Michigan Health System as one of the best places for young doctors to train in their chosen field, across 20 medical specialties, according to a new ranking released today. [More]
Professor receives award for development of anti-angiogenic therapy for retinal disease

Professor receives award for development of anti-angiogenic therapy for retinal disease

Napoleone Ferrara, MD, distinguished professor of pathology and distinguished adjunct professor of ophthalmology at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and senior deputy director for basic sciences at UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, was named today as one of seven recipients of the Ant-nio Champalimaud Vision Award in Lisbon, Portugal. [More]
Pollution in many cities threatens brain development in children

Pollution in many cities threatens brain development in children

Pollution in many cities threatens the brain development in children. Findings by University of Montana Professor Dr. Lilian Calder-n-Garcidue-as, MA, MD, Ph.D., and her team of researchers reveal that children living in megacities are at increased risk for brain inflammation and neurodegenerative changes, including Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease. [More]
Growth factors present in human breast milk may protect against intestinal damage

Growth factors present in human breast milk may protect against intestinal damage

Studies Suggest that ErbB4 Receptor Activation May Be a Novel Therapeutic Avenue for Intestinal Diseases Involving Epithelial Cell Death, According to Research Published in The American Journal of Pathology [More]
Study evaluates impact of myPath Melanoma diagnostic test

Study evaluates impact of myPath Melanoma diagnostic test

Myriad Genetics, Inc. today presented results from a pivotal clinical utility study of the Myriad myPath- Melanoma test at the 2014 College of American Pathologists (CAP) annual meeting in Chicago, Ill. [More]