Pathology News and Research RSS Feed - Pathology News and Research

Pathology is the study and diagnosis of disease through examination of organs, tissues, bodily fluids, and whole bodies (autopsies). The term also encompasses the related scientific study of disease processes, called General pathology.

Medical pathology is divided in two main branches, Anatomical pathology and Clinical pathology. Veterinary pathology is concerned with animal disease whereas Phytopathology is the study of plant diseases.
Tau pathology underlies deterioration of spatial cognition in Alzheimer's disease

Tau pathology underlies deterioration of spatial cognition in Alzheimer's disease

Columbia University Medical Center researchers have discovered that the spatial disorientation that leads to wandering in many Alzheimer's disease patients is caused by the accumulation of tau protein in navigational nerve cells in the brain. [More]
New research exposes cellular responses linked to bird flu vaccine

New research exposes cellular responses linked to bird flu vaccine

New research from Vanderbilt eavesdrops on gene expression in human immune system cells before and after vaccination against bird flu. [More]
‘Collateral lethality’ may create new therapeutic options for several cancers

‘Collateral lethality’ may create new therapeutic options for several cancers

Cancer cells often delete genes that normally suppress tumor formation. These deletions also may extend to neighboring genes, an event known as "collateral lethality," which may create new options for development of therapies for several cancers. [More]
Researchers show how adult learning is impaired in females using mouse models of Rett syndrome

Researchers show how adult learning is impaired in females using mouse models of Rett syndrome

Neurodevelopmental disorders like autism very likely have their origin at the dawn of life, with the emergence of inappropriate connectivity between nerve cells in the brain. [More]
Study shows multiplying effects of delirium and dementia in older patients

Study shows multiplying effects of delirium and dementia in older patients

When hospitalised, people can become acutely confused and disorientated. This condition, known as delirium, affects a quarter of older patients and new research by UCL and the University of Cambridge shows it may have long-lasting consequences, including accelerating the dementia process. [More]
Blocking molecular signaling pathway could prevent or reverse peripheral neuropathy

Blocking molecular signaling pathway could prevent or reverse peripheral neuropathy

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, the University of Manitoba and St. Boniface Hospital Albrechtsen Research Centre in Canada, have identified a molecular signaling pathway that, when blocked, promotes sensory neuron growth and prevents or reverses peripheral neuropathy in cell and rodent models of type 1 and 2 diabetes, chemotherapy-induced neuropathy and HIV. [More]
Epigenetic changes drive successful metastases of pancreatic cancer cells

Epigenetic changes drive successful metastases of pancreatic cancer cells

A multicenter team of researchers reports that a full genomic analysis of tumor samples from a small number of people who died of pancreatic cancer suggests that chemical changes to DNA that do not affect the DNA sequence itself yet control how it operates confer survival advantages on subsets of pancreatic cancer cells. [More]
Researchers explore how metastatic pancreatic cancer gets ‘reprogrammed’ for optimal malignancy

Researchers explore how metastatic pancreatic cancer gets ‘reprogrammed’ for optimal malignancy

Metastatic pancreatic cancer -- cancer that has spread from the pancreas to other tissues and is responsible for most patient deaths -- changes its metabolism and is "reprogrammed" for optimal malignancy, according to new findings reported Jan. 16 in Nature Genetics. [More]
Functional deficits caused by mini-strokes can last longer than previously thought

Functional deficits caused by mini-strokes can last longer than previously thought

Evidence overwhelmingly supports a link between cognitive decline and cerebrovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, arteriolosclerosis, and cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Not only do individuals with cerebrovascular diseases have a much higher incidence of cortical microinfarcts (mini-strokes), but post-mortem histological and in vivo radiological studies also find that the burden of microinfarcts is significantly greater among people with vascular cognitive impairment and dementia (VCID) than in age-matched, non-demented individuals. [More]
Study compares two common treatment options for pelvic organ prolapse

Study compares two common treatment options for pelvic organ prolapse

Pelvic organ prolapse occurs when the pelvic organs drop from their normal position in the pelvis. [More]
Concussions accelerate Alzheimer's disease-related brain atrophy and cognitive decline, research finds

Concussions accelerate Alzheimer's disease-related brain atrophy and cognitive decline, research finds

New research has found concussions accelerate Alzheimer's disease-related brain atrophy and cognitive decline in people who are at genetic risk for the condition. [More]
Scientists identify Smurf1 protein that plays role in autophagy of TB bacteria

Scientists identify Smurf1 protein that plays role in autophagy of TB bacteria

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a protein that is central to the immune system's ability to recognize and destroy the bacterium responsible for the global tuberculosis (TB) epidemic. [More]
Could pathogen infection really lead to Alzheimer’s?

Could pathogen infection really lead to Alzheimer’s?

New concepts of infectious disease are evolving with the realization that pathogens are key players in the development of progressive chronic diseases that originally were not thought to be infectious. Infection is well-known to be associated with numerous neurological diseases for which... [More]
Inhibition of EZH2 protein could be new strategy to treat multiple myeloma

Inhibition of EZH2 protein could be new strategy to treat multiple myeloma

In a study published in the scientific journal Oncotarget, researchers from Uppsala University show how the protein EZH2 affects the development of multiple myeloma, and that inhibition of EZH2 could be used as a new strategy to treat the disease. [More]
Genes implicated in rare pediatric epilepsy contribute to common forms of disorder, study finds

Genes implicated in rare pediatric epilepsy contribute to common forms of disorder, study finds

An international study led by Columbia University Medical Center and NewYork-Presbyterian researchers has found that several genes previously implicated only in rare, severe forms of pediatric epilepsy also contribute to common forms of the disorder. [More]
Scientists discover gene that may open new door to developing treatments for Alzheimer's disease

Scientists discover gene that may open new door to developing treatments for Alzheimer's disease

Scientists at the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) of the University of Luxembourg have identified a gene that may provide a new starting point for developing treatments for Alzheimer's disease (AD). [More]
Hormonal fluctuations make women more sensitive to addictive properties of cocaine, study reveals

Hormonal fluctuations make women more sensitive to addictive properties of cocaine, study reveals

Hormonal fluctuations women undergo make them particularly sensitive, compared to men, to the addictive properties of cocaine, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published January 10 in the journal Nature Communications. [More]
New research paves way for better strategies to diagnose and manage vascular graft infections

New research paves way for better strategies to diagnose and manage vascular graft infections

A rising prevalence of cardiovascular disease has generated substantial growth in the use of medical implants, such as vascular grafts. [More]
Transfusion of ‘oldest blood’ may lead to complications in some patients

Transfusion of ‘oldest blood’ may lead to complications in some patients

The oldest blood available for transfusions releases large and potentially harmful amounts of iron into patients' bloodstreams, a new study by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center has found. [More]
Landmark study unravels secrets of aggressive prostate cancer

Landmark study unravels secrets of aggressive prostate cancer

A landmark study, led by Monash University's Biomedicine Discovery Institute with the involvement of the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, has revealed the reason why men with a family history of prostate cancer who also carry the BRCA2 gene fault have a more aggressive form of prostate cancer. [More]
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