Pathology News and Research RSS Feed - Pathology News and Research

Pathology is the study and diagnosis of disease through examination of organs, tissues, bodily fluids, and whole bodies (autopsies). The term also encompasses the related scientific study of disease processes, called General pathology.

Medical pathology is divided in two main branches, Anatomical pathology and Clinical pathology. Veterinary pathology is concerned with animal disease whereas Phytopathology is the study of plant diseases.
Inhalation exposure to PM2.5 pollution triggers liver fibrosis

Inhalation exposure to PM2.5 pollution triggers liver fibrosis

A research team led by Kezhong Zhang, Ph.D., at the Wayne State University School of Medicine's Center for Molecular Medicine and Genetics, has discovered that exposure to air pollution has a direct adverse health effect on the liver and causes liver fibrosis, an illness associated with metabolic disease and liver cancer. [More]
TMIGD1 protein could be a novel target for restoring kidney function from kidney disease

TMIGD1 protein could be a novel target for restoring kidney function from kidney disease

A new discovery by Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) researchers may change how kidney disease is treated in the future. [More]
New study suggests potential use of targeted therapies for two subtypes of esophageal cancer

New study suggests potential use of targeted therapies for two subtypes of esophageal cancer

Nearly all advanced esophageal cancers harbor genetic mutations that can be targeted with emerging drug therapies, according to a new study published in The Oncologist on September 2, 2015. [More]
Altering protein recycling complexes in human cells may help overcome chemotherapy resistance

Altering protein recycling complexes in human cells may help overcome chemotherapy resistance

Altering the protein recycling complexes in human cells, including cancer cells, allows the cells to resist treatment with a class of drugs known as proteasome inhibitors, according to Whitehead Institute scientists. [More]
U-M study suggests potential treatment options for children with aggressive, advanced cancer

U-M study suggests potential treatment options for children with aggressive, advanced cancer

For children with rare, aggressive and advanced cancer, precision medicine may help doctors determine their best treatment options, a new study finds. [More]
Affinity tuning can make CAR T cells spare normal cells and attack cancer cells

Affinity tuning can make CAR T cells spare normal cells and attack cancer cells

A new development in engineering chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, called affinity tuning, can make the CAR T cells spare normal cells and better recognize and attack cancer cells, which may help lower the toxicity associated with this type of immunotherapy when used against solid tumors, according to a preclinical study. [More]
InterSystems plans to launch next-generation laboratory business management system in 2016

InterSystems plans to launch next-generation laboratory business management system in 2016

InterSystems, a global leader in software for connected care and developer of the InterSystems TrakCare unified healthcare information system, today announced that it will release its next-generation laboratory business management system (LBMS) in early 2016. [More]
MACC1 gene can help predict better treatment options for patients with Klatskin carcinoma

MACC1 gene can help predict better treatment options for patients with Klatskin carcinoma

Bile duct cancer is rare and is usually detected too late. Often only extensive liver surgery can help or, in rare cases, liver transplantation. But which patients will benefit from surgery and which will not, because their risk of cancer recurrence is too high? With the oncogene MACC1 as a biomarker, physicians for the first time have a tool to decide which treatment option is best for patients with Klatskin carcinoma, one type of bile duct cancer. [More]
Scientists discover the oldest case of leukemia in prehistoric female skeleton

Scientists discover the oldest case of leukemia in prehistoric female skeleton

Scientists of the Senckenberg Center for Human Evolution and Paleoenvironment and the University of Tübingen have discovered what may well be the oldest known case of Leukemia. [More]
Keratin 17 protein plays crucial role in degrading key tumor suppressor protein

Keratin 17 protein plays crucial role in degrading key tumor suppressor protein

Keratin 17 (K17), a protein previously believed to provide only mechanical support for cancer cells, appears to play a crucial role in degrading a key tumor suppressor protein in cancer cells named p27. This finding, published in the September 1 issue of Cancer Research, is based on the work of researchers in the Department of Pathology at Stony Brook University School of Medicine. [More]
Four UC San Diego researchers selected to receive newly established NCI Outstanding Investigator Award

Four UC San Diego researchers selected to receive newly established NCI Outstanding Investigator Award

Four University of California, San Diego School of Medicine researchers have been selected to receive the newly established National Cancer Institute (NCI) Outstanding Investigator Award. The multi-million dollar awards fund new projects that have an unusual potential in cancer research over seven years. [More]

Scientists uncover mechanism responsible for development of adrenal gland tumors

Scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München have elucidated a mechanism that is responsible for the development of adrenal gland tumors. They discovered that the BMP7 protein plays a key role in this process and that it could be a possible target for future treatments. The results have been published in the journal 'Oncotarget'. [More]
Researchers identify drugs that may enhance ability of TKI dasatinib to kill human cancer cells

Researchers identify drugs that may enhance ability of TKI dasatinib to kill human cancer cells

Researchers have discovered how a common mutation in a high-risk leukemia subtype drives the cancer's aggressiveness and have identified drugs that may work with existing precision medicines to improve survival. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists led the study, which was published online today in the journal Cancer Cell. [More]
Adaptive immune system plays active role in guiding development of mammary glands

Adaptive immune system plays active role in guiding development of mammary glands

In experiments with mouse tissue, UC San Francisco researchers have discovered that the adaptive immune system, generally associated with fighting bacterial and viral infections, plays an active role in guiding the normal development of mammary glands, the only organs--in female humans as well as mice--that develop predominately after birth, beginning at puberty. [More]
Researchers identify new virus that plays role in rare type of liver cancer

Researchers identify new virus that plays role in rare type of liver cancer

More than a cause of a simple infection, viruses are often involved in the development of serious diseases. Such is the case with liver cancer, which often develops in an organ that has been weakened by hepatitis B or C virus. [More]
Isolated tauopathy ‘surprisingly common’ in AD dementia

Isolated tauopathy ‘surprisingly common’ in AD dementia

A study shows that about a quarter of people with clinically diagnosed mild or moderate Alzheimer’s disease have only minimal β-amyloid deposition on autopsy. [More]

Study sheds further light on the way APOL1 protein kills trypanosmoe

The African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei is a blood parasite capable of infecting many mammals. Humans are provided with natural immunity against infection through the activity of the protein apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1): captured via endocytosis, APOL1 forms pores in the lysosomal membrane, leading to the death of the trypanosome. [More]
Transplanting multi-layered sheet of liver cells into damaged liver improves function in test animals

Transplanting multi-layered sheet of liver cells into damaged liver improves function in test animals

Liver transplantation is currently the only established treatment for patients with end stage liver failure. However, this treatment is limited by the shortage of donors and the conditional integrity and suitability of the available organs. Transplanting donor hepatocytes (liver cells) into the liver as an alternative to liver transplantation also has drawbacks as the rate of survival of primary hepatocytes is limited and often severe complications can result from the transplantation procedure. [More]
Researchers design online database to help researchers identify cancer gene mutations

Researchers design online database to help researchers identify cancer gene mutations

Many clinical trials use genome sequencing to learn which gene mutations are present in a patient's tumor cells. The question is important because targeting the right mutations with the right drugs can stop cancer in its tracks. But it can be difficult to determine whether there is evidence in the medical literature that particular mutations might drive cancer growth and could be targeted by therapy, and which mutations are of no consequence. [More]
Agena Bioscience releases Chip prep module to automate sample handling after PCR for MassARRAY System

Agena Bioscience releases Chip prep module to automate sample handling after PCR for MassARRAY System

Agena Bioscience today introduced the Chip prep module to automate sample handling after PCR for the MassARRAY 96-well System. This enables laboratories to operate the MassARRAY System largely unattended for high-throughput, multiplex genetic analysis. [More]
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