Pathology News and Research RSS Feed - Pathology News and Research

Pathology is the study and diagnosis of disease through examination of organs, tissues, bodily fluids, and whole bodies (autopsies). The term also encompasses the related scientific study of disease processes, called General pathology.

Medical pathology is divided in two main branches, Anatomical pathology and Clinical pathology. Veterinary pathology is concerned with animal disease whereas Phytopathology is the study of plant diseases.
Studies refine amyloid imaging role in dementia

Studies refine amyloid imaging role in dementia

Two meta-analyses published in JAMA help to define the role of amyloid imaging in dementia. [More]
Enterprise Therapeutics secures additional funding to accelerate drug discovery for treatment of respiratory diseases

Enterprise Therapeutics secures additional funding to accelerate drug discovery for treatment of respiratory diseases

ENTERPRISE THERAPEUTICS Ltd, a drug discovery company focused on new therapeutics for respiratory diseases, today announced that it has secured an additional £2.4m ($3.6m) in Series-A financing. [More]
Non-coding micro RNA molecule may control chemotherapy resistance among ovarian cancer patients

Non-coding micro RNA molecule may control chemotherapy resistance among ovarian cancer patients

A molecule that helps control gene expression may play a role in controlling chemotherapy resistance among patients with the most common form of ovarian cancer. [More]
Mi-Prostate Score improves prostate cancer detection

Mi-Prostate Score improves prostate cancer detection

A new urine-based test improved prostate cancer detection - including detecting more aggressive forms of prostate cancer - compared to traditional models based on prostate serum antigen, or PSA, levels, a new study finds. [More]
Men with a history of asthma less likely to have aggressive prostate cancer

Men with a history of asthma less likely to have aggressive prostate cancer

In what they are calling a surprising finding in a large study of men who completed questionnaires and allowed scientists to review their medical records, Johns Hopkins researchers report that men with a history of asthma were less likely than those without it to develop lethal prostate cancer. [More]
Studies support use of ThyraMIR and ThyGenX to improve detection of benign/malignant thyroid nodules

Studies support use of ThyraMIR and ThyGenX to improve detection of benign/malignant thyroid nodules

Data will be presented at both Digestive Disease Week (DDW) and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) annual medical meetings. [More]
New findings could help better understand neurodegenerative diseases

New findings could help better understand neurodegenerative diseases

Researchers at the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB), of the University of Luxembourg, have, under Dr. Manuel Buttini, successfully measured metabolic profiles, or the metabolomes, of different brain regions, and their findings could help better understand neurodegenerative diseases. [More]

Researchers report new label-free chemical imaging that provides similar information as molecular stains

Histopathology is a cornerstone of modern biomedical research. Yet, the practice of histopathology has evolved just a few times -- non-specific stains in the late 19th century, immunohistochemical staining in the mid-to-late 20th century and digital imaging/computerized analysis at the turn of the 20th century. In all cases, prepared biopsy samples are stained and examined under a light microscope. [More]
Novel computer-aided system developed for acute stroke detection

Novel computer-aided system developed for acute stroke detection

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University has developed a novel computer-aided detection system for acute stroke using computer intelligence technology. Reading 80-100 computer images, the system is able to detect if the patient was struck by ischemic stroke or haemorrhagic stroke. [More]
Researchers devise novel method to perform NIR optical measurements of resected breast tissue

Researchers devise novel method to perform NIR optical measurements of resected breast tissue

Roughly 1 in 4 women having breast conserving surgery (BCS) return to the surgical suite for further resection because of cancerous tissue left behind due to unclear margins. Investigators at the Optics in Medicine Lab at Dartmouth's Thayer School of Engineering and Norris Cotton Cancer Center, led by Brian W. Pogue, PhD and Keith Paulsen PhD, with first author and PhD candidate David M. McClatchy III, devised a novel approach to perform near infrared (NIR) optical measurements of resected breast tissue after the margins have had their traditional marking by the surgeon to preserve information about their orientation for potential follow-up surgeries. [More]
Research finding could lead to better treatments for inflammatory bowel disease

Research finding could lead to better treatments for inflammatory bowel disease

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) afflicts 1.6 million people in the United States, causing abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, rectal bleeding and other potentially debilitating symptoms. [More]
Transgender people at greater risk for eating disorders

Transgender people at greater risk for eating disorders

Transgender and non-transgender lesbian, gay and bisexual students are at greater risk for eating disorders, finds a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Researchers develop new tool to identify common genetic anomalies in cancer

Researchers develop new tool to identify common genetic anomalies in cancer

Researchers from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center and Thermo Fisher Scientific have developed and tested a new tool that searches for the most common genetic anomalies seen in cancer. The assay demonstrates the ability to make gene sequencing easier over a large volume of samples. [More]
Repetitive head injuries may accelerate aging process, increase dementia risk

Repetitive head injuries may accelerate aging process, increase dementia risk

Repetitive head injuries that occur during contact sports and military service may accelerate the aging process by increasing the build-up of beta-amyloid in the brain, leading to worse disease and an increased likelihood of developing dementia. In particular, boxers fared the worst among athletes and military veterans with a history of head injuries. [More]
Griffith research sheds new light on cause of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Griffith research sheds new light on cause of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

New research findings may shed new light on the potential cause of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME). [More]
Study: Disrupting cancer pathway could extend benefits of new immunity-boosting drugs

Study: Disrupting cancer pathway could extend benefits of new immunity-boosting drugs

Understanding how to overrule a signaling pathway that can cause treatments to fail in metastatic melanoma patients should help physicians extend the benefits of recently approved immunity-boosting drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors to more patients. [More]
Research findings could lead to new targeted treatments for aggressive subtype of lymphoma

Research findings could lead to new targeted treatments for aggressive subtype of lymphoma

An international team of researchers, including Lukas Kenner from the Clinical Department of Pathology at MedUni Vienna, has discovered a specific combination of mutations and new gene fusions, which are heavily implicated in tumour growth in patients with a particularly aggressive subtype of lymphoma (ALCL). [More]
Study sheds light on developing more targeted therapies against medulloblastoma

Study sheds light on developing more targeted therapies against medulloblastoma

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have gained ground toward developing more targeted therapies for the most common childhood brain tumor. [More]
RBD persists in Parkinson’s disease patients

RBD persists in Parkinson’s disease patients

Symptoms of rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) are unlikely to resolve in patients with Parkinson’s disease, show the findings of a 3-year study. [More]
Gynecologic oncologist awarded grant to improve quality of life for women with endometrial cancer

Gynecologic oncologist awarded grant to improve quality of life for women with endometrial cancer

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute Board of Governors recently awarded more than $2.7 million in contracted funding to Katina Robison, MD, a gynecologic oncologist with the Program in Women's Oncology at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, a Care New England hospital, for the study "Cancer of the Uterus and Treatment of Stress Incontinence." [More]
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