Pathology News and Research RSS Feed - Pathology News and Research

Pathology is the study and diagnosis of disease through examination of organs, tissues, bodily fluids, and whole bodies (autopsies). The term also encompasses the related scientific study of disease processes, called General pathology.

Medical pathology is divided in two main branches, Anatomical pathology and Clinical pathology. Veterinary pathology is concerned with animal disease whereas Phytopathology is the study of plant diseases.
New study links inflammatory bowel diseases to increase in diversity of viruses

New study links inflammatory bowel diseases to increase in diversity of viruses

Inflammatory bowel diseases are associated with a decrease in the diversity of bacteria in the gut, but a new study led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has linked the same illnesses to an increase in the diversity of viruses. [More]
Cleveland Clinic researcher awarded grant to advance treatment of lethal prostate cancer

Cleveland Clinic researcher awarded grant to advance treatment of lethal prostate cancer

The Prostate Cancer Foundation has presented Nima Sharifi, M.D., Kendrick Family Endowed Chair for Prostate Cancer Research at Cleveland Clinic's Lerner Research Institute, a Challenge Award to advance the treatment of lethal prostate cancer. He is also co-investigator on a second Challenge Award that was also selected for funding. [More]
CAP, ASCO University and AMP partner to create Molecular Oncology Tumor Board series

CAP, ASCO University and AMP partner to create Molecular Oncology Tumor Board series

The College of American Pathologists, the American Society of Clinical Oncology's ASCO University, and the Association for Molecular Pathology recently announced their partnership in the creation of the Molecular Oncology Tumor Board series, an online and user-driven resource designed to help cancer care providers with the interpretation and understanding of tumor molecular profiling tests and studies. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers propose novel cancer-fighting strategy

Johns Hopkins researchers propose novel cancer-fighting strategy

Existing cancer therapies are geared toward massacring tumor cells, but Johns Hopkins researchers propose a different strategy: subtly hardening cancer cells to prevent them from invading new areas of the body. They devised a way of screening compounds for the desired effect and have identified a compound that shows promise in fighting pancreatic cancer. [More]
Researchers invent new imaging system to help detect malignant tissue during surgery

Researchers invent new imaging system to help detect malignant tissue during surgery

With the goal of making it easier for surgeons to detect malignant tissue during surgery and hopefully reduce the rate of cancer recurrence, scientists have invented a new imaging system that causes tumors to "light up" when a hand-held laser is directed at them. [More]
Research opens door to potential new cancer biomarkers

Research opens door to potential new cancer biomarkers

A new analysis opens the door to discovery of thousands of potential new cancer biomarkers. [More]
CSHL researchers describe new pathway that controls fear memories in the mouse brain

CSHL researchers describe new pathway that controls fear memories in the mouse brain

Some people have no fear, like that 17-year-old kid who drives like a maniac. But for the nearly 40 million adults who suffer from anxiety disorders, an overabundance of fear rules their lives. Debilitating anxiety prevents them from participating in life's most mundane moments, from driving a car to riding in an elevator. [More]
Abnormal attachment of sugar to BACE1 enzyme leads to formation of Aβ plaques in the brain

Abnormal attachment of sugar to BACE1 enzyme leads to formation of Aβ plaques in the brain

Researchers at the RIKEN-Max Planck Joint Research Center in Japan have demonstrated that hallmark symptoms of Alzheimer's disease can be reduced when sugars are prevented from binding to one of the key enzymes implicated in the disease. The new findings, reported in EMBO Molecular Medicine, show that abnormal attachment of a particular sugar to the enzyme BACE1 is a critical factor leading to the formation of Aβ plaques in the brain, and that plaques were reduced and cognitive performance improved when this action was prevented in mice through loss of the enzyme GnT-III. [More]
New study characterizes genetic underpinnings of phyllodes tumors

New study characterizes genetic underpinnings of phyllodes tumors

A new study from researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center characterizes the genetic underpinnings of a rare type of breast tumor called phyllodes tumors, offering the first comprehensive analysis of the molecular alterations at work in these tumors. [More]
Philips, Indica Labs partner to offer advanced image analysis algorithms for cancer research

Philips, Indica Labs partner to offer advanced image analysis algorithms for cancer research

Royal Philips today announced that it will further support oncology researchers' efforts to analyze pathology samples by offering advanced image analysis algorithms from Indica Labs, Inc. as part of its Digital Pathology Solutions offerings. [More]
Advanced techniques may lead to screening tool for early detection of autism in children

Advanced techniques may lead to screening tool for early detection of autism in children

Autism is a spectrum of closely related disorders diagnosed in patients who exhibit a shared core of symptoms, including delays in learning to communicate and interact socially. Early detection of autism in children is the key for treatments to be most effective and produce the best outcomes. [More]
People with iron overload disease are more vulnerable to Vibrio vulnificus infections

People with iron overload disease are more vulnerable to Vibrio vulnificus infections

Every summer, the news reports on a bacterium called Vibrio vulnificus found in warm saltwater that causes people to get sick, or die, after they eat raw tainted shellfish or when an open wound comes in contact with seawater. [More]
Platelet transfusion treatment increases death in people with certain rare blood cell disorders

Platelet transfusion treatment increases death in people with certain rare blood cell disorders

People hospitalized with certain rare blood cell disorders frequently receive a treatment that is associated with a two- to fivefold increase in death, according to a new study that reviewed hospital records nationwide. The study authors recommend that for these rare disorders, doctors should administer the treatment, a platelet transfusion, only in exceptional circumstances. [More]
Study suggests that antibiotics may help fight norovirus

Study suggests that antibiotics may help fight norovirus

Antibiotics aren't supposed to be effective against viruses. But new evidence in mice suggests antibiotics may help fight norovirus, a highly contagious gastrointestinal virus, report scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
UH Case Medical Center, ABL partner to design and validate HIV drug resistance tests

UH Case Medical Center, ABL partner to design and validate HIV drug resistance tests

University Hospitals Case Medical Center has signed an agreement with Advanced Biological Laboratories, an information technology and diagnostic company based in Luxembourg, to join efforts on the designing and validation of an HIV drug resistance and tropism assay based on next-generation sequencing (NGS). [More]
Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island receives 2015 Women's Choice Award

Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island receives 2015 Women's Choice Award

Today it was announced that Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, a Care New England Hospital, has received the 2015 Women's Choice Award as one of America's Best Hospitals for Obstetrics. This evidence-based designation identifies the country's best health care institutions based on robust criteria that consider female patient satisfaction, clinical excellence and what women say they want from a hospital. [More]
Beckman Coulter Genomics announces CAP accreditation

Beckman Coulter Genomics announces CAP accreditation

Beckman Coulter Genomics, a leading provider of DNA Sequencing Services announces today accreditation from the College of American Pathologists (CAP). [More]
Blast phase characteristics differ in TKI-, non-TKI–treated CML patients

Blast phase characteristics differ in TKI-, non-TKI–treated CML patients

Features of the blast phase, such as blast cell morphology and accompanying cytogenetic changes, vary between chronic myeloid leukaemia patients who received tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy and those treated in the pre-TKI era, research shows. [More]
ULB researchers uncover new mechanism involved in tumour initiation, growth in SCC

ULB researchers uncover new mechanism involved in tumour initiation, growth in SCC

Researchers at the Université libre de Bruxelles (Belgium) report the mechanisms regulating the different functions of Twist1 controlling skin tumour initiation, cancer stem cell function and tumor progression. [More]
Study finds difference between results from IHC and quantitative molecular techniques

Study finds difference between results from IHC and quantitative molecular techniques

The cause of type 1 diabetes remains unknown. Several studies using immunohistochemistry (IHC) have independently reported hyperexpression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I on pancreatic islet cells in young patients with recent-onset type 1 diabetes. Investigators have therefore suggested that HLA hyperexpression may be an important first step in the development of type 1 diabetes. [More]