Pathology News and Research RSS Feed - Pathology News and Research

Pathology is the study and diagnosis of disease through examination of organs, tissues, bodily fluids, and whole bodies (autopsies). The term also encompasses the related scientific study of disease processes, called General pathology.

Medical pathology is divided in two main branches, Anatomical pathology and Clinical pathology. Veterinary pathology is concerned with animal disease whereas Phytopathology is the study of plant diseases.
Bowel Cancer UK's new landmark study aims to identify critical gaps in current bowel cancer research

Bowel Cancer UK's new landmark study aims to identify critical gaps in current bowel cancer research

Bowel Cancer UK is announcing on World Cancer Day (Thursday 4 February) a new research project which will bring together 100 clinicians and scientists to identify gaps in current research into bowel cancer which, if addressed, will help save the lives of thousands of people diagnosed with the disease. [More]
Mercury may not thwart seafood brain benefits

Mercury may not thwart seafood brain benefits

Accumulation of mercury in the brain from eating seafood does not appear to lead to Alzheimer’s disease neuropathology, shows research published in JAMA. [More]
BDNF gene expression signals cognitive reserve against AD progression

BDNF gene expression signals cognitive reserve against AD progression

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression contributes to slowing of cognitive decline in older adults and may protect against the effects of Alzheimer’s disease pathology, researchers report in Neurology. [More]
New gene cut-and-paste methods help correct disease-causing mutation in animal model

New gene cut-and-paste methods help correct disease-causing mutation in animal model

For the first time, researchers have treated an animal model of a genetic disorder using a viral vector to deliver genome-editing components in which the disease- causing mutation has been corrected. [More]
Frequent consumption of nuts may reduce risk of breast, colon, pancreatic and lung cancer

Frequent consumption of nuts may reduce risk of breast, colon, pancreatic and lung cancer

Adding nuts to your diet is associated to a reduction in the risk of cancer. This is the main conclusion of multiple studies that have shown that eating 2 or 3 servings per week (57-84 g) of nuts is associated to a reduction in the risk of some types of cancer (breast, colon, pancreatic and lung cancer). [More]
Certain viral infections during pregnancy could cause behavioral changes in offspring

Certain viral infections during pregnancy could cause behavioral changes in offspring

A study published in the journal Science found that activation in pregnant mice of a particular immune response, similar to what may occur with certain viral infections during pregnancy, alters the brain structure of the mouse offspring and causes behavioral changes, reminiscent of those observed in humans with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). [More]
Hearing aids improve brain function in people with hearing loss

Hearing aids improve brain function in people with hearing loss

A recent study by Jamie Desjardins, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the speech-language pathology program at The University of Texas at El Paso, found that hearing aids improve brain function in persons with hearing loss. [More]
Multinational study suggests new way to classify gliomas

Multinational study suggests new way to classify gliomas

A comprehensive analysis of the molecular characteristics of gliomas—the most common malignant brain tumor—explains why some patients diagnosed with slow-growing (low-grade) tumors quickly succumb to the disease while others with more aggressive (high-grade) tumors survive for many years. [More]
UCLA researchers find protein combination that could improve clinical bone restoration

UCLA researchers find protein combination that could improve clinical bone restoration

A UCLA research team has found a combination of proteins that could significantly improve clinical bone restoration. The findings may be a big step toward developing effective therapeutic treatments for bone skeletal defects, bone loss and osteoporosis. [More]
Patients sent for unnecessary blood tests before low-risk surgical procedures

Patients sent for unnecessary blood tests before low-risk surgical procedures

Depending on which hospital you go to for your low-risk surgical procedure, you may be 2.4 times more or less likely to be sent for unnecessary blood tests. This is among the findings of a study conducted by researchers from the Institute of Clinical Evaluative Sciences and the Women's College Hospital Institute for Health Systems Solutions and Virtual Care. [More]
Genetic mutations could help explain cause of cancer in pediatric patients

Genetic mutations could help explain cause of cancer in pediatric patients

Combined whole exome tumor and blood sequencing in pediatric cancer patients revealed mutations that could help explain the cause of cancer or have the potential to impact clinical cancer care in 40 percent of patients in a study led by researchers from Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Cancer Center. [More]
Study provides detailed new information about diffuse glioma

Study provides detailed new information about diffuse glioma

An international collaborative study has revealed detailed new information about diffuse glioma, the most common type of tumor found in some 80 percent of adult brain cancer patients, raising hopes that better understanding of these disease groups may aid improved clinical outcomes. [More]
Brain-derived neurotrophic factor linked to slower cognitive decline in older people

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor linked to slower cognitive decline in older people

Older people with higher amounts of a key protein in their brains also had slower decline in their memory and thinking abilities than people with lower amounts of protein from the gene called brain-derived neurotrophic factor, or BDNF, according to a study published in the January 27, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Study shows prevalence of clinically relevant depressive symptoms among Division I college athletes

Study shows prevalence of clinically relevant depressive symptoms among Division I college athletes

Nearly a quarter of Division I college athletes reported depressive symptoms while enrolled at a liberal arts university on the East Coast, says a new study published in the February issue of the British Journal of Sports Medicine. Women were almost two times more likely to experience symptoms than their male peers. [More]
Newly drafted consensus statement promotes widespread use of HPV vaccines to prevent cancer

Newly drafted consensus statement promotes widespread use of HPV vaccines to prevent cancer

Leaders of several cancer centers designated by the National Cancer Institute have united to support human papillomavirus vaccination. Among them is Cheryl Willman, MD, Director and CEO of the University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center. [More]
CUMC, Iowa scientists use CRISPR to repair genetic mutation responsible for retinitis pigmentosa

CUMC, Iowa scientists use CRISPR to repair genetic mutation responsible for retinitis pigmentosa

Columbia University Medical Center and University of Iowa scientists have used a new gene-editing technology called CRISPR, to repair a genetic mutation responsible for retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited condition that causes the retina to degrade and leads to blindness in at least 1.5 million cases worldwide. [More]
Using centrifugal elutriation and flow cytometry to answer biological questions: an interview with Peter Lopez

Using centrifugal elutriation and flow cytometry to answer biological questions: an interview with Peter Lopez

Flow Cytometry, the measurement of various cellular characteristics as they flow through a measuring apparatus, has so many applications that it's hard to know where to begin. [More]
Nutrition and breast cancer; starving triple negative breast cancer cells to death: an interview with Associate Professor Jeff Holst

Nutrition and breast cancer; starving triple negative breast cancer cells to death: an interview with Associate Professor Jeff Holst

While there are a range of reports that different foods and food groups can increase or decrease your risk of cancer, these associations are very difficult to scientifically verify. [More]
Researchers identify three single-driver genetic alterations that occur in neuroepithelial tumors

Researchers identify three single-driver genetic alterations that occur in neuroepithelial tumors

The St. Jude Children's Research Hospital – Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project (PCGP) has identified critical driver genes that account for disease-related alterations in a range of uncommon low-grade neuroepithelial tumors. [More]
Using acidity to detect cancer

Using acidity to detect cancer

Normally, tissues demonstrate a slightly acidic intracellular pH (pHi) and slightly alkaline extracellular pH (pHe). However, proliferating tissues demonstrate transient pH Gradient Reversal i.e. alkalinization of pHi and acidification of pHe. [More]
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