Pathology News and Research RSS Feed - Pathology News and Research

Pathology is the study and diagnosis of disease through examination of organs, tissues, bodily fluids, and whole bodies (autopsies). The term also encompasses the related scientific study of disease processes, called General pathology.

Medical pathology is divided in two main branches, Anatomical pathology and Clinical pathology. Veterinary pathology is concerned with animal disease whereas Phytopathology is the study of plant diseases.
Combining vitamin A with chemotherapy may offer promise for pancreatic cancer treatment

Combining vitamin A with chemotherapy may offer promise for pancreatic cancer treatment

Around 8,800 people in the UK are diagnosed with pancreatic cancer each year. It is known as the UK's deadliest cancer, with a survival rate of just 3 per cent. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy alone are relatively unsuccessful in treating the disease, and while surgery to remove the tumour offers the best chance of survival, most patients are diagnosed when the cancer has already spread to other organs. [More]
PET imaging with PiB may help in early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

PET imaging with PiB may help in early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

The effort to find ways to detect and diagnose preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD) has taken a big step forward with the use of positron emission tomography (PET), a "nuclear medicine" for imaging processes in the body, when PET is used with a special 'tracer' that binds to the amyloid plaques in the brain that are a characteristic cause of AD. [More]
Vitamin D and androgen receptor-targeted therapy may help treat TNBC

Vitamin D and androgen receptor-targeted therapy may help treat TNBC

A recent study by researchers at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine revealed that triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), which has generally been unresponsive to hormone receptor-targeted treatments, can indeed be treated using vitamin D and androgen receptor-targeted therapy. [More]
Researchers identify mutations that may stimulate early cancer growth in precancerous colorectal tissue

Researchers identify mutations that may stimulate early cancer growth in precancerous colorectal tissue

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered mutations that may fuel early cancer growth in precancerous colorectal tissue from high-risk patients. [More]
Could whole-mount scanning of breast tissue lead to better clinical outcomes? An interview with Dr Martin Yaffe

Could whole-mount scanning of breast tissue lead to better clinical outcomes? An interview with Dr Martin Yaffe

We actually normally refer to this as whole-specimen imaging of breast tissue. What we mean is that when tissue is removed from the breast, which could be in the form of a lumpectomy – a breast-conserving surgery – or a mastectomy, the piece of tissue removed is relatively large. [More]
Researchers identify trigger for immune cells' inflammatory response

Researchers identify trigger for immune cells' inflammatory response

Scientists at the University of Bristol have identified the trigger for immune cells' inflammatory response - a discovery that may pave the way for new treatments for many human diseases. [More]
ULK1, ULK2 enzymes play key role in maintaining cellular homeostasis

ULK1, ULK2 enzymes play key role in maintaining cellular homeostasis

Researchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have uncovered how two enzymes, ULK1 and ULK2, which are best known for their role in the degradation and recycling of proteins, control the trafficking of specific proteins. [More]
New collaborative research center to investigate promising aspects of mucosal immunology

New collaborative research center to investigate promising aspects of mucosal immunology

Immunology - and the idea that many diseases can best be addressed by boosting the body's own immune response - is one of the hottest areas in medical research and clinical treatment. [More]
Two-way communication between cancer cells may be key to tumor metastasis

Two-way communication between cancer cells may be key to tumor metastasis

Two-way communication between cancer cells appears to be key to their becoming motile, clustering and spreading through metastasis, according to Rice University scientists. [More]
High levels of p62 protein in liver linked to cancer recurrence

High levels of p62 protein in liver linked to cancer recurrence

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have discovered that high levels of the protein p62 in human liver samples are strongly associated with cancer recurrence and reduced patient survival. [More]
microDimensions releases upgraded version of free digital pathology viewer Zoom

microDimensions releases upgraded version of free digital pathology viewer Zoom

microDimensions has launched an upgraded version of its free digital pathology viewer Zoom, including a set of features to facilitate collaboration of researchers working on digital whole slide images. [More]
Loss of HOXA5 protein may allow breast cancer cells to thrive

Loss of HOXA5 protein may allow breast cancer cells to thrive

Many breast cancers are marked by a lack of HOXA5 protein, a gene product known to control cell differentiation and death, and lower levels of the protein correspond to poorer outcomes for patients. [More]
Simple sarcopenia screening method could easily diagnose severity of heart disease

Simple sarcopenia screening method could easily diagnose severity of heart disease

Researchers from Kumamoto University in Japan have shown that a simple screening method could quickly and easily diagnose the severity of heart disease. The method was originally developed to diagnose sarcopenia, a disease that causes a loss of muscle mass and strength. [More]
Understanding antibody transport mechanisms in the brain

Understanding antibody transport mechanisms in the brain

Diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), such as stroke, brain cancer, and Alzheimer's disease, are a serious threat affecting over 50 million Americans with an associated cost of over $750 billion per year, which is expected to grow significantly over the coming decades. [More]
Inflammatory response prompted by secretion of cytokines causes acid reflux damage in GERD patients

Inflammatory response prompted by secretion of cytokines causes acid reflux damage in GERD patients

The "acid" in "acid reflux" may not be the direct cause of damage to the esophagus as previously suspected, according to researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center and Dallas VA Medical Center. [More]
Memory test offers clue to pathological diagnosis in primary progressive aphasia

Memory test offers clue to pathological diagnosis in primary progressive aphasia

Patients with primary progressive aphasia show selective vulnerabilities in effortless learning and delayed retrieval of verbal information if their syndrome is related to Alzheimer's disease rather than frontotemporal lobar degeneration, research indicates. [More]
First-ever clinical trial of bioabsorbable cardiovascular device in children shows promise

First-ever clinical trial of bioabsorbable cardiovascular device in children shows promise

Current cardiovascular valve or blood vessel implants are generally associated with a number of complications, have limited efficacy over time, and may necessitate repeated interventions over a patient's lifetime, especially when implanted in a young child. [More]
Physical fitness may offer protection from Alzheimer's disease, other dementias

Physical fitness may offer protection from Alzheimer's disease, other dementias

Recent research suggests that exercise might provide some measure of protection from Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. [More]
Researchers identify risk factors for unplanned readmissions following esophageal resection

Researchers identify risk factors for unplanned readmissions following esophageal resection

Esophagectomy is a major surgical procedure associated with significant complications with up to 1 in 5 patients readmitted following hospital discharge. These unplanned readmissions are an important problem as they negatively impact patient care and, in the future, may have implications for reimbursement through the Hospital Readmissions Reduction program. [More]
High or rapidly rising BP poses greatest stroke, mortality risk

High or rapidly rising BP poses greatest stroke, mortality risk

Findings from the Rotterdam study show how the trajectories of people's blood pressure in mid to late life have varying effects on their risk of having a stroke or dying. [More]
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