Pathology News and Research RSS Feed - Pathology News and Research

Pathology is the study and diagnosis of disease through examination of organs, tissues, bodily fluids, and whole bodies (autopsies). The term also encompasses the related scientific study of disease processes, called General pathology.

Medical pathology is divided in two main branches, Anatomical pathology and Clinical pathology. Veterinary pathology is concerned with animal disease whereas Phytopathology is the study of plant diseases.
NeoGenomics' revenue up 16.1% in first quarter 2014

NeoGenomics' revenue up 16.1% in first quarter 2014

NeoGenomics, Inc., a leading provider of cancer-focused genetic testing services today reported its results for the first quarter of 2014. [More]
Personalis receives CAP accreditation

Personalis receives CAP accreditation

Personalis, Inc., a leading provider of genome-based diagnostics, announced today that its onsite clinical laboratory has received accreditation from the College of American Pathologists (CAP), meeting the highest standard of excellence in clinical laboratory practices. [More]

AMP releases report on recommendations for molecular diagnostics curriculum

The Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP) released a report today in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics on recommendations for a molecular diagnostics curriculum at both the baccalaureate and master's levels of education. [More]
Pediatrician reviews co-pathogenesis of influenza viruses with bacteria in lung

Pediatrician reviews co-pathogenesis of influenza viruses with bacteria in lung

Le Bonheur Children's Hospital Pediatrician-in-Chief Jon McCullers, MD, was recently invited to submit a review in the April issue of Nature Reviews Microbiology, one of the world's foremost scientific publications. [More]
Researchers examine link between alcoholism and loss of muscle strength

Researchers examine link between alcoholism and loss of muscle strength

Muscle weakness is a common symptom of both long-time alcoholics and patients with mitochondrial disease. Now researchers have found a common link: mitochondria that are unable to self-repair. [More]
Researchers develop simple assay that reveals evolutionary relationships among various tumor sites within patient

Researchers develop simple assay that reveals evolutionary relationships among various tumor sites within patient

​The process of metastasis - a tumor's ability to spread to other parts of the body - is still poorly understood. It is not easy to determine whether metastasis began early or late in the development of the primary tumor or whether individual metastatic sites were seeded directly from the original tumor or from an intermediate site. [More]

Genoa Pharmaceuticals, McMaster University report additional benefits of GP-101 for IPF patients

Genoa Pharmaceuticals, the leader in inhaled medicines for pulmonary fibrosis, and collaborators Drs. Martin Kolb and Kjetil Ask at McMaster University announced today additional measured advantages of inhaled GP-101 (aerosol pirfenidone) in the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). [More]
Research: Drugs used to treat lung, breast and pancreatic cancers promote drug-resistance, spur tumor growth

Research: Drugs used to treat lung, breast and pancreatic cancers promote drug-resistance, spur tumor growth

Most drugs used to treat lung, breast and pancreatic cancers also promote drug-resistance and ultimately spur tumor growth. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered a molecule, or biomarker, called CD61 on the surface of drug-resistant tumors that appears responsible for inducing tumor metastasis by enhancing the stem cell-like properties of cancer cells. [More]
Researchers devise new approach to treatment of Alzheimer's disease

Researchers devise new approach to treatment of Alzheimer's disease

A team of researchers from Columbia University Medical Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, and Brandeis University has devised a wholly new approach to the treatment of Alzheimer's disease involving the so-called retromer protein complex. Retromer plays a vital role in neurons, steering amyloid precursor protein (APP) away from a region of the cell where APP is cleaved, creating the potentially toxic byproduct amyloid-beta, which is thought to contribute to the development of Alzheimer's. [More]

Men with chronic inflammation in non-cancerous prostate tissue may have nearly twice risk of prostate cancer

Men who show signs of chronic inflammation in non-cancerous prostate tissue may have nearly twice the risk of actually having prostate cancer than those with no inflammation, according to results of a new study led by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center. [More]
Study: Chronic inflammation associated with aggressive prostate cancer

Study: Chronic inflammation associated with aggressive prostate cancer

The presence of chronic inflammation in benign prostate tissue was associated with high-grade, or aggressive, prostate cancer, and this association was found even in those with low prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. [More]
B1/Cdk1 protein which plays key role in cell division also boosts power of mitochondrial activity

B1/Cdk1 protein which plays key role in cell division also boosts power of mitochondrial activity

​An international team led by researchers at UC Davis has shown that the cyclin B1/Cdk1 protein complex, which plays a key role in cell division, also boosts the mitochondrial activity to power that process. [More]
New research may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever

New research may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever

Two recent papers by a University of Colorado School of Medicine researcher and colleagues may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever, West Nile virus, Yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and other disease-causing flaviviruses. [More]
New insight provides potential to improve treatment for sepsis

New insight provides potential to improve treatment for sepsis

In a review published in the April issue of Immunity, Kevin J. Tracey, MD, president of The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, says it's time to take a fresh look at the medical community's approach to treating sepsis, which kills millions worldwide every year, including more than 200,000 Americans. [More]

College of American Pathologists and ASC sign MOU to advance delivery of cytopathology services

The College of American Pathologists and the American Society of Cytopathology announced today the signing of a memorandum of understanding (MOU) to collaborate on initiatives to advance the delivery of cytopathology services and improve patient care. [More]
Researchers uncover mechanism that may help explain severe forms of schistosomiasis

Researchers uncover mechanism that may help explain severe forms of schistosomiasis

​Researchers at the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts and Tufts University School of Medicine (TUSM) have uncovered a mechanism that may help explain the severe forms of schistosomiasis, or snail fever, which is caused by schistosome worms and is one of the most prevalent parasitic diseases in the world. The study in mice, published online in The Journal of Immunology, may also offer targets for intervention and amelioration of the disease. [More]
New mouse study indicates that mutant protein in muscle cells is responsible for SBMA

New mouse study indicates that mutant protein in muscle cells is responsible for SBMA

Sometimes known as Kennedy's disease, spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a rare inherited neuromuscular disorder characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. [More]
AAA announces 2014 award winners in the field of anatomy

AAA announces 2014 award winners in the field of anatomy

The American Association of Anatomists is honored to announce its 2014 award winners. All awards will be presented during the Closing Awards Ceremony being held at the San Diego Marriott Hotel on Tuesday, April 29th at 7:30 p.m. during AAA's 2014 Annual Meeting at Experimental Biology. [More]
UTMB experts honored with Lifetime Achievement Award for contributions to study of deadly diseases

UTMB experts honored with Lifetime Achievement Award for contributions to study of deadly diseases

The global experts who study the deadliest infectious diseases recognized the contributions of Frederick A. Murphy and Thomas G. Ksiazek, professors at the University of Texas Medical Branch, with a Lifetime Achievement Award at the 6th annual International Symposium on Filoviruses. The filoviruses include Ebola and Marburg viruses that cause death in 50 to 90 percent of people infected. The current outbreak of Ebola virus raging in West Africa has caused more than 100 deaths so far. [More]

Study: Bacterium that causes whooping cough changes in Australia

The bacterium that causes whooping cough, Bordetella pertussis, has changed in Australia - most likely in response to the vaccine used to prevent the disease - with a possible reduced effectiveness of the vaccine as a result, a new study shows. [More]