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Scientists find altered blood-brain barrier and increased intestinal permeability in people with ASD

Scientists find altered blood-brain barrier and increased intestinal permeability in people with ASD

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has the dubious distinction of being the fastest-growing developmental disability in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
Impact of IBS on patients

Impact of IBS on patients

The report reveals a quite alarming situation about the economic impact of IBS on healthcare system, society and patients themselves. In particular, it disclosed that there are a lot of hidden costs related to the utilization of healthcare resources by means of patients, frequently not recognized as IBS... [More]
ATA releases new guidelines for diagnosis, treatment of thyroid disease during pregnancy and postpartum

ATA releases new guidelines for diagnosis, treatment of thyroid disease during pregnancy and postpartum

New evidence-based recommendations from the American Thyroid Association provide guidance to clinicians in diagnosing and managing thyroid disease during pregnancy and the postpartum period. [More]
Stuttering linked to reductions in blood flow in the brain area that controls speech production

Stuttering linked to reductions in blood flow in the brain area that controls speech production

A study led by researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles demonstrates what lead investigator Bradley Peterson, MD, calls "a critical mass of evidence" of a common underlying lifelong vulnerability in both children and adults who stutter. [More]
Tau biomarker could lead to early identification of Alzheimer's disease pathology

Tau biomarker could lead to early identification of Alzheimer's disease pathology

A discovery of high relevance in medical research will be published in Volume 55, number 4 of December 2016 of the prestigious "Journal of Alzheimer's Disease (JAD)", entitled "Tau Platelets Correlate with Regional Brain Atrophy in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease". [More]
New study suggests how risk gene linked to ADHD may work

New study suggests how risk gene linked to ADHD may work

Genetics play a strong part in the development of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but the path from a gene to risk for the disorder has remained a black box to researchers. [More]
New study shows link between metabolic syndrome and cognitive abilities in U.S. adolescents

New study shows link between metabolic syndrome and cognitive abilities in U.S. adolescents

A new study of U.S. adolescents shows an association between metabolic syndrome and impairments in reading, attention, and working memory. [More]
Enzyme research provides new insights into pathophysiology of depression

Enzyme research provides new insights into pathophysiology of depression

Despite the fact that more than four percent of the world's population suffer from depression, and even though approximately 1,500 individuals commit suicide each year in Sweden, the understanding of the pathophysiology of depression remains unclear and only a few new discoveries of mechanisms behind it have been made in recent years. [More]
ADD Program receives $19.5 million NIH contract to test drugs for treating epilepsy

ADD Program receives $19.5 million NIH contract to test drugs for treating epilepsy

The University of Utah College of Pharmacy's Anticonvulsant Drug Development Program has been awarded a five-year $19.5 million contract renewal with the National Institutes of Health to test drugs to treat epilepsy, and the major focus of the project is to address needs that affect millions of people worldwide -identify novel investigational compounds to prevent the development of epilepsy or to treat refractory, or drug-resistant, epilepsy. [More]
New method to generate kidney organoids from patient cells can help study human kidney diseases

New method to generate kidney organoids from patient cells can help study human kidney diseases

A new method to create kidney organoids from patient cells may provide insights into how kidney diseases arise and how they should be treated. [More]
Single exposure to stress may cause long-term functional and structural consequences in the brain

Single exposure to stress may cause long-term functional and structural consequences in the brain

One day a person experiences deep stress caused by a sudden happening (a traffic accident, a natural catastrophe, an episode of violence). Later on this person could develop a serious neuropsychiatric disorder that may last for years, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). [More]
New bioinformatic framework identifies protein that plays key role in diabetic kidney disease

New bioinformatic framework identifies protein that plays key role in diabetic kidney disease

A new bioinformatic framework developed by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine has identified key proteins significantly altered at the gene-expression level in biopsied tissue from patients with diabetic kidney disease, a result that may reveal new therapeutic targets. [More]
Identifying foods that trigger IBS: an interview with Dr Bill Chey

Identifying foods that trigger IBS: an interview with Dr Bill Chey

IBS is a common medical condition which is diagnosed in the presence of characteristic gastrointestinal symptoms including recurring bouts of abdominal pain and diarrhea and/or constipation. IBS patients also commonly report bloating and abdominal distension or swelling. [More]
Study explores biological marker to predict individual response to drug treatment for combat PTSD

Study explores biological marker to predict individual response to drug treatment for combat PTSD

Treatment with the drug prazosin effectively reduces symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) for many people, but about one third of patients don't respond to the treatment at all. [More]
New study to explore therapeutic pill for treatment of concussion

New study to explore therapeutic pill for treatment of concussion

The goal of finding a treatment for concussion may be one step closer due to a new study being launched by University of Miami researchers. [More]
Study offers clues to help develop new treatments for cannabis use disorder

Study offers clues to help develop new treatments for cannabis use disorder

A new paper in Biological Psychiatry reports that chronic cannabis users have reduced levels of an enzyme called fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). [More]
New imaging method helps observe activation of neural circuits in the brain

New imaging method helps observe activation of neural circuits in the brain

Watching millions of neurons in the brain interacting with each other is the ultimate dream of neuroscientists! A new imaging method now makes it possible to observe the activation of large neural circuits, currently up to the size of a small-animal brain, in real time and three dimensions. [More]
Researchers confirm long persistence of Zika virus in semen and reveal its presence within spermatozoa

Researchers confirm long persistence of Zika virus in semen and reveal its presence within spermatozoa

Recent work has shown that Zika virus persists in semen for up to 6 months after infection. In a correspondence published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, the researchers, in addition to confirming its long persistence in semen (in this case for more than 130 days, i.e., over 4 months), reveal the presence of the virus even within spermatozoa. [More]
CCN article outlines unique treatment options for cardiovascular patients with HIV

CCN article outlines unique treatment options for cardiovascular patients with HIV

Cardiovascular disease has become the leading cause of death for those living with HIV, as the infection has moved from a terminal disease to a chronic illness. [More]
Graded aerobic treadmill testing safe, tolerable in young patients with sports-related concussion

Graded aerobic treadmill testing safe, tolerable in young patients with sports-related concussion

Graded aerobic treadmill testing is safe, tolerable, and useful in evaluating and managing cases of sports-related concussion in children and adolescents. [More]
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