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Novel non-invasive method of vagus nerve stimulation reduces depressive symptoms

Novel non-invasive method of vagus nerve stimulation reduces depressive symptoms

Researchers of a new study published in the current issue of Biological Psychiatry report successful reduction of depressive symptoms in patients using a novel non-invasive method of vagus nerve stimulation, or VNS. [More]
Height affects risk of major non-communicable diseases

Height affects risk of major non-communicable diseases

Height is largely genetically determined, but in recent decades the height of children and adults has steadily increased throughout the world: In adulthood the children are almost always significantly taller than their parents. [More]
Oxeia accelerating development of neurometabolic treatments for concussions

Oxeia accelerating development of neurometabolic treatments for concussions

Oxeia Biopharmaceuticals, Inc., a biotechnology company, is catalyzing the development of first-in-class neurometabolic treatments for concussions and other aspects of brain injury. [More]
GBI Research says COPD therapeutics pipeline lacks innovation

GBI Research says COPD therapeutics pipeline lacks innovation

Analysis from business intelligence provider GBI Research - Frontier Pharma: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) - Identifying and Commercializing First-in-Class Innovation - states that while currently-available drugs aim to manage the frequency and severity of symptoms associated with COPD, none have been shown to modify long-term disease progression. [More]
Researchers link idiopathic congenital nystagmus to a defect in neurocomputation

Researchers link idiopathic congenital nystagmus to a defect in neurocomputation

Botond Roska and his group at the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research implicate a clearly defined neuron type and its circuit in the retina in the pathophysiology of idiopathic congenital nystagmus. [More]
Concussion expert shares important information on sports-related concussions

Concussion expert shares important information on sports-related concussions

The Sports Concussion Program in the Children's Orthopaedic Center at Children's Hospital Los Angeles is the only pediatric program of its kind in Southern California. [More]
NEJM publishes results of Cosentyx Phase III studies in ankylosing spondylitis

NEJM publishes results of Cosentyx Phase III studies in ankylosing spondylitis

Novartis announced today that the results of the MEASURE 1 and MEASURE 2 Phase III studies for Cosentyx® (secukinumab) in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) were published in The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). These pivotal studies demonstrated significant clinical improvements with Cosentyx versus placebo in reducing the signs and symptoms of active AS – a long-term, painful and debilitating inflammation of the spine. [More]
Benjamin Wolozin receives $500,000 award in Alzheimer's Disease Drug Discovery Research

Benjamin Wolozin receives $500,000 award in Alzheimer's Disease Drug Discovery Research

Research that leads to improved therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients is one goal of Boston University School of Medicine professor of pharmacology and neurology Benjamin Wolozin, MD, PhD. He was one of six researchers awarded a two-year, $500,000 award in Alzheimer's Disease Drug Discovery Research by the Edward N. & Della L. Thome Memorial Foundation. [More]
Bile acid may help treat fatty liver disease and obesity

Bile acid may help treat fatty liver disease and obesity

A bile acid that can turn off a receptor in the gut has prevented and reversed fatty liver disease in mice, according to an international team of researchers. The compound may help treat certain metabolic disorders, such as Type 2 diabetes and obesity, as well. [More]
New CRC aims to better understand autophagy at molecular and cellular level

New CRC aims to better understand autophagy at molecular and cellular level

The German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft/DFG) has approved 11 M € for the next four years for establishing a CRC on selective autophagy under the lead of Goethe University. Autophagy literally means "self-eating" and refers to a sophisticated system in which cellular waste is specifically detected and removed. [More]
Findings may lead to new treatment strategy for phobia

Findings may lead to new treatment strategy for phobia

A new study published in the latest issue of Biological Psychiatry reports the successful and instant reduction of fear in spider-fearful participants following a 2-minute exposure combined with a single dose of a regular pharmacological treatment. [More]
New drug therapies that target glutamate pathway may be effective for subgroups of patient with schizophrenia

New drug therapies that target glutamate pathway may be effective for subgroups of patient with schizophrenia

Mounting evidence indicates that disturbances in the brain's glutamate pathway contribute to symptoms of schizophrenia. Thus, the glutamate pathway has become the target of a number of new drug therapies. Findings published in the journal Biological Psychiatry suggest that at least one of these drugs may be an effective treatment for individuals in the early course of the illness. [More]
Treatment with antiplatelet therapy does not reduce pain crises in children with sickle cell disease

Treatment with antiplatelet therapy does not reduce pain crises in children with sickle cell disease

Treatment with the antiplatelet agent prasugrel does not significantly reduce the rate of pain crises or severe lung complications in children with sickle cell disease, according to a report published in the New England Journal of Medicine describing one of the largest and most geographically diverse international clinical trials on sickle cell disease to date. [More]
New drug screening method may predict treatment options for patients with multiple myeloma

New drug screening method may predict treatment options for patients with multiple myeloma

A personalized method for testing the effectiveness of drugs that treat multiple myeloma may predict quickly and more accurately the best treatments for individual patients with the bone marrow cancer. The process, developed by scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, also may aid patients with leukemia or lymphoma. [More]
Olfactory testing uses extended to Alzheimer’s disease

Olfactory testing uses extended to Alzheimer’s disease

A simple olfactory test may help to identify people at increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease dementia, suggest findings from a population-based study. [More]
Boston Children's Hospital selects Vijay G. Sankaran to receive Rising Star Award

Boston Children's Hospital selects Vijay G. Sankaran to receive Rising Star Award

Saluting his spectacular track record to date of innovative research on red blood cell disorders and his future promise as a physician/scientist, Boston Children's Hospital has selected Vijay G. Sankaran, MD, PhD, of Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center to receive the Rising Star Award at the hospital's third annual Global Pediatric Innovation Summit, Taking on Tomorrow (#PedInno15). [More]
Anavex reports safety and efficacy data of ANAVEX 2-73 Phase 2a trial in Alzheimer’s patients

Anavex reports safety and efficacy data of ANAVEX 2-73 Phase 2a trial in Alzheimer’s patients

On Saturday, investigators presented positive safety and cognitive efficacy data for ANAVEX 2-73, the Company’s lead investigational oral treatment for Alzheimer’s disease targeting sigma-1 and muscarinic receptors, which are believed to reduce protein misfolding including reduction of beta amyloid, tau protein and inflammation at the international CTAD 2015 conference in Barcelona, Spain. [More]
Gastric reduction surgery can significantly increase patient's risk of developing allergy

Gastric reduction surgery can significantly increase patient's risk of developing allergy

Amongst other things, operations to reduce the size of the stomach can significantly increase the patient's risk of developing an allergy. This is the conclusion of a study conducted by the Medical University of Vienna. [More]
International research project examines effectiveness of tried and tested medicines for different diseases

International research project examines effectiveness of tried and tested medicines for different diseases

The Medical University of Vienna is coordinating an international research project, which investigates the effectiveness of tried and tested medicines for the treatment of some of the heaviest burdens of our modern society including diseases such as cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. One molecule that these disorders have in common is a receptor known as the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), which is the molecular starting point of this project. [More]
Study suggests a neural pathway through which early life stress may contribute to depression

Study suggests a neural pathway through which early life stress may contribute to depression

Early life stress is a major risk factor for later episodes of depression. In fact, adults who are abused or neglected as children are almost twice as likely to experience depression. [More]
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