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AbbVie's all-oral, interferon-free therapy granted FDA priority review for treatment of GT4 HCV infection

AbbVie's all-oral, interferon-free therapy granted FDA priority review for treatment of GT4 HCV infection

AbbVie has announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has accepted its New Drug Application (NDA) and granted priority review for the company's, all-oral, interferon-free, two direct-acting antiviral treatment of ombitasvir, paritaprevir, ritonavir (OBV/PTV/r), with ribavirin (RBV). [More]
UT researchers receive 2.5 million euros from European Commission for TransGeno project

UT researchers receive 2.5 million euros from European Commission for TransGeno project

The European Commission supports the TransGeno project of UT researchers with 2.5 million euros. This support helps to recruit top researchers to work at the ERA Chair of Translational Genomics of the University of Tartu soon to be created. The research work done at the new chair will advance research in translational genomics, so that in the future, doctors would be able to diagnose diseases as early as possible, thus improving opportunities for treatment. [More]
A new amyloid-targeting treatment for Alzheimer's disease

A new amyloid-targeting treatment for Alzheimer's disease

With each new amyloid-targeting treatment for Alzheimer's disease that has been developed, there has been a corresponding concern. For example, antibodies targeting amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) produce inflammation in the brain in some patients. [More]
NASH patients more likely to have increased intestinal permeability, shows study

NASH patients more likely to have increased intestinal permeability, shows study

Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), the more severe form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) that can progress to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, is associated with leakiness of the intestinal wall, which in turn may worsen liver disease, according to research published in Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the new basic science journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Study shows high-fat diet may increase risk for depression, psychiatric disorders

Study shows high-fat diet may increase risk for depression, psychiatric disorders

Can the consumption of fatty foods change your behavior and your brain? High-fat diets have long been known to increase the risk for medical problems, including heart disease and stroke, but there is growing concern that diets high in fat might also increase the risk for depression and other psychiatric disorders. [More]
Montefiore physician offers tips for seasonal allergy sufferers

Montefiore physician offers tips for seasonal allergy sufferers

This winter was one of the coldest on record, but spring allergy season is already beginning and it's time for sufferers to start preparing now. [More]
MED15 may serve as prognostic marker for HNSCC recurrence

MED15 may serve as prognostic marker for HNSCC recurrence

A new study provides the first evidence that the mediator complex subunit 15 (MED15) may play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). MED15 overexpression was found to be associated with higher mortality rates in HNSCC patients with cancer recurrence, particularly in oral cavity/oropharyngeal tumors, according to the study published in The American Journal of Pathology. [More]
Research findings offer new insights into pathophysiology of PTSD

Research findings offer new insights into pathophysiology of PTSD

Researchers at the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System and University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in New York and the United Kingdom, have identified genetic markers, derived from blood samples that are linked to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The markers are associated with gene networks that regulate innate immune function and interferon signaling. [More]
Better interventions possible for children experiencing acute psychosis with antibodies

Better interventions possible for children experiencing acute psychosis with antibodies

Antibodies defend the body against bacterial, viral, and other invaders. But sometimes the body makes antibodies that attack healthy cells. In these cases, autoimmune disorders develop. [More]
Celimmune licenses anti-IL-15 monoclonal antibody from Amgen

Celimmune licenses anti-IL-15 monoclonal antibody from Amgen

Celimmune LLC, a clinical development-stage immunotherapy company focused on treating and preventing autoimmune diseases, announced today that it has licensed a Phase 2-stage, anti-IL-15 monoclonal antibody (AMG 714) from Amgen. [More]
Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome can be compared to normal aging, say scientists

Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome can be compared to normal aging, say scientists

In a new research study, scientists from Vision Genomics, LLC, Insilico Medicine, Inc., and Howard University showed that Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS or Progeria) is comparable to normal aging with respect to cellular signaling pathways, and that HGPS truly recapitulates the normal aging process. [More]
AbbVie gets European Commission's approval to market VIEKIRAX + EXVIERA for HCV treatment

AbbVie gets European Commission's approval to market VIEKIRAX + EXVIERA for HCV treatment

AbbVie announced that the European Commission has granted marketing authorizations for its all-oral, short-course, interferon-free treatment of VIEKIRAX (ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir tablets) + EXVIERA (dasabuvir tablets). The treatment has been approved with or without ribavirin (RBV) for patients with genotype 1 (GT1) chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, including those with compensated liver cirrhosis, HIV-1 co-infection, patients on opioid substitution therapy and liver transplant recipients. [More]

Caution advised over OCT measurement of thick choroid

Enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography is consistent for measuring choroidal thickness, researchers confirm, but its accuracy may be impaired in eyes with a very thick choroid. [More]
Elevated anxious temperament associated with neuropeptide Y receptors

Elevated anxious temperament associated with neuropeptide Y receptors

Persistent anxiety is one of the most common and distressing symptoms compromising mental health. Most of the research on the neurobiology of anxiety has focused on the generation of increased anxiety, i.e., the processes that "turn on" anxiety. [More]
Neuroimaging markers have synergistic effect on cognitive decline

Neuroimaging markers have synergistic effect on cognitive decline

The Alzheimer disease neuroimaging markers β-amyloid and neurodegeneration have synergistic effects on the rate of cognitive decline in clinically normal people, research shows. [More]
New blood test could help detect cold-related asthma risk

New blood test could help detect cold-related asthma risk

People who have asthma generally suffer worse with colds caused by rhinoviruses than other people do. There are also asthmatics and patients with the severe lung condition COPD in whom the cold virus can trigger serious flare-ups of their condition. A team of researchers from the Institute of Pathophysiology and Allergy Research at the MedUni Vienna has now discovered how this risk group can be filtered out using a blood test. [More]
Variants of ASIC1a gene appear to be associated with panic disorder

Variants of ASIC1a gene appear to be associated with panic disorder

Panic disorder is a severe form of anxiety in which the affected individual feels an abrupt onset of fear, often accompanied by profound physical symptoms of discomfort. Scientists have known from studying twins that genes contribute to the risk of panic disorder, but very little is known about which specific genes are involved. [More]
Training medical students on handheld ultrasound device can enhance their physical diagnosis

Training medical students on handheld ultrasound device can enhance their physical diagnosis

A new study by researchers from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai found that training medical students to use a handheld ultrasound device can enhance the accuracy of their physical diagnosis. [More]
Successful antipsychotic treatment may alter striatal connectivity

Successful antipsychotic treatment may alter striatal connectivity

Connectivity within the striatum changes as psychotic symptoms improve in patients treated with second-generation antipsychotics, a study shows. [More]
Scientists receive NARSAD Distinguished Investigator Grants for mental health research

Scientists receive NARSAD Distinguished Investigator Grants for mental health research

The Brain & Behavior Research Foundation today announced the award of NARSAD Distinguished Investigator Grants valued at $1.5 million to 15 scientists, who are full professors or the equivalent, conducting innovative projects in diverse areas of neurobiological and behavioral research. [More]
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