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Drug-eluting stents more beneficial to patients undergoing saphenous vein graft angioplasty

Drug-eluting stents more beneficial to patients undergoing saphenous vein graft angioplasty

Drug-eluting stents had a clear advantage over bare metal stents in patients undergoing revascularisation of saphenous (leg) vein grafts, results of the BASKET-SAVAGE trial show. [More]
New research may explain why people with blood group O get more severely ill from cholera

New research may explain why people with blood group O get more severely ill from cholera

People with blood type O often get more severely ill from cholera than people of other blood types. New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis may explain why. [More]
Researchers explore molecular mechanisms through which lead exposure may affect neural stem cells

Researchers explore molecular mechanisms through which lead exposure may affect neural stem cells

Researchers have identified a potential molecular mechanism through which lead, a pervasive environmental toxin, may harm neural stem cells and neurodevelopment in children. [More]
Scientists link malfunctioning molecular pathways to specific heart abnormalities in SCA

Scientists link malfunctioning molecular pathways to specific heart abnormalities in SCA

Patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) develop heart complications and nearly a quarter die a sudden death. Now, researchers have linked malfunctioning molecular pathways to specific heart anomalies in SCA that result from progressive fibrosis and result in sudden death. [More]
Virgin olive oil helps in preventing and treating hypertension

Virgin olive oil helps in preventing and treating hypertension

Oleic acid plus a constellation of minor constituents as a natural antihypertensive. [More]
Researches create mini-brain model of idiopathic ASD characterized by early neuronal overgrowth

Researches create mini-brain model of idiopathic ASD characterized by early neuronal overgrowth

The vast majority of cases of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are idiopathic - the cause is unknown. [More]
Study identifies new blood markers to accurately diagnose Gulf War Illness

Study identifies new blood markers to accurately diagnose Gulf War Illness

Based on a study of 85 Gulf War veterans, Veterans Affairs researchers in Minneapolis have developed a tentative panel of blood markers they say can verify a diagnosis of Gulf War Illness with 90 percent accuracy. [More]
New study may help develop effective medication for severe pain

New study may help develop effective medication for severe pain

The nerve cells that transmit pain signals in the body are called nociceptors. When activated they release pro-inflammatory neuropeptides. In order to recognise harmful external influences, nociceptors are equipped with a wide range of receptors. [More]
Why does appetite loss occur during illness? An interview with Prof. Conti and Prof. Francesconi

Why does appetite loss occur during illness? An interview with Prof. Conti and Prof. Francesconi

Appetite, as a word, come from the Latin appetitus, meaning "desire for.” Therefore, appetite can be defined as a pleasurable sensation or the desire to eat. This sensation is coordinated by several brain areas associated with reward processing such amygdala, hippocampus, ventral pallidum, nucleus accumbens and striatum, and others. [More]
Photodynamic therapy effective in treating porphyrias but can be severely painful, cause inflammation

Photodynamic therapy effective in treating porphyrias but can be severely painful, cause inflammation

Severe paleness and photosensitivity are two symptoms of a rare group of hereditary diseases that affect haem, a substance in the blood. While these metabolic disorders - known as the porphyrias - are extremely rare, a similar effect is often deliberately triggered by dermatologists in localised areas during the treatment of pre-cancerous skin lesions and skin cancers. [More]
Study suggests how expression, function of nAChRs regulated in AD

Study suggests how expression, function of nAChRs regulated in AD

Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have been pursued for decades as potential molecular targets to treat cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (AD) due to their demonstrated role in processes underlying cognition such as synaptic facilitation, and theta and gamma wave activity. [More]
Study provides new insight into poorly understood effects of high explosive blasts in male soldiers

Study provides new insight into poorly understood effects of high explosive blasts in male soldiers

Scientists have identified a distinctive pattern of injury in the brains of eight deceased military personnel who survived high explosive attacks and died between 4 days and 9 years later from their injuries or other causes. [More]
Avoiding allergens could be best approach to prevent food allergies

Avoiding allergens could be best approach to prevent food allergies

Around two million people in Austria suffer from an allergy. 400,000 of them are allergic to birch pollen and have associated food allergies, particularly to apples, peaches, hazelnuts, carrots and celery. According to experts, around 80,000 people are thought to have a primary food allergy in childhood. [More]
Imaging data shows brains may have capacity to reverse schizophrenia effects

Imaging data shows brains may have capacity to reverse schizophrenia effects

A team of scientists from across the globe have shown that the brains of patients with schizophrenia have the capacity to reorganize and fight the illness. This is the first time that imaging data has been used to show that our brains may have the ability to reverse the effects of schizophrenia. [More]
Four major phenotypes may help improve prediction, prevention of cardiometabolic risk in prediabetes

Four major phenotypes may help improve prediction, prevention of cardiometabolic risk in prediabetes

Prediabetes is associated with increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, dementia and cancer. However, the disease risk considerably varies among subjects. [More]
Understanding potential of illicit drug ketamine in treating depression

Understanding potential of illicit drug ketamine in treating depression

Advancing the understanding and treatment of psychiatric disorders is a principal goal of neuroscientists. As mental disorders are the leading cause of disabilities worldwide, it is concerning that there are few effective therapeutics on the market due to the lack of knowledge regarding pathophysiology. [More]
Hydroxyurea treatment improves pulmonary function decline in children with sickle cell disease

Hydroxyurea treatment improves pulmonary function decline in children with sickle cell disease

For the first time, researchers were able to demonstrate that children diagnosed with sickle cell disease showed improvement in lung function after treatment with hydroxyurea, a treatment that is underused despite its demonstrated benefits. [More]
Many biomarkers for PD fail to inform on progression

Many biomarkers for PD fail to inform on progression

Longitudinal monitoring of 30 tests for marker candidates in early Parkinson's disease has found that just 10 show significant changes commensurate with disease progression. [More]
Genetic variations that increase PKC alpha activity may influence development of Alzheimer's disease

Genetic variations that increase PKC alpha activity may influence development of Alzheimer's disease

In Alzheimer's disease, plaques of amyloid beta protein accumulate in the brain, damaging connections between neurons. [More]
Novel gene therapy can treat pulmonary hypertension linked with heart failure

Novel gene therapy can treat pulmonary hypertension linked with heart failure

Scientists have used a novel gene therapy to halt the progression of pulmonary hypertension, a form of high blood pressure in the lung blood vessels that is linked to heart failure, according to a study led by Roger J. Hajjar, MD, Professor of Medicine and Director of the Cardiovascular Research Center at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
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